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Morris Campus

Philosophy B.A.

Division of Humanities - Adm
Division of Humanities
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2024
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 40 to 48
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The philosophy program provides an environment in which students receive rich, well-rounded instruction in philosophy, whose pursuit is essential to a liberal arts education. Program Student Learning Outcomes UMM's philosophy curriculum offers coursework in all major subfields of philosophy including the history of philosophy, metaphysics and logic, epistemology, and values. In addition to a standard philosophy major, we also offer tracks in "Legal Studies", "Computer and Data Studies", and "Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE)." As a field of study, philosophy is at the core of a liberal arts education, as its skills encourage independent thought and interdisciplinary, integrated inquiry. Specifically, UMM's philosophy program offers students the opportunity to: Explore philosophy's fundamental questions and proposed answers; Cultivate their own philosophical powers, which include creativity, sensitivity, intellectual courage, open-mindedness and critical-mindedness, logical rigor, and analytical precision; Join the great conversation by contributing their own considered insights; Hone their ability to speak and write effectively.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S/N, unless offered S/N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
PHIL 1101 - Introduction to Philosophy [HUM] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 1801 - THINK: An Introduction to Philosophy [IC] (4.0 cr)
PHIL 1102 - Introduction to Symbolic Logic [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
PHIL 1103 - Introductory Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
PHIL 4901 - Advanced Seminar in Philosophy (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Philosophy, Standard
Core Courses
Take exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3141 - Epistemology [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
Take exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2121 - Philosophy of Religion [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3143 - Philosophy of Mind [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2116 - Free Will [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2117 - Existentialism [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3142 - Philosophy of Language [HUM] (4.0 cr)
Philosophy, Computer and Data Studies
The Computer and Data Studies sub-plan offers students the opportunity to combine the study of Philosophy, Computer Science, and Data Science. The interdisciplinary sub-plan will equip students with a range of critical thinking skills -- including logical, computational, and statistical reasoning -- that are highly prized in today's job market.
Core Course
PHIL 2115 - Ethics and Artificial Intelligence [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Philosophy Electives
Take exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3143 - Philosophy of Mind [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3141 - Epistemology [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3142 - Philosophy of Language [HUM] (4.0 cr)
Statistical Literacy
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Computational Literacy
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CSCI 1301 - Problem Solving and Algorithm Development [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1221 - Introductory Programming Concepts I [M/SR] (2.0 cr)
CSCI 1222 - Introductory Programming Concepts II (2.0 cr)
Data and Computer Science Blocks
The Philosophy, Computer and Data Studies sub-plan requires completion of one of the following two elements.
Element 1: The Data Science Block
Take exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
Introduction to Data Science
· CSCI 2701 - Introduction to Data Science [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2701 - Introduction to Data Science [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· Intermediate Data Science
· CSCI 3701 - Intermediate Data Science (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3701 - Intermediate Data Science (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Element 2: The Computer Science Block
Core Course
CSCI 2101 - Data Structures [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
Element 2 Electives
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 3501 - Algorithms and Computability (5.0 cr)
· CSCI 4403 - Systems: Data Mining (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4454 - Systems: Robotics (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4553 - Theory: Evolutionary Computation and Artificial Intelligence (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4555 - Theory: Neural Networks and Machine Learning (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4557 - Theory: Quantum Computing (4.0 cr)
Philosophy, Legal Studies
The Legal Studies sub-plan offers students the opportunity to hone their critical thinking skills and acquire a solid background in the foundations of law, justice, and government. This sub-plan may be especially appealing to students interested in applying to law school as well as those who are planning careers in business, politics, or public policy.
Core Course
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
Philosophy Electives
Take exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3141 - Epistemology [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Law Electives
Take exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [IP] (4.0 cr)
· Ethics Electives
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2115 - Ethics and Artificial Intelligence [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3112 - Climate Change and Moral Responsibility [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3201 - Environmental Justice [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Philosophy, Politics, Economics (PPE)
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) originated as a unified field at Oxford University in the 1920s and has since grown into an international movement. The PPE sub-plan at the University of Minnesota, Morris offers philosophy majors an interdisciplinary approach to the study of philosophical, political and economic thought. Students will rigorously examine the foundations of social values, political institutions, and economic systems and engage in reflective and informed debates about contemporary affairs and the impact of public policies on human welfare. This sub-plan may be especially interesting to students planning careers or post-graduate work in business, law, politics, or public policy.
Core Course
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy [SS] (4.0 cr)
Economics Core Course
ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics [SS] (4.0 cr)
Philosophy Electives
At least 8 credits of the philosophy electives must be at the 3xxx level.
Take exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· Upper-level electives
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3141 - Epistemology [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy [HIST] (4.0 cr)
Political Science Electives
Take exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1401 - World Politics [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2411 - Model United Nations [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3263 - Political Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· Division of Humanities

View sample plan(s):
· Philosophy
· Philosophy, Standard Sample Plan
· Phil, Computer and Data Study Sample Plan
· Philosophy, Legal Studies Sample Plan
· Phil, Pol, Econ (PPE) Sample Plan

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· Philosophy B.A.
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PHIL 1101 - Introduction to Philosophy (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1101/Phil 1801
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How should we live? What happens after we die? What is the relation between our minds and bodies? How much can we know? Does God exist? Do our lives have meaning? In this course, we will examine classic works in philosophy that address these big questions. Authors include: Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Boethius, Lucretius, Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, Berkeley, and Hume. We will also focus on critical thinking, writing, reading, and speaking skills.
PHIL 1801 - THINK: An Introduction to Philosophy (IC)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1101/Phil 1801
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How should we live our lives? What happens after death? What is the relationship between the mind and body? Does God exist? Why do bad things happen to good people? Examine classical works in philosophy that address these big questions about human nature and its place in the universe. Authors include: Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Lucretius, Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, and Hume. Work on the development of philosophical writing, reading, and speaking skills. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
PHIL 1102 - Introduction to Symbolic Logic (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to formal or deductive logic, including basic concepts of logical argumentation, Aristotelian logic, symbolic translations, truth tables, and theory of deduction. Samples from political speeches, philosophical essays as well as original LSAT questions are analyzed.
PHIL 1103 - Introductory Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to philosophical positions about the nature of morality, what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong, and various applied-ethical debates, such a abortion, wage ethics, and animal rights. [Note: no cr for students who have received cr for Phil 2111]
PHIL 4901 - Advanced Seminar in Philosophy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil4902/4903/4904
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced research seminar on a selected topic. Students read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. Additionally, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth, writes a paper, and gives a public presentation. prereq: phil major
PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores fundamental metaphysical issues such as the nature of reality, the notion of personal identity, the relationship between language, thought, minds, and the world. Philosophical works of both classic and contemporary philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Quine, Putnam, and Kripke are discussed. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An exploration of active debates in political theory and applied political philosophy. Topics such as political legitimacy, free speech (and hate speech), distributive justice, political equality and individual liberties, communitarianism, nationalism, immigration, and secession are discussed from a variety of political perspectives. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3141 - Epistemology (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores historical and contemporary views on the limits, justification, and nature of human knowledge. Topics include experiential versus a priori knowledge, the nature of belief, skepticism, and different theories of justification. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course offers a broad survey of ancient philosophy. Topics include: happiness, beauty, virtue, fatalism, relativism, taoism, hedonism, skepticism, friendship, emotions, and tragedy. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course offers a broad spectrum of modern philosophy. Topics include: innateness, materialism, idealism, personal identity, induction, causation, freedom, skepticism, optimism, pessimism, morality, beauty, laughter, tragedy, toleration, and free speech. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A critical examination of moral issues that arise in a person's professional life. Possible topics include affirmative action, autonomy in the workplace, ethical issues in advertising, corporate responsibility, coercive wage offers, distributive justice, and sexual harassment. Issues concerning race, gender, and women are included in selected modules.
PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of international relations and biomedical technologies. Topics include: warfare, terrorism, abortion, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, patient autonomy, humanitarian intervention, organ donation, famine relief, and genetic enhancement.
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
PHIL 2121 - Philosophy of Religion (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
An exploration of philosophical debates concerning the nature of religion, the existence and nature of God, the relationship between faith and reason, and other targets of religious interest such as free will, the soul, and immorality.
PHIL 3143 - Philosophy of Mind (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course serves as an introduction to contemporary philosophy of mind. Topics include: mind/brain identity, artificial intelligence, extended minds, consciousness, emotions, implicit attitudes, the paradox of fiction, illusionism, self-knowledge, personal identity, mind uploading, and virtual reality. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or instr consent
PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates about the ethics of love and sex. Topics include: competing accounts of erotic love, hookup culture, sexual consent and fraud, racial preferences, prostitution, polygamy and polyamory, BDSM and sexual dignity, sex robots, and sex ultimatums.
PHIL 2116 - Free Will (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores ancient and contemporary debates about the nature of free will and its value. Possible topics include: whether the sciences tell us what free will is and/or whether we have it, whether free will is required for moral and/or legal responsibility, whether it is possible for non-humans (e.g. animals or AI) to have free will, and the role of free will in living an autonomous and meaningful life. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Critical examination of theoretical and normative issues in the philosophy of law, including the connection (if any) between the law and morality, the nature of criminal responsibility, debates over the purpose of punishment, theories of legal interpretation, etc.
PHIL 2117 - Existentialism (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to some prominent thinkers often classified as "existentialists": Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus. Topics include what human freedom is, what makes a life authentic (or inauthentic), what role passion and choice should play in acquiring our beliefs and values, and what difference (if any) God's existence or non-existence makes on the significance of our lives. prereq: any 1xxx or instr consent
PHIL 3142 - Philosophy of Language (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traditional and contemporary discussions of philosophical problems such as the nature of language, its relationships to the world, to human thought, and to truth; the nature of logical reasoning; metalogical problems. Readings from philosophers such as Frege, Russell, Quine, Putnam, Goodman, Wittgenstein, and Kripke. prereq: 1102 or instr consent
PHIL 2115 - Ethics and Artificial Intelligence (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course surveys a number of ethical issues that arise from emerging forms of artificial intelligence. Topics include: superintelligence, robot rights, self-driving cars, autonomous weapons, sex/love/friendship robots, data privacy, online manipulation, algorithmic bias, and the future of work.
PHIL 3143 - Philosophy of Mind (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course serves as an introduction to contemporary philosophy of mind. Topics include: mind/brain identity, artificial intelligence, extended minds, consciousness, emotions, implicit attitudes, the paradox of fiction, illusionism, self-knowledge, personal identity, mind uploading, and virtual reality. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or instr consent
PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores fundamental metaphysical issues such as the nature of reality, the notion of personal identity, the relationship between language, thought, minds, and the world. Philosophical works of both classic and contemporary philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Quine, Putnam, and Kripke are discussed. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3141 - Epistemology (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores historical and contemporary views on the limits, justification, and nature of human knowledge. Topics include experiential versus a priori knowledge, the nature of belief, skepticism, and different theories of justification. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course offers a broad spectrum of modern philosophy. Topics include: innateness, materialism, idealism, personal identity, induction, causation, freedom, skepticism, optimism, pessimism, morality, beauty, laughter, tragedy, toleration, and free speech. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3142 - Philosophy of Language (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traditional and contemporary discussions of philosophical problems such as the nature of language, its relationships to the world, to human thought, and to truth; the nature of logical reasoning; metalogical problems. Readings from philosophers such as Frege, Russell, Quine, Putnam, Goodman, Wittgenstein, and Kripke. prereq: 1102 or instr consent
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
CSCI 1301 - Problem Solving and Algorithm Development (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to different problem solving approaches, major programming paradigms, hardware, software, and data representations. Study of the functional programming paradigm, concentrating on recursion and inductively-defined data structures. Simple searching and sorting algorithms.
CSCI 1221 - Introductory Programming Concepts I (M/SR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1221/CSci 1201
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic ideas of data representation, data manipulation, problem solving, and programming. Introduction to programming constructs including defining functions, using conditional execution, and repetition.
CSCI 1222 - Introductory Programming Concepts II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to programming concepts including recursion, higher-order functions, and object-oriented programming. Application of basic programming constructs in increasingly complex ways.
CSCI 2701 - Introduction to Data Science (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 2701/Stat 2701
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Stat 2701. Introduction to data science and informatics and their application to real world scenarios. Computational approaches to data types; database creation including technologies such as SQL/no-SQL; data visualization; data reduction, condensation, partitioning; statistical modeling; and communicating results. prereq: CSci 1222 (or CSci 1201) or CSci 1251 or CSci 1301, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or Stat 2611 or instr consent
STAT 2701 - Introduction to Data Science (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 2701/Stat 2701
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as CSci 2701. Introduction to data science and informatics and their application to real world scenarios. Computational approaches to data types; database creation including technologies such as SQL/no-SQL; data visualization; data reduction, condensation, partitioning; statistical modeling; and communicating results. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or Stat 2611, CSci 1222 (or CSci 1201) or CSci 1301 or CSci 1251 or instr consent
CSCI 3701 - Intermediate Data Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 40.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3701/Stat 3701
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Stat 3701. Continued development of topics introduced in Introduction to Data Science. Data mining techniques; applied machine learning techniques; mathematical fundamentals such as introductory linear algebra; graphical models such as Bayesian networks; network analysis; special topics such as topological data analysis; and a strong emphasis on communicating results. prereq: CSci 2701 or Stat 2701 or instr consent.
STAT 3701 - Intermediate Data Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3701/Stat 3701
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as CSci 3701. Continued development of topics introduced in Introduction to Data Science. Data mining techniques; applied machine learning techniques; mathematical fundamentals such as introductory linear algebra; graphical models such as Bayesian networks; network analysis; special topics such as topological data analysis; and a strong emphasis on communicating results. prereq: CSci 2701 or Stat 2701 or instr consent
CSCI 2101 - Data Structures (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to data structures, including stacks, queues, trees, and graphs; implementation of abstract data types and introduction to software testing, using object-oriented techniques and reusable libraries. (4 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab) prereq: 1222 (or 1201) or 1301 or instr consent
CSCI 3501 - Algorithms and Computability
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Models of computation (such as Turing machines, deterministic and non-deterministic machines); approaches to the design of algorithms, determining correctness and efficiency of algorithms; complexity classes, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms. (4 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab) prereq: CSci 1302 or both Math 2202 and Math 3411, CSci 2101 or instr consent
CSCI 4403 - Systems: Data Mining
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course provides a broad introduction to the data mining field. The topics covered are: Data exploration, transformation and preprocessing. Handling data quality problems. Supervised and unsupervised models. Cross-Validation. Performance measures. Feature generation and feature selection techniques to optimize models? performance. Underfitting and Overfitting. Data Visualization. Introduction to Deep Learning methods and applications. Using SQL to data mine large data sets. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
CSCI 4454 - Systems: Robotics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to robotic systems. Topics may include robot classification, mechanical armatures, concepts of kinematics and coordinate systems, basic electronic circuits as applied to robotic systems, embedded system architecture and programming, communications hardware and protocols, and algorithms in robotics. Some lecture times may be replaced by supervised work in electronics lab and machine shop; times for this work are to be arranged with the instructor. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
CSCI 4553 - Theory: Evolutionary Computation and Artificial Intelligence
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to Evolutionary Computation as an Artificial Intelligence tool for developing solutions to problems that are difficult to describe precisely or solve formally, as well as comparisons with other AI techniques. Includes discussions of theoretical background and tools, implementation issues, and applications. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
CSCI 4555 - Theory: Neural Networks and Machine Learning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of the underlying theory, structure, and behavior of neural networks and of how neural networks compare to and can be used to supplement other methods of machine learning. Methods such as decision tree learning, inductive learning, reinforcement learning, supervised learning, and explanation-based learning are examined. Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to machine learning. Includes an implementation project. prereq: CSci 1302 or both Math 2202 and Math 3411, CSci 2101 or instr consent
CSCI 4557 - Theory: Quantum Computing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Summarization of relevant mathematical and quantum mechanical concepts. Basic quantum algorithms concepts and simple algorithms are explored, along with Shor's algorithm, Grover's algorithm, and the quantum Fourier transform. prereq: CSci 1302 or both Math 2202 and Math 3411, CSci 2101, CSci 3501 or Math 1101 or higher or instr consent
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Critical examination of theoretical and normative issues in the philosophy of law, including the connection (if any) between the law and morality, the nature of criminal responsibility, debates over the purpose of punishment, theories of legal interpretation, etc.
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An exploration of active debates in political theory and applied political philosophy. Topics such as political legitimacy, free speech (and hate speech), distributive justice, political equality and individual liberties, communitarianism, nationalism, immigration, and secession are discussed from a variety of political perspectives. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3141 - Epistemology (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores historical and contemporary views on the limits, justification, and nature of human knowledge. Topics include experiential versus a priori knowledge, the nature of belief, skepticism, and different theories of justification. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course offers a broad survey of ancient philosophy. Topics include: happiness, beauty, virtue, fatalism, relativism, taoism, hedonism, skepticism, friendship, emotions, and tragedy. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 2202/HMSV 2202
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Same as HMSV 2202. Law enforcement is a critical function in the United States that operates on the local, state, and national level. This course examines processes, actors, and institutions involved in criminal justice, from the investigation of criminal activity through the arrest and incarceration of individuals. With a focus on modern controversies such as use of force and systemic racism, the course provides students with a critical foundation for understanding the criminal justice system in the context of the United States.
POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2221/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course examining the common law system as broadly practiced in the United States, including types of legal recourse, the structures of state and federal judicial systems, how judges are selected, and the various influences on their decisions.
POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2222/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course specifically looking at the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. politics with an emphasis on its historical development, how it interacts with the other federal branches, and the decision-making process of the justices on the Court.
POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 3231/Pol 3233
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions primarily dealing with the Bill of Rights and including topics such as freedom of religion, speech and the press, rights of the accused, and struggles over the right to privacy and how to guarantee civil rights protections. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions dealing with separation of powers, checks and balances, and issues of federalism. Specific topics include the importance of due process, the Contract Clause, the power to tax and spend, the Commerce Clause, and the struggle to define national and state powers. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of criminal law, tribal law and criminological theory within the United States. Includes a focus on the interactions between tribal versus federal and state criminal law. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3411 - International Law (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
An introduction to public international law, examining basic concepts, theories, and legal cases in international law. Includes the nature of international law, recognition, succession, the rights and duties of international persons, the individual and international law, territorial questions, and laws of war. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A critical examination of moral issues that arise in a person's professional life. Possible topics include affirmative action, autonomy in the workplace, ethical issues in advertising, corporate responsibility, coercive wage offers, distributive justice, and sexual harassment. Issues concerning race, gender, and women are included in selected modules.
PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of international relations and biomedical technologies. Topics include: warfare, terrorism, abortion, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, patient autonomy, humanitarian intervention, organ donation, famine relief, and genetic enhancement.
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
PHIL 2115 - Ethics and Artificial Intelligence (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course surveys a number of ethical issues that arise from emerging forms of artificial intelligence. Topics include: superintelligence, robot rights, self-driving cars, autonomous weapons, sex/love/friendship robots, data privacy, online manipulation, algorithmic bias, and the future of work.
PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates about the ethics of love and sex. Topics include: competing accounts of erotic love, hookup culture, sexual consent and fraud, racial preferences, prostitution, polygamy and polyamory, BDSM and sexual dignity, sex robots, and sex ultimatums.
ENST 3112 - Climate Change and Moral Responsibility (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 4 cr of EnSt or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Considers the moral responsibilities that citizens have regarding climate change. Includes: 1) tours and discussion of local green infrastructure; 2) panel discussions by professionals and practitioners from the community who will share their expertise; and 3) discussion of the most recent work on climate ethics. prereq: 4 cr of EnSt or instr consent
ENST 3201 - Environmental Justice (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 4 cr of EnSt or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Environmental justice has shifted the way that scholars, activists, and policy makers understand and address environmental problems. Core environmental concerns such as pollution and climate change are now also understood to be social justice problems. Considers development of the environmental justice movement and key contemporary environmental justice problems. prereq: 4 cr of EnSt or instr consent
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An exploration of active debates in political theory and applied political philosophy. Topics such as political legitimacy, free speech (and hate speech), distributive justice, political equality and individual liberties, communitarianism, nationalism, immigration, and secession are discussed from a variety of political perspectives. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The first half of the course will focus on theories related to individual and firm decision-making. Core concepts like supply and demand, concepts of elasticity, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, and pricing of factors of production will be covered. The latter half of the course will cover the theories related to the aggregate economy. Core concepts like measurement of economic performance such as national income, inflation, and unemployment, macroeconomic theories to understand business cycle fluctuations, and stabilization policies will be covered. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for 1111 and 1112] prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of international relations and biomedical technologies. Topics include: warfare, terrorism, abortion, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, patient autonomy, humanitarian intervention, organ donation, famine relief, and genetic enhancement.
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
PHIL 3101 - Metaphysics (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores fundamental metaphysical issues such as the nature of reality, the notion of personal identity, the relationship between language, thought, minds, and the world. Philosophical works of both classic and contemporary philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Quine, Putnam, and Kripke are discussed. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Critical examination of theoretical and normative issues in the philosophy of law, including the connection (if any) between the law and morality, the nature of criminal responsibility, debates over the purpose of punishment, theories of legal interpretation, etc.
PHIL 3141 - Epistemology (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores historical and contemporary views on the limits, justification, and nature of human knowledge. Topics include experiential versus a priori knowledge, the nature of belief, skepticism, and different theories of justification. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3151 - History of Ancient Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course offers a broad survey of ancient philosophy. Topics include: happiness, beauty, virtue, fatalism, relativism, taoism, hedonism, skepticism, friendship, emotions, and tragedy. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PHIL 3171 - History of Modern Philosophy (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course offers a broad spectrum of modern philosophy. Topics include: innateness, materialism, idealism, personal identity, induction, causation, freedom, skepticism, optimism, pessimism, morality, beauty, laughter, tragedy, toleration, and free speech. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
POL 1401 - World Politics (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to international relations, covering the basic concepts, theories, and trends. The major issue fields include historical international systems, war and peace, foreign policy, diplomacy, national interests, international conflict and cooperation, international law, and international organizations.
POL 2411 - Model United Nations (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Students examine the nature and functions of the United Nations and hone their negotiating skills through a series of mock UN conferences. The issue areas to be covered include peace and security, social justice, economic well-being, nuclear proliferation, environment, and human rights.
POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the American system of choosing new political leaders and the reasons behind political engagement and making specific voting choices. Attention is paid to the demographics of who does and does not participate, what happened in recent elections, and how American voting behavior has changed and is changing. There is a significant focus on the mid-term or presidential elections which occur during the semester the course is offered, including the creation and implementation of a poll of voters. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4251] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the intersection of political science and psychology research, particularly on topics such as personality, emotions, and cognition. Explores the various roles of individuals and groups in political decision-making, emphasizing the connections between how we think and learn and how we structure society and make political choices. prereq: 1201; Psy 1051 or instr consent recommended
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent