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Morris Campus

German Studies B.A.

Division of Humanities - Adm
Division of Humanities
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 40
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
This is an interdisciplinary program housed in the Division of the Humanities. The program is administered by the German studies coordinator and the chair of the Division of the Humanities. The German studies curriculum includes the language, literature, film, linguistics, history, and culture of German-speaking countries and Germanic languages. The courses are designed to enhance students' understanding of their own language and culture through introduction to another. Our courses expand students' ability to think by giving them a new tool with which to do so. The courses are carefully sequenced to incrementally increase student aptitude in the one skill upon which everything else they could possibly do or study relies: language. Expansion of thought in any field of study requires the acquisition of new language. Learning the German language provides students with direct access to the world's fourth largest economy as well as the sister economies of the other German-speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland). Additionally students gain intimate knowledge of a linguistic tradition and culture that has produced innovation in almost every field of study pursued on campus, thereby benefiting students regardless of their main area of concentration. Objectives - Learning an entirely new linguistic idiom increases one's ability to think, and neurological studies have shown that it actually grows brain cells. Our primary goal is to enable students to become culturally competent. We have constructed the curriculum to increase students' confidence and social skills by capitalizing on their innate and extant ability to use language and by demonstrating to them that they can acquire another language, while also providing an understanding of language itself that will enable them to acquire further languages. The intellectual and practical skills enable students to gain a deeper understanding of the roles of individuals in society, as well as building upon their capacity for integrative learning. Our program aims to provide students with opportunities that will enable them to directly apply newly acquired linguistic abilities, cultural knowledge, and social skills in their chosen area of study through study abroad, internships, and professional exchanges. Program Student Learning Outcomes • Students will be able to understand the main idea and most supporting details of written or listening texts in the target language. • Students will be able to express themselves, in speaking and in writing, in the past, present, and future in the target language. • Students will be able to interpret cultural artifacts, texts, and films with accuracy, demonstrating knowledge of the target cultures that produced them. • Students’ work will reflect an awareness of their own cultural biases and articulate the inherent complexities, worldviews, and values of other cultures. • Students will be able to locate, apply, and cite effective secondary materials in their own work. Study Abroad In light of today's increasingly interdependent world, the German faculty strongly encourages study abroad in combination with a German Studies major or minor.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of German. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Elective plans must be designed to ensure that there is sufficient depth of coverage in the chosen German studies electives. For many students, a double-major (or minor) in a closely related disciplinary major is desirable. For some majors, electives can be selected in such a way that many of the courses in a coherent German studies elective plan also count toward the second major. An advising sheet for recommended course combinations and areas of focus is available. In addition to the requirements for the major, students are encouraged to complete at least one year of instruction in another foreign language. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S/N unless offered S/N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
GER 2001 - Intermediate German I [IP] (4.0 cr)
GER 2002 - Intermediate German II [IP] (4.0 cr)
GER 3001 - Advanced German Grammar [IP] (4.0 cr)
GER 4901 - German Studies Capstone (2.0-4.0 cr)
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
Selection of Elective Courses
Other elective courses, not listed below, may be appropriate to add depth and provide more theoretical context for the German studies coursework (requires written approval of the course instructor and the program coordinator). All or most elective credits should be from upper division (3xxx or 4xxx) courses.
Elective Courses
Take a total of 20 elective credits for the major. Take 12 or more credits from courses taught in German. An additional 8 credits may come from courses taught in English.
Take exactly 20 credit(s) from the following:
Electives Taught in German
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GER 3101 - Introduction to German Literature and Culture [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3602 - Scandinavian Literature 20th and 21st Century Novel [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3701 - The Red Army Faction in German Literature [IP] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3702 - Martial Masculinities: Manhood and Aggression in German Literature and Culture [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· GER 4001 - German Civilization I [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Electives Taught in English
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3132 - Castles and Cathedrals [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3201 - Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3211 - Modern European Art from Impressionism to Surrealism [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3222 - History of Twentieth-Century Design [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3274 - Modern Art in Germany [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3021 - Grammar and Language [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4004 - Research Seminar: Old English Literature and Language (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4002 - Existentialism [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 2103 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome [FA] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
 
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· Division of Humanities

View sample plan(s):
· German Studies B.A. Sample Plan

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· German Studies B.A.
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GER 2001 - Intermediate German I (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The skills of listening, reading, and writing are enhanced through grammar review while exploring several different cities in German-speaking lands and their history and cultural heritage. Course improves students' listening, speaking and writing abilities through guided readings including assignments on the internet relevant to topics such as geography, history, and culture. prereq: 1002 or placement or instr consent
GER 2002 - Intermediate German II (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Builds on existing German skills by exploring several different cities in German-speaking lands along with their history and cultural heritage. The course further improves students listening, speaking and writing abilities through grammar review and guided readings including assignments on the internet relevant to topics such as geography, history, and culture. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
GER 3001 - Advanced German Grammar (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GER 3001/GER 3333
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reinforce and review entirety of German Grammar at an advanced level to competently approach reading and writing assignments in advanced German courses while gaining a detailed knowledge of grammar. prereq: 2002 or instr consent; may enroll concurrently with 3xxx-4xxx
GER 4901 - German Studies Capstone
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A substantial scholarly or creative work (at the undergraduate level) in conjunction with or upon the completion of another course within the discipline. The capstone is required for German Studies majors. prereq: 3011 or instr consent
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of German history from the development of German national ideas through unification and consolidation of the modern German state in 1871 and through its re-unification at the end of the 20th century. Examines one of the most fascinating and tumultuous periods in German and European history, why the attempt to understand the German past has occupied so many historians, and why the debates surrounding that attempt have been so contentious. Sources include writings by established historians of Germany, novels, films, and music.
GER 3101 - Introduction to German Literature and Culture (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces German culture through a variety of texts and media (music, film, etc.) throughout all periods of German literature with the aim of building reading, writing, and listening skills. prereq: 2002 or instr consent
GER 3602 - Scandinavian Literature 20th and 21st Century Novel (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
An introduction to the modern Scandinavian novel, including works from Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, and Finnish authors. This course is taught in English.
GER 3701 - The Red Army Faction in German Literature (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of the historical background surrounding the turbulent era of student protest in Germany and subsequent formation of the terrorist organization, the Red Army Faction. This course is only offered in German. prereq: Ger 3xxx course or instr consent
GER 3702 - Martial Masculinities: Manhood and Aggression in German Literature and Culture (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of masculinity in German-speaking lands by exploring history, literature, film, and graphic art from a theoretical perspective with particular focus on patterns of representation that define and shape "manliness" from the medieval to the modern era.
GER 4001 - German Civilization I (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course facilitates effective engagement with the history and culture of German-speaking countries and. This is a lecture style course taught entirely in German to improve listening, speaking, and writing abilities as well as to prepare for a study abroad experience. prereq: 3001 or equiv
ARTH 3132 - Castles and Cathedrals (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
An investigation of the two major forms of architectural construction in the Middle Ages. Exploration of the development of the cathedral and castle as architectural forms and examination of the circumstances surrounding their evolution through the medieval period. Examples are drawn from continental Europe, the British Isles, and the Levant. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or instr consent
ARTH 3201 - Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of major movements from Neoclassicism through Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism, considering these in their theoretical, historical, social, and artistic contexts. The course also highlights issues of class, imperialism/colonialism, and gender. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3211 - Modern European Art from Impressionism to Surrealism (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of major modern movements including Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, Dada, Constructivism and Surrealism, considering these in their theoretical, historical, social, and artistic contexts. Particular attention is given to modern art's relationship to popular culture and to issues of gender and race. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3222 - History of Twentieth-Century Design (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of key styles, works, individuals, and issues in twentieth-century European and American design history. Considers themes including handcraft, industrial and mass production, standardization, planned obsolescence, sustainability, and globalization, as well as colonialism, gender, and race in modern and postwar design. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or junior status or instr consent
ARTH 3274 - Modern Art in Germany (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of modern art in Germany from the late 19th century through WWII, examining many important movements, tendencies, figures, and issues. It includes the Secessions, Die Brücke, Blue Rider, Dada, the Bauhaus, New Vision, and New Objectivity and studies painting, photography, film, and design. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ENGL 3021 - Grammar and Language (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of the English language. Historical development and current structure. Includes language variation and change, social history of language, phonology, syntax, semantics, development of English grammar, prescriptive versus descriptive grammar, and contemporary theories of grammar.
ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the major schools of literary theory and cultural analysis; particular attention to the ways in which the dialogue and debate between these approaches define the discipline of literary criticism. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 4004 - Research Seminar: Old English Literature and Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: two from 31xx-35xx, #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Prose and poetry of early medieval England (650-1100) in translation and in Old English (which is studied), with attention to material (manuscripts) and cultural contexts and to reception history. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The intellectual ferment of the Enlightenment has been given the credit and the blame for all things modern--from the concept of human rights and the democracies it has engendered to the subversion of those rights in the totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Exploration of the ideas of the Enlightenment and their political context and attempt to answer the question of how such an important development in human history can be viewed in such contradictory ways.
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
PHIL 4002 - Existentialism (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of some prominent thinkers often classified as "existentialists": Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus. Topics include what human freedom is, what makes a life authentic (or inauthentic), what role passion and choice should play in acquiring our beliefs and values, and what difference (if any) God's existence or non-existence makes on the significance of our lives. prereq: any 1xxx or 2xxx or instr consent
ARTH 2103 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or sophomore status or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
In-depth study of Roman art and archaeology beginning with the Villanovans and Etruscans and ending with the rise of Early Christian art. Focus on the public and political art of the various emperors. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or sophomore status or instr consent
HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of fairy tales and folklore in European history from the early modern era to the present, with a primary emphasis on tracing changes in the social and cultural use of fairy tales over time. Sources drawn from a diverse corpus of tales and retellings, as well as scholarly interpretations from historians, ethnographers, and folklorists. Explores key developments, such as the transformation of 17th-century French tales written as political allegory into the Grimms' 19th-century reinvention of the fairy tale as a staple of middle-class childhood. Other topics may include the oral tradition and literacy; changing ideas about gender, class, and religion; and themes of violence, nationalism, and sexuality.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.