Rochester campus
 
Rochester Campus

Health Professions B.S.

UM Rochester
UMR Chancellor's Office
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120 to 126
  • Required credits within the major: 96 to 102
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The Bachelor of Science in Health Professions (BSHP) is an educational collaboration between the University of Minnesota Rochester and Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences. The curriculum has a broad focus and includes rigorous science foundations, liberal education, and prerequisite courses selected to meet the need for deeper academic preparation in health professions. Students majoring in the health professions are admitted into one of four tracks: Echocardiography, Radiography, Respiratory Care or Sonography. Academic coursework is coordinated with clinical rotations at Mayo Clinic to optimize the learning experience. The BSHP program prepares students to become certified health professionals in select allied health fields where increased technical complexity and strong cognitive abilities are needed due to specialization and new technologies in health care.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 12 courses before admission to the program.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.75 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.75 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.75 transferring from outside the University
Students applying to Echocardiography and Sonography must complete the patient care coursework that qualifies them to take the exam for one of the medical profession certifications listed below. Sonography students must also pass the relevant certification exam; Echocardiography students are only required to take the coursework. Students in the other programs are not required to complete a patient-care course, however applicants who have patient care experience will be more competitive. The following coursework/certifications meet the patient care requirement for Echocardiography and Sonography: o Certified nursing assistant (CNA) o Registered medical assistant (RMA) o Registered nurse (RN) o Licensed practical nurse (LPN) o Certified EMT o Respiratory therapist o Radiologic technologist R.T.(R) or senior radiography student
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Statistics
MATH 1161 - Statistics and Discrete Mathematics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
College Algebra
MATH 1110 - College Algebra with Physical Concepts [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1111 - Precalculus with Physical Concepts [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Chemistry with Laboratory
CHEM 1231 - Organic Chemistry I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2331 - General Chemistry I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Physics with Laboratory
PHYS 1251 - Physics I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Microbiology with Laboratory
BIOL 3344 - Microbiology [ENV] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Anatomy and Physiology
BIOL 2331 - Anatomy and Physiology I [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 3332 - Anatomy and Physiology II (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Psychology
PSY 1511 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Writing
WRIT 1511 - Writing Studio I (1.0 cr)
WRIT 1512 - Writing Studio II (2.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Speech or Communication
WRIT 3511 - Communication Methods (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Ethics
PHIL 1441 - Introduction to Ethics [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 1641 - Social Justice and Ethical Decision Making [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Medical Terminology
PHAR 1002 [UMTC Course] - Health Sciences Terminology (2.0 cr) or other course of two or more credits in medical terminology
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements.
Program Requirements
Admission to Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences in one of four programs: Echocardiography, Radiography, Respiratory Care, or Sonography.
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Echocardiography-Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
The BSHP Echocardiography Track delivers upper-division curriculum designed to prepare students to become well-rounded, fully competent cardiac sonographers in an environment based on teamwork and mutual respect. The program offers an exceptional educational experience by providing high-quality didactic and clinical experiences that prepare students to: perform patient assessments, acquire and analyze data obtained using ultrasound and related diagnostic technologies, provide a summary of findings to the physician to aid in patient diagnosis and management, and use independent judgment and systematic problem solving methods to produce high quality diagnostic information and optimize patient care.
Echocardiography
The echocardiography curriculum currently consists of 66 credits.
ECHO 3011 - Foundations of Echocardiography [TS] (2.0 cr)
ECHO 3101 - Cardiovascular Anatomy & Physiology (3.0 cr)
ECHO 3202 - Adult Echocardiography (6.0 cr)
ECHO 3301 - Clinical Practicum I (8.0 cr)
ECHO 3302 - Clinical Practicum II (7.0 cr)
ECHO 3403 - Echocardiographic Application (3.0 cr)
ECHO 3503 - Stress Echocardiography (2.0 cr)
ECHO 4111 - Ultrasound Physics I (2.0 cr)
ECHO 4112 - Ultrasound Physics II (2.0 cr)
ECHO 4211 - Congenital Heart Disease I (3.0 cr)
ECHO 4303 - Clinical Practicum III (6.0 cr)
ECHO 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV (8.0 cr)
ECHO 4402 - Clinical Practicum V (9.0 cr)
ECHO 4501 - Research Project and Publication I (1.0 cr)
ECHO 4460 - Special Procedures (2.0 cr)
ECHO 4540 - Professional Growth and Development (1.0 cr)
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques (1.0 cr)
Radiography-Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
The Bachelor of Science in Health Professions (BSHP) Radiography Track delivers upper-division curriculum designed to prepare students to become well-rounded, fully competent radiographers in an environment based on teamwork and mutual respect. Radiography is an exciting and challenging career involving the use of highly sophisticated equipment to create x-rays--anatomical images that are used by physicians to diagnose disease, injury, or disability. Radiographers have direct patient contact in clinic and hospital settings and are valuable members of the primary health care team. Our high-quality professional curriculum presents a broad didactic component, comprehensive clinical rotations, and an environment that instills professional skills in our students.
Radiography
The radiography curriculum currently consists of a total of 62 credits.
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques (1.0 cr)
HP 4802 - Health Economics and Finance [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
HP 4902 - Management and Leadership in Healthcare [GP] (2.0 cr)
RADI 3011 - Foundations of Radiography [TS] (2.0 cr)
RADI 3101 - Radiographic Procedures I (4.0 cr)
RADI 3102 - Radiographic Procedures II (7.0 cr)
RADI 3111 - Radiation Physics (2.0 cr)
RADI 3202 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure (2.0 cr)
RADI 3301 - Clinical Practicum I (5.0 cr)
RADI 3302 - Clinical Practicum II (5.0 cr)
RADI 3603 - Applied Radiography Topics (1.0 cr)
RADI 4101 - Radiographic Procedures III (3.0 cr)
RADI 4241 - Radiation Protection Advanced Imaging (3.0 cr)
RADI 4303 - Clinical Practicum III (7.0 cr)
RADI 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV (7.0 cr)
RADI 4402 - Clinical Practicum V (8.0 cr)
Respiratory Care-Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
The BSHP Respiratory Care Track delivers upper-division curriculum designed to prepare students to become respiratory care practitioners with advanced-level clinical skills. The curriculum includes professional courses and clinical experiences to support professional development and prepares students to serve as consultants to physicians and other medical staff. Students are offered the options to engage in specialized clinical study in areas of adult critical care and patient transport, newborn and pediatric critical care, cardiopulmonary diagnostics-pulmonary function testing, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, disease prevention, case management in asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), as well as smoking cessation and lung health counseling.
Respiratory Care
The respiratory care curriculum currently consists of a total of 61 credits.
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques (1.0 cr)
HP 4802 - Health Economics and Finance [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
HP 4902 - Management and Leadership in Healthcare [GP] (2.0 cr)
RESP 3011 - Foundations of Respiratory Care [TS] (2.0 cr)
RESP 3101 - Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment I (4.0 cr)
RESP 3102 - Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment II (4.0 cr)
RESP 3201 - Cardiopulmonary Patient Assessment (4.0 cr)
RESP 3202 - Advanced Cardiopulmonary Physiology and Pathophysiology (3.0 cr)
RESP 3301 - Clinical Practicum I (3.0 cr)
RESP 3302 - Clinical Practicum II (3.0 cr)
RESP 3401 - Seminar in Respiratory Care I (1.0 cr)
RESP 3402 - Seminar in Respiratory Care II (1.0 cr)
RESP 3502 - Clinical Research: Literature, Methodology, and Application (3.0 cr)
RESP 4300 - Clinical Practicum Summer - Adult Critical Care (2.0 cr)
RESP 4311 - Advanced Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care (3.0 cr)
RESP 4321 - Advanced Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics (2.0 cr)
RESP 4331 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Disease Prevention and Case Management (1.0 cr)
RESP 4341 - Clinical Practicum III: Advanced Respiratory Care (3.0 cr)
RESP 4342 - Clinical Practicum V: Advanced Respiratory Care (3.0 cr)
RESP 4400 - Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care Techniques I (2.0 cr)
RESP 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV: Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care (1.0 cr)
RESP 4402 - Clinical Practicum VI: Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care (2.0 cr)
RESP 4500 - Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care Techniques II (1.0 cr)
RESP 4501 - Research Project I (1.0 cr)
RESP 4502 - Research Project II (1.0 cr)
RESP 4602 - Grand Rounds (2.0 cr)
PHAR 3800 - UMTC Course - Pharmacotherapy for the Health Professions (3 cr.)
Sonography-Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
The BSHP Sonography track delivers upper-division curriculum designed to prepare students to become competent, entry-level sonographers in an environment based on teamwork and mutual respect. Students will have the opportunity to train in specialties that include abdomen, obstetrics, gynecology, and peripheral vascular. The program offers an exceptional educational experience by providing high-quality didactic and clinical experiences that prepare students to perform patient assessments, acquire and analyze data obtained using ultrasound and related diagnostic technologies, provide a summary of findings to the physician to aid in patient diagnosis and management, as well as to use independent judgment and systematic problem solving methods to produce high quality diagnostic information and optimize patient care.
Sonography
The sonography curriculum currently consists of a total of 65 credits.
SONO 3011 - Foundations of Sonography [TS] (3.0 cr)
SONO 3111 - Abdomen I Sonography (2.0 cr)
SONO 3201 - Gynecologic Sonography (2.0 cr)
SONO 3121 - Cross-Sectional Abdominal Anatomy (1.0 cr)
SONO 3311 - Vascular Technology (2.0 cr)
SONO 3301 - Clinical Practicum I (3.0 cr)
SONO 3112 - Abdomen II Sonography (3.0 cr)
SONO 3401 - OB Sonography (2.0 cr)
SONO 3312 - Vascular Technology II (3.0 cr)
SONO 3302 - Clinical Practicum II (5.0 cr)
SONO 3503 - Superficial Sonography (2.0 cr)
SONO 3113 - Abdomen III Sonography (2.0 cr)
SONO 3313 - Vascular Technology III (1.0 cr)
SONO 3403 - Concepts Review and Case Studies (2.0 cr)
SONO 4303 - Clinical Practicum III (6.0 cr)
SONO 4111 - Ultrasound Physics I (2.0 cr)
SONO 4201 - Pediatric Sonography (1.0 cr)
SONO 4301 - Fetal Anomalies (2.0 cr)
SONO 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV (7.0 cr)
SONO 4501 - Research Project & Publication (1.0 cr)
SONO 4112 - Ultrasound Physics II (2.0 cr)
SONO 4802 - Mock Exams (1.0 cr)
SONO 4602 - Professional Growth and Development (1.0 cr)
SONO 4402 - Clinical Practicum V (8.0 cr)
SONO 4502 - Research Project and Publication II (1.0 cr)
 
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View sample plan(s):
· Echocardiography
· Radiography
· Respiratory Care
· Sonography

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· Health Professions B.S.
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MATH 1161 - Statistics and Discrete Mathematics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration of statistical analysis in a health sciences context, using technology and active/peer learning. Build statistical inferences from scientific methods. Gather, sort, describe, arrange and construct visual representations of data sets and generate basic predictive models. Introduction to probability and data distributions, leading to inferential statistics. prereq: three years of high school math
MATH 1110 - College Algebra with Physical Concepts (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The goals of this course are to strengthen fundamental quantitative reasoning skills and gain exposure to fundamental physical concepts by exploring topics including unit conversion; number sense; polynomial, rational, and exponential/logarithmic equations and expressions; introductory graphing; systems of equations and variation. Quantitative reasoning skills will be motivated by exposure to fundamental physical concepts. Students learn to simplify expressions and solve equations using mathematical and logical symbols and quantitative techniques, to communicate results clearly, and the importance of these skills to physical sciences. This course goes beyond the usual coverage in three-year high school mathematics curriculum. prereq: three yrs high school math
MATH 1111 - Precalculus with Physical Concepts (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The goal of this course is to make students proficient in quantitative reasoning skills relevant to fundamental algebra concepts, in depth treatment of functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential/logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, vectors, matrices and systems of equations with a focus on the use of physical sciences contexts. Students learn to model real world situations, graph, simplify expressions and solve equations using mathematical and logical symbols and quantitative techniques and communicate results clearly. This course goes beyond the usual coverage in three-year high school mathematics curriculum. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [MATH 1110 or equiv] or placement exam;
MATH 1171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential/integral calculus of a single variable. Optimization, numerical methods. Differential equations, graphing. Functions of several variables and Introduction to partial derivatives. Applications emphasize biology, health sciences, and integration of mathematical models. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1111 or placement exam or instr consent
CHEM 1231 - Organic Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to organic chemistry. Atomic theory of matter. Reaction stoichiometry, bonding, hybridization, functional groups, IR spectroscopy, thermochemistry, organic acids/bases, stereochemistry. Conformational analysis of cycloalkanes. Chemical kinetics. Classification of organic reactions. Aliphatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. Biological examples. Lab. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1161, [high school chemistry or equiv preferred and three years high school math required]
CHEM 2331 - General Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
SI units, factor conversion and essential physical magnitudes. Structure, properties and behavior of gases, liquids and solids. Ideal gases. Thermochemistry. Nature of light and quantum atomic theory. Periodic table and periodic trends. Chemical bond and molecular structure. Intermolecular interactions and phase change. Solution chemistry and stoichiometry. Chemical equilibrium. Acid-base reactions. Chemical applications to Health Sciences. Lab. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1111 or equivalent; high school chemistry and three years of high school math
PHYS 1251 - Physics I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An activity-based introductory physics course focused on concepts of motion, force, energy, fluid dynamics, and oscillating systems. The course develops problem solving skills through a systematic decision-making framework and develops knowledge through a formal disciplinary integration and application to biomedical and other real world application. The laboratory component enhances knowledge and promotes good experimental design, techniques, and technical writing. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [MATH 1111 or equiv] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1171 or equivalent] or MATH 2161
BIOL 3344 - Microbiology (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Microbiology examines the evolution, structure, physiology, metabolism and genetics of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Students also examine the dynamic impact of microbes on humans and the role of microbes in the environment. This course is taught using student-centered, active learning and writing integrated approaches. Students apply these concepts to problem solving within the field, while also gaining confidence in his/her communication of microbiology through collaborative, team-based assignments. In the accompanying laboratory, students gain exposure to and develop a variety of current microbiology techniques. prereq: grade of at least C- in [2311 or equiv], [CHEM 1231 or equiv], [MATH 1110 or equiv]
BIOL 2331 - Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines the shape, structure, and function of human body and its parts including basic anatomy, structure, and function of body systems and special senses. Specific attention is spent differentiating the anatomy and physiological workings of the Integument, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous including the special senses, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive and Urinary systems. Case studies and laboratory activities are used in within a reduced-lecture delivery method to provide a student-centered, active-learning environment. prereq: 2311
BIOL 3332 - Anatomy and Physiology II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course reviews and elaborates on the basic anatomy, structure, and function of body systems and special senses, concepts/principles of body organization, histology, and hematology topics covered in BIOL 2331. Attention is given to understanding how those systems and concepts are related to higher order physiological phenomena such as: 1) Our ability to sense stimuli and respond (nervous system, endocrine system, lymphatic system and immune response); 2) The complex mechanisms/requirements for homeostatic regulation (relationship between nutrition and metabolism and water and ion balance in the human body); 3) Reproduction and fertility​; 4)​ shape, structure, and function of human body and its parts. Case studies and laboratory activities incorporate problem solving and applications to health sciences within a student-centered, active-learning environment. Strong emphasis on experimental design and execution. Prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2331 or placement test
PSY 1511 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Analysis of historical and contemporary paradigms in psychology, research methods, sequence and processes of human development, and the joint contribution of biological and environmental influences on behavior..
WRIT 1511 - Writing Studio I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to and practice of writing. Integrated into freshman academic coursework. Formal/informal writing assignments. Critical reading skills. Principles of audience, purpose, and argumentative strategies. prereq: Only Rochester-admitted students will be able to enroll in this course.
WRIT 1512 - Writing Studio II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Drafting, revising, editing. Integrated into freshman academic coursework. Formal/informal writing assignments. Critical reading skills. Principles of audience, purpose, and argumentative strategies. Library. Annotated bibliography. prereq: Writ 1511 or instr consent
WRIT 3511 - Communication Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/practices of interpersonal, small group, organizational, scientific, and technical communication. Theory and analysis of public presentation of information. Oral presentation skills. Visual communication. Small group work. prereq: Writ 1512 or instr consent
PHIL 1441 - Introduction to Ethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces students to basic ethical theories and examines several contemporary ethical problems. Some of the problems that may be examined include: income inequality, immigration, the right to die, the right to health care, civil disobedience, just war theory, paternalism, animal rights, and capital punishment. Students will gain an understanding of the nature and historical origin of these problems and learn to critically evaluate possible solutions to these problems. The course also includes an integrated project with Writing, Biology, and Sociology. prereq: 1431 or instr consent
SOC 1641 - Social Justice and Ethical Decision Making (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Utilizes foundational sociological concepts to systematically explore the role of policies, regulations, values, norms, and social structures in reinforcing or undermining inequality. Students will exercise decision-making in the context of ethical dilemmas regarding inequality, stratification, research ethics, and biomedical ethics. Students will use reasoned arguments and evidence to support a position on an ethical issue.
ECHO 3011 - Foundations of Echocardiography (TS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of echocardiographic techniques. The course will provide students with patient care skills required for cardiac sonographers and will identify proper imaging techniques to prevent injury. The course will include recognition of cardiac anatomy on an echocardiogram, provide an understanding of machine instrumentation and basic ultrasound physics, indentify proper 2-D, M-mode, and Doppler techniques, and echocardiographic assessment of systolic and diastolic function.
ECHO 3101 - Cardiovascular Anatomy & Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of gross and cross-sectional cardiac anatomy and an understanding of normal cardiac physiology. The concepts of cardiovascular physiology will include circulation blood flow, the cardiac cycle, electrical and mechanical properties of the heart, and blood flow hemodynamics of the arterial and venous system. This course will provide the foundation for advanced physiologic concepts and Doppler hemodynamic assessment in subsequent courses.
ECHO 3202 - Adult Echocardiography
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The intent of this course is to provide the student with the necessary knowledge of cardiomyopathies, coronary artery disease, and cardiac diseases due to systemic illness, pericardial diseases, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, cardiac tumors and masses, diseases of the great vessels and echocardiographic assessment of valvular heart disease by utilizing 2-D, M-mode, and Doppler techniques.
ECHO 3301 - Clinical Practicum I
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The intent of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to perform portions of an echo exam, review position, transducer placement, and terminology in the clinical setting. Two-dimensional (2-D) and Doppler skills learned in Foundations of Echocardiography will be applied in the clinical setting. Clinical Practicum I will provide the student with the opportunity to observe the clinical environment, understand the clinical application of echocardiography, and interact with clinical staff.
ECHO 3302 - Clinical Practicum II
Credits: 7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The intent of this course is to continue to provide the student with the necessary skills and knowledge to integrate academic and clinical learning. Course content will include review of how to perform a routine two-dimensional, Color Flow, and Doppler echocardiography examination and the development of skills necessary to do a complete hemodynamic and Doppler assessment. Course will use hands-on experience to help develop the skills required to do a hemodynamic assessment.
ECHO 3403 - Echocardiographic Application
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
The intent of this course is to integrate knowledge from previous courses. This course will focus on case reviews and the integration of all 2-D and Doppler data. Students will be able to demonstrate application of echocardiographic data and recognize discrepancies in data, ability to identify key findings, ability to create a preliminary report, and effectively communicate the echo findings to the reviewer.
ECHO 3503 - Stress Echocardiography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will provide the student with the necessary knowledge regarding common lab values, ECG, and basis cardiac pharmacology along with a thorough understanding of the different types of stress tests performed in an echocardiographic laboratory and the technical aspects of the digitizing equipment. The role of the sonographer for each procedure will be identified. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of exercise echocardiography and the use of Dobutamine and contrast during a stress echo.
ECHO 4111 - Ultrasound Physics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to introduce the student to basic physics principles and instrumentation used in diagnostic ultrasound. The course will describe basis ultrasound physics principles, formulae and calculations as well as describe ultrasound itself. Key areas to be covered include: the properties of sound waves, principles of reflection, transmission, scattering and refraction; principles of attenuation and components of sound energy loss; transducer construction and function; sound beam ⿿anatomy⿝; spatial resolution; transducer array technology; sound beam steering, and focusing. The course goal is to help the student understand the process by which an image is created, and ultimately identify ways to produce an optimal echo image.
ECHO 4112 - Ultrasound Physics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is designed to expand the information learned in Ultrasound Physics I and provide new information regarding theory and operation of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. The course will describe 2-dimensional imaging principles and instrumentation, image storage and display, the Doppler effect, pulsed and continuous wave Doppler generation, spectral analysis and display, color flow imaging, image features and artifacts, quality assurance, bioeffects and safety, and will introduce students to newer technologies including contrast and tissue harmonics, Doppler tissue imaging, and power Doppler. The course goal is to help the student understand the process by which an image is created, Doppler information is generated and displayed, and identify ways to produce high quality, diagnostic echocardiographic information.
ECHO 4211 - Congenital Heart Disease I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The intent of this course is to provide the student with advanced knowledge of anatomy of congenital cardiac abnormalities, adult congenital heart disease (CHD), and follow-up of these patients. Surgical repair and interventional catheterization or methods will be discussed as well as postoperative complications. The student will also be provided necessary information on performing a systematic 2-D, spectral, and Color Flow Doppler examination on a patient with CHD.
ECHO 4303 - Clinical Practicum III
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Clinical Practicum III will primarily focus on development of students clinical skills for 2-Dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Clinical Practicum III is devoted to clinical training, allowing students an opportunity to apply didactic classroom instruction and develop their clinical skills. Students will begin to integrate the clinical and echo findings and identify final impressions related to the echo exam. Observational rotations will include intraoperative TEE, Outreach echocardiography, Stress Echocardiography, TEE and contrast echocardiography. 3D and strain rate echocardiography and the role of the sonographer for each procedure will also be included in this course. Lab sessions will allow students the opportunity to demonstrate the required skills for 3D and strain rate imaging.
ECHO 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Clinical Practicum IV will continue to develop the student⿿s clinical skills to complete an optimal echocardiographic hemodynamic assessment. The focus of the term will be the ability to integrate 2-D and echo data in an accurate patient report. Clinical Practicum IV will introduce students to congenital echocardiography, to the field of stress echocardiography, and to echocardiographic research.
ECHO 4402 - Clinical Practicum V
Credits: 9.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
During Clinical Practicum V, the students will apply previous didactic and clinical training to complete a quality echocardiographic examination. Students will be responsible for integrating echo data, preparing preliminary echo findings and delivering the report.
ECHO 4501 - Research Project and Publication I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will be responsible for devising, developing and undertaking a research project which would be suitable for submission either to a scientific meeting or for publication. This will include developing a research question, devising and submitting a research protocol, reviewing related literature, and reporting the findings in abstract, paper, and/or a short oral presentation. Research mentors will be assigned to allow guided independent study.
ECHO 4460 - Special Procedures
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Focus on the special procedures performed involving echocardiography and the sonographer's role. Includes anatomy and clinical indications of TEE, intro-operative procedures, pericardiocentesis, cardiac catheterization procedures, and echo assessment of left ventricular assist devices. Introduction to other imaging modalities including Nuclear, CT, and MRI, and the information they can provide about the heart. Also includes 3D and strain echocardiography and the role of the sonographer for each procedure.
ECHO 4540 - Professional Growth and Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Provides students with the skills and knowledge for future professional growth. Discussion of the scope of practice and career advancement for sonographers, medical ethics. Includes registry exam preparation.
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This multidisciplinary course uses a blended format to introduce students to the fundamental practice, attitudes, and compentencies needed by all health care providers. Professionalism, communication skills, infection control, vital signs, ergonomics, patient safety, medical emergencies, medication, and managing tubes are reviewed. Students will practice general patient care procedures and skills and demonstrate competent performance.
NUCM 4001 - Management & Methods of Patient Care
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A survey of hospital administrative procedures including medical terminology, medical ethics, medical research, career development and quality improvement.
NUCM 4003 - Radiation Protection
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Properties of alpha, beta and gamma radiations, their effects upon human beings and methods for protecting patients and staff from unnecessary exposure and possible injury.
NUCM 4007 - Clinical Nuclear Practicum I
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive exploration of nuclear medicine imaging of patients for diagnostic purposes through theory, observation, supervised use and reflection of clinical application.
NUCM 4010 - Nuclear Radiation Physics and Instrumentation
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of alpha, beta and gamma radiations; their origins and interactions with matter; their control and shielding; and the statistics of counting.
NUCM 4013 - Nuclear Medicine Chemistry and Pharmacology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A study of the radiopharmacology and chemistry of radionuclides used in the clinical nuclear medicine technology laboratory.
NUCM 4002 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The clinical application of anatomy, physiology and pathology of the human organ systems treated in the application of nuclear medicine.
NUCM 4008 - Clinical Nuclear Practicum II
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The supervised use of radionuclides in imaging and scanning of patients for diagnostic purposes.
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This multidisciplinary course uses a blended format to introduce students to the fundamental practice, attitudes, and compentencies needed by all health care providers. Professionalism, communication skills, infection control, vital signs, ergonomics, patient safety, medical emergencies, medication, and managing tubes are reviewed. Students will practice general patient care procedures and skills and demonstrate competent performance.
HP 4802 - Health Economics and Finance (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will learn micro- and macro-economic theory applied within the healthcare sector. A flow of funds approach explores finances in healthare transactions and incentives. Historical development of third party reimbursement, healthcare financial structures and mechanisms,individual health and public health factors affecting the delivery system, payment system, and supply/demand system is followed by a wider macroeconomic review to explore factors of change within the healthcare system. National health spending and the role of government and regulators in public and private health will be applied by case study and contemporary readings. The health of individuals and the health of groups will be studied in terms of cost, economic, ethical and socioeconomic disparities, and in non-Western countries. The course aims to make the language of healthcare finance and economics understandable and relevant for students in healthcare professions.
HP 4902 - Management and Leadership in Healthcare (GP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students acquire background and skills of business/administrative aspects of healthcare. Applications of business theory are applied to medical settings. Functions of management organization models, budget and other planning, information systems, human resource functions including staff scheduling, employee evaluation, productivity management, personal accountability, group leadership, external factors including accreditation and non-Western views will be explored. Alternative theories including Systems Thinking will be explored and contrasted with traditional management.
RADI 3011 - Foundations of Radiography (TS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to the profession and provides a foundation for understanding the radiographer's role in a radiology department. The radiographers ethical responsibility to their profession, institution and the diverse patient population is clarified through the introduction of the Radiographers Code of Ethics and the Patients Bill of Rights. The course will introduce exposure factors and corresponding technique chart use, interactions with patients, and methods to ensure radiation protection for patients and healthcare workers. The theoretical concepts and practical application of Automatic Exposure Control will be covered in this course.
RADI 3101 - Radiographic Procedures I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce radiographic positioning terminology as it relates to patient anatomy, This course also provides a review of the anatomy of the upper and lower limbs. Routine radiographic anatomy as well as pathology and traumatic changes demonstrated on radiographic images will be included. Methods to modify standard positioning for trauma and pediatric patients are presented. Specialized projections of the upper and lower limbs will also be presented in this course. Positioning considerations and evaluating radiographs will be emphasized.
RADI 3102 - Radiographic Procedures II
Credits: 7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides a review of the anatomy of the axial skeletal system, skull, gastrointestinal system, and urinary system. Radiographic positioning instruction used to demonstrate the anatomy of the systems listed above is provided in this course. Routine radiographic anatomy and traumatic changes demonstrated on radiographic images will be included. This course also covers pathology specific to the bone, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, urinary system, hematopoietic system, endocrine system,and reproductive system. Methods to modify standard positioning for trauma, pathology and pediatric patients are presented. Positioning considerations and evaluating radiographs will be emphasized. pre-req: 3101; 3301
RADI 3111 - Radiation Physics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Radiation physics presents the students with a history of people and events which lead to the discovery and use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging, with a review of introductory physics concepts and their application to x-radiation production. Electricity, magnification, transformers, and rectification will be discussed as components of x-ray circuitry and production of x-rays. The student will learn and understand each component of the x-ray tube, including its function and contribution to the production of x-radiation. Theoretical concepts and mathematical formulas needed to adjust exposure techniques in radiography practice will be presented. Students will solve algebraic equations to determine how to make adjustments to exposure factors when changes to mA, time, kVp, or distance are necessary; and explain how these changes affect the emission spectrum. prereq: Physics with lab component
RADI 3202 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course presents X-ray exposure principles. X-ray interactions with matter are defined. Dose and the impact on the radiologic image are presented. The effect of scattered and secondary radiation on image quality and methods of control are included. Image receptors are discussed in terms of structure, function, types, and uses. The role of the primary variables (kVp, time mA, and SID) in radiography is presented. Variable effects on density, contrast, and visibility of detail are defined. Methods of exposure calculation for changes in the primary variables are reviewed.. Principles of digital image acquisition and display including CR and DR imaging are explored in this course. prereq: 3111;
RADI 3301 - Clinical Practicum I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course consists of three components: professional development, a lab practicum and clinical rotations as assigned on the Mayo Campuses. Lab practicum encompasses: anatomy, positioning simulations and image critique of projections addressed in RADI 3101 Radiographic Procedures I course.
RADI 3302 - Clinical Practicum II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course consists of three components: professional development a lab practicum and clinical rotations as assigned on the Mayo Campuses. Lab practicum encompasses: anatomy, positioning simulations and image critique of projections addressed in RADI 3101 Radiographic Procedures I and RADI 3102 Radiographic Procedure II courses. pre-req: 3101; 3301;
RADI 3603 - Applied Radiography Topics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
The Applied Radiography Course focuses on conducting and summarizing research then presenting that information in three assignments including a persuasive paper, a written literature review and visual presentation.The assignments must adhere to the American Psychological Association, 6th Edition (APA) writing style.
RADI 4101 - Radiographic Procedures III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introduction to MRI, CT, Mammography and interventional radiology. The history, theory and required equipment for the imaging modality is presented, along with an discussion of exams performed in each modality. Emphasis is placed on anatomy visualized by each modality.
RADI 4241 - Radiation Protection Advanced Imaging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course reviews the types and sources of radiation and their interactions with matter. Effects of high doses on biologic systems are described, and effects of low doses on populations are presented. Elements of radiation protection are included. Quality management concepts, measurements, interpretation, and correcting actions, and governmental regulations insuring compliance are presented. The theoretical concepts and practical application of fluoroscopy, tomography, automatic exposure control, and duplication of radiographs are discussed.
RADI 4303 - Clinical Practicum III
Credits: 7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course consists of three components: professional development a lab practicum and clinical rotations as assigned on the Mayo campus. Lab practicum encompasses: anatomy, positioning simulations and image critique of projections addressed in RADI 3102 Radiographic Procedure II courses and factors learned in RADI 3202 Principles of Radiographic Exposure course. pre-req: 3102; 3202; 3302;
RADI 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV
Credits: 7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course consists of three components: professional development a lab practicum and clinical rotations as assigned on the Mayo Clinic campus and Mayo Health Systems campuses. Students will participate in non-regular shifts consisting of evenings and weekends. Lab practicum encompasses: anatomy, positioning simulations and image critique of projections addressed in RADI 3101 Radiographic Procedures I, RADI 3102 Radiographic Procedure II and factors learned in RADI 3202 Principles of Radiographic Exposure course. pre-req: 4303;
RADI 4402 - Clinical Practicum V
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course consists of three core components: 1)Professional Development 2)Curriculum Review of all sections outlined in the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists board examination content specifications and 3) Clinical Rotation practical experience as assigned on the Mayo Campus and Mayo Health System sites. Students will participate in non-regular shifts consisting of evenings, overnights and weekends. pre-req: 4401;
HP 3021 - Patient Care Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This multidisciplinary course uses a blended format to introduce students to the fundamental practice, attitudes, and compentencies needed by all health care providers. Professionalism, communication skills, infection control, vital signs, ergonomics, patient safety, medical emergencies, medication, and managing tubes are reviewed. Students will practice general patient care procedures and skills and demonstrate competent performance.
HP 4802 - Health Economics and Finance (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will learn micro- and macro-economic theory applied within the healthcare sector. A flow of funds approach explores finances in healthare transactions and incentives. Historical development of third party reimbursement, healthcare financial structures and mechanisms,individual health and public health factors affecting the delivery system, payment system, and supply/demand system is followed by a wider macroeconomic review to explore factors of change within the healthcare system. National health spending and the role of government and regulators in public and private health will be applied by case study and contemporary readings. The health of individuals and the health of groups will be studied in terms of cost, economic, ethical and socioeconomic disparities, and in non-Western countries. The course aims to make the language of healthcare finance and economics understandable and relevant for students in healthcare professions.
HP 4902 - Management and Leadership in Healthcare (GP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students acquire background and skills of business/administrative aspects of healthcare. Applications of business theory are applied to medical settings. Functions of management organization models, budget and other planning, information systems, human resource functions including staff scheduling, employee evaluation, productivity management, personal accountability, group leadership, external factors including accreditation and non-Western views will be explored. Alternative theories including Systems Thinking will be explored and contrasted with traditional management.
RESP 3011 - Foundations of Respiratory Care (TS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course reviews the clinical roles/responsibilities and career options within the fields of respiratory care. In addition, this course provides students with a solid foundation in professional attributes, cardiopulmonary science, chemical and physics relationships, and mathematical skills to promote success as they begin the clinical-based curriculum. Students explore respiratory care subspecialties and role differences in various clinical settings. Class includes laboratory sessions, discussion, simulation and role-playing.
RESP 3101 - Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will become proficient in performing non-invasive monitoring and therapeutic procedures, including medical gas therapy, humidity and aerosol therapy, bronchial drainage and volume expansion therapy. Commonly prescribed aerosol medications will also be reviewed. Learners will practice skills using simulation-based education and in a laboratory setting. Procedures will be discussed in the context of national practice guidelines as to the scientific rationale, limitations, hazards and complications, issues of asepsis and modification to adapt to patient needs.
RESP 3102 - Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will become competent in the implementation and operation of a range of invasive monitoring devices and life support technology used in care of the critically ill patient. Learners will practice skills using simulation-based medical education and in a laboratory setting. This will include airway management, electrocardiogram hemodynamic and respiratory monitoring, and mechanical ventilation for perinatal, pediatric and adult patients. prereq: 3101
RESP 3201 - Cardiopulmonary Patient Assessment
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patient assessment skills are developed to allow students to both gather and interpret a wide range of patient data. This would include the medical record, patient interview, physical examination, medical laboratory tests, pulmonary function reports (including blood gas analysis), hemodynamic record and radiographic imaging. Cardiopulmonary diseases are introduced with emphasis on pathophysiological manifestations that can be assessed. The laboratory provides a setting for role playing, mock exams and practice of assessment skills. A weekly bedside teaching case review is designed to integrate coursework, examination skills as well as the human aspect of patient care. The Mayo Multidisciplinary Simulation Center allows practice and debriefing of assessment skills in a safe environment.
RESP 3202 - Advanced Cardiopulmonary Physiology and Pathophysiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The first half of the course will provide students with a detailed review of the physiology of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The second section involves a review of adult, pediatric and perinatal cardiopulmonary disorders. Emphasis will be placed on integrating assessment, laboratory evaluation, major pathology, pathophysiologic manifestations and treatment options with focus on respiratory care. A bi-weekly bedside patient case review allows interaction with patients and application of coursework on cardiopulmonary disorders. The Mayo Multidisciplinary Simulation Center allows. Students to apply skills, knowledge and develop as reflective practitioners using simulated patients in a safe environment. prereq: 3201
RESP 3301 - Clinical Practicum I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students begin a series of rotations including 18 different clinical areas at the Mayo Medical Center. Each rotation requires completion of specific competencies. Those areas include 9 intensive care units, the operating room, emergency room, general floor care areas, pulmonary function labs, sleep disorders center, smoking cessation clinic, pulmonary rehabilitation program, home care and outpatient clinic. Learners will practice and master skills using simulation-based medical education. Students will perform respiratory care procedures and diagnostic testing with the supervision of a clinical instructor.
RESP 3302 - Clinical Practicum II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students continue a series of rotations including 18 different clinical areas at the Mayo Medical Center. Those areas include 9 intensive care units, the operating room, emergency room, general floor care areas, pulmonary function labs, sleep disorders center, smoking cessation clinic, pulmonary rehabilitation program, home care and an outpatient clinic. Learners will practice and master skills using simulation-based medical education. Students will expand their competencies in adult as well as perinatal & pediatric critical respiratory care. prereq: 3301
RESP 3401 - Seminar in Respiratory Care I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will attend weekly conferences and seminars in which issues and cases of clinical importance in respiratory care will be discussed. Students will, with faculty guidance, prepare a presentation on a topic and lead class discussion on the topic presented. The emphasis will be on a critical review of the medical literature. Effective presentation skills will be covered. (1 hour-either Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Case Conference or Combined Critical Care Conference) and 1 hour seminar weekly).
RESP 3402 - Seminar in Respiratory Care II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will attend weekly conferences and seminars in which cases and issues of clinical importance in respiratory care will be discussed. Students will prepare and present a case presentation and lead discussion on the case and issues raised by the case. The relevant medical literature will be critically reviewed. In the second part of the course students will gain familiarity with the common forms of medical literature and be introduced to the critical appraisal of published articles in a seminar format. prereq: 3401
RESP 3502 - Clinical Research: Literature, Methodology, and Application
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will become readers and writers of research literature, especially that literature which pertains to health care. Students will learn the methodologies of scientific investigation. Students will learn to become constructive critics of scientific investigation. The course provides study content in scientific writing, statistics, research study design including problem statement development and protocol development, research questions or hypothesis development, feasibility analysis, sampling methods and instruments, data management, data analysis and interpretation, and dissemination of research. Prereq: Statistics course, 3401
RESP 4300 - Clinical Practicum Summer - Adult Critical Care
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Students will focus on topics relevant to providing respiratory care to critically ill adults. There will be an emphasis on reviewing case examples of cardiopulmonary problems and therapeutic procedures. However, a multi-organ system-wide patient approach will be maintained. Advanced competencies in ventilator management and critical care monitoring, diagnostics and therapeutic procedures will be assured by laboratory experiences. prereq: 3302
RESP 4311 - Advanced Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The didactic course combined with its clinical counterpart will allow students to assume the role of the perinatal/pediatrics specialist as defined by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). A thorough review of the literature on mechanical ventilation, monitoring applied with emphasis on an evidence-based care, will be provided. Current strategies for extended mechanical ventilation or other forms of long-term support will be reviewed using case study examples. prereq: 3202
RESP 4321 - Advanced Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will review the rationale and methods used in cardiopulmonary diagnostics. This course along with its clinical counterpart will allow students to assume the role of the advanced pulmonary function technologist and complete the NBRC's CPFT specialty board exams. Procedures in which participants would become competent include inert gas and body plethysmographic measurement of lung capacity, diffusion studies, bronchial provocation, and heart & lung function during maximal exercise. Interpretation of results and quality control in the laboratory will be facilitated by case reviews and laboratory experiences. prereq: 3202
RESP 4331 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Disease Prevention and Case Management
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will review the delivery of care to chronically ill patients with lung and heart disorders with emphasis on respiratory care. The rehabilitation process will be applied to hospital-based program, extended care facilities and in the home. Topics include clinical testing, exercise prescriptions, and practice guidelines for management. Patient care reviews as part of the laboratory will underscore the multidisciplinary approach to case management and responsibilities unique to the respiratory therapist. This course along with its clinical counterpart will allow students to perform the responsibilities attributed to this subspecialty in respiratory care. Students will become certified asthma educators. prereq: 3202
RESP 4341 - Clinical Practicum III: Advanced Respiratory Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will complete competencies focused in the areas of advanced-level respiratory care including clinical subspecialties and related areas important to the respiratory care practitioner desiring greater scope of practice. Learners will practice and master skills using simulation-based medical education. Advanced Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care: Clinical experiences in high-risk delivery, perinatal & pediatric intensive, inter-hospital transport and chronic care. Advanced Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics: Clinical experiences in pulmonary function testing including lung volume measurement, diffusion studies, exercise testing, sleep diagnostics, ventilation control, indirect calorimetry, provocation testing, oxygen titration and laboratory quality control. Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, disease prevention and case management: Clinical experiences in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation including cardiopulmonary disease assessment, disease prevention, patient family education, evaluation of impairment/disability, exercise training and social and psychological considerations. prereq: 3302
RESP 4342 - Clinical Practicum V: Advanced Respiratory Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students will complete competencies focused in the areas of advanced-level respiratory care including clinical subspecialties and related areas important to the respiratory care practitioner desiring greater scope of practice. Learners will practice and master skills using simulation-based medical education. Advanced Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care: Clinical experiences in high-risk delivery, perinatal & pediatric intensive, inter-hospital transport and chronic care. Advanced Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics: Clinical experiences in pulmonary function testing including lung volume measurement, diffusion studies, exercise testing, sleep diagnostics, ventilation control, indirect calorimetry, provocation testing, oxygen titration and laboratory quality control. Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, disease prevention and case management: Clinical experiences in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation including cardiopulmonary disease assessment, disease prevention, patient family education, evaluation of impairment/disability, exercise training and social and psychological considerations. prereq: 4341
RESP 4400 - Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care Techniques I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Students will focus on topics relevant to providing respiratory care to critically ill adults. There will be an emphasis on reviewing case examples of cardiopulmonary problems and therapeutic procedures. However, a multi-organ system-wide patient approach will be maintained. Advanced competencies in ventilator management and critical care monitoring procedures including hemodynamic monitoring will be assured by laboratory experiences. prereq: 3102
RESP 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV: Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Clinical experiences in intensive care of patients including post-operative general-surgical, neurology/neurologic surgery ICU, trauma care, medical ICU, thoracic surgical ICU, inter-hospital transport and hemodynamic monitoring. prereq: 3302
RESP 4402 - Clinical Practicum VI: Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Clinical experiences in intensive care of patients including post-operative general-surgical, neurology/neurologic surgery ICU, trauma care, medical ICU, thoracic surgical ICU, inter-hospital transport and hemodynamic monitoring. prereq: 4401
RESP 4500 - Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care Techniques II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will focus on advanced topics relevant to providing respiratory care to critically ill adults. There will be an emphasis on reviewing complex case examples of cardiopulmonary problems and therapeutic procedures. However, a multi-organ system-wide patient approach will be maintained. Advanced competencies in ventilator management and critical care monitoring, diagnostics and therapeutic procedures will be assured by laboratory experiences. prereq: 3502
RESP 4501 - Research Project I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students in small groups will be responsible for devising, developing and undertaking a research project which would be suitable for submission either to a scientific meeting or for publication. This will include developing a research question, devising and submitting a research protocol, carrying out the research and reporting the findings in abstract and a short oral presentation. Research mentors will be assigned to allow guided independent study.
RESP 4502 - Research Project II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students in small groups will continue work on their chosen research project from RESP 4501. This project will be suitable for submission to either a scientific meeting or for publication. This will include developing a research question, devising and submitting a research protocol, carrying out the research and reporting the findings in abstract and a short oral presentation. Research mentors will be assigned to allow guided independent study. prereq: 4501
RESP 4602 - Grand Rounds
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This capstone course reviews allied health clinical and professional issues over a broad spectrum and also allows reflection on caregiver roles. Presentations cover a wide range of topics that impact allied health practitioners and include global views of national health policy, economics, multiculturalism/diversity, ethical and legal problems, and challenging clinical cases. Group discussion sessions provide a forum for multidisciplinary review of cases in order to bring larger issues down to individual patient and family experiences. A key element of the course will be the opportunity to both experience and apply course topics through service learning activities.
SONO 3011 - Foundations of Sonography (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This introductory course will provide the skills and knowledge necessary to begin a clinical rotation in an ultrasound department. Students will receive lectures and participate in lab exercises to help them understand basic anatomy, physics, instrumentation, ultrasound terminology, scanning techniques, image orientation, film labeling, and scanner controls.
SONO 3111 - Abdomen I Sonography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will present the anatomy, physiology, laboratory values, pathology, and sonographic appearances of the prevertebral vessels, kidneys, and spleen. There will be a review of scanning protocols and scanning practice in a controlled environment which will integrate course material with clinical applications.
SONO 3201 - Gynecologic Sonography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
GYN Sonography is the first course of the obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) curriculum. This course covers gynecologic anatomy, pathophysiology, and GYN ultrasound information. The curriculum includes the following topics: female pelvic anatomy and physiology, uterine, ovarian, and tubal pathology, infertility, and pelvic sonographic scanning techniques.
SONO 3121 - Cross-Sectional Abdominal Anatomy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This predominantly online course will assist students in identifying abdominal and pelvic anatomical structures in cross-sectional imaging studies. After reviewing anatomical structures using standard anatomy illustrations, the corresponding Ultrasound, CT and MRI planar images will be demonstrated with a focus on location and spatial relationships to each other.
SONO 3311 - Vascular Technology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Vascular I is the first course of the Vascular curriculum. This course provides the student with basic knowledge of the physics of duplex ultrasound imaging. Doppler concepts and machine instrumentation to prepare the student to perform carotid duplex exams and transcranial Doppler exams and identify normal and abnormal anatomy and physiology of the carotid system.
SONO 3301 - Clinical Practicum I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a 13-week clinical rotation in the following ultrasound areas: General, Vascular, and Obstetrics. Students will learn through observation, scanning, and application of knowledge obtained during didactic coursework and scanning labs. Students will be directly supervised.
SONO 3112 - Abdomen II Sonography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will use lectures and scanning labs to help students learn the anatomy, physiology, laboratory values, pathology, and sonographic appearances and scanning techniques for the liver, biliary tree and pancreas.
SONO 3401 - OB Sonography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides the student with the necessary information to perform and aid in interpreting normal and abnormal obstetrical sonograms. The following topics will be presented: embryology, first trimester sonography, normal fetal anatomy, amniotic fluid, invasive procedures, assessment of fetal age and growth restriction, placenta, cord, membranes, high-risk pregnancy, indications and safety.
SONO 3312 - Vascular Technology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides the student with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to perform duplex imaging of the abdominal arteries, lower extremity arteries and veins, and nonimaging testing of the peripheral vessels. Lectures and scanning labs include anatomy, pathophysiology, treatment, and testing techniques (including nonimaging vascular testing) for upper and lower extremity veins and arteries.
SONO 3302 - Clinical Practicum II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is a 16-week clinical rotation in the following ultrasound areas: General, Vascular, and Obstetrics. Students will learn through observation, scanning, and application of knowledge obtained during didactic coursework and scanning labs. Students will be directly supervised.
SONO 3503 - Superficial Sonography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will present anatomy, physiology, laboratory values, pathology and sonographic appearance of the breast, neck, prostate and scrotum. Musculoskeletal ultrasound will also be introduced. There will be review of scanning protocols and practices.
SONO 3113 - Abdomen III Sonography
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This predominantly Blackboard course will present the anatomy, pathophysiology, laboratory values, and sonographic appearances of the GI tract, retroperitoneum, peritoneum, chest cavity, abdominal wall, as well as emergency sonography, transplant sonography and interventional applications. Emphasis and practical application will be placed on topics most commonly encountered in a typical sonography department such as appendix, FAST Scan, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, renal-pancreas, and liver transplant and ultrasound guided sterile procedures.
SONO 3313 - Vascular Technology III
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course covers anatomy, pathology, treatment, indications, and scanning techniques necessary to perform duplex imaging exams of upper extremity arteries and veins, dialysis grafts and mapping, lower extremity venous insufficiency and perforator veins, and upper and lower extremity venous mapping. Test validation and QA statistics will also be explored.
SONO 3403 - Concepts Review and Case Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course provides the student opportunities to review concepts taught throughout the curriculum by completing computerized review exams and case studies.
SONO 4303 - Clinical Practicum III
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course is a 14-week clinical rotation in the following ultrasound areas: General, Vascular, Obstetrics, Vascular Testing Lab, and affiliate rotations. Students will learn through observation, scanning, and application of knowledge obtained during didactic coursework and scanning labs. Students will be indirectly supervised at the discretion of the Clinical Instructor.
SONO 4111 - Ultrasound Physics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides the student with a general overview of diagnostic pulse-echo ultrasound imaging devices, basic mathematical concepts, and knowledge of the basic physics of ultrasound and its interaction with tissue.
SONO 4201 - Pediatric Sonography
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides the student with necessary information about the anatomy of the neonatal brain and pathologies of intracranial hemorrhage. Other pediatric pathophysiologies are also presented including: pediatric renal/urinary tract disease, pediatric abdominal masses and neonatal hips and spines.
SONO 4301 - Fetal Anomalies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
The Fetal Anomalies course prepares students to define fetal pathologies and identify classic sonographic findings associated with cranial, thoracic, neck, GI, GU, skeletal, cardiac, and chromosomal fetal anomalies.
SONO 4401 - Clinical Practicum IV
Credits: 7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a 16-week clinical rotation in the following clinical areas: General, Vascular, Obstetrics, Vascular Testing Lab, Neurovascular Lab, and Breast Imaging. Students will learn through observation, scanning, and application of knowledge obtained during didactic coursework and scanning labs. Students will be indirectly supervised at the discretion of the Clinical Instructor.
SONO 4501 - Research Project & Publication
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore emerging technologies and advanced concepts in sonography through the completion of a research paper.
SONO 4112 - Ultrasound Physics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides the student with a detailed description of the physics and technology of diagnostic pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging devices.
SONO 4802 - Mock Exams
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through a series of course reviews, mock registry examinations and information sessions, students are able to prepare for ARDMS examinations. Information on credentialing examinations, effective test-taking strategies, and ARDMS examination content are also provided. Students will be required to apply for and take the ARDMS Physics and Instrumentation board examination during the last part of Semester 5.
SONO 4602 - Professional Growth and Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore the many aspects of professionalism including: professional interactions, professional responsibilities, sonographer scope of practice, clinical practice standards, ARDMS credentialing requirements, legal issues, sonography lab expenses, interviewing and resume skills, and current sonographer issues.
SONO 4402 - Clinical Practicum V
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is a 17-week clinical rotation in the following clinical sites: General, Vascular, Obstetrics, Vascular Testing Lab, and selected specialty areas. Students will learn through observation scanning, and application of knowledge obtained during didactic coursework and scanning labs. Students will be indirectly supervised at the discretion of the Clinical Instructor.
SONO 4502 - Research Project and Publication II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore emerging technologies and advanced concepts in sonography through the completion of a poster to be submitted for competition at the Minnesota Society of Diagnostic Ultrasound (MSDU) Annual Spring Seminar, or the national SDMS meeting.