Rochester campus
 
Rochester Campus

Health Sciences B.S.

UM Rochester
UMR Chancellor's Office
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 83 to 93
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Rochester students majoring in the health sciences will receive an integrated education across the biological sciences, the physical sciences, the quantitative sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities. Students must complete at least 120 credits, including at least 80 credits in the major. All courses in the major must be taken A-F, unless the course is only offered S-N. The health sciences BS program prepares students for post baccalaureate education in a broad spectrum of health science related fields and for graduate programs in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities; health profession careers, including certificate programs in the health sciences; professional schools in the health sciences; and entry-level science and laboratory positions in industry, government agencies, and universities.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 3 semester(s) of Spanish or approved alternate language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
All students are required to complete campus-wide requirements for liberal education and writing. UMR liberal education is integrated into the curriculum throughout the four years and follows the liberal education requirements on the UMTC campus, except that UMR requires all five themes. Writing and communication follows a writing-integrated curriculum and is incorporated throughout the curriculum across all courses. In addition to the requirements below, students are required to create a personalized capstone. As part of the capstone, students write a proposal that requires them to list credit bearing activities, reflect upon their holistic experience, and express how their capstone endeavors align with their personal and professional goals. It may be possible, in some unique cases, for specially approved capstones to fulfill or waive program requirements.
Foundational Courses
BIOL 2311 - Integrative Biology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2331 - Anatomy and Physiology I [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1331 - Chemical Structures and Properties [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1333 - Chemical Reactivity [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CLI 1711 - University Experience I (1.0 cr)
CLI 1712 - Personal Development and Career Exploration (1.0 cr)
CLI 2522 - Community Collaboratory (3.0 cr)
CLI 2713 - Career Development and Career Skills in the Health Sciences (1.0 cr)
ENGL 1433 - Introduction to Literature [LITR] (3.0 cr)
MATH 1161 - Introduction to Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
PHIL 1431 - Introduction to Philosophy [AH] (3.0 cr)
PHYS 1251 - Physics I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
PUBH 2561 - Introduction to Public Health [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 1571 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
WRIT 1511 - Academic Writing: Summarizing & Persuading (1.0 cr)
WRIT 1512 - Academic Research & Scientific Writing (2.0 cr)
Additional Required Coursework
Ethics
PHIL 1441 - Introduction to Ethics [CIV, AH] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 1641 - Social Justice and Ethical Decision Making [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Communication
COMM 2511 - Communication Methods (3.0 cr)
or COMM 2711 - Communication in Professional Contexts (3.0 cr)
Language
SPAN 1521, SPAN 1522, SPAN 2521 can be replaced by a Spanish proficiency exam or an approved alternative language assessment.
SPAN 1521 - Spanish I (3.0 cr)
SPAN 1522 - Spanish II (3.0 cr)
SPAN 2521 - Spanish III (3.0 cr)
or an approved alternate language
Quantitative Reasoning
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1110 - College Algebra with Physical Concepts [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· MATH 1111 - Precalculus with Physical Concepts [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· MATH 1171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2161 - Biostatistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data II [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division
Take 3 or more course(s) from the following:
Biological and Physical Sciences
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3321 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3332 - Anatomy and Physiology II (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3311 - Genetics [BIOL, TS] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3344 - Microbiology [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4312 - Advanced Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology and Genetics (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4342 - Neuroscience (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4364 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4331 - Chemical Biology/Bioorganic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4333 - Physical Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· Humanities, Public Health and Social Sciences
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3471 - Gender and Sexuality Studies [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3481 - Society, Science, and Science Fiction [TS] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3437 - History and Philosophy of Science [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3441 - Ethics of Medicine and the Sciences [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3510 - Human Development across the Lifespan (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3512 - Principles of Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 4512 - Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3531 - Health Policy & Systems [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3561 - Environmental Health and Environmental Justice [ENV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 4561 - Introduction to Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3531 {Inactive} [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3571 - Drugs and Society [DSJ, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3581 - Medical Sociology and Technology [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
Proposal & Reflection
CLI 3712 - Capstone Proposal Writing (2.0 cr)
CLI 4713 - Capstone Reflections (1.0 cr)
or CLI 4711 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
CLI 4712 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
Activities
Student must complete a minimum of 6 additional credit hours of upper division (3xxx+) coursework. These credits cannot be used to satisfy any other program requirements.
Pre-PA Pathway
Students should choose the following courses, normally options within the BSHS degree, to prepare for PA Master's programs: BIOC 3321; BIOL 3332, 3344 & 4364; CHEM 2231 & 2333; MATH 1110 & 1111; and PSY 1511, 3510 & 3512. In addition, the following courses are recommended: BIOL 3311; additional upper division physiological sciences courses such as cellular biology or virology; and a research methodology course.
 
More program views..
View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2019

View sample plan(s):
· Health Sciences BS General Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Health Sciences B.S.
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BIOL 2311 - Integrative Biology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introductory biology course with lab for health sciences majors. Emphasis on scientific literacy, mastery of core biological concepts, the relationship of biology to health sciences and other major disciplines, lifelong learning and citizenship. Taught utilizing student-centered, active learning, and writing-integrated approaches. coreq: WRIT 1512
BIOL 2331 - Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to the shape, structure, and function of the human body and its parts including basic anatomy, structure, and function of body systems and special senses. Specific attention is spent differentiating the anatomy and physiological workings of the integument, skeletal, muscular, nervous including the special senses, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and urinary systems. Case studies and laboratory activities are used in within a reduced-lecture delivery method to provide a student-centered, active-learning environment. prereq: 2311
CHEM 1331 - Chemical Structures and Properties (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on the study of the electronic, atomic and molecular structure of matter. Topics include: Atomic composition and mass spectrometry, theory of light, electronic structure and atomic spectroscopy, periodic table, covalent bond and molecular structure, organic functional groups and infrared spectroscopy, conformational analysis and H-NMR, intermolecular forces and phase change, solutions and solubility. Spectroscopic techniques are presented from the beginning as tools for evidence and analysis of atomic and molecular structure and composition. prereq: high school chemistry or equiv preferred and three years high school math required
CHEM 1333 - Chemical Reactivity (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on the study of change and stability in chemical reactions. Topics include: combustion, acid/base and nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions as well as conformational change using kinetic and thermodynamic principles. These principles allow students to understand how fast and to what extent reactants evolve towards products. Spectroscopic techniques such as NMR and IR are revisited and developed further as tools for evidence and analysis of molecular structure and products of a reaction. prereq: C- or better in 1331
CLI 1711 - University Experience I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Orients students to UMR's campus environment and resources, providing opportunities to connect with members of the campus community. The course focuses on developing strategies for wellbeing (e.g., academic, community, financial, physical, and social) students can implement as they navigate the university experience. prereq: Admitted to Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (BSHS)
CLI 1712 - Personal Development and Career Exploration
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding and application of their strengths. Strengths and personal values are explored in the context of both personal development and career exploration. Discussion of a wide variety of health careers prepares students to continue their career development in CLI 2713.
CLI 2522 - Community Collaboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The academic goal of this course is to extend the student learning experience into the local community. Responding to needs identified by local public, private, and nonprofit organizations, students will confront the challenges present in complex human systems and contribute to projects aimed at improving the quality of life in Southeastern Minnesota. In doing so, students participate in sustainable and meaningful partnerships between the University of Minnesota Rochester and the surrounding community. Students will also have the opportunity to build relationships with people of different backgrounds and life experiences, to broaden their worldview, to critically and creatively examine community concerns, and to discover their own capacity to affect change in the world around them.
CLI 2713 - Career Development and Career Skills in the Health Sciences
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course builds on the foundation of personal development and career exploration covered CLI 1712. Students apply their interests, skills, values and strengths to their selected health careers and their career decision making process. Students practice the career skills of networking, professionalism, resume and cover letter writing, and interviewing. prereq: 1712
ENGL 1433 - Introduction to Literature (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic techniques for analyzing/understanding literature and developing critical thinking skills. Readings of novels, short stories, poems, plays.
MATH 1161 - Introduction to Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration of statistical analysis in a health sciences context, using technology and active/peer learning. Build statistical inferences from scientific methods. Gather, sort, describe, arrange and construct visual representations of data sets and generate basic predictive models. Introduction to probability and data distributions, leading to inferential statistics. prereq: three years of high school math
PHIL 1431 - Introduction to Philosophy (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines historical and contemporary philosophical problems and introduces students to the standards for evaluating philosophical arguments. Some of the problems that may be examined include: the existence of god, the nature of knowledge, the relationship between the mind and the body, the nature of personal identity, and the problem of free will. Students gain an understanding of the nature and historical origin of these problems and learn to critically evaluate possible solutions to these problems.
PHYS 1251 - Physics I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An activity-based introductory physics course focused on concepts of motion, force, energy, fluid dynamics, and oscillating systems. The course develops problem solving skills through a systematic decision-making framework and develops knowledge through a formal disciplinary integration and application to biomedical and other real world application. The laboratory component enhances knowledge and promotes good experimental design, techniques, and technical writing. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [MATH 1111 or equiv] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1171 or equivalent] or MATH 2161
PUBH 2561 - Introduction to Public Health (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students acquire an understanding of the academic discipline of public health, major public health problems, and public health systems. The course examines core principles of public health, and provides opportunities to apply new knowledge to address complex population health problems both domestically and globally. Course activities promote critical thinking and integration of public health problems and solutions providing the tools to address population health issues that face individuals, our communities, and the world.
SOC 1571 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to foundational ideas and research techniques in sociology. Includes a critical engagement with core concepts, including the sociological imagination, socialization, culture, the interplay between individuals and institutions, and social stratification.
WRIT 1511 - Academic Writing: Summarizing & Persuading
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students explore writing across the disciplines with a focus on paragraph development. Students learn to summarize academic texts using signal phrases, develop cohesive persuasive paragraphs using cited material from academic texts, and use writing to reflect on their experiences. coreq: SOC 1571
WRIT 1512 - Academic Research & Scientific Writing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course focuses on writing in the sciences, academic research, and collaborative writing. Students actively read and analyze scientific writing, conduct and evaluate academic research, and respond to scientific ideas with well-developed arguments. Students also develop collaborate writing skills through a group project and explore using reflective writing to support their personal and academic growth. coreq: BIOL 2311
PHIL 1441 - Introduction to Ethics (CIV, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to basic ethical theories and examines several contemporary ethical problems. Some of the problems that may be examined include: income inequality, immigration, the right to die, the right to health care, civil disobedience, just war theory, paternalism, animal rights, and capital punishment. Students gain an understanding of the nature and historical origin of these problems and learn to critically evaluate possible solutions to these problems.
SOC 1641 - Social Justice and Ethical Decision Making (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Utilizes foundational sociological concepts to systematically explore the role of policies, regulations, values, norms, and social structures in reinforcing or undermining inequality. Students will exercise decision-making in the context of ethical dilemmas regarding inequality, stratification, research ethics, and biomedical ethics. Students will use reasoned arguments and evidence to support a position on an ethical issue.
COMM 2511 - Communication Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students learn the role of communication in the public's understanding of health. Students learn theories and practices of verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication and the impact of interpersonal, group, organizational, and scientific contexts on communication in order to analyze and create messages about health related topics. Students develop public speaking skills using presentation software.
COMM 2711 - Communication in Professional Contexts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students learn the role of communication skills for professionals in a health care context developing public speaking skills using presentation software. Students learn theories of communication and how to effectively communicate through verbal and nonverbal channels while exploring the role of interpersonal, group, and organizational communication in health care settings.
SPAN 1521 - Spanish I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
A communicative approach for beginners to grammar and vocabulary within the context of daily life in both personal and professional interactions. Focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in culturally and situationally appropriate ways. Includes an initial exploration of Spanish within the healthcare environment. Students should expect to build their knowledge bank with a large amount of vocabulary necessary to form meaningful conversations. Lecture is limited; class time is spent primarily in small group practice.Taught utilizing student-centered, active learning and writing-integrated approaches. Students who have previously studied Spanish are expected to take the placement exam before enrolling in a course.
SPAN 1522 - Spanish II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
A communicative approach to grammar and vocabulary within the context of daily life and the healthcare environment in both personal and professional interactions. Focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in culturally and situationally appropriate ways. Students should expect to continue building their vocabulary knowledge bank and deepen their understanding of grammar structures. Lecture is limited; class time is spent primarily in small group practice.Taught utilizing student-centered, active learning and writing-integrated approaches. Students must have received at least a C- in Spanish 1521 or have placed into 1522 through the placement exam.
SPAN 2521 - Spanish III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
A communicative approach to grammar and vocabulary at the intermediate level within the context of the healthcare environment in both personal and professional interactions. Focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in culturally and situationally appropriate ways. Students should expect to review and deepen previously covered grammar structures and learn in-depth medical Spanish vocabulary. Lecture is limited; class time is spent primarily in small group practice.Taught utilizing student-centered, active learning and writing-integrated approaches. Students must have received at least a C- in Spanish 1522 or have placed into 2521 through the placement exam.
MATH 1110 - College Algebra with Physical Concepts (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The goals of this course are to strengthen fundamental quantitative reasoning skills and gain exposure to fundamental physical concepts by exploring topics including unit conversion; number sense; polynomial, rational, and exponential/logarithmic equations and expressions; introductory graphing; systems of equations and variation. Quantitative reasoning skills will be motivated by exposure to fundamental physical concepts. Students learn to simplify expressions and solve equations using mathematical and logical symbols and quantitative techniques, to communicate results clearly, and the importance of these skills to physical sciences. This course goes beyond the usual coverage in three-year high school mathematics curriculum. prereq: three yrs high school math
MATH 1111 - Precalculus with Physical Concepts (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The goal of this course is to make students proficient in quantitative reasoning skills relevant to fundamental algebra concepts, in depth treatment of functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential/logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, vectors, matrices and systems of equations with a focus on the use of physical sciences contexts. Students learn to model real world situations, graph, simplify expressions and solve equations using mathematical and logical symbols and quantitative techniques and communicate results clearly. This course goes beyond the usual coverage in three-year high school mathematics curriculum. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [MATH 1110 or equiv] or placement exam;
MATH 1171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential/integral calculus of a single variable. Optimization, numerical methods. Differential equations, graphing. Functions of several variables and Introduction to partial derivatives. Applications emphasize biology, health sciences, and integration of mathematical models. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1111 or placement exam or instr consent
MATH 2161 - Biostatistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Using real data, students will develop their conceptual understanding of statistical hypothesis testing and think critically about sampling techniques and experimental design. Students will choose appropriate hypothesis tests for research questions and correctly complete ANOVA tests, non-parametric tests, log/odds ratio tests, logistic regression and survival analysis. Students will use Microsoft Excel and make extensive use of SAS to perform the computational parts of hypothesis testing and produce meaningful graphical representations. Students will develop their ability and confidence to discuss statistics in groups, present findings and communicate results. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1161
MATH 2171 - Calculus, Modeling, and Data II (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Differential/integral calculus of a single variable. Sequences and series. Differential calculus of multiple variables. Systems of differential equations. Matrices. Phase plane analysis. Applications emphasize biology, health sciences, and integration of mathematical models. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1171 or placement exam
BIOC 3321 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students gain an appreciation for the breadth and depth of current knowledge in biochemistry through an active learning, student-centered approach. Students examine the structure of macromolecules essential to life (including proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates). This analysis gives special consideration to the manner in which molecular structure dictates function. Additionally, students examine the enzymatic pathways responsible for synthesis and degradation of macromolecules, the regulation of enzymes that catalyze these reactions, and the energy expended or produced during these processes. Such pathways include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle), lipid metabolism (beta-oxidation, lipid synthesis), and oxidative phosphorylation. Students apply these concepts to problem solving within the field, while also gaining confidence in his/her communication of biochemical principles through collaborative, team-based activities. prereq: BIOL 2311, CHEM 2231, and CHEM 2333; or instr consent
BIOL 3332 - Anatomy and Physiology II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course reviews and elaborates on the basic structure and function of body systems covered in BIOL 2331. Attention is given to understanding how those systems and concepts are related to higher order physiological phenomena such as: 1) Our ability to sense stimuli and respond (nervous system, endocrine system, lymphatic system and immune response); 2) The complex mechanisms/requirements for homeostatic regulation (relationship between nutrition and metabolism and water and ion balance in the human body); 3) Reproduction and fertility?. Case studies and laboratory activities incorporate problem solving and applications to health sciences within a student-centered, active learning environment. Strong emphasis on experimental design and execution. Analysis of data using statistical methods. prereq: grade of at least C- in 2331
BIOL 3311 - Genetics (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to genetic information, including molecular aspects of inheritance and disease; gene expression and regulation in cells/organisms; population genetics; mutation and molecular evolution; genome organization; gene databases; and pedigree analysis. Incorporates ethical, social and legal perspectives relevant to advances in genetic technology and increasing availability of human genetic information. Taught utilizing student-centered, active learning and writing-integrated approaches. prereq: 2311, CHEM 1231, CHEM 2331
BIOL 3344 - Microbiology (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Microbiology examines the evolution, structure, physiology, metabolism and genetics of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Students also examine the dynamic impact of microbes on humans and the role of microbes in the environment. This course is taught using student-centered, active learning and writing integrated approaches. Students apply these concepts to problem solving within the field, while also gaining confidence in his/her communication of microbiology through collaborative, team-based assignments. In the accompanying laboratory, students gain exposure to and develop a variety of current microbiology techniques. prereq: grade of at least C- in [2311 or equiv], [CHEM 1231 or equiv], [MATH 1110 or equiv]
BIOL 4312 - Advanced Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology and Genetics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of the synthesis, function, and regulation of biological molecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins). Examination of the structure of chromosomes and genes and the processes of gene regulation involving DNA replication, transcription, translation, and epigenetic modification. Emphasis placed on the molecular basis of cell function including cellular communication, transport, secretion pathways, movement and more. The course is delivered through an active learning, student-centered and writing-intensive approach. Laboratory exercises maximize student exposure to an array of techniques dealing with DNA, RNA, and proteins while addressing a novel hypothesis. prereq: 3311
BIOL 4342 - Neuroscience
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Investigation into principles of brain function from neurons to behaviors within the context of current technological advances in studies of the brain and nervous system. prereq: 2331; [2332 or 3311 or BIOC 3321]; or instr consent
BIOL 4364 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immunology explores the general properties of the human immune system including: the structure, function, and origin of participating tissues and cells, the general mechanism of the innate and adaptive immune systems, and the development and deployment of self vs non-self. A multidisciplinary lens is used to examine the social, ethical and historical perspectives of the immune system through specific cases of disease relevant to the health sciences and prevention of disease through vaccination. prereq: 3332 or 3344 or BIOC 3321
CHEM 4331 - Chemical Biology/Bioorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include: Chemical control of signal transduction; Polyketide biosynthesis; Non-natural amino acid insertion into proteins (in vivo nonsense suppression); Non-ribosomal peptides; Organic chemistry of polymerase chain reaction; Protein backbone modification - secondary structure stabilization; Chemical biology of fluorescent proteins. DNA binding antibiotics; DNA backbone modification; RNAi; Cell surface engineering through oligosaccharide biosynthesis. prereq: C- or better in 2231; Recommended BIOC 3321
CHEM 4333 - Physical Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: &MATH 2171, [Grade of at least C- in [2333], [PHYS 2251], [MATH 1171]];
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Statistical mechanics to understand macroscopic description of chemical phenomena: molecular energy levels, Boltzmann factor and partition functions. Chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, liquid-liquid solutions and chemical equilibria. Introduction to molecular spectroscopy. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2171, [Grade of at least C- in [2333], [PHYS 2251], [MATH 1171]];
ENGL 3471 - Gender and Sexuality Studies (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores a variety of theories of gender and sexuality; the literary and media representations of gender and sexuality (both contemporary and historical); and the embodiment, performance and construction of gender and sexual identities. The ethical, social, and political dimensions of gender- and heteronormativity and the role of power in theories and manifestations of gender and sexuality are considered. prereq: 1433 or HIST 1435 or HUM 1437 or PHIL 1441
ENGL 3481 - Society, Science, and Science Fiction (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/contemporary analysis of science and technology and their representation in literary, cinematic, and/or multimedia science fiction. Course will explore how science/technology figures creation of socio-cultural values and truth production, and may include, but is not limited to, the cultural, psychological, historical, and literary perspectives. Course is discussion-based and project-centered. prereq: 1433 or HIST 1435 or HUM 1437 or PHIL 1441
PHIL 3437 - History and Philosophy of Science (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of several historical and contemporary philosophical problems that arise within the context of scientific practice. Problems may include: the nature of scientific explanation, the problem of induction, the problem of demarcation, the role of laws and models in scientific theorizing, the social responsibilities of scientists, and scientific realism. Students gain an understanding of the nature and historical origin of these problems and learn to critically evaluate possible solutions to these problems. prereq: sophomore status or above
PHIL 3441 - Ethics of Medicine and the Sciences (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines several contemporary ethical problems that arise within the context of medicine and scientific research. Some of the problems that may be examined include: the social responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies, the role of the family in medical-decision making, cognitive enhancement, the proper payment for research participation, direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceutical drugs, empathy and medical professionalism, and the permissibility of religious conscientious objection. Students will gain an understanding of the nature and historical origin of these problems and learn to critically evaluate possible solutions to these problems. prereq: 1441 or instr consent
PSY 3510 - Human Development across the Lifespan
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course emphasizes the diverse cultural, social, socioeconomic, and historical contexts of human development throughout the lifespan and explores how these contexts directly influence biosocial, cognitive and psychosocial aspects human development. The course covers the basic principles of human development including: major paradigms, research methods, the sequences and processes of development, and the joint contributions of biological and environmental influences. prereq: 1511
PSY 3512 - Principles of Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Abnormal psychology is the study of the classification, explanation and treatment of abnormal phenomena and mental disorder. This course focuses on the major concepts and controversies in the field. We consider how abnormality is defined and classified, and how the biological, psychological, and sociocultural paradigms contribute to understanding and treating individuals with mental disorders. The multicausality of mental disorder is understood using a diathesis-stress model. Common types of mental disorders are covered with an emphasis on the phenomenology of the disorder (i.e., what it is like to have the disorder), the biopsychosocial causes of the disorder, and the major treatment approaches. Attention is given to appreciating the impact of abnormal mental phenomena on the sufferer and their loved ones, and examining the values and ethics that apply to working with people with mental disorder. prereq: 1511
PSY 4512 - Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social Psychology is the scientific study of how peoples' thoughts, feelings, and actions can influence and/or be influenced by others. This course covers topics that include, but are not limited to: research methods, ethics, and classic as well as contemporary research on topics including social influence and social cognition, self and person perception, attitude formation and change, prejudice and stereotypes, aggression and conflict, helping and prosocial behavior. pre-requ: 1511;
PUBH 3531 - Health Policy & Systems (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students explore health policy as it shapes the lives and health of people and populations locally, nationally, and globally. Students use policy analysis frameworks and evidence-based resources to learn the many dimensions of public health and health policy. Attention is paid to policy at multiple levels, from local policies to national to global policies impacting health outcomes. Students examine the creation, implementation, and impact of health policy through a ?health in all policies? lens. Students address the challenge of meeting the needs of target populations with often different, and conflicting, viewpoints. prereq: 2561
PUBH 3561 - Environmental Health and Environmental Justice (ENV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines environmental health issues and the complex challenges that occur within our communities that affect human health. Examination of environmental health at a micro level--investigating problems that occur within the Rochester community--to understand macro concepts. Includes community engagement with learning opportunities to assess current and past environmental conditions throughout the Rochester, MN area. Themes for this course include neighborhood-churning, food, water, air, and waste while investigating corresponding environmental justice issues that contribute to negative health outcomes. Incorporates a variety of hands-on engaged community learning in partnership with community stakeholders with in-class activities and field trip experiences. This ?hands-on? learning in our community encourages critical reflection for students to reconcile personal ideals with new knowledge and skills. prereq: 2561
PUBH 4561 - Introduction to Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course examines epidemiologic concepts to introduce students to the systematic methods of disease discovery, control and prevention. Students looks at procedures of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, injuries, disability, and mortality in populations. Application of epidemiologic methods investigate the control of conditions such as infectious and chronic diseases, mental disorders, community and environmental health hazards, and unintentional injuries. This course discusses the broader contexts of how epidemiological methods assist in identifying and solving public health issues. prereq: 2561, MATH 1161
SOC 3571 - Drugs and Society (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course investigates a variety of causal factors for drug use, including environmental and biological, and situate these within their social, historical, and cultural contexts. Topics include drug use across cultures; social responses to drug use; drug use and race/class conflict; drug policy, legislation, and enforcement; drug treatment; mass media images of drug use and related activities. prereq: sophomore status or above
SOC 3581 - Medical Sociology and Technology (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Exploration of the complicated interplay among health, illness, disease, health care systems, technology, biomedical science, and society. This course utilizes the sociological perspective to investigate the personal, social, cultural, and organizational, and technological issues that influence the health of people in the United States and globally. Topics include the role that society plays in the development of medical technologies, as well as the impact of those technological developments on population health, individual health, and the field of medicine. prereq: sophomore status or above
CLI 3712 - Capstone Proposal Writing
Credits: 2.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on all aspects of writing and submitting the Capstone Proposal for the BSHS degree. Students will propose a set of learning experiences which connect to a holistic theme. Capstone Proposals are reviewed by the CLI Faculty and must be approved before Capstone experiences can begin.
CLI 4713 - Capstone Reflections
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will complete this course in the final semester of their UMR capstone experience. This course integrates student life, the curriculum, and career exploration to facilitate student growth and professional development. The purpose of this course is to participate in, observe, analyze, and interpret students' capstone experiences. To illustrate growth, students will record their observations and analysis throughout the semester and present their capstone portfolio in a public presentation.