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Morris Campus

Liberal Arts for the Human Services B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Students will no longer be accepted into this program after Spring 2015. Program requirements below are for current students only.
  • For students interested in a Liberal Arts for the Human Services major, see Human Services.
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2015
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 60
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Objectives--This program's three main purposes are to provide a firm liberal arts basis for understanding individual human behavior in its social context; provide the liberal arts foundation for professional work in baccalaureate-level human services occupations, such as counseling, casework, personnel work, criminal justice, and administration of human services in federal and state agencies, private businesses, or professional organizations; and prepare students for graduate work in the human services professions.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to take 2 semester(s) of any second language.
Students develop a coherent program of study in consultation with their major advisers generally no later than the spring semester of their sophomore year. Advisers normally are faculty with a background or specialties related to the human services area (anthropology, psychology, sociology). Because LAHS students pursue varied careers, they are advised to include in their programs courses appropriate to their career plans. In all instances, students should consult with their advisers when designing their programs. Students should discuss the arrangement of their field experience with the LAHS internship adviser no later than the fall semester of their junior year. Information concerning specific field placements can be obtained from the directory of the Career Services or the LAHS internship adviser. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S-N, unless offered S-N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
Courses and directed studies not listed below may be considered for addition to the LAHS major, provided the subject matter is appropriate for the program of study. Contact LAHS coordinator. Students should complete Psy 4102 during the year before their internship (PSY 4896 or IS 3796 or IS 3996).
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology [SS] (4.0 cr)
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
or PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
· IS 3996 - Interdisciplinary Internship (1.0-16.0 cr)
· PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
Electives
38 credits to be selected from the courses listed below, with a minimum of 14 credits each in anthropology/sociology and upper division psychology.
Upper Division Anthropology/Sociology Electives
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· ANTH 2103 - Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2604 {Inactive} [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2605 {Inactive} [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3352 {Inactive} [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3402 {Inactive} [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3251 - African Americans [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Psychology Electives
Students who plan to enroll in PSY 4101 should complete the course before their internship or field experience.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3302 - Personality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3315 - Parenting and Family Therapy (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3502 - Psychology and Law (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3513 - Negotiation (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3513 - Negotiation (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3521 - Health Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4910 - Advanced Seminar in Learning or Cognitive Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4920 - Advanced Seminar in Biological or Comparative Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4930 - Advanced Seminar in Personality or Clinical Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4940 - Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4950 - Advanced Seminar in Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4960 - Advanced Seminar in Health Psychology (4.0 cr)
Additional Elective Courses
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· CMR 2411 - Health Communication [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 2421 - Business and Professional Communication [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3401 - Communication Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3421 - Organizational Communication Theory and Research [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3151 - Human Resources Management I [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3152 - Human Resources Management II [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3171 - Leadership in Organizations [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3201 - Legislative Process [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3234 {Inactive} [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2354 - Political Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3503 {Inactive} [IP] (4.0 cr)
 
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ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of sociology, the exploration of societies, and how societies operate. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, guides analytical thinking, and develops writing skills. By actively thinking about issues facing societies today, students learn to examine life situations and the influence of societies and groups on people's lives, careers, hopes, fears, and personalities. Emphasis on how society is stratified: how organizations and institutions influence the way people think, talk, feel, and act and how different groups (e.g., racial and ethnic) and divisions (e.g., gender and social class) within society have different access to power and privilege. People live their lives in relation to social and physical environments; sociologists study these environments and their effects on people's experiences and behavior.
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the science of mind and behavior. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, biological bases for behavior, life span development, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive and social processes, personality, psychopathology, and applications of psychology.
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts of professional ethics in human services professions; ethically relevant legal mandates and constraints on professional practice; practical problems in the application of ethical principles. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for IS 4101] prereq: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
IS 3996 - Interdisciplinary Internship
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
One-semester educational experience in a work environment providing field applications for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences.
PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individually arranged, supervised observation of and assistance with activities of professional psychologists in schools, clinics, hospitals, and other field settings. Prereq-Normally requires 4101, 4102, other courses appropriate to field experience. [Note: only 4 cr may be applied to the BA or the Psy major]
ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2103 - Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies. (two 65-minute lectures, one 120-minute lab session)
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues. prereq: some academic background or knowledge about gender and sexuality is recommended
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Soc 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration of human ecology and the causes and effects of environmental change, using data from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on understanding the social and economic context of human adaptations to the environment. Examination of cultures worldwide and through time that have (or have failed to) live sustainably. prereq: 1111 or 2101 or 2103
ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Soc 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmentally and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Soc 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1111 or 2103
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies. prereq: 1111 or 2103
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 2101 or Biol 2102
HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01990 - Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3111 - Sociology of Modernization (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Process of modernization in non-Western societies. Social, economic, and political impact of modernization from different theoretical perspectives. Assessment of those theoretical perspectives as a means to understand dynamics of change in Third World countries. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00895 - Anth/Soc 3204
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Anth 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3251 - African Americans (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of African American religious, economic, political, family, and kinship institutions in the context of the greater American society. Struggles to overcome problems and the degree of success or failure of these struggles are examined and placed in historical context. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01270 - Anth 3601/Soc 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Anth 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmental and socially sustainable development. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01271 - Anth 3602/Soc 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Anth 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081] prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Empirical study of sensory processes and perceptual organization with emphasis on vision and audition. Anatomy and physiology of sense organs, psychophysics, signal detection theory, attention, speech perception, and perceptual-motor coordination. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Brain organization and function; an emphasis on an understanding of the neural processes that underlie human and nonhuman behavior. Incorporates information from psychology, neuroscience, endocrinology, physiology, chemistry, neurology, and zoology to investigate the physiological bases of behavior. Topics include sensory processes, drugs and addiction, biological rhythms, sexual differentiation, reproduction, methods in neuroscience, neuropsychological disorders, and clinical assessment. Lab projects focus on neuroanatomical organization and function of the brain. (4 hrs lect, 1 hr lab) prereq: [1051, 2001] or Biol 1101 or Biol 1111
PSY 3221 - Behavioral Biology of Women (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of proximate and ultimate influences on female behavior in human and nonhuman species. Topics include sexual differentiation, gender differences in cognition, biological basis of sexual orientation, female sexual selection, dominance, and other topics of interest to students. Readings consist of primary journal articles. prereq: (3201 or 3211) or Biol 2111 or instr consent
PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051, 2001
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of aspects of human sexuality, including intimacy and communication; male and female anatomy, physiology, and response; development of sexual differentiation, gender identity, gender role, and gender orientation; varieties of sexual expression; pregnancy and child birth; contraception and disease prevention; sexual coercion and abuse; sexual dysfunctions and their treatment. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Psy 1071] prereq: 1051, 2001
PSY 3302 - Personality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of personality constructs and theories. Conscious vs. nonconscious processes; emotion and motivation; nature and measurement of personal traits; their dimensional structure, stability, development, and heritability. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3315 - Parenting and Family Therapy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of the effects of parenting on the growth and development of children. Emphasizes specific parenting styles and practices and their effects on the social/emotional development and functioning of children at each stage of life. Provides an overview of the theory and practice of family counseling/therapy. Major systemic theoretical orientations are explored. prereq: 1051
PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to adolescence. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory, data, and research in adolescent development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, and social development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An overview of current concepts, theories, and methods in the study of adult development and aging. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3502 - Psychology and Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A psychological perspective to the law and to the legal system. Topics include jury decision making, forensic psychology, trial processes, eyewitness testimony, and sentencing. prereq: 1051
PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01764 - Psy 3503/Mgmt 3503
Prerequisites: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Same as Mgmt 3503. Psychological basis for understanding consumers. Some of the topics include consumer behavior, consumer cognitive processes, and consumer judgments and decisions. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 3513 - Negotiation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00918 - Mgmt 3513/Psy 3513
Prerequisites: 3501 or Mgmt 3221 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Same as Mgmt 3513. Examines the theoretical and applied aspects of negotiation. Topics include negotiation theory, strategy, skills and tactics, communication processes, global negotiation, and ethics. Use of negotiation simulations. prereq: 3501 or Mgmt 3221 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
MGMT 3513 - Negotiation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00918 - Mgmt 3513/Psy 3513
Prerequisites: 3221 or Psy 3501 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Same as Psy 3513. Examines the theoretical and applied aspects of negotiation. Topics include negotiation theory, strategy, skills and tactics, communication processes, global negotiation, and ethics. Use of negotiation simulations. prereq: 3221 or Psy 3501 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
PSY 3521 - Health Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Health implications of interactions among behavioral, environmental, and physiological states. Physiological bases of behavior and health; stress and coping; behavioral antecedents of disease; psychoneuro-immunology; disease prevention and health promotion. prereq: 1051
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Mgmt 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as Psy 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of psychological assessments and interventions from different perspectives. Topic examples: structured and unstructured assessments; career counseling and assessment; motivational interviewing; family and couples therapy; interpersonal therapy; group therapy; and solution-focused therapy. prereq: 3313 or 3314 or 4101
PSY 4910 - Advanced Seminar in Learning or Cognitive Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01272 - Psy 4710
Prerequisites: 2001, 3101 or 3111 or 3112, sr status, #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Learning or Cognitive Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3101 or 3111 or 3112, sr status, instr consent
PSY 4920 - Advanced Seminar in Biological or Comparative Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01273 - Psy 4720
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Biological and Comparative Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3201 or 3211, sr status, instr consent
PSY 4930 - Advanced Seminar in Personality or Clinical Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01274 - Psy 4730
Prerequisites: 2001, 3302 or 3313 or 3314, sr status, #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Personality or Clinical Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3302 or 3313 or 3314, sr status, instr consent
PSY 4940 - Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01275 - Psy 4740
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Developmental Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3401 or 3402 or 3403, sr status, instr consent
PSY 4950 - Advanced Seminar in Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01276 - Psy 4750
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Social Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3501, sr status, instr consent
PSY 4960 - Advanced Seminar in Health Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01277 - Psy 4760
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced seminar on selected topics in the area of Health Psychology. Members of the seminar read and discuss primary source material on a topic of common interest. In addition, each student investigates a related topic in greater depth. The student writes a paper and gives a public presentation based on the in-depth investigation. prereq: 2001, 3521 (or 3201 and 3211), sr status, instr consent
CMR 2411 - Health Communication (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
A survey of the critical role communication plays in health promotion, specifically in the area of doctor-patient interaction and health campaigns. Communicative issues include the social construction of health, the role of culture in health and healing, and social support.
CMR 2421 - Business and Professional Communication (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Developing proficiency in communication skills in business and professional contexts. Preparing, selecting, organizing, designing, and delivering messages in business situations. Analyzing meeting/group facilitation, interviewing, and professional presentations. prereq: 1052, 1062 or instr consent
CMR 3401 - Communication Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Detailed study of the theoretical tradition of human communication. Focuses on social scientific and humanities theories used to explain social interaction. Provides general foundation on various traditions of inquiry as well as qualitative and quantitative methods. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of intercultural communication from an interpersonal and group perspective. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
CMR 3421 - Organizational Communication Theory and Research (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Study of organizational communication, including small group perspectives. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic economic problems, concepts, and theoretical models. U.S. economic institutions and the economic organization of society. The role of markets in the production and distribution of societal resources. Measurement of economic performance; national income, inflation, and unemployment; competing macroeconomic theories and stabilization policies. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical approach to decision making by individual economic units in the output and input markets, under perfect and imperfect market conditions. Externalities and role of government. prereq: 1111, Math 1101 or instr consent
ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The theory of national income determination; inflation, unemployment, and economic growth in alternative models of the national economy. prereq: 1112, Math 1101 or instr consent
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from U.S independence to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, social, and cultural relationships between the two.
HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore issues of race and ethnicity in Latin America from a historical perspective. Covering the colonial and national periods, examine how ideas of race and ethnicity have intersected with political, economic, and socio-cultural developments in the region. Consider the ways in which race, class, and gender have intersected in Latin America.
MGMT 3151 - Human Resources Management I (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 2101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to the functional areas of human resource management through the use of case studies. Topics include legal issues, planning, recruitment, training, evaluation, compensation, and benefits. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
MGMT 3152 - Human Resources Management II (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 3151 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics in human resource management: evaluating employee performance, training, safety, labor relations, international human resource management. prereq: 3151 or instr consent
MGMT 3171 - Leadership in Organizations (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Leadership is the ability to influence a group of people towards a goal. Examination of leadership qualities and theories as they apply to leading an organization. Ethics, social responsibility, team work, motivation, and conflict resolution skills from the perspective of a leader. International and culturally diverse aspects of leadership and leadership development. Students have the opportunity to practice leadership skills during the course. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
POL 3201 - Legislative Process (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The internal organization of Congress and state legislatures, with emphasis on how rules and organizational changes affect the policy process. Topics include the evolution of the modern Congress and state legislatures, the committee system, the role of party leadership, and competing theories of congressional organization and behavior. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 2354 - Political Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the strengths, weaknesses, and implications of moral arguments in political decision making. Ethical frameworks drawn from theoretical readings are applied to a range of contemporary U.S. case studies such as state use of violence, interrogation in times of war, governmental secrecy and deceit, official disobedience, health-care access, welfare reform, and environmental regulation and protection. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3354]