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Twin Cities Campus

Nutrition Minor

Food Science & Nutrition
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 24 to 27
The nutrition minor gives students a basic understanding of human nutritional needs through two required core courses. Based on the elective courses chosen, students may focus on either a community nutrition emphasis or a nutritional science emphasis. However, students are not restricted to taking courses in one emphasis.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Prerequisite Coursework
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Biochemistry prerequisites for minor courses
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
or PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
or ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
Some of the courses listed in the minor have prerequisites that do not count toward the 13 to 15 credits.
Minor Courses
The nutrition minor gives students a basic understanding of human nutritional needs through two required core courses. Based on the elective courses chosen, students may focus on either a community nutrition emphasis or a nutritional science emphasis. However, students are not restricted to taking courses in one emphasis.
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition [TS] (3.0 cr)
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3.0 cr)
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture [GP] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 4612W - Advanced Human Nutrition [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FSCN 4613 - Experimental Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 4621 - Nutrition and Metabolism (4.0 cr)
· FSCN 4622 - Nutritional Toxicology, the basic science of diet-related toxicants (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences


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· Nutrition Minor
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CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3050/Phsl 3051
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/AnSc 3303W/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Functions of major systems in mammals. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular system, respiration, renal system. Endocrinology/metabolism. Blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course. Biol 1009 or equivalent is strongly recommended.
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/AnSc 3303W/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, and food sources. We will learn about evaluating nutrition information and food safety, and investigate the role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment. Nutrition is both a science and social science. This class involves social aspects, but mainly concerns the biochemistry and physiology of how food is processed in the body. The chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism especially built on biology and physiology. Course topics include: 1. essential nutrients (macro-and-micro-nutrients) needed from the diet; 2. major functions of nutrients and physiological changes with deficiency or excess; 3. digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; 4. weight management; 5. scientific method and nutrition; 6. life cycle issues; 7. food safety issues 8. nutrition for sports Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
FSCN 3612 focuses on nutritional requirements and common issues during different stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adulthood, and aging. There are no required courses for this class; however, it is best to take a basic nutrition class beforehand, such as FSCN 1112 Principles of Nutrition or an equivalent.
FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is a fun, hands-on cooking class. It is also an Experiential Learning (EL) course which meets the EL requirement for all CFANS students. This lecture /lab format course will give students the confidence to cook healthful whole foods as they learn about the food system. Subject matter will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective. Concepts covered include fundamental concepts of nutrition, food sources, food safety, the food system; skills/resources for food choices based on nutritional, environmental, local and global societal implications. We will examine the ethical and civic themes that guide food choices. We will discuss and write about how environmental, cultural, social, and health issues impact personal food choices. prereq: [soph, jr, sr] or instructor consent
FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Account of traditional and contemporary food customs and culture. Practice of food choice, preparation, and preservation in the context of worldview, perspectives on diet and health, and belief systems of communities and societies around the world. Major emphasis on US cultures including Native American, Hispanic American, European American, African American, and Asian American. Development of cultural self-understanding and intercultural awareness via food and food habits-related experiences and reflections.
FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effective communication and counseling skills are essential for all food and nutrition professionals, whether working in clinical, community, or food service settings. This course will teach necessary concepts and skills for entry-level dietitians, such as educational theory, basic counseling techniques, and health disparities and health literacy. You will develop skills and explore these concepts through application: by practicing in small group breakout sessions and by completing written assignments. You will also reflect on the nature of dietetics as a helping profession and your role in supporting clients who want to make lifestyle changes. There are no required prerequisites courses for FSCN 3614. However, it is recommended that students take an introductory nutrition course, such as FSCN 1112 (Principles of Nutrition) or equivalent in order to be prepared.
FSCN 4612W - Advanced Human Nutrition (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of digestion/absorption of nutrients. Research techniques in nutrition, including human/epidemiological studies. Health promotion, disease prevention theories. Non-Enforced Prerequisites: FSCN 1112, CHEM 1062 and CHEM 1066 Enforced Prerequisites (students cannot register without the following): BioC 3021 or PHSL 3051 or ANSC 3301 or BIOL 3211 or Instructor Consent
FSCN 4613 - Experimental Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is a laboratory course focused on biochemical methods for determining nutritional status. This course uses biological samples from the students themselves as the source material. In this course, students will develop a better understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the biochemical methods, as well as the principles behind the procedures and instruments used. Students will also expand their nutrition knowledge, improve their lab skills, develop their scientific writing abilities, and exercise their problem solving skills Prerequisites: BIOC 3021, STAT 3011, Nutrition Major, or Instructor Consent
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
FSCN 4621 - Nutrition and Metabolism
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Carbohydrate, lipid, protein metabolism. Uses systems/holistic approach to emphasize how metabolic pathways interrelate. Prequisite courses: FSCN 4612, BIOC 3021, ANSC 3301
FSCN 4622 - Nutritional Toxicology, the basic science of diet-related toxicants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSCN 4622/Nutr 5627
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of toxicology. Molecular mechanism behind dietary chemical-induced toxicities. Impact/risk of dietary chemicals for human health. prereq: BIOC 3021; designed for students majoring in [nutrition or food science or toxicology ]