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Twin Cities Campus

Entrepreneurship Minor

CSOM Strategic Mgmt & Entrepre
Curtis L. Carlson School of Management
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2024
  • Required credits in this minor: 17
The University-wide Entrepreneurship Minor enables students to build upon a foundation of basic entrepreneurial knowledge and skills with additional courses that allow for application within a chosen discipline.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Required Courses
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ABUS 3052 - Career Building in the Remote Gig Economy (2.0 cr)
· ABUS 4217 - Real Estate Development: Process and Tools (2.0 cr)
· ABUS 4501 - Building and Running a Small Business Enterprise (4.0 cr)
· ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
· AECM 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AECM 4444 - Food and Agricultural Marketing Campaigns (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3551 - Concept Design and Value-Added Entrepreneurship in Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (3.0 cr)
· BA 4503 - Carlson Ventures Enterprise (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FINA 4920 - FinanceTopics (2.0-4.0 cr)
· GCC 3005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5501 - Knowledge to Impact: Creating Action with Your Grand Challenge Project Idea (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3041 - The Individual and the Organization (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 3042 - Organizational Behavior: Groups and Teams (2.0 cr)
· IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3061 - Leadership in Practice: Everyday Moments of Leadership (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4001 - Social Venturing in Action (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4034 - Technology Strategy (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4173 - New Venture Financing & Seed Stage Investing (2.0-4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 5018 - Philanthropy & Fundraising Strategy (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 5102 - StartUp: Customer Development and Testing (2.0 cr)
· MOT 4001 - Leadership, Professionalism and Business Basics for Engineers (2.0 cr)
· MOT 4002 - Technically Speaking Leadership Lecture Series (1.0 cr)
· MOT 4003 - Leading Technology Innovation (3.0 cr)
· MOT 4004 - Leading Innovation Teams (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3424 - Sales Training (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4421 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations (2.0 cr)
· DES 2701 - Creative Design Methods (3.0 cr)
· PDES 2771 - Product Design Studio 1 (4.0 cr)
· PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab (4.0 cr)
· PDES 4701W - Product Design Studio 4 [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3041 - Project Management (2.0 cr)
· SCO 3072 - Managing Technologies in the Supply Chain (2.0 cr)
· SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fundraising (3.0 cr)
· SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
MGMT 3015 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/MGMT 3010/MGMT 3015
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
ABUS 3052 - Career Building in the Remote Gig Economy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Businesses are shifting from full-time permanent employment models to a greater reliance on short-term contract work and freelance projects. This trend is referred to as the emerging "gig economy." Already, more than one in three people earn a full or partial income from leveraging this evolving marketplace. In 2019, Amazon announced plans to hire over a thousand remote customer service reps. Technical coders, freelance photographers, consultants, bloggers, rideshare contractors, career coaches, and online affiliate marketers are just a few among many remote gig opportunities experiencing rapid growth. This course examines the structure of a remote gig economy and corresponding career opportunities. Students will develop a deep understanding of the current gig landscape, develop initiatives and self-direction tactics to meet its needs, and leave armed to succeed in a growing remote gig economy. Activities are centered around obtaining work in the gig economy and being an exceptional remote "gigger" as an individual contributor. Additionally, students will learn how to parlay those talents into endless career path opportunities, including leadership and management roles in a quickly evolving, exciting workplace. Prerequisites: None
ABUS 4217 - Real Estate Development: Process and Tools
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Real estate development creates and alters our built environment. Working with architects, engineers, contractors, financing teams, government, and a host of consultants, real estate developers transform ideas into buildings, and with this, the spaces in which we live, work, and play. So, how do developers identify good and bad opportunities, and then, once committed, manage a wide group of stakeholders, often with disparate interests, to get the project completed and operating as planned? It is a challenge every step of the way, with a myriad of risks and obstacles to overcome, but with significant potential rewards. This course traces the development process from beginning to end, introducing foundational knowledge in project feasibility analysis and financial modeling, and integrating real world examples via case studies and interviews with Twin Cities-based practitioners. Prereq: 45 credits. Familiarity with finance and accounting concepts helpful.
ABUS 4501 - Building and Running a Small Business Enterprise
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategies and practical knowledge needed to build and operate a small business. Begins with basic marketing, finance, and leadership principles that apply to the formation of a small business enterprise and continues with growth strategies and exercises to refine the business vision. Class discussions and independent reflective activities will enable students to assess their resources and develop management, leadership, business administration, and conflict-resolution skills. Via group work, students will develop a business plan, strategically identify performance indicators, learn ways to remain competitive and innovative in the marketplace, and prepare to evolve business plans and processes over time. Prerequisite: None, but previous business experience or study will be helpful.
ACCT 2051 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces the topics of financial reporting and accounting. The purpose of financial accounting is to provide information to the entity owners and external parties to serve as the basis for making decisions about that entity. A student who successfully completes this class should be able to 1) understand the concepts and principles of accounting, 2) analyze, record and report the accounting treatment of business transactions, and 3) prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements.
ACCT 3001 - Strategic Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 3001/IBus 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: ACCT 2051 or 2050
AECM 2221W - Foundations of Leadership Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to be an effective leader in profit/non-profit agricultural settings. Roles, responsibilities, knowledge, attitudes, and skills to hire staff, set goals, coach, mentor/manage teams, and improve communication.
AECM 4444 - Food and Agricultural Marketing Campaigns
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course discusses the strategy and tactical tools and techniques required to create and execute an integrated marketing communications program in the food and agricultural industries. We will cover the issues and elements of audience analysis and segmentation, advertising, brand management, product development/naming, product placement, package design and labeling, advertising and marketing avenues, and evaluation of advertising effectiveness.
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3551 - Concept Design and Value-Added Entrepreneurship in Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore the core skills required by entrepreneurs in opportunity identification and problem framing that lead to creating viable concepts that provide solutions to real consumer challenges. Students will tackle innovation challenges from an in-depth exploration of entrepreneurial and design thinking and learn how to incorporate these skills into their future professional work. Master techniques for exploring problems from a systems viewpoint through a series of hands-on projects from concept design to product mapping and consumer testing. Students get to select a project of their choosing directly from their major of study and will pitch their new product or service concept to an expert panel.
BA 4503 - Carlson Ventures Enterprise
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA 4503/MBA 6503
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Carlson Ventures Enterprise (CVE) is intended for highly-motivated entrepreneurially minded graduate and undergraduate students who seek opportunities to develop creative problem solving and critical analysis skills to aid in better identifying, creating, and evaluating any new business opportunity, whether a start-up, social venture or innovation initiative inside a Fortune 500 company. CVE?s comprehensive curriculum includes the best practices, frameworks, and tools used in entrepreneurial and innovative pursuits. In a teach-then-apply environment, students manage client based projects solving real-world problems in real time, whether helping an entrepreneur develop their new business or an established organization evaluate opportunities for growth. CVE fits with multiple degree plans, in multiple schools at the University, as either a requirement, an elective or a capstone. This course will meet with MBA 6503. Registration for this course is by permission only. prereq: approved application
FINA 4920 - FinanceTopics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Discussion and analysis of current topics and developments in Finance.
GCC 3005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5571/GCC 3005/GCC 5005
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Do you want to make a difference? We live at the intersection of COVID-19, racism, economic recession, and environmental collapse. Now is the time to make an impact. In this project-based course, you will work in interdisciplinary teams. You'll develop entrepreneurial responses to current social and environmental problems. You'll develop tools, mindsets, and skills to address any complex grand challenge. Your project may address food insecurity, unemployment, housing, environmental impacts, equity, or other issues. Proposed designs for how you might have a social impact can take many forms (student group, program intervention with an existing organization, public policy strategy, or for-profit or non-profit venture) but must have ideas for how to be financially sustainable. Community members, locally and globally, will serve as mentors and research consultants to teams. Weekly speakers will share their innovative efforts to serve the common good. A primary focus of the course is up-front work to identify the ?right? problem to solve. You will use a discovery process, design thinking, and input from field research to addressing the challenge you choose. You will build a model around the community?s culture, needs, and wants. By the end of the class, you will have a well-designed plan to turn your project into an actionable solution if that is of interest. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
GCC 5501 - Knowledge to Impact: Creating Action with Your Grand Challenge Project Idea
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides an intensive, hands-on experience designing and developing a sustainable intervention to an aspect of a Grand Challenge. In other words, converting knowledge to impact. The target audience is students and student teams who have identified and/or worked on a specific problem in a previous GCC course and wish to dig deeper in developing a project plan. Students should enter the class with a problem statement identifying the challenge they aim to address, a target location or community, and a proposed solution or intervention that they wish to develop. Student solutions should address a problem that is about a broadly defined Grand Challenge; examples of applicable areas include water, immigration and refugees, energy, housing, educational opportunity gap, public health, food and sustainable agriculture. Ideas outside this range are also acceptable. By the end of class, students will create a plausible design and implementation plan for a solution that addresses their self-created Grand Challenge problem statement. This solution or intervention could take many forms, depending on student interest and problem statement. Business or nonprofit plans, policy and advocacy plans, media and awareness campaigns and activism plans are all possible. Determining the correct path(s) is part of the learning objectives for the course. Students will leave the course with a completed preliminary pitch deck for their plan in order to make the case for initial, or seed stage, support. Throughout this document (and course), the terms solution and intervention will be used somewhat interchangeably. This reflects the fact that different disciplines use different words to describe similar aspects of the overall process covered in this class. Understanding some of those differences is part of the learning objectives for the class. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to second year undergraduate students and above and graduate students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
HORT 4461 - Horticultural Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 4461/Hort 4461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major areas in horticultural marketing. Difference between horticultural products and commercial commodities. Core marketing components that should be used by every small horticultural business. Approaches to consumer research.
HRIR 3021 - Human Capital Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices.
MGMT 3041 - The Individual and the Organization
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 03129
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to understand both the impact and experience of the individual in an organizational setting. We will discuss the influence that individual differences and behaviors play within an organization, focusing on the employee as the key factor through which organizations function and grow. An employer?s success is largely attributable to the motivation and performance of those they employ. The factors that influence both their motivation and performance will be the focus of our content. We will explore topics such as personality, values, perceptions, and diversity among others. Each topic covered will enrich our understanding of the complex relationship between the individual and the organization. Recommended prerequisite: HRIR 3021. Prior, this course's designator was HRIR 3041.
MGMT 3042 - Organizational Behavior: Groups and Teams
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to understand both the impact and experience of the individual, leaders, and teams in an organizational setting. We will discuss the influence that individual differences and behaviors play within work teams, and how leadership may shape team experiences, focusing on the team as the key factor through which organizations function and grow. An employer?s success is largely attributable to the motivation and performance of those they employ. The factors that influence group, team, and organizational performance will be the focus of this class. We will explore topics such as communication, conflict, negotiation, leadership, organizational structure and change, among others. Each topic covered will enrich our understanding of the complex relationship between the individual, team, and the organization. Recommended prerequisite: HRIR 3021. Prior, the course's designator was: HRIR 3042.
IBUS 3055 - Innovating with Technology: Global IT Entrepreneurship in Action
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides state-of-the-art knowledge about information technologies and fundamentals of entrepreneurship with an international perspective. It also provides a comprehensive overview of current and emerging technologies in several different areas of IT, focusing on the needs of the modern net-enhanced organizations and IT adaptation to local markets. In particular, the course covers basics of consumer electronics, Internet and mobile communications, web technologies, cloud computing, cyber-security, social network, etc. Students will be trained to use sprints to evaluate ideas, risk, costs, and culturalization needs of IT solution for local markets. We will look at how technology leaders/entrepreneurs in the rest of the world are addressing these opportunities. This class will teach students to use sprints to answer pressing business questions. First, students will map out the problem and pick an important place to focus. Second, they will sketch competing IT solutions on paper. Third, they will need to make decisions and turn their ideas into testable hypothesis. Fourth, they will develop a real or conceptual model for a prototype. Lastly, they will prepare to test out the ideas or pitch them to the partner companies.
MGMT 3061 - Leadership in Practice: Everyday Moments of Leadership
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Every day, life gives us opportunities to practice leadership: experiencing group conflicts, recognizing the achievements of a classmate, overhearing an offensive joke, observing microaggressions, sharing innovative ideas with your team. In this course, you will learn how to investigate and respond to these moments of leadership using fundamental leadership science and frameworks based on leadership theory and empirical evidence. These moments provide an opportunity to become something, to do something different, usually through understanding complex issues, navigating change, empathy, and influencing others. The course will expose you to fundamental leadership science and frameworks backed by leadership theory and empirical evidence. You will focus on understanding personal leadership strengths and vulnerabilities through assessments, reflection, and feedback. To improve your leadership capabilities, you must know from what point you are starting. Throughout the class, there will be reflection exercises and assessments that will help you understand your values, default traits, and work styles as you navigate everyday moments of leadership. Leadership skills are best learned by integrating and applying evidence-based theoretical concepts to practical situations. These skills are difficult to meaningfully assess with exams and typical assignments. Thus, we will learn with practical exercises and the application of course materials to your life as a leader. The experiential learning of the class will allow you to navigate leadership moments and bring the course concepts to life.
MGMT 4001 - Social Venturing in Action
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BA4000/MGMT4000/MGMT4001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone course. Students choose projects with nonprofit organizations in local communities. Readings/discussions tie managerial theory to experiences. The focus of this course is on sectors of the economy that provide goods and services with motivation beyond generating profits for investors. The non-profit sector and impact-related for-profit organizations are a large, growing, and increasingly entrepreneurial part of our economy. Non-profit administration and social entrepreneurship require knowledge of subjects unique to this sector. This class will provide a basis of knowledge about these issues from the standpoint of practitioners and researchers. Because the landscape of the non-profit and impact-related for-profit world is broad, one seminar course cannot possibly cover all of the important and interesting issues in this field. In this course, we will focus our attention by exploring a number of issues that involve the intersection of the for-profit and the not-for- profit economies. prereq: Senior standing
MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management of a new venture after founding. Internal/external challenges of managing a startup organization. Working with resource constraints and understanding how business models may change over time. prereq: MGMT 3015 or MGMT 3010 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 4034 - Technology Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course addresses challenges and opportunities in the strategic management of technology and innovation. The course will equip students with the conceptual frameworks, tools, and language for analyzing and managing businesses in environments of technological change. We will examine how new technologies transform industries and create new markets, strategies for addressing technological change, and approaches for managers to shape and/or respond to new technologies. Because innovating or responding to new technologies often involves strategic and organizational change, we will also discuss how organizations change in response to new technologies. We will use a combination of readings, lectures, case discussions, and simulations. The final team project provides an opportunity to explore in-depth the technology strategy and innovation challenges of a particular organization. The class is heavily discussion-based, which means that all students must read the material and be prepared to contribute to the learning process. prereq: Mgmt 3004 or 3001
MGMT 4055 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how business organizations innovate and change. The course covers foundational topics and combines both theoretical insights and practical knowledge based on cases and hands-on exercises. The class topics address the following questions: What are the sources, types and patterns of innovation? What are the characteristics of an organization?s innovation ecosystem? How do organizations compete and collaborate in innovation ecosystems? What are some external forces shaping organizational innovations? How do organizations adapt to these external forces? By the end of this course, students will: Learn the key principles of success and failure of innovation and change in business organizations across different products, services and geographies. Apply course concepts to real organizational cases, diagnose problems and recommend solutions. Use clear written, verbal and online communication skills. Collaborate to create novel solutions to tasks and problems. Demonstrate the use of a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sources to support conclusions and recommendations. prereq: MGMT 3001 or MGMT 3004 or MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-semester sequence. In fall, students identify business opportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch business. In spring, students implement busienss plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 4171
MGMT 4173 - New Venture Financing & Seed Stage Investing
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This experiential course is offered to University undergraduate students interested in learning about new venture financing through the operation of an independent angel investment fund. It serves as an introduction to the subject matter, while providing a forum for the students to review investment opportunities, connect with members from the entrepreneurial and investor communities, and learn about startup fundraising through direct participation in the investment process. This course is being offered to complement a student-owned private venture capital fund in collaboration with individual accredited investors, which was initially formed in April of 2018. In addition to the ongoing management of the fund operations and reporting, the students will be responsible for ongoing capital raising. Final authority for all investment decisions rests with the students.
MGMT 4175W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 03099
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the following insights into ? Techniques for developing and screening business ideas ? Criteria for properly assessing idea feasibility ? Equipping yourself with the necessary information and analysis to develop a useful business plan ? Preparing an effective business plan ? Effectively pitching the plan to stakeholders, primarily prospective investors The class makes use of lecture, videos, articles, cases, class exercises, assignments, and quizzes to help develop depth of understanding amongst students of the relevant subject matter of this course. prereq: MGMT 3010 or MGMT 3015 or IBUS 3010
MGMT 5018 - Philanthropy & Fundraising Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This brief experiential course explores the evolving world of philanthropy and provides an opportunity to directly influence a real-life nonprofit?s funding strategies. It shows students how, despite resource constraints, nonprofit organizations can effectively build meaningful engagement and financial support around society?s most pressing needs. It provides an immersive experience ? supported by a professional ecosystem ? where students can learn, be inspired and leave this class more driven (and capable) to be ?a force for good.? By the end of this course, students will have gained hands-on consulting experience in partnership with nonprofit organizational leaders, active consultants and major philanthropists. They will have devised and presented implementable strategies at the ?virtuous nexus? between potential donors and their client?s organizational needs - solutions which increase engagement and promote lasting symbiotic relationships between the private and nonprofit sectors. They will be well-positioned to make a significant positive impact throughout their careers in the Twin Cities and beyond.
MGMT 5102 - StartUp: Customer Development and Testing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Provides a structured process with faculty and mentor oversight for students at any level and from any college at the University to learn the initial process of customer development by testing market acceptance of a specific new business concept. Students primarily take this course individually and must have an idea or technology that they are interested in pursuing. The goal of the curse is to teach the process to quickly and efficiently test the value and market fit for a new concept.
MOT 4001 - Leadership, Professionalism and Business Basics for Engineers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Elements of business, environment in which technology/business operate. Classes of 15 to 20 students.
MOT 4002 - Technically Speaking Leadership Lecture Series
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course features a selection of highly accomplished industry speakers, including UMN alumni, who share their unique insights on industry developments, leadership, and innovation accumulated through experience in their careers. The lecture series serves as a discovery course for topics at the intersection of technology innovation and entrepreneurship.
MOT 4003 - Leading Technology Innovation
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides students the perspective of a Technology Leader of an organization or product team. Details the innovation process, from an idea's inception through impact in the economy, regardless of organizational setting. Explores how solutions are developed to become ready for broader market deployment. Includes testing and development of the problem-solution fit, probing of solutions for robustness, and testing of both technical and operational scaling of proposed solutions. Examines the human aspects of innovation, specifically issues of team building and readiness. Considers the broader system for innovation, including the role of key stakeholders in shaping its success in order to arrive at an impactful solution. Addresses intellectual property, the effect of regulations and social and cultural differences across varied global markets, and the personal skills necessary to align and manage these issues.
MOT 4004 - Leading Innovation Teams
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students the perspective of a Chief Technology Officer leading the transformation of technologies to products entering the market. Includes testing and development of the value proposition, and product-market fit. Examines the human aspects of company culture and building a team for growth. Considers the broader requirements for a business model, go-to-market, funding, and resources required to build and scale a business. Addresses the skills needed to effectively communicate the organization?s strategy, technology roadmap, and growth and impact objectives.
OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project management for business and industry. Project lifecycles, deliverables, and processes as they are commonly used in the workplace.
OLPD 3424 - Sales Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Strategies and techniques for developing effective sales people. A review of review practices related to sales management, business development, selling strategies, and learning objectives essential to developing the skills, knowledge, and abilities to create a competent sales force.
OLPD 4421 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students the opportunity to develop and implement critical aspects of a nonprofit organization from board selection, training, fundraising, event marketing and management, and conducting outreach programs. Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of job functions including: sales, marketing, e-marketing, operations, management, accounting, administration, purchasing, procurement, fundraising, pre-event planning, and post-event evaluation.
DES 2701 - Creative Design Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class is an introduction to a variety of tools and methods used in developing new products, services, and experiences. The focus of the class is on the early stages of design which includes user research, market research, idea generation methods, concept evaluation, concept selection, intellectual property, and idea presentation. Students will learn the divergent and convergent design thinking process to frame problems, and generate, refine, and communicate ideas. Students work individually and in groups applying the content taught in lecture to multiple assignments and a semester-long design project.
PDES 2771 - Product Design Studio 1
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is the first design studio for product design majors. It is an introduction to user-centered design using industry-standard practices. Students will apply skills learned in their prior core classes towards several individual product design challenges. The deliverables focus on user research, market research, concept development, lo-fidelity prototyping, and concept presentation.
PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PDes 3711/PDes 5711
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A hands-on experience in integrated product design and development processes. Elements of industrial design, engineering, business, and humanities are applied to a semester-long product design project. Cross-functional teams of students in different majors work together to design and develop new consumer product concepts with guidance from a community of industry mentors. prereq: PDes 2772 OR Junior/Senior (any major) or permission from instructor
PDES 4701W - Product Design Studio 4 (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will explore several design research methods, understand the basis of these methods, and directly apply methods within a design project. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their facility with a wide range of exploratory, generative, and evaluative research methods. This course will cover field study, contextual inquiries, archival research, participatory codesign, research synthesis techniques, insights identification, early-stage prototyping, usability testing, and ways to communicate research in a visually compelling manner.
SCO 3001 - Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sustainable Supply Chain and Operations Management focuses on the design and management of transformation processes to provide products and services to create value for the people, planet, and firm prosperity. On the one hand, supply chain and operations management involves the integration of activities and processes, to facilitate the flows of materials, services, finances, and information to convert inputs into the firms? primary products and services. Operational issues include the design of products and processes, the procurement of raw materials, the control of inventories, the maintenance of quality, the planning of human resources and facilities, and the delivery of products or services, so that customer expectations and needs are met. Operations also have significant interactions with other functional areas of the firm (e.g., finance, marketing, strategy, and accounting). Therefore, understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm from both tactical and strategic aspects is an important part of any manager's training. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts, operations practices, and models in both manufacturing- and service-oriented firms. The course will cover both quantitative and qualitative methods.
SCO 3041 - Project Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles and methods useful for planning and controlling a project, including development of project plan, resource planning and scheduling, and project monitoring and control. Selected computerized packages are studied, including PERT and CPM, and examples of different types of projects from manufacturing and service industries are used. prereq: 3000 or instr consent
SCO 3072 - Managing Technologies in the Supply Chain
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Technologies and technological change within/between firms as opportunities for professional leadership. Selecting technologies, nurturing their adoption, and ensuring their exploitation. prereq: 3001
SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of organization, management, and administration within the sport industry. Students will have the opportunity to hear, learn, and share viewpoints as they relate to sport management through lectures, discussions on current events, and case study analysis. Upon the completion of this course, it is expected that students will (1) have a better understanding of the unique management characteristics of the sport industry, (2) understand the relationship between a sport organization and its environment, (3) have the capacity to diagnose critical issues in sport organizations and apply relevant conceptual framework for analysis, and (4) synthesize important managerial and leadership strategies and techniques to ?real world? issues in sport. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent.
SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
As the sport industry continues to evolve from a technological and service delivery perspective, the ability of future sport managers to think entrepreneurially about their business as they seek to solve industry problems is of paramount importance. This course examines the sport business ecosystem with a focus on fiscal responsibility and financial management while offering students the opportunity to use the principles of entrepreneurship, forecasting, and risk assessment to build ideas that can shape the future of sport industry offerings. In this course, students will learn relevant theories and industry best practices as they consider how to build organizational capacity for, and willingness to, embrace change and risk-taking to innovate product and service offerings. Projects and assignments in this course will include learning directly from, and writing papers reflecting on, discussions with industry executives in sport organizations that embrace an entrepreneurial mentality. The culminating assignment in this course is a sport entrepreneurship project in which students will leverage on-campus resources to develop a new sport product or service idea. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent
SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fundraising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effectively managing the revenue generating functions of sport organizations is critical to the long-term success and viability of those entities. This course will allow students to build their knowledge of theoretical approaches to selling and sales management in sport, and it will teach students a range of practical skills that they will be able to apply in addressing sport industry challenges in the revenue generating space. Students will learn the importance of strategic account management in the contexts of season ticket sales, group event sales, premium seating sales, and sponsorship sales. Additionally, students will explore the unique nature of the account management, relationship cultivation, and stewardship process in a sport fundraising context. Particular attention will be paid to fundraising in college athletics. The primary projects in this course will include weekly sales simulations, industry case studies, and a sales campaign that is developed in partnership with a real-world, sport industry partner. Upon conclusion of this class, students will be able to clearly identify, define, and solve problems related to generating revenue in sport organizations through the sale of sport services and fundraising using sport as a platform to positively impact the lives of sport participants. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent
SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SSM 4504W/SSM 5504
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of new-product development and product management, their application to biobased products. prereq: Jr or Sr or instr consent