Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Business and Marketing Education B.S.

Organizational Leadership, Policy and Development
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 61 to 63
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
This undergraduate program focuses on business and marketing education. Coursework includes leadership, sales management, marketing, e-marketing, project management, business communication, management and supervisory development, and customer relationship management. The program equips students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities that enable them to make meaningful contributions to organizations through employing principles and practices of business planning, project management, sales, marketing, and leadership development.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 16 credits before admission to the program.
Admission requirements include 45 credits, completed or in progress.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
First Year Experience
All incoming CEHD Freshman must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525W.
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EDHD 1525V - CEHD First Year Experience [WI] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Admission coursework
Psychology
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Public Speaking
OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Economics
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4.0 cr)
Leadership
OLPD 1303 is not required for admissions but is highly recommended and is required for completion of the major.
OLPD 1303 -  Leadership in the Organizational Context (3.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
A minimum grade of C- is required for all foundation, major, and supporting program courses. The only course that can be taken pass-fail is OLPD 4696. At least 12 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Foundational Coursework
Future Studies
OLPD 2811 - Societies of the Future: Changing Work Contexts [TS] (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 2811H - Societies of the Future: Changing Work Contexts, Honors [TS] (3.0 cr)
Business Writing
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BA 3033W - Business Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
or IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Major Coursework
A total of 30 credits of major coursework is required. These 30 credits include eight specific required courses (listed below), a 4-credit applied experience, and 3 credits of electives within the BME major (options listed below).
OLPD 3401 - Teaching Marketing Promotion (3.0 cr)
OLPD 3424 - Sales Training (3.0 cr)
OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management (3.0 cr)
OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management (3.0 cr)
OLPD 3641 - Introduction to Organization Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 3308 - Data-Driven Decision-Making in BME and HRD (3.0 cr)
OLPD 3609 - Profession and Practice of Business and Marketing Education and Human Resource Development (2.0 cr)
OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace (3.0 cr)
Applied Experience
All students must complete 4 credits of an Applied Experience. The Applied Experience is a culminating experience to apply BME theories to practice in real world settings. Registration for OLPD 4696 requires eligible students to secure their own work experience to receive permission to register. Eligibility requires the completion of OLPD 3609 and at least 3 of 4 core BME classes [OLPD 3401, OLPD 3424, OLPD 3318, and OLPD 4426]. Students may also accrue credits through one of the other courses.
OLPD 4696 - Applied Experience in Business Marketing Education & Human Resource Development (1.0-4.0 cr)
or OLPD 4421 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations (2.0 cr)
or LEAD 3971 - Leadership Minor: Field Experience (3.0 cr)
Electives within the Major
Students must complete 3 additional credits of electives from the following list of course options. OLPD 3310 must be taken for 3 credits.
OLPD 3305 - Learning About Leadership Through Film and Literature (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 3310 - Special Topics for Undergraduates (1.0-3.0 cr)
or OLPD 3381 - Developing Intercultural Competence (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing (3.0 cr)
Supporting Program
Students must take 12 credits of coursework outside of OLPD. Courses should be upper-division (3000 or higher) unless approved by an OLPD Advisor. Students may select courses from the pre-approved list, or propose other coursework in consultation with their OLPD Advisor. Common proposed coursework includes minors [Leadership minor excluded], majors, or self-designed themes. Pre-approved coursework includes the following:
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ABUS 3301 - Introduction to Quality Management (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4101 - Accounting and Finance for Managers (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4151 - Innovation for Leaders and Organizations (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4501 - Building and Running a Small Business Enterprise (4.0 cr)
· ABUS 4515 - Strategy and Management for a Sustainable Future (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4702 - Applied Digital Marketing (3.0 cr)
· ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
· CI 1871 - Computer Literacy and Problem Solving (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3401 - Introduction to Communication Theory (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3441 - Introduction to Organizational Communication (3.0 cr)
· FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
· HSM 4561W - Health Care Administration and Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BA 1011 - Leading Self & Teams (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3004 - Strategic Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· RM 1201 - Fashion, Ethics, and Consumption [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· RM 2215 - Introduction to Retail Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· RM 3243 - Visual Merchandising (2.0 cr)
· RM 4117W - Retail Environments and Human Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RM 4123 - Living in a Consumer Society (3.0 cr)
· RM 4216 - Retail Promotions (3.0 cr)
· RM 4247 - Advanced Buying and Sourcing (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management (2.0 cr)
· SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3034 - Advanced Business Spanish (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BA 3033W - Business Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Technical and Professional Writing
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
 
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EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing.
EDHD 1525V - CEHD First Year Experience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing. prereq: CEHD student, honors, 1st-term fr
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course introduces students to applied psychology as a discipline and reviews fundamental principles of psychology through the lenses of applied and professional areas that are the foci of CEHD majors. Specifically, through the lenses of education, we review principles of learning, memory, development, intelligence, and interventions; through the lenses of health and wellness, we review personality, biological, social, and cognitive bases of normal and abnormal behavior, as well as treatments; and, through the lenses of business and organizations, we review principles of motivation, sensation perception, and social behavior. Thus, these psychological principles are considered theoretically, empirically, and through examples for application, with lab discussions and projects emphasizing education, business, health and wellness. The course serves as a foundation for future coursework in education, health sciences, and psychology, and is consistent with the APA’s public education effort to demonstrate how the science and application of psychology benefits society and improves lives.
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology. prereq: Honors
OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1461/OLPD 1461
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course prepares students to present information and hone their messages based on audience need in a variety of business, leadership, and workplace contexts. Students interested in majoring in Business and Marketing Education (BME), Human Resource Development (HRD), and other majors can take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in training and development, as well as business and industry to convey vital and timely messages.
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1461/OLPD 1461
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course prepares students to present information and adjust their messages based on audience need in a variety of future work contexts. Students interested in majoring in Family Social Science, Education, Youth Studies, and Kinesiology will take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in counseling, community-based organizations, education, and health sciences to convey important, and often sensitive, material to specific audiences.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation. prereq: Honors
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1101H - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy. prereq: Honors student, proficiency in high school algebra
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 1102/Econ 1102/1105/1112
Typically offered: Every Spring
Unemployment/inflation, measures of national income, macro models, fiscal policy/problems. Taxes and the national debt. Money/banking, monetary policy/problems. Poverty and income distribution. International trade and exchange rates. Economic growth/development. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 1102/Econ 1102/1105/1112
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aggregate consumption, saving, investment, and national income. Role of money, banking, and business cycles in domestic and world economy. International trade, growth, and development. U.S. economy and its role in the world economy. International interdependencies among nations. prereq: [1101 or equiv], knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
OLPD 1303 - Leadership in the Organizational Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Life - like leadership - is full of paradoxes. We are all individuals. At the same time, we are all part of families, communities, institutions, structures, and systems. To understand and practice effective leadership, we must make sense of our lives - including our unique identities and experiences - within these broader organizational and societal contexts. We must think critically about how power flows through society, and how it shapes agency, opportunities and wellbeing for individuals and communities. And we must think creatively and critically about how leadership can help promote equity, justice, and human flourishing. In this course, we focus on organizations as a core context for leadership. Organizations are everywhere - some formal, some informal. For example, we are all part of an educational organization: the University of Minnesota. We all interact with governmental organizations at national, state, and local levels. We may belong to community, religious, or cultural organizations. We might work - now or in the future - for a corporation, a nonprofit, or a cooperative. We may belong to an advocacy organization that works for social change. To study leadership within these various types of organizations, we must also turn inward to examine our own identities, social locations, and experiences. We draw on concepts and theories - from the fields of leadership development, organizational studies, sociology, and psychology - to analyze our lived experiences within broader contexts, and better understand the behaviors of individuals and groups within organizations. This course will require active engagement with course materials, your classmates, and class projects. Our class sessions will include group activities, student-driven discussions, and the occasional mini-lecture. We will explore case studies and individual narratives as touchstones for applying theory to real world contexts. Over the semester, you will complete both individual and group assignments, including reflective writing and class facilitation. Ultimately, this course is a "learning lab" where we have the chance to practice being how we would like the world to be. Old: Students examine own views of leadership, differences between
OLPD 2811 - Societies of the Future: Changing Work Contexts (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ongoing evolution of social contexts and work through the interdisciplinary lens of future studies.
OLPD 2811H - Societies of the Future: Changing Work Contexts, Honors (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ongoing evolution of social contexts and work through the interdisciplinary lens of future studies. prereq: Honors student
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3029W/Writ 3029W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course students practice writing and revising common business documents for today?s business world. Students write memos, proposals, cover letters, resumes, and digital and web content as well as practice choice of appropriate formats and media. The course draws from current business practices and stresses workplace collaboration, broader issues of professional literacy, and responsive writing styles. Students practice rhetorical analysis and discuss concepts such as audience, purpose, tone, and context when writing and revising their documents. Students analyze and write from a variety of perspectives and contexts including formal (researched reports, proposals) and informal (email, social media) communication. Students also build a professional online presence through such platforms as LinkedIn.
BA 3033W - Business Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course teaches strategies and skills to communicate with confidence, clarity, and impact in business settings. Students develop their abilities in critical thinking (analyzing data, audience, purpose, and context) and craft (honing skills in storytelling, persuasion, writing, diction, tone, presence, data visualization, and visual design). They learn to navigate ambiguity, evaluate the needs of internal and external stakeholders, and communicate solutions to complex business problems. The course is performance- and project-based. Students produce professional-level memos, emails, and research-based proposal decks. They deliver multiple presentations (individual and team) and learn to communicate effectively with data. Students will meet with the instructor in small groups outside of class time for one scheduled lab session. The course culminates in the Case Study Competition where student teams apply their knowledge to address a real challenge from one of our industry partners. prereq: First Year Writing, Carlson School junior or senior.
IBUS 3033W - Business Communication in a Global Context (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Written/oral communication skills for effective participation in contemporary organizations. From basic principles to communication strategy. Communication technology. Cases, simulations of "real-world" situations in a domestic and global context. Global perspectives of focus have included India, Spain, South Korea and Japan. prereq: Fr composition, CSOM upper-div, at least 60 cr
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.
OLPD 3401 - Teaching Marketing Promotion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 3401/OLPD 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Materials, methods, and approaches to teaching marketing promotion. Advertising, promotion, public relations, direct selling, visual merchandising, and direct marketing.
OLPD 3424 - Sales Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Strategies and techniques for developing effective sales people. A review of review practices related to sales management, business development, selling strategies, and learning objectives essential to developing the skills, knowledge, and abilities to create a competent sales force.
OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project management for business and industry. Project lifecycles, deliverables, and processes as they are commonly used in the workplace.
OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of customer relationship management, brand identity, and integrated marketing communications. Comprehensive framework for how organizations interact with their various publics to create goodwill/loyalty.
OLPD 3641 - Introduction to Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization development theories, principles, concepts, and practices. How development is used to direct change in an organization.
OLPD 3308 - Data-Driven Decision-Making in BME and HRD
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Living in the age of technology has implications for everyone in Business & Marketing Education (BME) and Human Resource Development (HRD). Technology that makes it possible to collect huge amounts of data has given more individuals and organizations the power and responsibility to analyze data and make decisions based on this data. The amount of data being collected on our preferences, attitudes, and behaviors will only increase in the future, and this rich data can be used towards a variety of ends. In this course, we will use quantitative methods to uncover the information in large data sets and then consider how individuals and organizations are able to gain a competitive advantage by acting on this information. Topics covered in this course include: - Critical analysis of complex issues related to BME and HRD in organizations; - Major techniques of quantitative data analyses used in BME and HRD; - How to use of Excel and Excel Add-in Tools to conduct data analyses; - How to make effective decisions based on quantitative information in BME and HRD situations; and - Effective reporting of quantitative results to meet the expectations of stakeholders.
OLPD 3609 - Profession and Practice of Business and Marketing Education and Human Resource Development
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide Undergraduate Business and Marketing Education (BME) & Human Resource Development (HRD) students with the tools necessary to develop a career management plan to become successful business and marketing professionals and/or human resource development professionals. prereq: Admitted BME major or Admitted HRD major
OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 3821/OLPD 5821/ OLPD 5822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. Issues of recruitment, selection, management, learning, leadership, and performance.
OLPD 4696 - Applied Experience in Business Marketing Education & Human Resource Development
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 4496/OLPD 4696
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
OLPD 4696, the Applied Experience course, is designed as a culminating learning experience for students nearing graduation. It affords students an opportunity to seek out practical work experience related to their area of concentration in business and marketing or human resource development. An essential part of an Applied Experience is the opportunity to use the knowledge acquired in the classroom in practical applications in the workplace. Problem-solving and creative thinking in the workplace supports the retention and mastery of information gained in the classroom. To be successful, the Applied Experience in BME/HRD should focus on a specific project(s) or task(s) that lend to analysis and resolution over the course of 6 to 14 weeks. A typical Applied Experience in BME/HRD involves 160 hours of work for 4 credits including all the course work listed on this syllabus (20 hr) during a single semester (45 hours per credit). The Applied Experience in BME/HRD is not credit for work. Students must be engaged in specific activities/duties related to their area of concentration related to the field of business and marketing or human resource development. Each activity is expected to relate to a BME/HRD theory, a career competency area, or professional skill. The student and the employment supervisor will be asked to sign a contract stipulating to the internship objective and activities; the contract must also be approved by the instructor. prereq: OLPD ugrd student in BME/HRD, BME compl 3 of the 4 cores: OLPD 3318, 3401, 3424, 4426. HRD compl 4 of the 4 cores: OLPD 3601, 3202, 3621, 3641. Completed or permission to be concurrently registered for OLPD 3609.
OLPD 4421 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students the opportunity to develop and implement critical aspects of a nonprofit organization from board selection, training, fundraising, event marketing and management, and conducting outreach programs. Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of job functions including: sales, marketing, e-marketing, operations, management, accounting, administration, purchasing, procurement, fundraising, pre-event planning, and post-event evaluation.
LEAD 3971 - Leadership Minor: Field Experience
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students apply and integrate leadership theory in a community experience, think critically about their positional leadership roles, extrapolate the experience to future leadership issues within their specific fields, and work through challenges of positional leadership.
OLPD 3305 - Learning About Leadership Through Film and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Readings from leadership studies, literature, and film. Ethical dilemmas. Different styles of leadership and their consequences. Intersection of public/private in exercising leadership. Competing loyalties/pressures felt by leaders/followers. Fundamental questions about nature/desirability of leadership.
OLPD 3310 - Special Topics for Undergraduates
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Inquiry into special topics related to organizational leadership, policy/development.
OLPD 3381 - Developing Intercultural Competence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Past/current research on intercultural leadership. Students share their understanding/experiences within intercultural framework.
OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic understanding and personal experience with how e-marketing can be used as part of an overall marketing and promotion plan.
ABUS 3301 - Introduction to Quality Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/concepts of managing quality in business applications. Improving business processes with six sigma method. Implementing/leading process improvement. Baldrige Award, ISO 9000. prereq: Introductory statistics
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Demands on today's managers, with a focus on small to medium-sized organizations. Techniques/ideas beyond traditional studies. Applying management theory at all levels. Managing in a global workplace. Organizational planning and decision making. Organizing resources. Leading/motivating people. Controlling/evaluating organizational activities. This writing intensive designated course will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to this discipline because clear, accurate, and professional communication is essential to organization management. The ability to write effectively in terms of specified audiences ensures, in the professional world, successful communication between team members as well as the success of the projects, companies, and employees they represent. prereq: 45 semester credits recommended
ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Successful leadership via flexible approach. Knowledge, skills, and abilities that leaders develop from eight leadership strategies: academic, bureaucratic, eclectic, economic, fellowship, military, political, social. Ways to lead diverse populations in a global environment. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4101 - Accounting and Finance for Managers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ABus 4101/MT 4001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cost accounting concepts. Cost behavior. Management decision making using cost data. Time value of money. Cost of capital. Capital budgeting techniques. Financial statement analysis. Assignments draw on business/industry examples. prereq: Financial accounting, 45 cr
ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Providing day-to-day leadership. Organizing work, motivating employees. Delegating, coordinating, and achieving results. Front line human resource practices, including selection, induction, and training of new employees, employee appraisal. Handling grievances/discipline. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4151 - Innovation for Leaders and Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Innovation as cornerstone of knowledge economy. History of innovation process, importance to individuals/organizations. Strategies to foster innovation. Responsibilities in innovation skill-building/leadership. prereq: 45 cr
ABUS 4501 - Building and Running a Small Business Enterprise
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategies and practical knowledge needed to build and operate a small business. Begins with basic marketing, finance, and leadership principles that apply to the formation of a small business enterprise and continues with growth strategies and exercises to refine the business vision. Class discussions and independent reflective activities will enable students to assess their resources and develop management, leadership, business administration, and conflict-resolution skills. Via group work, students will develop a business plan, strategically identify performance indicators, learn ways to remain competitive and innovative in the marketplace, and prepare to evolve business plans and processes over time. Prerequisite: None, but previous business experience or study will be helpful.
ABUS 4515 - Strategy and Management for a Sustainable Future
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sustainability in business. Relationship of sustainable environments to organizations. Economic/strategic enterprise value. Relationship of sustainable business practices to marketplace trends/realities. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4702 - Applied Digital Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Digital marketing represents the fastest growing sector in most marketing departments. But what is digital marketing? Understanding the digital realm of marketing requires a curiosity about how new technologies will change business, while grasping the key strategies that drive tactics and trends. This course is designed to be a primer on the world of digital marketing and ways it will affect both your future employment and larger business trends. Through case studies, discussion forums, and interactive activities, you will learn about the latest research and best practices in the industry to have a solid grasp of the core concepts and tools of digital marketing management, both today and in the future. Prerequisites: None
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 2051H - Honors: Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of the financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
CI 1871 - Computer Literacy and Problem Solving
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1871/PSTL 1571/RM 1203
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Competencies in computer applications used in the social sciences and business to solve problems. Using advanced word processing techniques to create complex documents, electronic spreadsheets to analyze data and present it graphically, database management programs to store, organize, and query data, and presentation software to communicate ideas.
COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Historical development and current issues in electronic media technologies and programming. Effects of governmental, industrial, and public organizations on message content. Problem areas of electronic media.
COMM 3401 - Introduction to Communication Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Social scientific theory in human communication. Logic of scientific communication theories in interpersonal, small group, organizational, intercultural, and mediated communication.
COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cooperative thinking in task-oriented groups. Planning, preparing for, and participating in small groups in private and public contexts.
COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Application of communication concepts in information interview. Planning, conducting, and evaluating informational, journalistic/elite, helping, persuasive, appraisal, and employment interviews. Class training, field experience.
COMM 3441 - Introduction to Organizational Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Functions of communication in work groups, in organizational hierarchies, and between organizations.
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3501/Fina 3001/Fina 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How competition for capital in Capital Markets establishes metrics and measures used to understand financial performance of the firm. The course introduces the finance view of the firm and the application of value creation principles to firm decision making. Course presents the centrality of cash flows, the theoretical foundations for Time Value of Money, decision tools for investment of capital, basic valuation of stocks and bonds, and the theoretical foundations for the impact of risk on the required return on investor capital. prereq: ACCT 2050 or ACCT 2051, SCO 2550 or BA 2551 or equivalent statistics course
FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of personal/family financial management principles. Financial planning of savings, investments, credit, mortgages, and taxation. Life, disability, health, and property insurance. Public/private pensions. Estate planning.
FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Family financial issues are studied with an emphasis on the role of the financial counselor. This course emphasizes the development of professional skills for assisting individuals and families to cope with financial concerns in their day-to-day lives. This course includes an optional service-learning component where students will work throughout the semester with local non-profit organizations focused on financial literacy, financial counseling, financial curriculum development, and/or researching financial resources. This course will require students to produce video recordings. At minimum students will need recording equipment that captures both video and audio. The resulting file will need to be uploaded to the internet. Laptops with webcams and smart phones with video capabilities should be sufficient for this purpose. Equipment and training are available from the Library's SMART Learning Commons.
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
HSM 4561W - Health Care Administration and Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Knowledge and and skills in the organizational and managerial aspects of health care. Applications of behavioral and organizational theory to health care settings. Topics will include organization models, supervision, employee evaluation, problem solving, productivity management, group leadership, and case studies. As a Writing Intensive course, it will provide management-level communication skills to develop a thoughtful and reflective understanding of the writing (and rewriting) process.
IDSC 3001 - Information Systems & Digital Transformation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities, and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment.
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
BA 1011 - Leading Self & Teams
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 1001/BA 1011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course guides Carlson students through a self-reflective journey as they learn about interpersonal competencies and the role of these competencies in their own leadership style and when leading teams. As leadership and teamwork are an essential component in the Carlson education and more broadly in the business community, this class provides the foundational skills necessary for future success. The course is structured into two parts: understanding individual perspectives and understanding team dynamics. The course begins by providing students with a theoretical foundation on interpersonal differences that influence how people lead and interact in teams. Specifically, we explore differences in personality, identity, values, opinions, and cultures and the role they play when interacting with others. The focus of the course is providing students with essential skills to uncover, appreciate and navigate differences to create a solid foundation upon which to develop their own leadership skills and work together as a team. The second half of the course will focus on understanding team dynamics. This class provides students with a unique learning opportunity to learn how teams work while simultaneously working in their teams. In doing so, they will witness the direct application of course material to their own learning teams while completing their team project. Students will learn the science behind how teams are structured, team roles, processes within teams and what leads to effective teams. Specifically, the topics examined will include team decision making, conflict resolution, power, influence, analyzing team dynamics, and providing team feedback. At the end of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of themselves and will master skills for working in and leading teams. prereq: Carlson School of Management student
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
MGMT 3004 - Strategic Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 3004/Mgmt 4004W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Business strategy. How business firms set and pursue their goals. Key categories of strategic issues and concepts/frameworks managers use to analyze and address those issues. Attention to specific firms and situations. prereq: CSOM, soph or jr
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/MGMT 3010/MGMT 3015
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management of a new venture after founding. Internal/external challenges of managing a startup organization. Working with resource constraints and understanding how business models may change over time. prereq: MGMT 3015 or MGMT 3010 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: · What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? · What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? · How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? · What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? · How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mktg 3001/Mktg 3001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101 or ECON 1165
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
RM 1201 - Fashion, Ethics, and Consumption (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Apparel business. Overview of steps in the process of creating, merchandising, selling, and consuming apparel. Various ethical positions reflected in manufacturer, retailer, and consumer decision making are considered.
RM 2215 - Introduction to Retail Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of retailing management. Aspects of retailing management in global, multi-channel retail environment. Strategies/tactics to make decisions to operate retail business. Retail management principles covered.
RM 3243 - Visual Merchandising
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Retail store environment. Physical/psychological effects that initiate/motivate consumer behavior. Merchandise display: creativity, department layout, fixturing, lighting, cross merchandising, visual resources, signing, maintenance. prereq: 2215, [DHA major or minor or instr consent]
RM 4117W - Retail Environments and Human Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/research related to designed environments across retail channels. prereq: 2215 or DHA 2215, [jr or sr or grad student], [design major or minor or instr consent]
RM 4123 - Living in a Consumer Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApSt 5123/RM 4123
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Consumerism within U.S. society. Commodification of health care, education, and production of news. Commercialization of public space/culture. What drives consumer society. How meaning is manufactured. What the lived experiences are of consumers today. Postmodern market. Alternatives to consumer society. prereq: Sr, retail merchandising major or minor
RM 4216 - Retail Promotions
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApSt 4216/ApSt 5216/RM 4216
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of integrated marketing communications in retail businesses. Promotion techniques/media characteristics. Application of theories behind consumer decision making. prereq: 2215, [jr or sr or grad student], [DHA major or minor or instr consent]
RM 4247 - Advanced Buying and Sourcing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Technology application for buying/sourcing. Six-month dollar merchandise planning, assortment planning, market purchase and sales promotions planning, inventory management, costing, markdowns, timing, and sourcing. prereq: RM 2215, RM 3242, [DHA major or minor or instr consent]
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations Management focuses on the design and management of transformation processes to provide products and services to create value for the people, planet, and firm prosperity. On the one hand, supply chain and operations management involves the integration of activities and processes, to facilitate the flows of materials, services, finances, and information to convert inputs into the firms? primary products and services. Operational issues include the design of products and processes, the procurement of raw materials, the control of inventories, the maintenance of quality, the planning of human resources and facilities, and the delivery of products or services, so that customer expectations and needs are met. Operations also have significant interactions with other functional areas of the firm (e.g., finance, marketing, strategy, and accounting). Therefore, understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm from both tactical and strategic aspects is an important part of any manager's training. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts, operations practices, and models in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. The course will cover both quantitative and qualitative methods.
SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope/motive of the study of sport from sociological, psychological, historical, economic, and scientific perspective. Issues in sport.
SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of organization, management, and administration within the sport industry. Students will have the opportunity to hear, learn, and share viewpoints as they relate to sport management through lectures, discussions on current events, and case study analysis. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent, and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the business activity of the sports industry. Topics include sports and its business ecosystem, basic economic principles, revenue management, ticketing, sponsorships and other revenue sources, and expenditure management. prereq: SMGT or KIN or REC major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an overview of sport marketing management in sport organizations. The most basic objectives of the course provide you with a broad introduction to sport marketing concepts, the role of sport marketing in society, and the various factors that influence marketing decision making. Like other introductory survey courses, you will be exposed to and expected to learn the "language? of the industry (i.e., terms, concepts, and frameworks) used by practicing marketing professionals. However, it is also expected that by the end of the course you will have a solid understanding of the major decision areas under marketing, the basic interrelationships of those decision areas, and an appreciation of how to apply key frameworks and tools in analysis of customers, competition, and marketing strengths and weaknesses. With this combination, the course should help you develop insight about creative selection of target markets and blending decisions related to product, price, promotion, place, and PR (i.e., the marketing mix) to meet the needs of a target market. It is important that sport management students understand the vital role of marketing within the sport industry. Marketing may take several forms in sport businesses. Students must be able to differentiate between use of marketing to sell sport products and/or services (marketing of sport) from the use of sport and sport personality marketing to sell general or sport-related products or services (marketing through sport). These objectives can only be achieved through a joint effort. I will work to stimulate your interest and learning in these areas, but you will be expected to display initiative and a program of self-study. In that sense, a complementary objective of the course is to provide you with an environment that will encourage and reward your own intellectual effort, while simultaneously maintaining rigorous standards that identify those who are motivated to pursue excellence in their own educational preparation for a sport business career. prereq: SMGT Major or SMGT Minor, or instructor consent AND 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Foundation of revenue production in sport management. Necessary skills related to revenue production and sales processes as they apply to the business of sport. prereq: Sport Management major or minor or instr consent
SPAN 3034 - Advanced Business Spanish
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3022/Tldo 3022/Tldo 3023/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major issues of culture in relation to business in context of Spanish-speaking world. Important historical-social factors that contribute to understanding of economy/business relationships with industrialized nations. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3015W or SPAN 3015V or SPAN 3019W or TLDO 3231 or ECDR 3015W or ARGN 3015W
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3029W/Writ 3029W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course students practice writing and revising common business documents for today?s business world. Students write memos, proposals, cover letters, resumes, and digital and web content as well as practice choice of appropriate formats and media. The course draws from current business practices and stresses workplace collaboration, broader issues of professional literacy, and responsive writing styles. Students practice rhetorical analysis and discuss concepts such as audience, purpose, tone, and context when writing and revising their documents. Students analyze and write from a variety of perspectives and contexts including formal (researched reports, proposals) and informal (email, social media) communication. Students also build a professional online presence through such platforms as LinkedIn.
BA 3033W - Business Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 3033W/Mgmt 3033W/IBUS 3033W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course teaches strategies and skills to communicate with confidence, clarity, and impact in business settings. Students develop their abilities in critical thinking (analyzing data, audience, purpose, and context) and craft (honing skills in storytelling, persuasion, writing, diction, tone, presence, data visualization, and visual design). They learn to navigate ambiguity, evaluate the needs of internal and external stakeholders, and communicate solutions to complex business problems. The course is performance- and project-based. Students produce professional-level memos, emails, and research-based proposal decks. They deliver multiple presentations (individual and team) and learn to communicate effectively with data. Students will meet with the instructor in small groups outside of class time for one scheduled lab session. The course culminates in the Case Study Competition where student teams apply their knowledge to address a real challenge from one of our industry partners. prereq: First Year Writing, Carlson School junior or senior.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.