Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Elementary Education: Foundations B.S.

Curriculum & Instruction
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 62 to 65
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The B.S. degree program in Elementary Education: Foundations prepares students to work with children, including those with special needs and in urban school settings. The program does not lead directly to teaching licensure, but prepares students to enter the master of education (M.Ed.)/initial licensure program in elementary education, which leads to state of Minnesota teaching licensure. It also prepares graduates to work in non-licensure educational settings (daycare centers or youth community programs) or other settings where a strong liberal education base is useful. The curriculum includes an extensive core of liberal education coursework that is central to elementary school teaching.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 9 courses before admission to the program.
Freshman and transfer students are usually admitted to pre-major status before admission to this major.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
Admission is based on the following criteria: * Minimum 2.50 overall GPA; higher GPA is recommended. * Completion of required pre-admission coursework, including courses in progress at the time of application. * At least 70 hours of paid or unpaid experience working with children, including at least 35 hours in a K-6 public classroom setting. This may include mentoring, tutoring, and camp counseling, but not babysitting or nannying. * Experience with diverse populations.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Basic Requirements
CI 1001 - Introduction to the Elementary School (3.0 cr)
Any literature course that fulfills the University liberal education literature requirement
Students must fulfill the University writing requirement
Introductory Psychology
PSTL 1281 {Inactive} [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Mathematics
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Science
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or PSTL 1131 {Inactive} [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
PSTL 1171 {Inactive} [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or AST 1001 - Exploring the Universe [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Social Studies
Any history course that meets the liberal education requirement for historical perspectives. American history is recommended.
Additional social studies course
PSTL 1204 {Inactive} [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1005W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Introductory Block
CI 3212 - Field Experience: Elementary Teaching (2.0 cr)
with CI 5111 - Introduction to Elementary School Teaching (3.0 cr)
or CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching (3.0 cr)
with EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
Foundation Courses
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning (1.5 cr)
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society (1.0 cr)
OLPD 5005 - School and Society (2.0 cr)
PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 3005 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
Child Development
EDHD 5003 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Developmental Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Special Education Block
This block of courses should be taken during the third semester in the major, one year after the introductory block.
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
with EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving [WI] (3.0 cr)
with CI 3283 - Field Experience in Special Education (2.0 cr)
Mathematics
Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
MTHE 3101 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers I (3.0 cr)
or MATH 3113 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II
MTHE 3102 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers II (3.0 cr)
or MATH 3118 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
Science
Physical Science with Lab
CI 1563 - Physics by Inquiry [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 3071W - Laboratory-Based Physics for Teachers [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Social Studies
Human Geography
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
Literacy
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature [WI] (3.0 cr)
Linguistics
LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language (4.0 cr)
or CI 3610 - Linguistics for Teachers [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Reading Processes and Development
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading (3.0 cr)
with CI 5414 - Field Experience: Working with Developing Readers (2.0 cr)
Arts
CI 3001 - Engaged Arts Learning in Elementary Classrooms (2.0 cr)
Performing Arts
PSTL 1312 {Inactive} [AH] (4.0 cr)
or MUED 5011 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Kinesiology
KIN 3327 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School (2.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements, in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies, or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP adviser and their departmental faculty adviser.
 
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CI 1001 - Introduction to the Elementary School
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Three modules focus on important aspects of contemporary urban elementary school teaching: the principal's role, the teacher's role, and the students. Central to each module are school-based visits, observations, and interviews.
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math modeling, including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, counting/probability. Excel or calculators used to develop equations/graphs from theoretical/real interdisciplinary data. Projects enable students to use models to examine trends, make predictions. prereq: Three yrs high school math or grade of at least C+ in PsTL 0731 or PsTL 0732 or CI 0832 or placement test score or instr consent
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
AST 1001 - Exploring the Universe (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ast 1001/Ast 1005/Ast 1011H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The human place in the Universe. Study of Earth, other planets, sun, stars, galaxies. Background and fragility of life on Earth. Scale, origin, history of universe and our relationship to it.
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 1001/Pol 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is intended to introduce students to the expressed hopes of the American people for their government and to the institutions and processes that have been created and recreated to achieve these hopes. The course is designed to help students understand what liberal education is by engaging in the study of American politics as a fundamentally critical and creative enterprise, and by grappling with the most complex and challenging problems of political life, such as the sources of political equality and inequality, and the tension between individual aspirations and political control. Questions of power and choice, opportunity and discrimination, freedom and restrictions on freedom are fundamental to the historical development of and current controversies within the American political system, and we will attend to all of these. We will explore topics including the ideas underlying the nation?s founding and its constitutional foundations; civil rights and civil liberties; the role of the United States in an increasingly globalized world; the structure and function of American political institutions; and the behavior of American citizens in the political process. In addition, we will learn to think and communicate like political scientists. We will read primary documents, such as the Federalist papers, engage with scholarly arguments about the way the American political system works, and critically evaluate critiques of the American political system that have been offered from a variety of perspectives. By the end of the semester students should have a basic understanding of the structure and function of American government as well as an increased ability to critically reflect on the degree to which our institutions, processes, and citizens live up to the expectations placed on them. Students will be able to identify, define, and solve problems and to locate and critically evaluate information. Students will have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry. This course fulfills the liberal education requirements for the Social Sciences Core.
CI 3212 - Field Experience: Elementary Teaching
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based experience. Students apply learning from their University courses to elementary school setting, connecting theory, research, and practice. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 5111, [elementary education foundations or early childhood foundations] major
CI 5111 - Introduction to Elementary School Teaching
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Curriculum organization, instruction, management, assessment, professional decision making. prereq: Foundations of ed major or elem ed initial lic
CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classroom management, instructional planning, working with families in elementary classroom. Assigned readings, lectures, classroom activities, assignments. prereq: [Elementary ed or early childhood ed foundations major], concurrent practicum experience
EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, assessment. Behaviorism, cognitive/social constructivism, human information processing theory. Intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability/validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, portfolios, demonstrations. Applications to instruction/organization of curricular materials. prereq: MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed or preteaching major or instr consent; psych course recommended
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, and assessment. Topics: behaviorism, cognitive and social constructivism, human information processing theory, intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability, validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, and portfolios.
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or #], basic computer skills
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse educational technology in K-12 classrooms. Effective use of technology. Computer technologies used to stimulate personal productivity/communication and to enhance teaching/learning processes. prereq: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent], basic computer skills
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues of prejudice/discrimination in terms of history, power, social perception. Knowledge/skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, leadership, judgment/decision making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution, teaching in diverse educational settings. prereq: MEd/init lic or CLA music ed or preteaching or instr consent
OLPD 5005 - School and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Readings in history, philosophy, social sciences, and law revealing diverse educational values in a pluralistic society. Multiple expectations of schools. Civil liberties, rights, community. Varying cultural backgrounds of students, family circumstances, exceptional needs. prereq: Jr or sr or MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent
PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3003/PubH 3004/PubH 3005/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of alcohol and other drug abuse problems. Emphasizes incidence, high-risk populations, prevention, and intervention.
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Developmental Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CPsy 2301/ 3301/ H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in developmental psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. PSY majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 3301.
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3613/EPsy 5613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
To review the foundations of special education, culminating in an understanding of the application of the IDEAL Problem Solving Model. The course will address concepts related to exceptionality; historical and legal foundations; problem solving and tools of inquiry; collaborative relationships with families, educational, and community professionals; support of students with disabilities in general education; characteristics of students with high and low incidence disabilities, and ethics. Teacher candidates will learn methods of formative assessment using curriculum-based measures (CBM) and practice analyzing data to make instructional decisions and inform early intervention for struggling students.
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focuses on principles of behavior analysis and procedures used in the assessment and management of classroom behavior. Although the application of behavioral principles in educational settings is the central purpose of this course, complementary issues related to general classroom management will also be addressed. Consistent with the mission of the College of Education and Human Development, this course aims to strengthen effective educational practice, promote inquiry, and build leadership skills for regular and special educators and professionals in allied fields. prereq: For online sections, students must be an ASD certificate candidate or a Special Education Major or Special Education M.Ed./M.A.
CI 3283 - Field Experience in Special Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based experience. Students apply learning from their university course in elementary school setting, linking theory, research, and practice. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in EDPSY 5613, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in EDPSY 5616, elementary education: foundations major
MTHE 3101 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math content knowledge of K-6 in an environment modeling pedagogy for future implementation. Integrated content/methods. Problem solving, connections, communication, reasoning, representation. Functions, proportionality, number, numeration. prereq: [College algebra, elementary FOE or Early Childhood student, jr status or above] or instr consent
MTHE 3102 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math content knowledge of K-6 in an environment modeling pedagogy for future implementation. Integrated content/methods. Problem solving, connections, communication, reasoning, representation. Geometry, measurement, probability, statistics. prereq: 3101, college algebra
CI 1563 - Physics by Inquiry (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory-based introductory class where students learn by experimenting and model building and testing. Topics include electric circuits, light and color, and observational astronomy. Emphases include the nature of science and science learning, effective strategies for team-based learning, and logical reasoning skills.
PHYS 3071W - Laboratory-Based Physics for Teachers (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory-based introductory physics. Topics selected to apply to elementary school curriculum: earth's motion, properties of matter, heat and temperature, kinematics, and electric current. prereq: College algebra; no credit for CSE students or students who have completed PHYS 1201/1202, PHYS 1301/1301, PHYS 1401/1402, or PHYS 1501/1502.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classic/contemporary books for children in all genres, created by authors/illustrators. Research in transactional theory. Cultural authenticity. Reading, discussion, group activities, interactive lectures, projects.
LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ability to acquire and use language is a biological trait of the human species. This capacity for language manifests itself as thousands of particular languages spoken around the world in communities large and small. But what is language? What does it mean for a human to ?know? a particular language? How do children acquire this knowledge? How do we use language to communicate? These are some of the important questions addressed by the field of linguistics, the scientific study of the human capacity for language in its physiological, cognitive, historical, and social manifestations. This course introduces some of the essential findings of linguistics: first and foremost, that all varieties of all languages are intricately structured at multiple distinct but related levels. Second, that this intricate structure can be described in terms that are not only precise, but which apply to all human languages. We will work to replicate some of these findings by deploying simple analytical methods on data from a variety of languages. These methods allow us to answer questions about the different structural components of language: phonology (how do speech sounds pattern?), morphology (what are possible words and how are they built?), and syntax (what is the hierarchical structure underlying sequences of words?). In all instances these methods require that we pay attention to basic notions of semantics, from which more complex conceptions of meaning will emerge. Having characterized language as an intricately-structured system of knowledge, we will then possess the tools to ask a number of additional questions about language and cognition. How does such complex knowledge play into the actual task of sentence production or comprehension? What do we know about the neural implementation of this knowledge in human brains? How does child language acquisition proceed, and what makes it so much more robust than language acquisition later in life? Do animals have languages of their own? Can they learn human languages? Finally, we will turn our attention to variation in language patterns observed over the passage of time, across geographical space, and within social systems. How and why do languages change over historical time? What can we know about languages spoken before the invention of writing? What distinctions exist between languages spoken in different places, and how can we tell whether similarities are due to genealogical relationships? How do new languages emerge? How do languages disappear? How does language use vary between individuals from the same place or the same community? How do socioeconomic class, ethnicity, and gender relate to the linguistic behavior of individuals? How does language policy affect educational outcomes? What about social cohesion and conflict? Although we will find that most of these questions lack definitive answers, we will develop an understanding of what it takes to ask them meaningfully and precisely. In particular, we will be able to eliminate false or misleading answers, especially when they fail to take into account the observable and describable properties of the human capacity for language.
ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to structure of English. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. pragmatics. Language variation/usage.
CI 3610 - Linguistics for Teachers (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
For pre K-6 pre-service teachers. Introduction to linguistics. Linguistic terminology and how to apply methods of linguistic analysis to English, focusing on educational settings and classroom instruction.
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Reading processes, development of readers. Assessment and tutoring of individual children in reading and other literacy practices. prereq: CI 3610 and concurrent registration with CI 5414
CI 5414 - Field Experience: Working with Developing Readers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based experiences. Students apply learning from their University course to working with developing readers. Instructor provides specific assignments.
CI 3001 - Engaged Arts Learning in Elementary Classrooms
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to pictorial expression, design, and the function of art in the social environment.
KIN 3327 - Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
KIN 3327 addresses inquiry, research, and reflection through class projects, reading assignments, discussions, and team-teaching. Inquiry is addressed as classroom teachers review several sources in order to formulate a philosophy about physical education and its importance in the lives of the students they teach. Research takes place as students delve into current curriculum practices, methodology and strategies as well as knowledge of age level characteristics and developmentally appropriate activities. Reflection is twofold as student?s team-teach a variety of lessons. Students must present post reflective comments on their own teaching as well as offering positive comment as peers present physical education lessons. This course is activity based and is designed to give the classroom teacher the ability to teach elementary physical education with age appropriate, energizing activities. We will be utilizing the classroom and the gymnasium for instruction and team-teaching. Gymnasium classes will be active, experiencing current curriculum ideas and methodology. As classroom teachers, please realize the importance of physical education to the total school curriculum including the health, social, and emotional benefits for the child.