Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Neuroscience B.S.

Neuroscience
College of Biological Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 74 to 85
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Neuroscience majors study the molecular and cellular building blocks that make up the brain and control its function. The study of neuroscience aims to understand how complex animals, including humans, see, hear, move, think, and feel. Neuroscientists also study abnormalities that cause diseases and mechanisms that underlie pain and addiction. A BS in neuroscience prepares undergraduates to pursue advanced studies in neuroscience, professional degrees in medicine, or related fields.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
At least 16 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Foundational Courses
Nature of Life/Nature of Science and Research
BIOL 1805 - Nature of Life: Introducing New Students to the Biological Sciences (0.5 cr)
BIOL 1806 - Nature of Life, Part Two (0.5 cr)
BIOL 2905 - Nature of Life, Part III (0.5 cr)
BIOL 2906 - Nature of Life, Part IV (0.5 cr)
or BIOL 3001 - Nature of Science and Research (1.0 cr)
Foundations of Biology
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)
BIOL 2003 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 2003H - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3004 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II Laboratory (3.0 cr)
Quantitative Requirements
MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 5465 - Introduction to Computing for Biologists (3.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems (3.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
Chemistry
Track 1: Preferred CBS Chemistry Sequence
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or Track 2
This track is allowable for students entering CBS with previous chemistry credit or for whom space is not available in the preferred track. Students should speak with a CBS academic advisor to determine eligibility for this track.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or Track 2 (Honors Option)
This track is allowable for CBS honors students.
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
Physics
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
CBS Content Areas
At least one course is required from 5 out of the 6 Content Areas. Students can choose to fulfill any 5 Content Areas.
Take 5 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Content Area A: Ecology
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· Content Area B: Evolution
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· Content Area C: Organismal Biology
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· MICB 3303 - Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory) (3.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PMB 3212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PMB 5212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)
· PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· Content Area D: Biochemistry
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)
· Content Area E: Genetics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4131 - Prokaryotic Genetics (3.0 cr)
· Content Area F: Cell Biology
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)
Neuroscience Core Requirements
NSCI 2101 - Human Neuroanatomy [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or NSCI 2001 - Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab) (3.0 cr)
NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
NSCI 4101 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms (3.0 cr)
or NSCI 4201 - Neuroscience of Drug Abuse (3.0 cr)
or NSCI 4501 - Neurodegenerative Diseases, Mechanisms to Therapies (3.0 cr)
Directed Research or Lab Experience
Students may use a maximum of seven credits of directed research toward a CBS degree.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry [WI] (2.0 cr)
· BIOC 4125 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4225 - Laboratory in NMR Techniques (1.0 cr)
· BIOC 4325 - Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry (1.0 cr)
· BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 5005 - Computer Programming for Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 5111 - Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems (3.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics (3.0 cr)
· MICE 5035 - Personal Microbiome Analysis (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· NSCI 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PHCL 4100 - Laboratory in Molecular Pharmacology (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Take at most 1 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 2996 - Directed Introduction to Research (1.0 cr)
Neuroscience Major Electives
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3025 - Molecular Biology and Society [TS] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4960H - Thesis Writing in the Biological Sciences: Developing the Literature Review (1.0 cr)
· BMEN 5411 - Neural Engineering (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4330W - Animal Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4171 - Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine (3.0 cr)
· GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· NSC 5203 - Basic and Clinical Vision Science (3.0 cr)
· NSC 5461 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
· NSC 5561 - Systems Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
· NSC 5661W - Behavioral Neuroscience [WI] (4.0 cr)
· NSCI 3001W - Neuroscience and Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· NSCI 3505W - Mind and Brain [WI] (4.0 cr)
· NSCI 4150 - Advanced Topics in Neuroscience (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4201 - Neuroscience of Drug Abuse (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4501 - Neurodegenerative Diseases, Mechanisms to Therapies (3.0 cr)
· PHCL 4343 - Pharmacology of the Synapse (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5036W - Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GCC 3xxx
· GCC 5xxx
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry [WI] (2.0 cr)
· BIOC 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOC 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOL 4321W - Deconstructing Research: Writing about Biological Research for Non-scientists [WI] (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOL 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· COP 4793W - Writing Intensive Directed Studies [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· COP 4794W - Writing Intensive Directed Research [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4330W - Animal Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· EEB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· GCD 4005W - Cell Biology-Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· GCD 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· MICB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· NSCI 3001W - Neuroscience and Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3505W - Mind and Brain [WI] (4.0 cr)
· NSCI 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· NSCI 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· PMB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health
The College of Biological Sciences (CBS) and the School of Public Health (SPH) offer an early-admission opportunity for eligible CBS students interested in pursuing the Environmental Health MPH degree. The MPH program in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences emphasizes the scientific, technological, policy and management skills required to address environmental health concerns. These concerns include investigating health hazards in our environment, protecting worker health, and establishing the basis for public health policy. The Division of Environmental Health is committed to graduating professionals with interdisciplinary training, which includes practicing innovative problem solving, and gaining experience with a diversity of approaches and applications. To be eligible for this program, applicants must be admitted undergraduate students in the College of Biological Sciences, have completed at least 60+ credits, and have a GPA of a least 3.25.
Students admitted to the Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health program take 12 MPH credits during their senior year, and complete the MPH by taking remaining credits as a full-time graduate student in the summer and academic year after completing their undergraduate degree. Graduate courses cannot be applied toward both BS and MPH credit and degree requirements. Admitted students must maintain timely degree progress to ensure that the BS degree is awarded no later than the end of the senior year. The application deadline for the Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health opportunity is the spring of the applicant's junior year. Interested students should consult with their CBS academic advisor or School of Public Health for application instructions.
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Biological Sciences
View sample plan(s):
· Neuroscience (with Chem 1081 track)
· Neuroscience (with Chem 1061 track)
· Neuroscience (with Chem 1015)
· Integrated BS/MPH-EnvHlth Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Neuroscience B.S.
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BIOL 1805 - Nature of Life: Introducing New Students to the Biological Sciences
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Building on incoming student summer programming to get started in the Biological Sciences in CBS. Providing transition programming, academic success tools, college learning, and guidance as a foundation for success in the biological sciences. Introduction to the College of Biological Sciences community and opportunities through class content, guild activities, and peer mentoring. prereq: Fr in College of Biological Sciences
BIOL 1806 - Nature of Life, Part Two
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second semester of Nature of Life with focus on building intentional pathway in CBS/student success/engagement. prereq: 1805
BIOL 2905 - Nature of Life, Part III
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reflect on aspirations, personal characteristics, experiences. Resources/practical tools to reach educational/professional goals. Special focus on developing personal/professional goals, articulating personal experiences in light of aspirations. prereq: 1805, 1806
BIOL 2906 - Nature of Life, Part IV
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reflect on aspirations, personal characteristics, experiences. Resources/practical tools to reach educational/professional goals. Special focus on developing personal/professional goals, articulating personal experiences in light of aspirations. prereq: 2905
BIOL 3001 - Nature of Science and Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore how to read/use research papers. Role of research ethics. Financial, legal, regulatory oversight on research/other topics. **This course is for new CBS transfer students from other institutions. prereq: College-level biology
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS honors students
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 2003 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2003/Biol 2003H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Second of two courses. Biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Ecology/biochemistry concepts within problem solving/application.
BIOL 2003H - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2003/Biol 2003H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Second of two courses. Biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Ecology/biochemistry concepts within problem solving/application.
BIOL 3004 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3004/Biol 3004H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course follows BIOL 1961 and is required for all CBS majors. Students design and perform research projects that will require an additional 4-to-6 hours per week of work outside of class; times to be arranged. Each section is devoted to a single research area; check the section details to see which sections correspond to each research area. Research projects in zebrafish environmental toxicology and zebrafish microbiome sections will require in-person work in the BIOL 3004 laboratory. Only students with previous command line coding experience should enroll for a computational microbiology section. All projects involve applying quantitative skills, scientific method, and modern biological tools to real-world questions. Prerequisite is Foundations of Biology Lab I: BIOL 1961, 1961H, 2002, or 2002H AND CHEM 1021, 1061, 1071H, or 1081. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: BIOL 3004H.
MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programming concepts using Python language. Real world problem solving, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Abstractions/modularity. Optional honors topics: programming robots, programming paradigms, artificial intelligence. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H], CSci majors, pre-majors in CSE/CLA, honors student
CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3003/CSci 5465
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
This course builds computational skills needed to carry out basic data analysis tasks common in modern biology. Students will learn computing concepts (algorithm development, data structures, complexity analysis) along with practical programming skills in Python and R. No previous programming knowledge assumed. Prereq: introductory biology course.
CSCI 5465 - Introduction to Computing for Biologists
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3003/CSci 5465
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
This course is designed for graduate students in biology or other related sciences that wish to learn fundamental computing skills that will enable them to develop their own computational approaches for meaningful interpretation of scientific data. Students will complete programming assignments in Python and R. No previous programming knowledge assumed. Prereq: Introductory biology course; non-CSE students only.
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development, analysis and simulation of models for the dynamics of biological systems. Mathematical topics include discrete and continuous dynamical systems, linear algebra, and probability. Models from fields such as ecology, epidemiology, physiology, genetics, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [1241 or 1271 or 1371] w/grade of at least C-
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems. Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered. prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products. prereq: 3301
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Developmental biology is the study of the process by which organisms grow and develop from embryo to adult. This field encompasses the biology of morphogenesis, differentiation, regeneration, metamorphosis, and the growth and differentiation of stem cells. Topics focus primarily on animal development to include fertilization, cell specification, body patterning, stem cells, neurogenesis, organogenesis, limb formation, regeneration, sex determination and developmental timing, as well as environmental impacts on development. Students will learn about genetic models such as fruit flies, nematodes, fish, mice, and plants. Coverage will be extended to human development and disease as appropriate. prereq: BIOL 4003; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BIOL 4004
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: [Biol 1961 and Biol 2003] or Biol 1009 or instructor permission
MICB 3303 - Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, infectious disease, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to function of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses. prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 or instructor permission
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 3212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi. This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a "Fungus in Focus" one-page "brief" focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect "dots" for students linking microbial processes to environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather. prereq: Introductory Biology course
PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns. prereq: MicB 3301 required; BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 recommended
PMB 5212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Typically offered: Every Spring
No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi. This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a Fungus in Focus one-page brief focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect dots for students linking microbial processes to the environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather.
PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores a range of plant physiological processes, including how plants make and use food; acquire and use minerals; transport water and nutrients; and regulate growth and development in response to hormones and environmental cues, such as light quality. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
BIOC 3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to biochemistry including discussion of the structure and functions of biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), central metabolic pathways, and the mechanisms of enzyme action. This course is intended for students in the College of Biological Sciences. Students from other colleges should register for BIOC 3021. prereq: CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent
BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics. prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad
PMB 4131 - Prokaryotic Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4131/PMB 5131
Typically offered: Every Spring
Genetics is the application of abstractions to understand biological function. Much of our understanding at the molecular level of the natural world is derived from genetic work in model microbial systems like Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Saccharomyces. Prokaryotic Genetics will focus on a molecular understanding of bacteria, with a smattering of archaea and phage genetics, covering both classic (transposons, mutant/suppressors) and modern (sequencing, metagenomics, synthetic biology) genetic approaches.
BIOC 4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of molecular biology. Mechanisms of gene action/biological regulation. prereq: BioC 4331 or Bioc 3201 or BioC 3022
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or Biol 4003 or grad
MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4141W/4171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, attachment, entry. Genome replication/mRNA production by RNA viruses. Reverse transcription. DNA virus templates. Replication of DNA virus genomes. Processing of viral pre-mRNA. Translational control. Assembly, host defense, tumor viruses, pathogenesis, HIV, antivirals. prereq: Biol 2003 and Biol 4003 and [MicB 4131 or instructor permission]
PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PBio 4516W/5516
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structure, function, and dynamic properties of plant cellular components. How cellular structures function and contribute to cell growth. Cell fate/development. Developing a clear/concise writing style for incisive criticism of scientific papers. prereq: [Biol 2022 or Biol 3002 or Biol 3007], [BioC 3021 or Biol 3021 or Biol 4003]
NSCI 2101 - Human Neuroanatomy (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSci 2001/NSci 2100
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will provide a broad introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on the human nervous system. The course will introduce the structure and function of neurons, the major anatomical parts of the nervous system and the main functional systems. Functional systems will be approached through an understanding of the anatomical circuitry. The fundamental concepts of neurochemical communication studied in general terms in the first part of the course will be re-examined relative to specific functional systems later in the course. Although the major focus of the course will be on the normal nervous system, common diseases will be introduced for each main topic. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of many neurological diseases, which will provide further insight into how the normal nervous system functions. The neuronal substrates of learning/memory, addiction and drug actions will be examined. Through the lectures, laboratory exercises and other resources, students will be expected to gain an understanding of the neural circuitry and information processing responsible for the diverse range of human behaviors. The material covered in Nsci 2001 and 2100 is very similar. N2100 is taught only fall semester. It is a traditional lecture course that includes a weekly laboratory. The faculty believe that the laboratory is a valuable part of the course. N2001 is taught only spring semester for those who cannot take the fall course. It does not have a lab, but has the advantage of a flipped format. In N2001, students will be expected to watch the assigned lectures prior to coming to class. Class time will be spent on exercises and discussions that use the material presented in the online lectures. Students who take one of these two courses will not be allowed to take the other course. For more information, see http://mcloonlab.neuroscience.umn.edu/2100/index.htm
NSCI 2001 - Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSci 2001/NSci 2100
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will provide a broad introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on the human nervous system. The course will introduce the structure and function of neurons, the major anatomical parts of the nervous system and the main functional systems. Functional systems will be approached through an understanding of the anatomical circuitry. The fundamental concepts of neurochemical communication studied in general terms in the first part of the course will be re-examined relative to specific functional systems later in the course. Although the major focus of the course will be on the normal nervous system, common diseases will be introduced for each main topic. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of many neurological diseases, which will provide further insight into how the normal nervous system functions. The neuronal substrates of learning/memory, addiction and drug actions will be examined. Through the lectures, discussions and other resources, students will be expected to gain an understanding of the neural circuitry and information processing responsible for the diverse range of human behaviors. The material covered in Nsci 2001 and 2100 is very similar. N2100 is taught only fall semester. It is a traditional lecture course that includes a weekly laboratory. The faculty believe that the laboratory is a valuable part of the course. N2001 is taught only spring semester for those who cannot take the fall course. It does not have a lab, but has the advantage of a flipped format. In N2001, students will be expected to watch the assigned lectures prior to coming to class. Class time will be spent on exercises and discussions that use the material presented in the online lectures. Students who take one of these two courses will not be allowed to take the other course. For more information, see http://mcloonlab.neuroscience.umn.edu/2001/index.htm
NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites. Enrollment Requirements: Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 OR concurrent/previous BioC 3021/3022/4331 or equivalent. Nsci 2001/2100 highly recommended.
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
NSCI 4101 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nsci 4100/Nsci 8211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will extend students? understanding of fundamental concepts of biology and neuroscience through study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie development of the nervous system. Neurodevelopment provides a context in which to study processes active in many biological functions and diseases. Students will learn about each of the major cellular processes involved in development of the nervous system such as cell division and cell migration, and will learn about the function of molecules and signaling pathways active in each process. Human developmental pathologies will be studied as a means to better understand normal developmental processes. Some lectures will focus on current research, and students will be expected to read some scientific literature.
NSCI 4201 - Neuroscience of Drug Abuse
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The use and abuse of illicit drugs is an ongoing and insidious world problem. Neuroscience research has contributed importantly to understanding drug abuse as a disease of the nervous system. The goal of this course will be to provide a clinical characterization of drug abuse from a human perspective. From there animal models of drug use and addiction will be discussed as a basis for research examining cellular and molecular mechanisms of the effects of drugs on the nervous system. As all drugs of abuse have a common neurobiology, that neurobiology will be examined from a circuit perspective that will include the underlying molecular control. Collectively students should develop a comprehensive view of the problem of drug addiction including prospects for the development of neurobiologically-based therapeutics.
NSCI 4501 - Neurodegenerative Diseases, Mechanisms to Therapies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
With a rapid increase in population aging in western educated industrialized rich democratic (WEIRD) societies, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease have become an alarming health priority due to the current absence of disease-modifying therapies. The objective of this course is to acquire a fundamental appreciation for the most common degenerative disorders of the nervous system as well as to integrate central notions shared across these diseases and emerging concepts in the field
BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory, principles, and use of fundamental techniques in modern biochemistry labs. prereq: 3021, 3022, or 4331 or equiv
BIOC 4125 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4125/BioC 4185/Biol 4125/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This molecular biology laboratory course is designed to give students hands-on experience performing common techniques used in modern molecular biology, as well as the background information needed to understand what kind of information can be obtained by using them. Because of the dual nature of this course, a portion of the laboratory time will be spent on lectures explaining the theory behind the techniques being used as well as practical aspects of experimental design. In addition, readings will be assigned that explain the history and principles behind some of the techniques used. Basic recombinant DNA techniques: methods for growing, isolating, and purifying recombinant DNA and cloning vectors, DNA sequencing and sequence analysis, gene expression, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), other current techniques. prereq: Biol 3015 or Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Bioc 3021 or Bioc 3022 or Bioc 4331 or Biol 4003 or instructor consent
BIOC 4225 - Laboratory in NMR Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Practical aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Hands-on experience with 500/600 MHz instruments. Sample preparation/handling, contamination sources, tube/probe options, experiment selection, experimental procedures, software, data processing. prereq: 4331; 4521 recommended; intended for biochemistry majors
BIOC 4325 - Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience with techniques/instruments. Sample preparation/handling, 2-dimenstioal gels, MS-MS, MALDI-TOF, electrospray/LC-MS, experiment selection/procedures, software, data processing. prereq: 4332, 4521
BIOC 5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to genomics. Emphasizes microbial genomics. Sequencing methods, sequence analysis, genomics databases, genome mapping, prokaryotic horizontal gene transfer, genomics in biotechnology, intellectual property issues. Hands-on introduction to UNIX shell scripting, genomic data analysis using R and Excel in a computer lab setting. prereq: College-level courses in [organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology]
GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Bioinformatic analysis is the exploration of molecular sequence, structure, and function using online tools and databases. In this class, we'll learn to use some of the most powerful tools available for biologists to investigate the nature of genes and proteins. We will each explore a gene and the protein it encodes that no one before us has studied. We will learn to analyze and interpret the diverse forms of bioinformatic data we obtain, and we will consider how the data we find allows us to generate and evaluate original hypotheses that can be tested in the laboratory. This is a hands-on course. While the class has no exams, it does require the completion of four problem sets and a summative final project over the course of the semester. It also involves doing some peer review of classmates? work. prereq: One semester of college biology is recommended
GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for juniors and seniors to learn experimental approaches and techniques to study cellular processes and stem cell biology during animal development and tissue regeneration. Students will be exposed to the advantages of different model systems that include cultured cells, chick, C. elegans and zebrafish. Students will learn to manipulate the cytoskeleton, perform cell differentiation, RNAi and regeneration assays, and to image both fixed tissue and live animal samples with conventional light microscopes as well as cutting edge technology, including super-resolution and multi-photon microscopes. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: 3033 or Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 5005 - Computer Programming for Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Computer programming skills with applications in biology. Design/build new computer programs for applications in cell/developmental biology, including modeling of biological processes, advanced data analysis, automated image analysis. prereq: BIOL 4003 or GCD 3033, general statistics course
GCD 5111 - Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 5111/GCD 8111
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Fluorescence microscopy is an essential technique to probe the inner workings of cells and tissues. You will learn ?hands on? the inner workings of fluorescent microscopes, how to set up and acquire fluorescent images using microscopes, and how to quantitatively analyze image data using FIJI (ImageJ) software. Undergraduate students require instructor permission for enrollment. Graduate students are allowed to register for 5111 without instructor permission.
MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development, analysis and simulation of models for the dynamics of biological systems. Mathematical topics include discrete and continuous dynamical systems, linear algebra, and probability. Models from fields such as ecology, epidemiology, physiology, genetics, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [1241 or 1271 or 1371] w/grade of at least C-
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: [Biol 1961 and Biol 2003] or Biol 1009 or instructor permission
MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms. prereq: MICB 3301 AND Microbiology major or minor; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement, and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methods prereq: MicB 3301 and [Biol 4003 or permission]; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors
MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques, experimental methods in microbial genetics, immunology. Virology used to study microbes/interactions with host. prereq: Micb 3301 and [Bioc 3022 or Bioc 4331] and [MicB 4171 prereq or concurrent registration or permission]
MICE 5035 - Personal Microbiome Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Personal Microbiome Analysis, an introduction to the computational exploration and analysis of your inner microbial community, also known as your microbiome. In this course, you will have the opportunity to explore your own microbiome using visualization and analysis tools. Sequencing your own microbiome is encouraged but not required for the course. Introductory biology or genetics is recommended: BIOL 1009, GCD 3022 or BIOL 4003.
NSCI 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. Writing intensive. prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements
NSCI 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. prereq: instr consent, dept consent; max of 7 cr of 4993 and/or 4994 may count toward major requirements
PHCL 4100 - Laboratory in Molecular Pharmacology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hands-on experimentation using molecular techniques for data collection/analysis. prereq: [2001 or 4001], 3100, [BioC 3021 or BioC 4331], [BioC 4025, BioC 4125 recommended]
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
BIOL 2996 - Directed Introduction to Research
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Directed Introduction to Research is an introduction to laboratory or field biological research for students with no prior experience, normally first- and second-year students. The University directed studies contract will be used to describe the training experience which could include attending lab meetings, reading and discussing research papers from the lab, learning basic lab and field techniques, assays, and approaches used by the research group, and learning to keep a lab or field notebook. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. Lab or field training can be led by graduate students or postdocs in the research group but one-on-one meetings with the PI should be included. The course is one credit and the student and PI agree that 45 hours of work will be done. There will be one group meeting per semester per major for all of the students enrolled in 2996 to discuss the research experience with the Director of Undergraduate Research for the major and a panel of more experienced undergraduate researchers. The goal of that meeting is community building and to introduce students to opportunities for further research experience. The grading option is S/N, similar to all directed studies/research courses in CBS. This course can be repeated, if it is done with a different mentor, for a total of two credits. One credit of this course can be counted as a degree requirement for each CBS major.
BIOL 3025 - Molecular Biology and Society (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3015/Biol 3020
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An in-depth analysis of molecular biology topics and methods related to the Central Dogma of modern biology. Successful completion of this course is required as the prerequisite for most upper-level CBS courses.
BIOL 4960H - Thesis Writing in the Biological Sciences: Developing the Literature Review
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In the Fall semester of the two-semester capstone thesis support course, CBS honors students will develop and refine the literature review introduction component of the honors thesis. The course will focus on conceptualizing the gap in knowledge, drafting the literature review, and revising in response to peer and outside reader feedback. We will use the literature to unpack the conventions of authentic scientific writing so that students can begin to draft other sections of their thesis (methods, results narrative, publication ready figures, legends) By the end of the term, students will have developed and peer-workshopped at least one draft module of each data-related thesis section and they will have a revised version of the thesis introduction/literature review to deliver to their faculty research mentor for feedback before the start of the Spring term. Students should be in a research lab and have started their research project before the start of the semester. Students who have not yet fulfilled an upper division WI course in the biological sciences should wait until the Spring (final) semester to register for their major's version of WI directed research or WI directed studies (for example, MicB 4794W or 4793W). The completed and approved thesis will count for the WI.
BMEN 5411 - Neural Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis. Signal processing techniques. Modeling of nervous system, its response to stimulation. Electrode design, neural modeling, cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation. Prosthetic limbs, micturition control, prosthetic vision. Brain machine interface, seizure prediction, optical imaging of nervous system, place cell recordings in hippocampus. prereq: 3401 recommended
EEB 4330W - Animal Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Mechanisms of signal production/perception, signal propagation. How signals can convey information. How signalers, signals, receivers are adapted for communication by natural/sexual selection. prereq: (BIOL 1951 or BIOL 1951H or Biol 1009) and (EEB 3412W or EEB 3411 or EEB 3811W)
GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.
GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulatory pathways involved in directing normal development of complex eukaryotic organisms, how disruptions of these pathways can lead to abnormal cell growth/cancer. Causes, detection, treatment, prevention of cancer. prereq: Biol 4003
GCD 4171 - Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 8181/SCB 8181
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contemporary stem cell biology with emphasis on mechanisms/applications. Embryonic, tissue-specific, and induced pluripotent stem cells and potential uses in human disease. recommended prerequisites BIOL 4003 Genetics; recommended prerequisite or corequisite BIOL 4004 Cell Biology This course can be used as an elective for certain CBS majors, such as the GCD major. Check the Program Requirements for your major to determine if it can be used as an elective.
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent; [sr or grad student] recommended
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease, cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies. Prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 and [Junior or senior]
NSC 5203 - Basic and Clinical Vision Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Basic and clinical vision science. prereq: instr consent
NSC 5461 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Lectures by team of faculty, problem sets in important physiological concepts, discussion of original research papers. prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent
NSC 5561 - Systems Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of organization of neural systems forming the basis for sensation/movement. Sensory-motor/neural-endocrine integration. Relationships between structure and function in nervous system. Team taught. Lecture, laboratory. prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent
NSC 5661W - Behavioral Neuroscience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Neural coding/representation of movement parameters. Neural mechanisms underlying higher order processes such as memorization, memory scanning, and mental rotation. Emphasizes experimental psychological studies in human subjects, single cell recording experiments in subhuman primates, and artificial neural network modeling. prereq: Grad NSc major or grad NSc minor or instr consent
NSCI 3001W - Neuroscience and Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethical implications. Readings, personal reflections, class discussions, debates, and formal writing. Development of logical arguments, writing skills, oral presentation skills, and teamwork. Students present/argue both their own personal views and those of others. What it is like to have altered mentation, i.e. a brain disease or disability. Readings/multimedia reports from primary neuroscience literature as well as philosophy, policy, and law literature and popular media.
NSCI 3505W - Mind and Brain (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is intended as an introduction to the new views on the relationship between mind and brain. Over the last several decades, a new view of cognition and neural processing has been developed based on the concepts of al¬gorithm, representation, computation, and information processing. Within this theoretical frame¬work, psychological constructs are computational processes occur¬ring across physical neural systems. We will take a neuroscience and psychological perspective in which the physical neuroscience instantiates but does not diminish the psychological constructs. Although our conceptual framework will be computational, this course will not require or expect any mathematical or computer background. At the completion of this class, you will understand the implications of the physical nature of the brain ? how mentation is explicable from physical processes, and how decision-making arises from those same physical processes. Importantly, you will also understand the limitations of current knowledge and the methodologies being used to push those limitations. This class is not intended as a final step in this understanding, but as a first step into these issues. At the conclusion of the class, you should have sufficient understanding to continue more in-depth reading and study in these issues. There are no official prerequisites. However, I have found that students who have EITHER a strong computational background (computer science, mathematics, economics, physics) OR have taken an introductory neuroscience course (e.g. Nsci 2100) have done better in the class than students with no background. However, I have seen students come in with very little background and do well in the class if they engage with the class and work hard.
NSCI 4150 - Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In-depth study of aspects of neurodevelopment, neurochemistry/molecular neuroscience, sensory systems, motor control, and behavioral neuroscience. Primarily for undergraduates majoring in neuroscience or related areas.
NSCI 4201 - Neuroscience of Drug Abuse
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The use and abuse of illicit drugs is an ongoing and insidious world problem. Neuroscience research has contributed importantly to understanding drug abuse as a disease of the nervous system. The goal of this course will be to provide a clinical characterization of drug abuse from a human perspective. From there animal models of drug use and addiction will be discussed as a basis for research examining cellular and molecular mechanisms of the effects of drugs on the nervous system. As all drugs of abuse have a common neurobiology, that neurobiology will be examined from a circuit perspective that will include the underlying molecular control. Collectively students should develop a comprehensive view of the problem of drug addiction including prospects for the development of neurobiologically-based therapeutics.
NSCI 4501 - Neurodegenerative Diseases, Mechanisms to Therapies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
With a rapid increase in population aging in western educated industrialized rich democratic (WEIRD) societies, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease have become an alarming health priority due to the current absence of disease-modifying therapies. The objective of this course is to acquire a fundamental appreciation for the most common degenerative disorders of the nervous system as well as to integrate central notions shared across these diseases and emerging concepts in the field
PHCL 4343 - Pharmacology of the Synapse
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study synapse as pharmacological gateway to nervous system. Explore physiology of/cellular signalling at synapse, how signalling influences conditions such as Parkinson's disease, depression, anxiety, pain, addiction. How various drugs modify signalling at synapse. recommend: [PHCL 2001, PHCL 3100]
PSY 5036W - Computational Vision (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control. prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory. prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent
PSY 5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consequences of different types of brain damage on human perception/cognition. Neural mechanisms of normal perceptual/cognitive functions. Vision/attention disorders, split brain, language deficits, memory disorders, central planning deficits. Emphasizes function/phenomenology. Minimal amount of brain anatomy. prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory, principles, and use of fundamental techniques in modern biochemistry labs. prereq: 3021, 3022, or 4331 or equiv
BIOC 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOC 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOL 4321W - Deconstructing Research: Writing about Biological Research for Non-scientists (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Deconstructing Biology Research is designed to help majors in the College of Biological Sciences improve their skills in selecting primary research papers, understanding the experimental approaches taken by the authors of those papers, and evaluating the results and conclusions. Students will then share that knowledge by writing effective deconstructions that explain the research approaches and results for different audiences, including the public at large.
BIOL 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOL 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
COP 4793W - Writing Intensive Directed Studies (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
COP 4794W - Writing Intensive Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a field station, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study of animal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicate to one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both of these. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independent research project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90 points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade. This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period in May/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 4330W - Animal Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Mechanisms of signal production/perception, signal propagation. How signals can convey information. How signalers, signals, receivers are adapted for communication by natural/sexual selection. prereq: (BIOL 1951 or BIOL 1951H or Biol 1009) and (EEB 3412W or EEB 3411 or EEB 3811W)
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
EEB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
EEB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
GCD 4005W - Cell Biology-Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: GCD major,3020, 4003
GCD 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
GCD 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora. prereq: Biol 4003
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement, and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methods prereq: MicB 3301 and [Biol 4003 or permission]; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors
MICB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
MICB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 15.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.
NSCI 3001W - Neuroscience and Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ethical implications. Readings, personal reflections, class discussions, debates, and formal writing. Development of logical arguments, writing skills, oral presentation skills, and teamwork. Students present/argue both their own personal views and those of others. What it is like to have altered mentation, i.e. a brain disease or disability. Readings/multimedia reports from primary neuroscience literature as well as philosophy, policy, and law literature and popular media.
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
NSCI 3505W - Mind and Brain (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is intended as an introduction to the new views on the relationship between mind and brain. Over the last several decades, a new view of cognition and neural processing has been developed based on the concepts of al¬gorithm, representation, computation, and information processing. Within this theoretical frame¬work, psychological constructs are computational processes occur¬ring across physical neural systems. We will take a neuroscience and psychological perspective in which the physical neuroscience instantiates but does not diminish the psychological constructs. Although our conceptual framework will be computational, this course will not require or expect any mathematical or computer background. At the completion of this class, you will understand the implications of the physical nature of the brain ? how mentation is explicable from physical processes, and how decision-making arises from those same physical processes. Importantly, you will also understand the limitations of current knowledge and the methodologies being used to push those limitations. This class is not intended as a final step in this understanding, but as a first step into these issues. At the conclusion of the class, you should have sufficient understanding to continue more in-depth reading and study in these issues. There are no official prerequisites. However, I have found that students who have EITHER a strong computational background (computer science, mathematics, economics, physics) OR have taken an introductory neuroscience course (e.g. Nsci 2100) have done better in the class than students with no background. However, I have seen students come in with very little background and do well in the class if they engage with the class and work hard.
NSCI 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual study of selected topics. Emphasis on readings, use of scientific literature. Writing intensive. prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements
NSCI 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. Writing intensive. prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PBio 4516W/5516
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structure, function, and dynamic properties of plant cellular components. How cellular structures function and contribute to cell growth. Cell fate/development. Developing a clear/concise writing style for incisive criticism of scientific papers. prereq: [Biol 2022 or Biol 3002 or Biol 3007], [BioC 3021 or Biol 3021 or Biol 4003]
PMB 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a research/directed studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
PMB 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.