Morris campus
 
Morris Campus

Social Science B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2015
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54 to 60
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Objectives--Students will understand how each social science discipline structures and advances knowledge, raises and answers analytical questions, and deals with competing theories and the changing nature of the field. Students develop a sub-plan in a single discipline or an interdisciplinary social science area within the major.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to take 2 semester(s) of any second language.
Students work closely with their advisers to plan a program that satisfies the required competencies in a chosen sub-plan and in the social science disciplines. The sub-plan most often is demonstrated by completing the minor in that discipline. Program plans must be on file with the Social Sciences Division Office by the completion of a student's junior year. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses for the major and in the sub-plan may not be taken S-N, unless offered S-N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
While the programs of individual students may vary, based upon arrangements approved by the divisional committee for the social science major, the minimum competencies required for each discipline normally may be achieved by completion of the following courses and a sub-plan:
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
GEOG 2001 - Problems in Geography [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology [SS] (4.0 cr)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or Equivalent proficiency in statistics approved by the divisional committee for the social science major.
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans. (Note for the Twin Cities and Morris campuses: The honors sub-plan does not meet this requirement. Honors students are required to complete one sub-plan plus the honors sub-plan. Please see an adviser if no honors sub-plan is listed for the program.)
Anthropology
This sub-plan requires a total of 20 credits.
Required Courses
ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
ANTH 2103 - Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
ANTH 4411 - Seminar in Anthropological Methodology [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
An additional 8 credits (exclusive of those used to complete required courses) in anthropology and sociology; 4 of which must be in courses 2xxx or above. No more than 4 credits can be from SOC courses. No more than 4 credits can be from IS 3796.
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1812 - Human Societies: Past and Present, Fact and Fiction [IC] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1813 - Culture on TV: An Introduction to Anthropology [IC] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 1xxx
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2xxx
· SOC 1811 - Global Sociology: Migration, Economic Globalization, Class, and Gender Inequality [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1812 - Human Rights in the Age of Globalization [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1813 - Political Economy of "Natural" Disaster [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1814 - Water Unites, Water Divides: Sharing Water in the 21st Century [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1xxx
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2xxx
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3xxx
· ANTH 4501 - Archaeological Fieldschool [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4xxx
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
· Sociology Electives
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3125 - Terrorism, Law, and the State [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3251 - African Americans [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4xxx
Economics
This sub-plan requires a total of 19 credits.
Required Courses
ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
Elective Courses
No more than 4 credits from each of the following can be applied to the sub-plan: ECON x993 - Directed Study ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ECON 3005 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics I [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3006 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics II [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3009 - Political Economy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3011 - Cost-Benefit Analysis [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3014 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior I [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3015 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior II [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3113 - Money, Banking, and Financial Markets [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3121 - Public Economics I [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3122 - Public Economics II [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3131 - Comparative Economic Systems [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3133 - Economics of China [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3134 - Cooperative Business Model [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3141 - Economic Development and Growth I [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3142 - Economic Development and Growth II [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3153 - Contemporary Global Economic Issues [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3211 - History of Economic Thought I [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3351 - Globalization: Examining India's Social and Economic Development [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3501 - Introduction to Econometrics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· ECON 3xxx
· ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4102 - Labor Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4111 - Mathematical Economics I (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4112 - Mathematical Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4121 - International Trade Theory (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4131 - International Finance (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4141 - Empirics of Economic Growth (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· ECON 4xxx
History
This sub-plan requires a total of 20 credits.
Electives
An additional 16 credits in history of which 12 credits are at 2xxx or above. There should be evidence of work in at least three (3) of the following areas: Asia, Europe, Middle East/Africa, Latin America, Native America/Indigenous, and United States. Directed Studies (X993) may be used in any of the areas if content is appropriate and approved by their major adviser.
Take 16 or more credit(s) including 3 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Geographical Areas - 1xxx
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
Asia
· HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Latin America
· HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction [IP] (4.0 cr)
· United States
· HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Geographical Areas - 2xxx or above
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Asia
· HIST 2551 - Modern Japan [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2552 - History of Modern China [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3557 - East Asia Since 1800 [IP] (4.0 cr)
· Europe
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3102 - Early Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3162 - The Scottish Enlightenment: Markets, Minds, and Morals [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3176 - Berlin as a Site of History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3177 - Virtue and Vice in Amsterdam: From the Golden Age to the Global Age [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3209 - Modern Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3211 - Modern France [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3213 - Modern Britain: Society, Culture and Politics [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Middle East/Africa
· HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Latin America
· HIST 2608 - History of Cuba: From Colony to Revolutionary State [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3601 - Great Books in Latin American History [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Native American/Indigenous
· HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2451 - The American West [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· United States
· HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2452 - Minnesota History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 [SS] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3353 - World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1974 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3455 - American Immigration [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3464 - History of Suburban America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
This sub-plan requires a total of 24 credits.
Required Courses
GWSS 1101 - Introduction to Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
An additional 16 or more credits from primary GWSS content courses, and up to 4 credits from partial GWSS content courses. Courses must be from at least three different disciplines. Note: Some of the courses carry prerequisites.
Primarily Gender, Women, and Sexuality Content
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3281 - Women and Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3155 - 20th-Century British Fiction (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3501 - Women's Issues in Contemporary German Culture [IP] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3001 - Troubling Genders in African Cinema [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3414 - Feminist Theory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3303 - Feminist Political Theory [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
Partial Gender, Women, and Sexuality Content
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form [ART/P] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· ENGL 2411 - Representations of American Indians in Popular and Academic Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3142 - The Rise of the Novel (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3154 - 19th-Century British Fiction (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3168 - Victorian Literature and Culture (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3444 - Holocaust Literature and Film [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4031 - Research Seminar: Renaissance Romance (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4034 - Research Seminar: The Adventure Novel in American and British Literature (4.0 cr)
· FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France [SS] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 1302 - French Cinema [IP] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema [IP] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3603 - Francophone Studies: Contes francophones (2.0 cr)
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Political Science
This sub-plan requires a total of 20 credits.
Elective Courses
An additional 16 credits (exclusive of those used to complete required courses); 8 of which must be in courses above 2xxx.
Elective Courses - 1xxx-2xxx
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 1101 - Introduction to Political Theory [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1401 - World Politics [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1xxx
· POL 2xxx
Elective Courses - 3xxx or above
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 2001 - Political Science Research Methods [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2262 - Power and Politics in American Cities and Communities [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2301 - Anarchy and Utopia [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2302 - Gandhi and the Politics of Resistance [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2354 - Political Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2401 - U.S. Foreign Policy [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2411 - Model United Nations [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2501 - East Asian Society and Politics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3201 - Legislative Process [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3211 - The American Presidency [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3251 - Political Participation and Voting Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3263 - Political Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3266 - Media and Politics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3302 - Islamic Political Thought [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3303 - Feminist Political Theory [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3351 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3352 - Modern Political Thought [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3451 - Comparative Foreign Policy (4.0 cr)
· POL 3453 - Russian Politics and Foreign Policy [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· POL 3504 - Latin American Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 3996 - Field Study in Political Science (1.0-16.0 cr)
· POL 3xxx
· POL 4205 - Seminar in American Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 4305 - Seminar in Political Theory (4.0 cr)
· POL 4405 - Seminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations (4.0 cr)
· POL 4xxx
Psychology
This sub-plan requires a total of 22 credits.
Required Courses
In addition to PSY 2001, students must complete at least one course from four of the five areas. One must be a designated lab course.
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Learning and Cognition
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
Biological and Comparative Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3201 - Comparative Psychology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3521 - Health Psychology (4.0 cr)
Personality and Clinical Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3302 - Personality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions (4.0 cr)
Developmental Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Social and Applied Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3502 - Psychology and Law (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3513 - Negotiation (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
Additional elective credits to total at least 22 credits in the psychology sub-plan (including required courses). Electives may be selected from any category above and the following:
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· IS 3800 - Practicum in Social Sciences (1.0-2.0 cr)
· POL 3263 - Political Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2112 - Psycholinguistics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 2612 - Environmental Psychology [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3315 - Parenting and Family Therapy (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3611 - History and Philosophy of Psychology [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3800 - Research Practicum (1.0-12.0 cr)
· PSY 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4770 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4771 - Independent Research in Psychology (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PSY 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· STAT 3601 - Data Analysis [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3611 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Sociology
This sub-plan requires a total of 20 credits.
Required Courses
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
No more than 4 credits of the 12 elective credits required for the sub-plan can be from ANTH courses. No more than 4 cr can be from IS 3796. SOC 4991 is strongly recommended.
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· ANTH 2103 - Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2xxx
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3xxx
· ANTH 4411 - Seminar in Anthropological Methodology [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4901 - Seminar in Anthropological Theory (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4xxx
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 1811 - Global Sociology: Migration, Economic Globalization, Class, and Gender Inequality [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1812 - Human Rights in the Age of Globalization [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1813 - Political Economy of "Natural" Disaster [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 1814 - Water Unites, Water Divides: Sharing Water in the 21st Century [IC] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2xxx
· SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3125 - Terrorism, Law, and the State [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3251 - African Americans [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4991 - Sociology Independent Project Seminar (4.0 cr)
· SOC 4xxx
Management
This sub-plan requires a total of 18 credits.
Required Courses
MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I (4.0 cr)
MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II (2.0 cr)
Elective Courses
No more than 4 credits from each of the following can be applied to the sub-plan: ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management MGMT x993 - Directed Study
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MGMT 3101 - Financial Management [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3102 - Financial Institutions [SS] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3123 - Managerial Economics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3133 - Managerial Accounting (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3134 - Cooperative Business Model (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3141 - Business Law I (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3142 - Business Law II (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3151 - Human Resources Management I [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3152 - Human Resources Management II [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3161 - Labor Management Relations I [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3162 - Labor Management Relations II [SS] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3171 - Leadership in Organizations [SS] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3201 - Marketing Principles and Strategy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3221 - Management and Organization Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3351 - Globalization: Examining India's Social and Economic Development [IP] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3352 - Emerging Markets in Asia [IP] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3501 - Applied Deterministic Modeling for Management Science (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3502 - Applied Probabilistic Modeling for Management Science (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3503 - Consumer Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3513 - Negotiation (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3601 - Transnational Enterprise [IP] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· MGMT 3xxx
· MGMT 4101 - Investment and Portfolio Analysis (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4201 - The Economics of Corporate Strategy I (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4202 - The Economics of Corporate Strategy II (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4501 - Globalization and Business Strategy (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4502 - Technological Change, Labor Market, and Skill Formation (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4505 - International Managerial Finance (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4601 - Advanced Topics in Financial Economics (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4602 - Long-Term Financing (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4603 - Working Capital Management (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4896 - Internship (1.0-4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· MGMT 4xxx
 
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· Division of Social Sciences

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· Anthropology
· Economics
· History
· Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
· Political Science
· Psychology
· Sociology
· Management

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· Social Science B.A.
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ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic economic problems, concepts, and theoretical models. U.S. economic institutions and the economic organization of society. The role of markets in the production and distribution of societal resources. Measurement of economic performance; national income, inflation, and unemployment; competing macroeconomic theories and stabilization policies. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
GEOG 2001 - Problems in Geography (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts and questions in the field of geography. The terminology and approaches of geographical inquiry and analysis, with emphasis on the spatial patterns and arrangements of human interaction with the landscape and the production of geographical knowledge.
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01803 - Hist 1101/Hist 1102/Hist 1111
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of world history.
HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of the history of the United States.
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the science of mind and behavior. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, biological bases for behavior, life span development, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive and social processes, personality, psychopathology, and applications of psychology.
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of sociology, the exploration of societies, and how societies operate. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, guides analytical thinking, and develops writing skills. By actively thinking about issues facing societies today, students learn to examine life situations and the influence of societies and groups on people's lives, careers, hopes, fears, and personalities. Emphasis on how society is stratified: how organizations and institutions influence the way people think, talk, feel, and act and how different groups (e.g., racial and ethnic) and divisions (e.g., gender and social class) within society have different access to power and privilege. People live their lives in relation to social and physical environments; sociologists study these environments and their effects on people's experiences and behavior.
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2103 - Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies. (two 65-minute lectures, one 120-minute lab session)
ANTH 4411 - Seminar in Anthropological Methodology (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
Exploration and evaluation of methods used in cultural anthropology; qualitative methods; research ethics; and design of qualitative research project. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc
ANTH 1812 - Human Societies: Past and Present, Fact and Fiction (IC)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Consider fictional representations of human societies in the fantasy, science fiction, and alternate history genres. Compare these to ethnographic and archaeological readings, exploring the diversity of human societies, all around the world, from our earliest human ancestors through the modern era, with particular focus on social/political structures, gender roles, religion, and ethnicity. Consider what factors most strongly affect the structure of human societies, how these are or are not reflected in fiction, and how fiction reflects the authors' beliefs of what constitute the fundamental aspects of humankind, human personalities, and human societies. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
ANTH 1813 - Culture on TV: An Introduction to Anthropology (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
Typically offered: 9T
Introduction to basic anthropological concepts using popular depictions of "culture" and anthropology in the media, specifically, in reality TV. Students watch clips or episodes of TV shows like "Cops," "Sister Wives," "Run's House," and "Deadliest Catch." These serve as a springboard to critical engagement with anthropological concerns and concepts like cultural relativism, ethics of research and entertainment, religion, gift exchange, sexuality, gender, marriage, and kinship. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues. prereq: some academic background or knowledge about gender and sexuality is recommended
ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by cultural anthropologists to study and understand educational processes. Exploration of approaches to diverse educational settings, including both formal and informal contexts. The seminar-style format of the course emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to connect the readings and course topics to their own lives and experiences.
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
SOC 1811 - Global Sociology: Migration, Economic Globalization, Class, and Gender Inequality (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of the global impact of migration on both societies receiving immigrants and societies from which people emigrate, the effect of economic globalization, class and gender inequality. A major goal of the course is to provide students with a systematic way of making sense of a rapidly changing and complex world. Learn from sociological perspectives what it means to live in an interdependent world. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1812 - Human Rights in the Age of Globalization (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Exploration of the relationship between globalization and human rights. Globalization as the driving force of capitalism has produced both positive and negative impacts on human rights. Optimists argue that integration into the global world of the free market will foster democracy and human rights, while critics challenge this optimism. Explores these contradictory views and processes. The course is interdisciplinary and integrates perspectives and concepts from different academic fields. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1813 - Political Economy of "Natural" Disaster (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examine the political economy of natural disasters through a survey of events drawn from around the world. Disasters can be viewed from multiple social perspectives (economic, political, ecological, and personal) and each of these carries implicit and explicit political judgments about how the environment should be managed. The following events offer rich documentation (academic and popular media) about the impact of governmental decisions prior to and in the aftermath of each event: famine-South Asian famine of 1770s, earthquake-Haiti 2010, deforestation/erosion-Nepal 1970s, hurricane-Katrina 2005, flood-Johnstown Flood of 1889, tsunami-South Asian tsunami of 2004. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1814 - Water Unites, Water Divides: Sharing Water in the 21st Century (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
With the effects of climate change and the world's population increasing, demands for water have also intensified. Survey of water conflicts around the world with a view to assess how nations can better manage available water within and across borders. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Soc 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Exploration of human ecology and the causes and effects of environmental change, using data from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on understanding the social and economic context of human adaptations to the environment. Examination of cultures worldwide and through time that have (or have failed to) live sustainably. prereq: 1111 or 2101 or 2103
ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: 9T3T
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: 9V
Same as Soc 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmentally and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Soc 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: 9T3T
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 2101 or Biol 2102
ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9T
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods. prereq: 2101 or Biol 1111
ANTH 4501 - Archaeological Fieldschool (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: 5T
Experience in archaeological fieldwork, including excavation, survey, artifact processing, and living under field conditions. prereq: instr consent
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: 9V
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Process of modernization in non-Western societies. Social, economic, and political impact of modernization from different theoretical perspectives. Assessment of those theoretical perspectives as a means to understand dynamics of change in Third World countries. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: 3V
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
SOC 3125 - Terrorism, Law, and the State (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of issues of violence, justice, and the responses of the state. Integrate competing political views and different cross-cultural perspectives. Explore answers for some difficult questions such as defining terrorism, should states suspend constitutional rights and abrogate human rights to face the threat of terrorism; does terrorist violence differ from the violence perpetuated by nation-states? Students learn and assess the complexities of competing moral and ideological values of terrorists and that of the liberal democracies.
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Anth 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3251 - African Americans (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of African American religious, economic, political, family, and kinship institutions in the context of the greater American society. Struggles to overcome problems and the degree of success or failure of these struggles are examined and placed in historical context. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01669 - Soc 3401/Soc 3402/Soc 3403
Prerequisites: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
Typically offered: 9V
Survey of major developments in sociological theory, with attention to both classical and contemporary variants. Emphasis on sociological ideas in relation to the principal intellectual currents of European society, American society, and non-Western thought. prereq: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: 9V
Same as Anth 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmental and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Anth 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Analytical approach to decision making by individual economic units in the output and input markets, under perfect and imperfect market conditions. Externalities and role of government. prereq: 1111, Math 1101 or instr consent
ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
The theory of national income determination; inflation, unemployment, and economic growth in alternative models of the national economy. prereq: 1112, Math 1101 or instr consent
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
ECON 3005 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics I (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Introduction to economic experiments as controlled tests of microeconomic and game-theoretic behavioral predictions. In-class economic experiments, elements of non-cooperative game theory, results of market and social preference experiments, and empirical applications. prereq: 1111, 1112, Math 1101 or instr consent
ECON 3006 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics II (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Advanced concepts and applications in experimental and behavioral economics. prereq: 3005 or instr consent
ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
An overview of "brown" pollution and "green" sustainability issues in environmental and natural resource economics. Emphasis on the role of market failures in causing environmental problems and on the design of market mechanisms and incentive regulations to solve those problems. Analysis of current federal policy in the areas of water and air pollution. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The economic analysis of sustainability, focusing on market designs to discourage over-exploitation of both renewable and exhaustible natural resources. Topics include markets for water, fisheries, and energy. prereq: 3007 or instr consent
ECON 3009 - Political Economy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01779 - Econ 3009/Econ 3003/Econ 3004
Typically offered: 3T
The historical evolution, methodological relevance, and basic structure of the modern capitalist economy, including the dynamics of capital accumulation, economic crisis, transformation and regulating mechanism of contemporary capitalism, and hegemonic tendency of economy over polity and other aspects of life in contemporary society. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3011 - Cost-Benefit Analysis (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Cost-Benefit Analysis is a widely used method for comparing the benefits and costs of competing alternatives a decision-maker is considering. Derive best methods for conducting Cost-Benefit Analysis, building upon a solid understanding of the theory underlying it. Successful completion of this course allows students to apply the techniques of Cost-Benefit Analysis, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of CBA, including valuation and discounting. prereq: 1111
ECON 3014 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior I (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or #
Typically offered: 3O
The analytic approach to strategic interaction. Strategic interaction takes place among people when the payoffs to each person depend on the choices of all the others, and each person knows this fact in choosing their behavior. Development of the basic concepts of the theory of strategic interaction, including the definition of a strategy, extensive form and strategic form representations of the same game, and the solution concepts of Nash equilibrium and rollback equilibrium. A selection of applications of economic interest are covered, such as market entry deterrence and social dilemma games. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for IS 3206H] prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3015 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior II (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Extensions to the basic analytic theory of strategic interaction that widen its applicability, including topics such as repeated games, asymmetric information, and refinements to basic solution concepts. A selection of applications of economic interest, such as screening, signaling, and brinkmanship. prereq: 3014 or instr consent
ECON 3113 - Money, Banking, and Financial Markets (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Nature and function of money; role of commercial banks and other financial institutions; structure and function of Federal Reserve system; monetary policies for stabilization and growth; and a survey and synthesis of major theories on the value of money. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3121 - Public Economics I (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Analysis of the economics of public expenditures. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3122 - Public Economics II (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Analysis of the economics of taxation. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3131 - Comparative Economic Systems (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1111, 1112 or #
Typically offered: 9T3T
Comparison of the theory and functioning of the major economic systems of the world; economic reform in capitalist and socialist economies. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3133 - Economics of China (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examine the sources of economic growth in China, one of the world's largest and fastest-growing economies. Analyze the restructuring and reforms made to the economy, including the opening of the economy to world trade. prereq: 1111, 1112
ECON 3134 - Cooperative Business Model (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01763 - Econ 3134/Mgmt 3134
Typically offered: 3O
Same as Mgmt 3134. In the northern plains of the United States, cooperative businesses, including consumer, producer, and worker cooperatives, have made significant contributions to economic growth and development. Identify the unique economic, legal, and organizational characteristics of these firms and their role in the economy. Special attention is given to the potential role of cooperative business organizations in community development. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3141 - Economic Development and Growth I (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Nature and meaning of economic development. Theories of economic growth and the historical experience of now developed countries. General development problems facing developing countries. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3142 - Economic Development and Growth II (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Current development problems and policies in developing countries; the possibilities and prospects for future development. Case studies examining the development progress of these countries. prereq: 3141 or instr consent
ECON 3153 - Contemporary Global Economic Issues (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Many of the most important global issues are economic in nature. Questions of population growth and aging, economic and political stability, security, terrorism, trade policy, poverty, development, the environment, energy, technology transfer, and even public health and education, in a global context can only be properly understood with some knowledge of economic principles. Gain knowledge of economic ideas necessary to understand and to criticize professional economic advice about global affairs. Strong emphasis on argumentation, rhetoric, and ability to debate economic ideas in a given framework. prereq: 1111, 1112, Stat 1601, or instr consent
ECON 3211 - History of Economic Thought I (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
The origin and development of economic thought from Mercantilism through the classical school. Among others, Adam Smith and Karl Marx are featured. Nature of economics as a social science through the study of its historical development. prereq: 1111, 1112
ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
The development of economic thought from Marx and the end of the classical school, through the development of more modern approaches. In addition to the demise of classical thought, a selection from the thinkers who contributed to the foundations of modern microeconomics and/or macroeconomics is covered. Nature of economics as a social science, through the study of its historical development. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
ECON 3351 - Globalization: Examining India's Social and Economic Development (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01175 - Econ 3351/Mgmt 3351
Typically offered: 3T
Same as Mgmt 3351. Observe and study the impact of globalization on the Indian economy. Examine the growing class divide between the middle and upper middle class and the lower class. Study the problem of mass poverty in India and its various ramifications such as child labor, lack of education and basic health care, and the inherent gender bias. Examine sustainable grass roots efforts to combat some of these problems. prereq: 1111 or 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3501 - Introduction to Econometrics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Designing empirical models in economics. Simple and multiple regression analysis. Violations of classical assumptions in regression analysis. Logit and probit models; simultaneous equation models and lag models. Emphasis on application techniques to economic issues. prereq: 3201 or 3202, Stat 1601
ECON 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Wage and employment determination. Distribution of earnings and earnings inequality by race and sex. Labor supply applications. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
ECON 4102 - Labor Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Functioning and performance of the labor market. Heterodox explanations of labor market behavior. Labor demand applications. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
ECON 4111 - Mathematical Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Application of mathematical methods to economic analysis. Mathematical formulations and solution of optimizing models pertaining to households and firms and of adjustments to disturbances. prereq: 3201, 3202 or instr consent
ECON 4112 - Mathematical Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Topics include linear modeling, input-output analysis and linear programming, efficiency and exchange, comparative static analysis, and dynamic microeconomic and macroeconomic models. prereq: 3201, 3202 or instr consent
ECON 4121 - International Trade Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Overview of why trade occurs, pattern of trade and international factor movement. Effect of trade and trade policy on the economy. Current topics in trade theory. prereq: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or instr consent
ECON 4131 - International Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Foreign exchange markets; theories of exchange rate determination; fixed vs. flexible rate systems; theories of balance of payments adjustments; international quantity of money theory; international reserves; international monetary system (past, present, and future); internal and external balance, international economic policy coordination, international debt problem; effect of international sector on domestic growth and stability. prereq: 3202 or instr consent
ECON 4141 - Empirics of Economic Growth
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Presentation of the recent developments in economic growth with an emphasis on empirical research. Students try to understand "Why are some countries so rich and some countries so poor?" In doing so, students first explore the proximate causes of economic growth such as physical capital, human capital, and productivity, and later move on to explore the role played by fundamental causes such as institutions, geography, and deep history. prereq: 3202 or 3023, 3501
ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Seminar on selected topics in economics and management. Guided research sessions familiarize students with literature in the field. Students are required to make a formal presentation on their research topic and attend presentations by their peers. prereq: sr or 3501 or instr consent; full year course begins in fall sem
ECON 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia before 1800. Possible sub-themes include the rise of the Confucian world order, the spread of Buddhism, and East Asian interactions with the outside world. Discussion of changing perceptions of gender.
HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of Latin American history.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 2551 - Modern Japan (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The history of Japan from the foundation of the Tokugawa Shogunate until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2552 - History of Modern China (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Study of the history of China from the foundation of the Qing dynasty in the 1600s until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
A broad survey of Southeast Asia's civilization and its modern challenges. Emphasizes recent colonialism, nationalism, and postwar development.
HIST 3557 - East Asia Since 1800 (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia [China, Japan, and Korea] since 1800.
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Examination of western European history and historiography between 1350 and 1600 with emphasis on cultural "renaissances" and religious "reformations."
HIST 3102 - Early Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 1350 through the 18th century.
HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
The intellectual ferment of the Enlightenment has been given the credit and the blame for all things modern--from the concept of human rights and the democracies it has engendered to the subversion of those rights in the totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Exploration of the ideas of the Enlightenment and their political context and attempt to answer the question of how such an important development in human history can be viewed in such contradictory ways.
HIST 3162 - The Scottish Enlightenment: Markets, Minds, and Morals (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01560 - Hist 3152/Phil 3152
Typically offered: 5T
Same as Phil 3162. Study of the philosophy and history of the Scottish Enlightenment. Focus on its original setting through analysis and discussion of primary texts and scholarly interpretations, guest lectures, and small-group discussions with recognized experts in the study of the Scottish Enlightenment. Includes visits to historically significant cities and sites.
HIST 3176 - Berlin as a Site of History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 5T
A study abroad course focusing on the intersection of space and history in the vibrant city of Berlin, Germany. Themes include Berlin in flows of capital and power, Berlin as a site of everyday life, and Berlin as a site of historical memory and contests over it. No knowledge of German is necessary.
HIST 3177 - Virtue and Vice in Amsterdam: From the Golden Age to the Global Age (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 5T
The "Golden Age" of the 17th-century Dutch Republic and the post-World War II period in the Netherlands represent times of intensive economic growth, linked closely to international involvement, and of struggles to maintain social stability. Definitions of vice and virtue in both periods have been deeply intertwined with the experiences of prosperity and the challenges it has posed to established forms of governance, as well as understandings of what constitutes membership in a national community and who merits it. Topics include religious identities of the early modern period; social welfare practices of the Dutch Republic; the Dutch East India Company, maritime prosperity, and colonial exploitation; the Dutch Republic as a refuge for radical thought; Jews in Amsterdam; social movements since World War II, including GLBT rights; postcolonial politics and immigration; Islam in the Netherlands; the legality of prostitution and the official tolerance of drugs.
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Examination of German history from the development of German national ideas through unification and consolidation of the modern German state in 1871 and through its re-unification at the end of the 20th century. Examines one of the most fascinating and tumultuous periods in German and European history, why the attempt to understand the German past has occupied so many historians, and why the debates surrounding that attempt have been so contentious. Sources include writings by established historians of Germany, novels, films, and music.
HIST 3211 - Modern France (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Examination of French culture and history from the Revolution (1789) to the present. The ways in which successive governments, from Napoleon's empire through the Fifth Republic, have come to terms with legacies of the Revolution such as national citizenship, individual rights, and the politicization of women.
HIST 3213 - Modern Britain: Society, Culture and Politics (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Examination of the history of modern Britain and its empire since the 17th century. Topics include the growth of Britain as a world power through imperialism and industrialization, the challenges of shaping a modern polity, and the 20th-century shifts that reduced its global profile.
HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.
HIST 2608 - History of Cuba: From Colony to Revolutionary State (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
A survey of the history of Cuba from Spanish colonization to the present, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include colonization, slavery, imperialism, nationalism, and the Cuban Revolution.
HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Examination of Brazilian history from Portuguese colonization in the early 1500s to its current status as a growing world economic power. Topics include Portuguese colonial rule, independence and the creation of the Brazilian Empire in the nineteenth century, the end of the Brazilian monarchy and the emergence of the oligarchic republic, the rise of the populist state in the mid-twentieth century, military dictatorship during the Cold War, and the return to democracy and Brazil's rise to world-power status. Additional topics include the Amazon and environmental history, indigenous history, Afro-Brazilian history, the U.S.-Brazilian relationship from a historical perspective, Brazilian economic development, how Brazilians are coping with the socioeconomic changes in their society, and how they perceive their role in the world.
HIST 3601 - Great Books in Latin American History (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
A look at Latin American history through great books.
HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of social revolution in 20th-century Latin America. Particular attention paid to social revolution in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua. Populism, democratic attempts at social revolution, and counterrevolution in other parts of Latin America also considered. Key issues include imperialism, capitalism, communism, nationalism, and the Cold War.
HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from U.S independence to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, social, and cultural relationships between the two.
HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Explore issues of race and ethnicity in Latin America from a historical perspective. Covering the colonial and national periods, examine how ideas of race and ethnicity have intersected with political, economic, and socio-cultural developments in the region. Consider the ways in which race, class, and gender have intersected in Latin America.
HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
The experience of the original Americans and their interaction with later immigrants.
HIST 2451 - The American West (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01839 - Hist 3451/Hist 2451
Typically offered: 9E
Overview of the history of the American West up to the 21st century. While many scholars have argued that the "West" was merely a necessary process of national expansion, others argue that it is a very significant region--the most culturally and ecologically diverse region in the country. Discussion of these major historical interpretations of the American West and examination of how people have understood this vast region as a cultural icon of national identity. Work through various definitions of the West and identify how political issues of the environment, international borderlands, and gender and race relations have significantly influenced the United States for many generations. Through lectures, readings, and discussion, examine Western history chronologically while also covering other major themes including federalism, the mythic West, tourism, ranching and agriculture, urban and suburban areas, film, and religion.
HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Exploration of the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the United States and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands.
HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
History of the United States in the 1960s. Backgrounds to the 1960s; political and cultural issues of the decade; the Kennedy promise, civil rights and other movements, Vietnam war, counterculture, conservative backlash, and legacy.
HIST 2452 - Minnesota History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the social, cultural, and political history of Minnesota with emphases on American Indian and European-American conflict, immigration and ethnicity, the development of political culture, and the changing nature of regional identity.
HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the history of the United States from the beginning of the Seven Years' War in 1754 to the end of the War of 1812. The origins of the nation and the political, cultural, and social changes that accompanied the birth and early years of the American Republic. Focus on the political and social history of the American Revolution. Other topics include women in revolutionary America, the retrenchment of slavery, indigenous people and early Indian policy, religion and revivalism, the constitutional crisis, and the early presidencies.
HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The themes of race, class, and gender are explored in-depth throughout the semester. Students gain a new awareness about historiography and theories that highlight this growing subfield of American history. Prominent topics covered in lecture and readings include colonization, slavery, suffrage, immigration, sovereignty, labor, ghettoization, art, literature, culture, and the rise of self-determination. Study the intersection of race, class, and gender relations through multiple perspectives of region, ideology, political-economy, and religion.
HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
History of the 20th-century U.S. presidency. Brief consideration of the Presidency before 1900, analysis of performance of presidents since 1900 in roles of chief executive, commander-in-chief, chief diplomat, and chief of state during an era of enlarged governmental functions at home and world power abroad.
HIST 3353 - World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Origins, political and military aspects of the war in Europe and Asia, domestic mobilization, the Holocaust and Atomic Bomb, aftermath.
HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Topics, themes, and problems in U.S. history, 1877 to 1920.
HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1974 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Background of the Civil Rights movement, emergence of the theory and practice of nonviolence, various Civil Rights groups, role of women, legislative and other accomplishments of the movement, its aftermath and influence.
HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Origin, context, and significance of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Seven former American Presidents were veterans of World War II and over 175,000 books have been published on this subject alone. Arguably this one event has commanded more attention by writers, filmmakers, and academics than any other modern historical event. For decades historians have also debated the significance of World War II. After the conclusion of the war, the worldwide devastation and loss of life had reached apocalyptic proportions and new military technologies, like the atom bomb, forever altered the American experience. Scientists and intellectuals, such as Albert Einstein, emerged as new celebrities. Literally every sector of American society and culture had been transformed by World War II. Investigate these questions and more throughout the semester. It is important to note that this course is not a strict military history of the European and Pacific campaigns. Instead, the purpose of this class is to challenge students to grapple with the historic origins and legacies of the war. prereq: jr or sr or instr consent
HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
A broad examination of how humans interacted with their natural world throughout American history. Combined emphasis on cultural ecology (the study of how various cultural groups shaped the American landscape) with political ecology (the role of the nation's political economy in driving environmental change). Possible topics include: the Columbian Exchange, European and American Indian conflict, Thoreau and the creation of an environmental ethic, the slaughter of the bison as an ecological tragedy, urbanization and environmental racism, conservation as a political movement and the development of environmental policy, eco-feminism, American religion and the environment, the politics of global climate change. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Hist 2361]
HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Growth and development of the U.S. presidency during its first century. Emphasis on selected presidencies such as those of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, Abraham Lincoln, and William McKinley.
HIST 3455 - American Immigration (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
The role of voluntary migration in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Emphases on settlement, ethnicity, nativism, transnational issues, and immigration law. Possible topics include European immigrants and "whiteness," restriction of immigration from Asia, ethnicity and U.S. foreign and military policy, and the varieties of immigration, legal and undocumented, since 1965.
HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The history of religion in American life from the perspective of ordinary Americans. Religious diversity receives special emphasis. Topics may include New England witchcraft, the First and Second Great Awakenings, American Indian belief systems, nativism and Anti-Catholicism, religion and politics, immigrant religion and new fundamentalist movements.
HIST 3464 - History of Suburban America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Overview of development of the suburban landscape within the United States, from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, with primary focus on post-World War II development. Topics include the importance of nature to the idea of a suburb, the role of technology (such as streetcars and automobiles) in development, racial and ethnic diversity and exclusion within the landscape, the effect of suburbs on gender roles, and the political and cultural relationship between the city and the suburb. Examine how the suburb is depicted within popular culture, including films, television programming, music, and literature of the past and present.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.
GWSS 1101 - Introduction to Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
This course introduces students to the theoretical concepts and impact of gender and sexuality in everyday life. Various feminist, queer, and other gender-oriented theories are considered and employed as students explore how definitions of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality have been created, maintained, negotiated, and resisted. Particular attention is paid to the complicated relationships between individuals and social systems, and to the ways in which class, race, ethnicity, age, and other identity categories intersect with definitions and representations of gender and sexuality.
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues. prereq: some academic background or knowledge about gender and sexuality is recommended
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Soc 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ARTH 3281 - Women and Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: 9E
A historical survey of women's roles as creators and patrons of the visual arts in Western European and American societies, from antiquity to the present. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
Typically offered: 9T3T
Introduction to literary and cultural representations of gender. Emphasis on the intersections between power and the social relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3155 - 20th-Century British Fiction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
Typically offered: 9T3T
Major novelists from the Modernist period and after, focusing on the historical context of the new challenges to literary tradition. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
If African Americans struggled to achieve equality and recognition in the racist United States, the situation was even more difficult for African American women, who had to contend with the sexism in both the white and black communities. This course examines the writings of prominent African American women. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or instr consent
ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01928 - Engl 3414/GWSS 3414
Typically offered: 9T3T
Same as GWSS 3414. Engages students in a critical examination of several influential works participating in the elaboration of feminist theories. Readings and discussions focus on a series of themes and issues--gender, sexuality, race, class, language, bodies, etc.--and how these issues bear upon society. prereq: [2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212] or [GWSS 1101]
GER 3501 - Women's Issues in Contemporary German Culture (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 3011 or #
Typically offered: 3T
Focus is on the German women's movement during the 20th century, historical relationship of gender and class, and lives of women from various ethnic backgrounds in Germany and Austria. Short stories, essays, and poems document the evolution of feminist literary theory in German studies. Readings and lectures are in English. Final papers either in German (for German credit) or English (for Humanities credit). prereq: 3011 or instr consent
GWSS 3001 - Troubling Genders in African Cinema (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
This course explores the ways in which Sub-Saharan African film directors have used cinematic arts to challenge and envision paradigms of feminine, masculine and queer identity. Students will study African models of womanist thought and how they work with, through and against various "Western" models of gender. All films have English subtitles.
GWSS 3414 - Feminist Theory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01928 - Engl 3414/GWSS 3414
Typically offered: 9T3T
Same as Engl 3414. Engages students in a critical examination of several influential works participating in the elaboration of feminist theories. Readings and discussions focus on a series of themes and issues--gender, sexuality, race, class, language, bodies, etc.--and how these issues bear upon society. prereq: [1101] or [Engl 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212]
GWSS 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Applies an analytical approach to issues discussed in feminist writings. A mixture of lecture and discussion. Requirements include essay exams, papers, attendance, service-learning projects with related reflective journals, and class participation.
POL 3303 - Feminist Political Theory (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1101 or #
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of various ways of understanding gender through study of diverging perspectives within feminist political theory in conjunction with critical analysis of the relationships of feminist theory to political action. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Exploration of proximate and ultimate influences on female behavior in human and nonhuman species. Topics include sexual differentiation, gender differences in cognition, biological basis of sexual orientation, female sexual selection, dominance, and other topics of interest to students. Readings consist of primary journal articles. prereq: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or instr consent
PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051, 2001
Typically offered: 9V
Survey of aspects of human sexuality, including intimacy and communication; male and female anatomy, physiology, and response; development of sexual differentiation, gender identity, gender role, and gender orientation; varieties of sexual expression; pregnancy and child birth; contraception and disease prevention; sexual coercion and abuse; sexual dysfunctions and their treatment. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Psy 1071] prereq: 1051, 2001
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Anth 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
The theme of sex, love, and marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature through prose, poetry, and theatre of the Golden Age (XVI-XVII centuries) Spain. Consideration of the gender relations and gender politics reflected in the works and the socio-historical context in which these works were produced. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
An examination of 19th-century Spanish literature with primary emphasis on gender representation and construction. Readings include both canonical and lesser known works, by both male and female writers, that reflect an ongoing dialogue regarding traditional and shifting notions of gender identity and relations in Spain at the time. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form (ART/P)
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Prerequisites: major or minor or #
Typically offered: 9T3T5T
Focus on the possibilities of fabric as the primary medium in art making. Topics include surface manipulation via hand and mechanical processes and using fabric to construct independent forms. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Wage and employment determination. Distribution of earnings and earnings inequality by race and sex. Labor supply applications. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
ENGL 2411 - Representations of American Indians in Popular and Academic Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
Typically offered: 9T
Study of representations of American Indians in American popular and academic culture including literature, films, and sports. Particular attention given to how Indian identity, history, and cultures are represented in pop culture by non-Indians and, more recently, Indians themselves. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3142 - The Rise of the Novel
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
Typically offered: 3T
The 18th-century origins of the British novel: experiments with the new form, influence of earlier genres, evolution of formal realism. Authors may include Austen, Burney, Fielding, Richardson, and Sterne. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
ENGL 3154 - 19th-Century British Fiction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
Typically offered: 9T3T
The rise of the novel to respectability and prominence in Britain from the Romantics to the Victorians. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
ENGL 3168 - Victorian Literature and Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2501, two from 2201, 2201, 2211, 2212, or #
Typically offered: 3V
Studies an array of 19th-century literary forms, including fiction, poetry, drama, and prose, in their social and political contexts. prereq: 2501, two from 2201, 2201, 2211, 2212, or instr consent
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Examination of literatures by African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, U.S. Latino/a, and other under-represented peoples. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212, or instr consent
ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Study of American Indian literature written in English. Particular attention given to language, identity, land, and sovereignty. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212, or instr consent
ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
Typically offered: 9T
An introduction to the major schools of literary theory and cultural analysis; particular attention to the ways in which the dialogue and debate between these approaches define the discipline of literary criticism. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
ENGL 3444 - Holocaust Literature and Film (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Survey of Holocaust literature and film, focusing on works that clarify the political ideology that led so many to participate in the murder of two-thirds of Europe's Jews and that articulated what Jews suffered during the Nazi era. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv
ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
During the 1920s, there was a major aesthetic outpouring in the African American community. Listen to jazz, examine African American artwork, and read poetry, short stories, novels and essays from Harlem Renaissance writers. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
ENGL 4031 - Research Seminar: Renaissance Romance
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: two from 31xx-35xx, #
Typically offered: 9T
An intensive study of the ever-controversial and paradoxical romance genre of 16th- and 17th-century England. Texts include Sir Philip Sidney's "Arcadia," Lady Mary Wroth's "Urania," Robert Greene's "Menaphon," and William Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale," among others. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
ENGL 4034 - Research Seminar: The Adventure Novel in American and British Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: two from 31xx-35xx, #
Typically offered: 9O
Survey of adventure fiction in the Anglo-American tradition from Walter Scott through the mid 20th century, paying particular attention to themes that shaped this tradition, including imperialism and revisions of masculine identity. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Beginning with Vesalius, this course examines how the notions of body and mind have been shaped and reshaped in tandem with the rise of the sciences in France, with emphasis on evolving conceptions of ability and disabilities. Taught in English. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement in the French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 1302 - French Cinema (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The history of filmmaking in France from the Lumiere brothers to the present; introduction to major trends in film theory. All films have English subtitles. Taught in English. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement for the French major. [Note: does not count towards the Fren minor]
FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Introduction to the history of cinema in French-speaking West Africa. Students learn to read African films, to recognize and analyze political themes in the films, and to become sensitive to issues facing many African nations in the postcolonial world. All films have English subtitles. Taught in English. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement for the French major. [Note: does not count toward the Fren minor]
FREN 3603 - Francophone Studies: Contes francophones
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: (or coreq) 3011 or #
Typically offered: 9T3T
Study of the oral tale in African and Caribbean cultures. Examination of the form of these tales, their thematic structure, and how these tales have been translated into written and/or cinematographic texts. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Fren 3042] prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
A critical examination of moral issues that arise in a person's professional life. Possible topics include affirmative action, autonomy in the workplace, ethical issues in advertising, corporate responsibility, coercive wage offers, distributive justice, and sexual harassment. Issues concerning race, gender, and women are included in selected modules.
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: 9V
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
A study of the major texts surrounding Cuban slavery from the 1812 Aponte slave rebellion to independence from Spain in 1898. How did 19th-century writers depict Cuban slave society? What was the relationship between literature, abolition, and independence? prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
A study of 20th- and 21st-century Latin American historical novels and the colonial and 19th-century texts on which they are based. How and why is the past mobilized to meet the needs of the present? How do historical events continue to haunt the present day? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
An overview of the literature and culture of peoples of African descent in Spanish America from the colonial period to present day. How have Afro-Hispanics been marginalized from national projects in Spanish America? To what extent and under what circumstances has the group been included? How have Afro-Hispanic writers responded to larger culture? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
POL 1101 - Introduction to Political Theory (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
An introduction to key political concepts, questions, and ideologies through the writings of major thinkers of Western political theory and examination of contemporary debates about political life.
POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Law is a significant part of modern-day society and culture, especially in the United States. Examine the adversarial system of law and the various actors and institutions that influence and shape it in this country. In particular, look at where legal authority comes from and its limits in modern society. Explore the ways in which law acts to restrict and empower individuals and groups in society. This introductory level course is intended as a survey of the concept of public law both for students interested in taking upper-level courses dealing with legal and constitutional questions and for students simply interested in a greater understanding of why and how law matters in 21st-century society. It is taught using lectures mixed with some in-class activities and simulations.
POL 1401 - World Politics (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
The contemporary international system, including nationalism, international political economy, foreign policy formulation, and global concerns such as the environment and conflict. North/South debate, definitions of power, the new world order, regional vs. global conflicts, and avenues of cooperation.
POL 2001 - Political Science Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Students conceive and develop research questions and hypotheses; collect and critically review published research on their topic; analyze empirical evidence using statistical software; and write clearly, forcefully, and logically about their research. Examination of the philosophy and critiques of social-science methods. prereq: any 1xxx-level UMM Pol course, major or minor or instr consent
POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02203 - Pol 2221/Pol 3221
Typically offered: 3E
A half-semester course examining the common law system as broadly practiced in the United States, including types of legal recourse, the structures of state and federal judicial systems, how judges are selected, and the various influences on their decisions.
POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02204 - Pol 2222/Pol 3221
Typically offered: 3E
A half-semester course specifically looking at the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. politics with an emphasis on its historical development, how it interacts with the other federal branches, and the decision-making process of the justices on the Court.
POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02205 - Pol 2234/Pol 3234
Typically offered: 3O
Using a case study approach, this half-semester course examines a variety of social movements from across U.S. history. Addresses questions such as why social movements arise, how they succeed or fail, and how the American political system adapts to their influence.
POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02206 - Pol 2235/Pol 3234
Typically offered: 3O
A half-semester course focusing on the growth and importance of interest groups in U.S. politics by looking at different types of interest groups, the tactics they use to try to influence the political system, how successful they are at doing so, and whether this system works for the public good.
POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 3T
Examination of the ways American democracy functions in the states. Analysis of principles, organizations, procedures, and functions of state government in the United States, with particular emphasis on comparing state politics and policy outcomes. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3261] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 2262 - Power and Politics in American Cities and Communities (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02207 - Pol 2262/Pol 3261
Typically offered: 3O
Explores the nature of political power and institutions in urban, suburban, and rural communities, along with cultural and economic forces. Analyzes political and policy trends in metropolitan regions and rural areas. Includes relevant experiential or service projects in surrounding communities.
POL 2301 - Anarchy and Utopia (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
An analytical survey of anarchist thought and utopian ideals that are used to challenge modern political and social systems. The course draws from scholarly work as well as fiction, films, and mixed media sources.
POL 2302 - Gandhi and the Politics of Resistance (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02208 - Pol 2302/Pol 4302
Typically offered: 9T
A study of Gandhi's theory and practice of satyagraha and swaraj as forms of nonviolent political resistance and human realization. Places Gandhi within the historical and theoretical context of Indian political thought and colonialism and examines the influence of Gandhi's politics of resistance on international political theory.
POL 2354 - Political Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of the strengths, weaknesses, and implications of moral arguments in political decision making. Ethical frameworks drawn from theoretical readings are applied to a range of contemporary U.S. case studies such as state use of violence, interrogation in times of war, governmental secrecy and deceit, official disobedience, health-care access, welfare reform, and environmental regulation and protection. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3354]
POL 2401 - U.S. Foreign Policy (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
American diplomatic history. Institutions and processes of American foreign policy. Major factors to be considered and levels of analysis that allow for the examination and dissection of foreign policy decisions. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3401]
POL 2411 - Model United Nations (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
Students examine the nature and functions of the United Nations and hone their negotiating skills through a series of mock UN conferences. In a mock conference, each student represents a country (President of the United States, Prime Minister of Great Britain, etc.), study issues, and engage in negotiations. The issues (or topics) for conferences include peace and security, social justice, economic well-being, nuclear proliferation, environment, and human rights. The concentration on the UN is justified on the grounds of the UN's high profile in the international system and the fact that it is the most prominent of the IGOs (International Governmental Organizations). Through the use of mock UN conferences, students gain understanding of the UN, acquire negotiating skills, and appreciate the complexities involved.
POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 5T
Discusses negotiation strategies and tactics and examines negotiation skills through a series of simulated negotiations and mock conferences. Diplomacy, negotiation styles, negotiation simulations, and mock conferences. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3461]
POL 2501 - East Asian Society and Politics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Examination of governments, political and leadership changes, and economic developments in China, Japan, and Korea. Modernization, democratization, political pluralism, revolution, authoritarianism, and civil-military relations. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3501]
POL 3201 - Legislative Process (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 3T
The internal organization of Congress and state legislatures, with emphasis on how rules and organizational changes affect the policy process. Topics include the evolution of the modern Congress and state legislatures, the committee system, the role of party leadership, and competing theories of congressional organization and behavior. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3211 - The American Presidency (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 3T
Traces the development of the American presidency over time. Major theories of presidential behavior and success are examined, as well as the literature on presidential popularity and executive/congressional relations. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02137 - Pol 3231/Pol 3233
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 9E
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions primarily dealing with the Bill of Rights and including topics such as freedom of religion, speech and the press, rights of the accused, and struggles over the right to privacy and how to guarantee civil rights protections. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 9O
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions dealing with separation of powers, checks and balances, and issues of federalism. Specific topics include the importance of due process, the Contract Clause, the power to tax and spend, the Commerce Clause, and the struggle to define national and state powers. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3251 - Political Participation and Voting Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 9E
Examination of factors which influence political behavior such as voting, protesting, attending political rallies, and working in campaigns in the U.S. context. Specific attention is paid to voting demographics, recent elections, change in behavior over time, and the various ways in which citizens are engaged or not with the political system. Included is a strong practical focus on mid-term or presidential elections occurring at the same time as the course is offered. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4251] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended
Typically offered: 3E
Examines the intersection of political science and psychology research, particularly on topics such as personality, emotions, and cognition. Explores the various roles of individuals and groups in political decision-making, emphasizing the connections between how we think and learn and how we structure society and make political choices. prereq: 1201; Psy 1051 or instr consent recommended
POL 3266 - Media and Politics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: 9O
Examination of the relationships between mass media, government, and public in American democracy. Focus on the role of informed citizenry in theories of U.S. democracy, role of media in informing the U.S. citizenry, and the methods by which this occurs or fails to. Specific attention is given to the ways media influences public opinion, the effects of media, such as framing, agenda setting, and priming, and relationship of media, public opinion, and elites in politics. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4266] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Exploration of the domestic and international politics of environmental and energy policy making. Focus on theoretical frameworks for policy making and political behaviors surrounding development of environmental and energy policies. Includes the applications of political dynamics and principles to specific areas of environmental and energy policy. Emphasis also given to politics of policy implementation. prereq: 1101 or 1201 or 1401
POL 3302 - Islamic Political Thought (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02209 - Pol 3302/Pol 4302
Prerequisites: 1101 or #
Typically offered: 9E
Examination of classical and contemporary perspectives on Islam and politics that draws from a diverse range of Muslim and non-Muslim political thinkers and scholars. Particular attention given to the global discourse on Islam and democracy. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3303 - Feminist Political Theory (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1101 or #
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of various ways of understanding gender through study of diverging perspectives within feminist political theory in conjunction with critical analysis of the relationships of feminist theory to political action. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3351 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3E
A survey of Western social and political thought from 5th century BCE through the 15th century. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3352 - Modern Political Thought (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
A survey of Western social and political thought from the 16th through the 19th centuries. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
An examination of political understandings of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Topics include Western and non-Western perspectives on the natural environment, technological optimism and survivalism, the tragedy of the commons, environmental direct action movements, the environmental justice movement, and theories of green democracy and citizenship. Readings cover a variety of political perspectives and ideologies including neoconservatism, libertarianism, ecoanarchism, ecosocialism, ecofeminism, social ecology, deep ecology, and postmodernism.
POL 3411 - International Law (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Relations of international law to individuals, states, the international community, jurisdictional problems, survey of principles developed by diplomatic agents and consuls, treaties, arbitration, treatment of aliens, pacific settlement. War, military occupation, war crimes, neutrality. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3451 - Comparative Foreign Policy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: 3E
Comparative examination of foreign policies of the United States, China, and Russia. Topics include Sino-American relations, Sino-Russia relations, China's rise, Russia's resurgence, global war on terrorism, and nuclear proliferation. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4451] prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3453 - Russian Politics and Foreign Policy (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: 3T
Domestic and foreign policies of Russia and the former Soviet Union from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present. Nature of the Soviet empire, Russian Federalism, democratic and market reforms, and Russian foreign relations. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: 3E
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3504 - Latin American Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: 9T
A comparative examination of central issues in and components of Latin American political life, with a particular focus on economic development, political development of democratic regimes, political violence and human rights, and the region's role in the world. Countries analyzed may include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico, Peru, and Cuba. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3996 - Field Study in Political Science
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Field study of governmental organization; internship with legislature, a state or local administrative office, lobbying group, or other position involving direct experience with government, governmental officials, or political organizations and environment. [Note: max of 4 cr may be applied to the major or minor]
POL 4205 - Seminar in American Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02210 - Pol 4205/Pol 4905
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1201, 2001 or instr consent
POL 4305 - Seminar in Political Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02211 - Pol 4305/Pol 4905
Prerequisites: 1101, 2001 or #
Typically offered: 9O
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1101, 2001 or instr consent
POL 4405 - Seminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02212 - Pol 4405/Pol 4905
Prerequisites: 1401, 2001 or #
Typically offered: 3O
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1401, 2001 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Empirical study of sensory processes and perceptual organization with emphasis on vision and audition. Anatomy and physiology of sense organs, psychophysics, signal detection theory, attention, speech perception, and perceptual-motor coordination. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3201 - Comparative Psychology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Comparison of the causations of human and non-human animal behavior from both an evolutionary and biological point of view. The contributions of evolutionary selection pressures, genetics, environment, learning, and culture on the expression of behavior in a wide variety of species, through topics such as adaptation, fitness, altruism, social behavior, parental care, reproductive behavior, mating systems, and aggression. Focus on explaining modern human behavior as informed by non-human behavior. Includes lab component. prereq: [1051, 2001] or Biol 2111
PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Brain organization and function; an emphasis on an understanding of the neural processes that underlie human and nonhuman behavior. Incorporates information from psychology, neuroscience, endocrinology, physiology, chemistry, neurology, and zoology to investigate the physiological bases of behavior. Topics include sensory processes, drugs and addiction, biological rhythms, sexual differentiation, reproduction, methods in neuroscience, neuropsychological disorders, and clinical assessment. Lab projects focus on neuroanatomical organization and function of the brain. (4 hrs lect, 1 hr lab) prereq: [1051, 2001] or Biol 1101 or Biol 1111
PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Exploration of proximate and ultimate influences on female behavior in human and nonhuman species. Topics include sexual differentiation, gender differences in cognition, biological basis of sexual orientation, female sexual selection, dominance, and other topics of interest to students. Readings consist of primary journal articles. prereq: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or instr consent
PSY 3521 - Health Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: 3V
Health implications of interactions among behavioral, environmental, and physiological states. Physiological bases of behavior and health; stress and coping; behavioral antecedents of disease; psychoneuro-immunology; disease prevention and health promotion. prereq: 1051
PSY 3302 - Personality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Nature of personality constructs and theories. Conscious vs. nonconscious processes; emotion and motivation; nature and measurement of personal traits; their dimensional structure, stability, development, and heritability. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: 9V
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Evaluation of psychological assessments and interventions from different perspectives. Topic examples: structured and unstructured assessments; career counseling and assessment; motivational interviewing; family and couples therapy; interpersonal therapy; group therapy; and solution-focused therapy. prereq: 3313 or 3314 or 4101
PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to adolescence. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Theory, data, and research in adolescent development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, and social development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
An overview of current concepts, theories, and methods in the study of adult development and aging. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3502 - Psychology and Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: 3O
A psychological perspective to the law and to the legal system. Topics include jury decision making, forensic psychology, trial processes, eyewitness testimony, and sentencing. prereq: 1051
PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01764 - Psy 3503/Mgmt 3503
Prerequisites: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Mgmt 3503. Psychological basis for understanding consumers. Some of the topics include consumer behavior, consumer cognitive processes, and consumer judgments and decisions. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: 3T
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 3513 - Negotiation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00918 - Mgmt 3513/Psy 3513
Prerequisites: 3501 or Mgmt 3221 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
Typically offered: 3T
Same as Mgmt 3513. Examines the theoretical and applied aspects of negotiation. Topics include negotiation theory, strategy, skills and tactics, communication processes, global negotiation, and ethics. Use of negotiation simulations. prereq: 3501 or Mgmt 3221 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: 9V
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: 9T
Same as Mgmt 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
IS 3800 - Practicum in Social Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Supervised experience of selected learning activities such as discussion group leader, lab assistant, research assistant, or other teaching-related activities.
POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended
Typically offered: 3E
Examines the intersection of political science and psychology research, particularly on topics such as personality, emotions, and cognition. Explores the various roles of individuals and groups in political decision-making, emphasizing the connections between how we think and learn and how we structure society and make political choices. prereq: 1201; Psy 1051 or instr consent recommended
PSY 2112 - Psycholinguistics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3T
An introduction to the crossroads of psychology and linguistics. Topics include: introduction to linguistics, language production and comprehension at various levels, dialogue, language development, reading, and language abnormalities. Specific methods are discussed throughout. prereq: 1051
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081] prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 2612 - Environmental Psychology (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Environmental psychology is the study of the relationship between humans and natural and built environments. Traditionally, the emphasis in environmental psychology has been on how human behavior, feelings, and well being are impacted by the environment. Currently, there is an increased emphasis on how humans impact natural environments. This course examines the theories guiding research in this field and reviews the research as it applies to topics such as the effects of weather and climate on behavior, urban and rural environments, crowding, and personal space. prereq: 1051
PSY 2993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3315 - Parenting and Family Therapy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: 3V
Examination of the effects of parenting on the growth and development of children. Emphasizes specific parenting styles and practices and their effects on the social/emotional development and functioning of children at each stage of life. Provides an overview of the theory and practice of family counseling/therapy. Major systemic theoretical orientations are explored. prereq: 1051
PSY 3611 - History and Philosophy of Psychology (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Historical roots and comparative features of major theoretical systems in psychology, including scientific methodology, research interests, and techniques. Movements within psychology that are discussed include: structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, Gestaltism, psychoanalytic, and existential movements and their modern syntheses, as well as other topics of interest to students. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3800 - Research Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Research activity carried out under the supervision of a psychology faculty member.
PSY 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: 9V3V
Concepts of professional ethics in human services professions; ethically relevant legal mandates and constraints on professional practice; practical problems in the application of ethical principles. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for IS 4101] prereq: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
PSY 4770 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001, #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
A yearlong class that provides students with an opportunity to conduct their own research. Students work independently or in groups. Students review an area of psychology, generate a hypothesis, design a study, obtain IRB approval, collect data, analyze data, submit and present their research to the Undergraduate Research Symposium or other instructor-approved venue and write an APA style research paper. [Note: full year course begins in fall semester] prereq: 2001, instr consent
PSY 4771 - Independent Research in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: 2001, #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Supervised independent research by a student in any area of psychology. A research proposal may be required by a faculty member prior to approval to enroll in the course. The student is required to write an APA style research paper or give a public presentation. prereq: 2001, instr consent
PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Individually arranged, supervised observation of and assistance with activities of professional psychologists in schools, clinics, hospitals, and other field settings. Prereq-Normally requires 4101, 4102, other courses appropriate to field experience. [Note: only 4 cr may be applied to the BA or the Psy major]
PSY 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
STAT 3601 - Data Analysis (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Nature and objectives of statistical data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory data analysis techniques. Some types of statistical procedures; formulation of models, examination of the adequacy of the models. Some special models; simple regression, correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: 1601 or 2601 or 2611 or instr consent
STAT 3611 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Analysis of categorical data. Loglinear models for two- and higher-dimensional contingency tables. Logistic regression models. Aspects of multivariate analysis, random vectors, sample geometry and random sampling, multivariate normal distribution, inferences about the mean vector, MANOVA. Analysis of covariance structures: principal components, factor analysis. Classification and grouping techniques: discrimination and classification, clustering, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: 1601 or 2601 or 2611 or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: 9V
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01669 - Soc 3401/Soc 3402/Soc 3403
Prerequisites: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
Typically offered: 9V
Survey of major developments in sociological theory, with attention to both classical and contemporary variants. Emphasis on sociological ideas in relation to the principal intellectual currents of European society, American society, and non-Western thought. prereq: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2103 - Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies. (two 65-minute lectures, one 120-minute lab session)
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues. prereq: some academic background or knowledge about gender and sexuality is recommended
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Soc 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Exploration of human ecology and the causes and effects of environmental change, using data from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on understanding the social and economic context of human adaptations to the environment. Examination of cultures worldwide and through time that have (or have failed to) live sustainably. prereq: 1111 or 2101 or 2103
ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: 9T3T
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: 9V
Same as Soc 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmentally and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Soc 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: 9T3T
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 2101 or Biol 2102
ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9T
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods. prereq: 2101 or Biol 1111
ANTH 4411 - Seminar in Anthropological Methodology (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
Exploration and evaluation of methods used in cultural anthropology; qualitative methods; research ethics; and design of qualitative research project. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc
ANTH 4901 - Seminar in Anthropological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
Examines the historical development of anthropological theory, influences that shaped historical and contemporary anthropological theories, and major debates regarding their interpretation. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
SOC 1811 - Global Sociology: Migration, Economic Globalization, Class, and Gender Inequality (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of the global impact of migration on both societies receiving immigrants and societies from which people emigrate, the effect of economic globalization, class and gender inequality. A major goal of the course is to provide students with a systematic way of making sense of a rapidly changing and complex world. Learn from sociological perspectives what it means to live in an interdependent world. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1812 - Human Rights in the Age of Globalization (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Exploration of the relationship between globalization and human rights. Globalization as the driving force of capitalism has produced both positive and negative impacts on human rights. Optimists argue that integration into the global world of the free market will foster democracy and human rights, while critics challenge this optimism. Explores these contradictory views and processes. The course is interdisciplinary and integrates perspectives and concepts from different academic fields. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1813 - Political Economy of "Natural" Disaster (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examine the political economy of natural disasters through a survey of events drawn from around the world. Disasters can be viewed from multiple social perspectives (economic, political, ecological, and personal) and each of these carries implicit and explicit political judgments about how the environment should be managed. The following events offer rich documentation (academic and popular media) about the impact of governmental decisions prior to and in the aftermath of each event: famine-South Asian famine of 1770s, earthquake-Haiti 2010, deforestation/erosion-Nepal 1970s, hurricane-Katrina 2005, flood-Johnstown Flood of 1889, tsunami-South Asian tsunami of 2004. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 1814 - Water Unites, Water Divides: Sharing Water in the 21st Century (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
With the effects of climate change and the world's population increasing, demands for water have also intensified. Survey of water conflicts around the world with a view to assess how nations can better manage available water within and across borders. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Process of modernization in non-Western societies. Social, economic, and political impact of modernization from different theoretical perspectives. Assessment of those theoretical perspectives as a means to understand dynamics of change in Third World countries. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: 3V
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
SOC 3125 - Terrorism, Law, and the State (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Examination of issues of violence, justice, and the responses of the state. Integrate competing political views and different cross-cultural perspectives. Explore answers for some difficult questions such as defining terrorism, should states suspend constitutional rights and abrogate human rights to face the threat of terrorism; does terrorist violence differ from the violence perpetuated by nation-states? Students learn and assess the complexities of competing moral and ideological values of terrorists and that of the liberal democracies.
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9E
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Anth 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3251 - African Americans (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Examination of African American religious, economic, political, family, and kinship institutions in the context of the greater American society. Struggles to overcome problems and the degree of success or failure of these struggles are examined and placed in historical context. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: 9V
Same as Anth 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmental and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Anth 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 4991 - Sociology Independent Project Seminar
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01298 - Soc 4902/Soc 4991
Typically offered: 3V
A capstone seminar to guide sociology majors in the completion of an independent study project, including selection and definition of a research project, designing and planning its execution, developing a literature review and bibliography, applying relevant theoretical perspectives to research materials, and organizing and writing a research paper. prereq: 3103, 3403
MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
An introductory course in accounting principles and practices. The students develop an understanding of both the conceptual and procedural framework of the accounting processes. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and communication of accounting information and the financial statements for a proprietorship.
MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 2101
Typically offered: 3V
A continuation of Principles of Accounting I. Students develop an understanding of the issues unique to partnerships, corporations, and organizational financing. Cash flow statements and performance analysis are also emphasized. prereq: 2101
MGMT 3101 - Financial Management (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2102, Econ 1111, Econ 1112, Stat 1601
Typically offered: 9V
Fundamental theories of financial management, their applications, and their limitations in solving real business problems. Emphasis on financial analysis, valuation of future cash flows, capital budgeting, risk and return, cost of capital. prereq: 2102, Econ 1111, Econ 1112, Stat 1601
MGMT 3102 - Financial Institutions (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
An introduction to the functioning and management of financial institutions such as: the banking industry, mutual fund industry, insurance companies, pension funds, investment banks, and venture capital firms. prereq: 2101, Econ 1111, Econ 1112
MGMT 3123 - Managerial Economics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2101, Econ 1111, Math 1101 or Math 1021, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Development of the basic concepts of the microeconomic theories of consumer behavior, the firm, and market structure, in application to managerial decision-making contexts in the operation and control of business and non-profit organizations. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Econ 3201] prereq: 2101, Econ 1111, Math 1101 or Math 1021, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3133 - Managerial Accounting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2102
Typically offered: 9T3T
Managerial accounting is designed to help managers assess needed information to carry out three essential functions in an organization: planning operations, controlling activities, and making decisions. The emphasis of this course is placed on cost behaviors, various product costing methods, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting and control through standard costs, and other quantitative techniques used by management. prereq: 2102
MGMT 3134 - Cooperative Business Model
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01763 - Econ 3134/Mgmt 3134
Prerequisites: Econ 1111 or #
Typically offered: 3O
Same as Econ 3134. In the northern plains of the United States, cooperative businesses, including consumer, producer, and worker cooperatives, have made significant contributions to economic growth and development. Identify the unique economic, legal, and organizational characteristics of these firms and their role in the economy. Special attention is given to the potential role of cooperative business organizations in community development. prereq: Econ 1111 or instr consent
MGMT 3141 - Business Law I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 2101 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Law as it relates to the commercial world, including the legal environment, federal regulation, contracts, intellectual property law, business torts, and white collar crimes. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
MGMT 3142 - Business Law II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 2101 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Law as it relates to the commercial world, including the mortgage foreclosure crisis, business organizations, corporations, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency and securities regulations. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
MGMT 3151 - Human Resources Management I (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 2101 or #
Typically offered: 9V
An introduction to the functional areas of human resource management through the use of case studies. Topics include legal issues, planning, recruitment, training, evaluation, compensation, and benefits. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
MGMT 3152 - Human Resources Management II (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 3151 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Topics in human resource management: evaluating employee performance, training, safety, labor relations, international human resource management. prereq: 3151 or instr consent
MGMT 3161 - Labor Management Relations I (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Historical development of labor relations and the legal framework governing collective bargaining. Labor relations law reform. Case studies from labor relations law. prereq: Econ 1111 or instr consent
MGMT 3162 - Labor Management Relations II (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Issues in labor-management negotiation, grievances, wages and economic security plans, public policies toward collective bargaining. Case studies from labor arbitration. prereq: 3161 or instr consent
MGMT 3171 - Leadership in Organizations (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 9V
Leadership is the ability to influence a group of people towards a goal. Examination of leadership qualities and theories as they apply to leading an organization. Ethics, social responsibility, team work, motivation, and conflict resolution skills from the perspective of a leader. International and culturally diverse aspects of leadership and leadership development. Students have the opportunity to practice leadership skills during the course. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3201 - Marketing Principles and Strategy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
Basic factors affecting policy and strategy issues in marketing. Economic, legal, behavioral, environmental, competitive, and technological factors as they affect product, pricing, promotion, and marketing-channel decisions. prereq: 2102, Stat 1601 or instr consent
MGMT 3221 - Management and Organization Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Theory, research, and practice of management. Planning, organizing, leading, controlling. Emphasizes goals, policies, procedures. Factors and human relationships necessary to achieve organizational success. Organizational structure/culture. Changing environment in which businesses operate. prereq: 2101, Econ 1111 or instr consent
MGMT 3351 - Globalization: Examining India's Social and Economic Development (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01175 - Econ 3351/Mgmt 3351
Typically offered: 3T
Same as Econ 3351. Observe and study the impact of globalization on the Indian economy. Examine the growing class divide between the middle and upper middle class and the lower class. Study the problem of mass poverty in India and its various ramifications such as child labor, lack of education and basic health care, and the inherent gender bias. Examine sustainable grass roots efforts to combat some of these problems. prereq: Econ 1111 or Econ 1112 or instr consent
MGMT 3352 - Emerging Markets in Asia (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
An overview of the largest and fastest-growing markets in the world, the Asian markets. Examines topics such as business strategy and organization, marketing strategies, and business-State relations in Asia. Theory is balanced with practice by including comparative studies and business case studies. prereq: Econ 1111, Econ 1112, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3501 - Applied Deterministic Modeling for Management Science
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00924 - Math 3501/Mgmt 3501
Prerequisites: 2102, Math 1101 or Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Math 3501. Formulations of real-world problems as Linear Programming or Integer Linear Programming models; graphical solutions of some LP-models. Linear Programming: the Simplex method, intuitive ideas behind the Simplex method. Using software to solve LP problems; interpreting optimal solutions; sensitivity analysis; duality. Network diagram representation; critical path method (CPM-PERT); transportation problem. prereq: 2102, Math 1101 or Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3502 - Applied Probabilistic Modeling for Management Science
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00925 - Math 3502/Mgmt 3502
Prerequisites: 2102, Math 1101 or Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Math 3502. Short review of probability and statistics; mean and variance of a data set; discrete and continuous random variables (especially the exponential distribution and the Poisson distribution). Decision and game theory. Decision trees, types of decision criteria. Queueing models, birth-and-death processes; Markovian or Poisson arrivals and exponential service times; M/M/k and M/M/8 queues; Statistical Quality Control; inventory control system. prereq: 2102, Math 1101 or Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3503 - Consumer Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01764 - Psy 3503/Mgmt 3503
Prerequisites: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: 3V
Same as Psy 3503. Psychological basis for understanding consumers. Some of the topics include consumer behavior, consumer cognitive processes, and consumer judgments and decisions. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
MGMT 3513 - Negotiation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00918 - Mgmt 3513/Psy 3513
Prerequisites: 3221 or Psy 3501 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
Typically offered: 3T
Same as Psy 3513. Examines the theoretical and applied aspects of negotiation. Topics include negotiation theory, strategy, skills and tactics, communication processes, global negotiation, and ethics. Use of negotiation simulations. prereq: 3221 or Psy 3501 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
MGMT 3601 - Transnational Enterprise (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Development and transformation of business enterprise within the global economy emerging from time and motion studies, mergers, "corporate revolution," Fordism through to multi-plant manufacturing beyond national boundaries. Includes the basic impact of structural, institutional, and organizational change upon the dynamics of the firm and industry in the contemporary hyper-competitive, technology-driven, fast-paced, global environment. prereq: 2101, Econ 1111, Econ 1112 or instr consent
MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: 9T3T
Same as Psy 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
MGMT 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
MGMT 4101 - Investment and Portfolio Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2101, 2102, 3101
Typically offered: 3V
The institutional environment of investment, techniques used to price financial products, and how to design a portfolio of many assets. prereq: 2101, 2102, 3101
MGMT 4201 - The Economics of Corporate Strategy I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Setting the horizontal boundaries (e.g., which lines of business) and vertical boundaries (whether to make or buy inputs and outputs) of the firm, considered as strategic decisions. The different types of competition associated with distinct market structures. prereq: 3123 or Econ 3201, Math 1021 or Math 1101, or instr consent
MGMT 4202 - The Economics of Corporate Strategy II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Tools for analyzing business strategies: credible strategic commitments, pricing rivalries, entry and exit, Porter's five forces framework, and the relationship between value creation and strategic market positioning. prereq: 4201
MGMT 4501 - Globalization and Business Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Review of the impact of increasing globalization of the corporate and economic environment; application of strategic methods to new business conditions. prereq: 3601 or instr consent
MGMT 4502 - Technological Change, Labor Market, and Skill Formation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
The change of technology in relation to the formation of skills and transformation of regional labor markets throughout the world. The intimate relationship between "skilling" and "deskilling" of labor and the transformation of technology. prereq: 3601 or instr consent
MGMT 4505 - International Managerial Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 3T
An introduction to the international dimensions of corporate financing, investment, and risk management decisions. Foreign exchange markets, international financial systems, foreign exchange rate determination, measuring/managing currency risk, multinational capital budgeting, cost of capital in emerging economies, international taxation policies, and transfer pricing. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
MGMT 4601 - Advanced Topics in Financial Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Continuation of Mgmt 3101. Topics include dividend policy, hybrid financing, derivatives, and mergers. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
MGMT 4602 - Long-Term Financing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Application of the fundamental financial theories acquired in Mgmt 3101 to long-term financing in corporations. The primary focus is on issuing securities to the public, financial leverage, capital structure policy, dividend policy, and leasing. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
MGMT 4603 - Working Capital Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Application of the fundamental financial theories acquired in Mgmt 3101 to working capital management in corporations. The primary focus is on financial planning, cash management, credit management, and risk management. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
MGMT 4896 - Internship
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Supervised educational experience and field application relevant to student's major. Written analysis appropriate to the application is required. [Note: 2 cr may be applied to major or minor] prereq: 2102
MGMT 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.