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Twin Cities Campus

Family Violence Prevention Minor

School of Social Work
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
  • n/a
The family violence prevention minor is a 15-credit undergraduate program for students interested in strengthening their educational experience with a research base and a set of practical skills in family violence prevention. It is an intensive, interdisciplinary learning experience for students in any field of study. Courses are in fields related to social services, education, health care, and other direct services addressing issues related to child abuse and neglect, adult domestic violence, elder abuse, and inter-generational abuse. Students learn theories and research related to violent behavior, examine relationships between violence in society and violence within families, and explore different professional responses to violence. Elective courses provide the opportunity to integrate these concepts into further study within a major, or in other fields of interest.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Minor Courses
SW 3701 - Introduction to Child Maltreatment: Intervention and Prevention (3.0 cr)
SW 3702 - Introduction to Adult Intimate Partner Violence: Intervention and Prevention (3.0 cr)
SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
Elective Courses
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· YOST 4322 - Work with Youth: Families (2.0 cr)
· AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5211 {Inactive} (2.0-3.0 cr)
· FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3415 - Feminist Perspectives on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research and Application (2.0 cr)
· SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4109 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3101H - Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Family Violence Prevention Sample Plan

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· Family Violence Prevention Minor
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SW 3701 - Introduction to Child Maltreatment: Intervention and Prevention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Child abuse/neglect as form of family violence. Prevalence, scope, dynamics, responses, and prevention strategies. Individual, familial, and community analyses using ecological perspective and risk/resilience framework.
SW 3702 - Introduction to Adult Intimate Partner Violence: Intervention and Prevention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories, research, intervention, and prevention strategies regarding violence against women and the abuse of vulnerable adults in the United States. Issues of gender, race, culture, age, physical ability, SES, and sexual orientation. Includes service learning.
SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on violence in intimate domestic relationships examined through multiple lenses. Overview of interventions in Minnesota, United States, and other societies.
YOST 4322 - Work with Youth: Families
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01197
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories /techniques of working with youth and their families. Emphasizes practical methods of structural change, developing effective communication, decision-making and problem-solving systems, winning the family's cooperation. Role of professional in influencing healthy family development. prereq: 1001 or 2002W or instr consent
AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course on the critical thought of Black intellectual-activists and others enmeshed in the struggles for the radical transformation of U.S. democracy. Introduces the following three leaders and activists--Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X--whose work in the building of the Black freedom movement spanned the period from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Course proposition is that their life and times in the struggle for liberation offer important insights into the transformation of the U.S. political economy from the welfare/warfare state to the neoliberal state. These intellectual-activists, as well as others who translate their radical traditions through Black-Brown and Afro-Asian solidarity projects (e.g. Grace Lee Boggs of Detroit) have responded to racial formation in the U.S. and presented not just visions of liberation but concrete alternatives at the grassroots to usher in a more just, egalitarian, and ethical society.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
AFRO 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02383
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Gender/sexual violence to poststructural, anti-racist theories and debates about social construction of sexuality. How intimacy and violence are co-constituted within normative frameworks of U.S. governmentality. Writings by black feminist criminologists who have linked incarceration, welfare reform, and other forms of state regulation to deeply systemic forms of violence against people of color.
FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Couple dynamics. Overview of how to develop, maintain, and terminate an intimate relationship. Communication, conflict resolution, power, roles. Programs for marriage preparation, marriage enrichment, and marital therapy.
FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00758 - FSoS 3104/FSOS 4102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Perspectives on family dynamics of various racial/ethnic populations in the United States/other countries in context of national/international economic, political, and social processes. prereq: at least Soph or instr consent
FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3426/5426
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychology/sociology of drug use/abuse. Life-span, epidemiological, familial, cultural data regarding use. Fundamentals of licit/illicit drug use behavior. Variables of gender, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, sexual orientation, disability.
GWSS 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02383
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Gender/sexual violence to poststructural, anti­racist theories/debates about social construction of sexuality. How intimacy/violence are co­-constituted within normative frameworks of U.S. governmentality. Writings by black feminist criminologists who have linked incarceration, welfare reform, other forms of state regulation to deeply  systemic forms of violence against people of color.
GWSS 3415 - Feminist Perspectives on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of and contemporary thinking about public policies and legal remedies directed toward domestic violence and sexual assault. How notions of public/private spheres and social constructions of gender roles, agency, and bodies contribute to attitudes/responses.
JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00352 - Hist 3727/JwSt 3520/RelS 3520
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians.
PUBH 3123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research and Application
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will cover a range of topics including: definitions and characteristics of various forms of violence, prevalence and risk factors, health effects, and prevention initiatives. Sources and limitations of existing epidemiologic data, analytic challenges, research quality and ethics will be examined throughout the course. prereq: None
SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02107 - Soc 3101/Soc 3101H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3101H - Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02107 - Soc 3101/Soc 3101H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors