Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Anthropology B.S.

Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 55
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Anthropology is the study of humankind in all of its forms (cultural, biological, and linguistic), using a holistic and global perspective. It comprises four primary subfields: archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology, all of which are uniquely linked by the concept of culture. Anthropology combines a set of theories and methods that have, at their core, the development of an understanding of human biological and cultural variability. It allows students to learn about the scientific, social, political, and historical perspectives on human variation and human evolution. It challenges them to examine their own beliefs, and come to their own conclusions, about the implications in today’s world of biological and cultural variation, including how false narratives have been— and continue to be—perpetuated in order to oppress certain groups. Fundamentally, Anthropology therefore contributes to the liberal education of students at the University of Minnesota by tackling questions that are at the heart of societal tensions: how does identity relate to the biological and cultural factors that have shaped humans as a species, and that continue to shape populations and individuals? Importantly, Anthropology as a reflexive discipline also examines its own legacy. Many of our classes tackle the impact of colonialism, racism, and other actions and ideologies that serve to justify and perpetuate inequality. The Bachelor of Science degree recognizes that many fields of study within biological anthropology and archaeology depend upon modes of inquiry based upon empirical scientific methods. It therefore develops competence in these scientific methods through curricular requirements within and outside Anthropology. Students pursuing this degree are required to take 20-24 credits outside Anthropology in a wide variety of courses within the Quantitative and Natural sciences. Within the major, students take numerous lab-based courses, in which they learn to ask scientific questions, design a research methodology, collect and analyze data, and use the results to refine the question. Non lab-based classes also strongly emphasize research skills, effective writing, and critical thought. The BS degree provides an excellent foundation for a wide range of careers in anthropology, such as evolutionary anthropology, molecular anthropology, geo-archaeology, archaeological chemistry, and forensic anthropology. Additionally, the BS degree enables students who are pursuing a career in the health sciences to fulfill the math and science prerequisites for medical school and other graduate programs in health, while gaining a solid foundation in anthropology. Although a second language is not required for the BS degree, cultural competency and an appreciation of the role of culture in how societies construct knowledge are gained through anthropological coursework at all levels.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
The major designator for the Anthropology BS is ANTH. At least 14 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn a B.S., B.A. or a minor in anthropology, but cannot earn more than one major or minor in anthropology. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) students earning a BA, BS, or BIS degree must complete the second-year career management course CLA 3002. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Students completing an additional degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Preparatory Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
Subfield Foundation Courses
Take three or more courses totaling 10-12 credits from the following courses. Take one course from the Biological Anthropology subfield foundation courses. In addition, take at least one course from two of the other three Subfield Foundation courses.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 10 - 12 credit(s) from the following:
Archaeology
· ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· Biological Anthropology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· Sociocultural Anthropology
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· Linguistic Anthropology
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
Quantitative and Natural Science Courses
At least two courses, 6 credits, must be upper-division (3xxx-level or higher).
Take 6 or more course(s) totaling 18 - 24 credit(s) from the following:
Math
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· Computer Science
The recommended sequence is CSCI 1133 and CSCI 2081.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 2081 - Introduction to Software Development (4.0 cr)
· Statistics
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3032 - Regression and Correlated Data (4.0 cr)
· Geographic Information Sciences
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World [TS, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· Chemistry
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)
with CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· Physics
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 1012 - Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues [BIOL, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1015 - Human Physiology, Technology, and Medical Devices [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1101 - Genetics and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· Earth Sciences
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CFAN 3334 - Parasites and Pestilence [GP] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3851W - Health and Biodiversity [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· ENT 1001 - How Insects Shape Society: Pollinators, Pests, and Policy [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3014 - Tribal and Indigenous Natural Resource Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Biochemistry
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists (3.0 cr)
· Neuroscience
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· NSCI 2001 - Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab) (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I (3.0 cr)
· Anatomy
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System (1.0-2.0 cr)
· Nursing
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach (3.0 cr)
· Physiology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· Genetic, Cellular, & Developmental Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4143 - Human Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· Microbial Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
or VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
or VPM 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
Upper-Division Training in Anthropology
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 - 20 credit(s) from the following:
ANTH 3xxx
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3004 - Great Controversies in Anthropology [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3006 - Humans and Aliens: Learning Anthropology through Science Fiction [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3008 - Introduction to Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3043 - Art, Aesthetics and Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3221 - Field School (6.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or CNRC 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3254 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4xxx-5xxx
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 - 20 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4007 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4009W - Warfare and Human Evolution [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4019 - Symbolic Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4025 - Studies in Ethnographic Classics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4029W - Anthropology of Social Class [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4047 - Anthropology of American Culture [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4077 - Neanderthals: Biology and Culture of Humanity's Nearest Relative (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 5128 - Anthropology of Education (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Directed studies, reading, and research courses
Courses must be taken for at least 3 credits to count toward this requirement.
Take at most 6 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4991 - Independent Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4992 - Directed Readings (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
Capstone
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Anthropology BS capstone, and they do not need to replace the 4 credits.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
Capstone Option 1
Students should enroll in ANTH 3993 at least one semester before taking ANTH 4013. Honors students and students who wish to undertake primary research should complete Option 1.
· ANTH 3993 - Directed Study for Capstone Project Preparation (1.0 cr)
ANTH 4013W - Capstone Project Writing Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4013H - Capstone Project Writing Seminar (3.0 cr)
· Capstone Option 2
Students wishing to acquire additional training through coursework should complete Option 2.
· ANTH 4093 - In-Class Capstone Project (1.0 cr)
with ANTH 4xxx
or ANTH 5xxx
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4009W - Warfare and Human Evolution [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4029W - Anthropology of Social Class [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5327W -  Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· Anthropology B.S.
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ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Archaeology is the study of humans in the past, primarily through the material remains they left behind. It seeks to answer fundamental questions, such as ?When did humans first become dependent on fire??, ?What factors led to the development of agriculture??, or ?How can we explain the rise and fall of early civilizations?? The study of each of these big questions relies on answering many small questions that are asked in the context of archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses. A common theme underlies them: archaeology aims to reconstruct and understand why past human cultures changed. The goal of this class is to provide an understanding of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their investigations. It includes not only hands-on learning of specific analytical techniques, such as faunal and lithic analysis as well as site survey and excavation strategies, but also focuses on the theoretical approaches that guide the questions we ask and the methods we apply to answer them. This class, therefore, prepares students for more upper-level classes in archaeology. It also leads to a new way of thinking. This way of thinking is primarily critical and analytical. It leads one to think about how data are interpreted, and how theoretical frameworks as well as innate biases color these interpretations. Seeking solutions to interpretive problems requires the creative application of multidisciplinary approaches. Therefore, the study of archaeology leads to a new way of thinking about and doing science.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, biogeography. Hands-on examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math1151/Math1155
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. prereq: 1133 or instr consent
CSCI 2081 - Introduction to Software Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Techniques for design and development of software using Java. Introduction to object-oriented programming and design, integrated development environments, inheritance, and polymorphism. Software design principles, testing and debugging, and use of project management tools. Implementation of a software project using data structures, files, and I/O. This course is intended for non-CS Majors. Prerequisite: CSCI 1133 or CSCI 1133H
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: STAT 3021/STAT 3021H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 3032 - Regression and Correlated Data
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is a second course in statistics with a focus on linear regression and correlated data. The intent of this course is to prepare statistics, economics and actuarial science students for statistical modeling needed in their discipline. The course covers the basic concepts of linear algebra and computing in R, simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, statistical inference, model diagnostics, transformations, model selection, model validation, and basics of time series and mixed models. Numerous datasets will be analyzed and interpreted using the open-source statistical software R. prereq: STAT 3011 or STAT 3021
GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World (TS, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Learn how maps and other spatial technologies like phones, drones, and GPS work. Use web-based tools to make maps for class, jobs, and fun. Explore how mapping is a useful lens through which to view interactions between technology and society, and see how mapping technology saves lives, rigs elections, and spies on people.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
GEOG 3511/5511 is a basic introduction to cartography?the art, science, and technology of maps and map making. Our primary emphasis will be on map making, with lesser emphasis on cartographic research and the history of cartography. Lectures will focus on modern cartographic design principles, how they were developed, and how they might be changing. Lab assignments help develop skills using digital tools for producing effective maps. The course has several specific learning objectives: ? use software to create maps that communicate their subjects appropriately and effectively using sound cartographic design principles ? acquire or produce a base map that is appropriate in scale, projection, and generalization ? select and aggregate data appropriately to represent on a map using a suitable symbolization strategy ? gain an understanding of how current changes in technology impact maps and map making ? understand how fundamental design decisions might differ for printed maps and web/mobile maps ? understand how contemporary GIS and cartography are interrelated, including the use of GIS becoming ubiquitous and map making becoming increasingly available to anyone ? gain an appreciation for the 3,500+ year history of maps! prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072H/1082
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072H/1082
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072H/1082
Typically offered: Every Spring
The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PHYS 1102W / PHYS 1108
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems. Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered. prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
BIOL 1012 - Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues (BIOL, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1010/Biol 1015/PSTL 1135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
One semester exploration of human anatomy and physiology within the context of ethics; topics such as human genetic diversity, organs and tissues, disease and reproduction. Weekly policy debates. Active learning format. Animal dissections required. Suitable for students in any major. Does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs. This course explores several interdisciplinary questions, each of which addresses biology through an ethical and societal lens. In ?What makes humans unique?? we will consider the evolution of human traits, how the concept of race relates to human genetic diversity, and the fallibility of human memories. In ?How does blood and organ donation work?? we will examine how our bodies can recognize and respond to foreign materials, how vaccines work, and who should have access to life saving tissue and organ transplants. In ?How do stress, diet and exercise affect health?? we will consider disparities in access to adequate nutrition, exposure to stress, and exercise, and how these affect our bodies and our mental health. Lastly, in ?How does a unique individual develop from a single cell? we will examine how a single cell develops into a fully functional human being, and how similar processes lead to cancer. We will also consider the role of genes and hormones in human reproduction and the development of reproductive structures in embryos, while explicitly addressing the ethics of the distinctions between the concepts of sex characteristics, sex assigned at birth, and gender. We will learn how a cell can become cancerous, as well as how a cell develops into a fully functioning human being. Additionally, we will consider the role of hormones in the development of male, female, and intersex organs, while being explicit about the differences between gender, sexual orientation, and sex assigned at birth. In lecture, instructors and teaching assistants will support students as they evaluate data and work through concepts in teams. Students will also dedicate significant time to the consideration of ethical questions in human biology, and work with teammates to organize and present a position on a policy related to an ethics question. In lab, students will further explore human anatomy and physiology, connecting structure and function through several dissections and activities. Students will read and share scientific papers, make observations, design experiments and analyze data. Students will work in teams to complete a multi-week project on the physiology of stress. We will continue our exploration of ethics topics in lab, where we will discuss and apply ethics in human subjects research and research on non-human animals. About ? of the course grade will be based on four traditional lecture exams and a final lab exam. The remainder of the course grade is comprised of open notes quizzes, in class team assignments, individual assignments, and team projects. Course grading is based on mastery of concepts and skills, and students are encouraged to collaborate in understanding course material.
BIOL 1015 - Human Physiology, Technology, and Medical Devices (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1010/PSTL 1135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Course is organized around homeostasis, information flow, and other concepts in physiology. For non-biology majors who wish to explore interests in health care or medical device engineering. Active learning format. Labs focus on data collection and simple organ dissections. Does not fulfill prerequisites for most biomedical graduate programs.
BIOL 1101 - Genetics and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of heredity and their social and cultural implications. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: BIOL 3020, Biol 4003, GCD 3022. No CBS Major Juniors or Seniors.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geosphere/biosphere interactions over temporal/spatial scales. Global biogeochemical cycling, microbe-metal interactions, microbial paleobiology, environmental geomicrobiology, life detection, habitability of planets.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
CFAN 3334 - Parasites and Pestilence (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of protozoan and metazoan parasites, focusing on the biology and epidemiology of parasitic diseases and on the parasite-host association. Parasites are explored in the context of transmission, associated disease, diagnosis and treatment options; and environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic drivers of disease epidemiology. The intent of this course is for students to see science as a tool for understanding the world and solving problems. Importantly, the course is not designed to promote skills to become a practicing parasitologist but rather aims to facilitate broad exposure to infectious disease dynamics to foster more informed global citizens?using parasitic diseases as examples. A key tenet of liberal education is that it does not ignore the sciences, as such topics are explored in a way that intertwines science, history, and politics. Liberal education also teaches students how to speak their mind, how to write, and how to learn. As a result, this course will teach students how to use fundamental biological principles to think critically about challenges facing their society and the world.
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 3851W - Health and Biodiversity (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3851W/EEB 5851
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basics of biodiversity, human/animal health, interdependence. Strategies for sustainable health. prereq: At least one year of college Biology or equivalent
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ENT 1001 - How Insects Shape Society: Pollinators, Pests, and Policy (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do you eat genetically modified foods, or do you avoid them? Vaccinate, or do not vaccinate? Did you know these are in part insect related questions? Insects make up more than half of the living organisms on this planet, and they have had a profound impact in shaping human society and culture. Even so, insects are swatted, stomped, squished, and otherwise misunderstood. In this course students will explore the complex, and often uncomfortable, relationships between insects and humans and explore the ethical dilemmas posed by our close relationships with the insect world. Ultimately this course examines the interactions between insects and humans, focusing on contemporary topics that explore how insects dictate human actions, policies, and behaviors. Topics include: human perception of insects; basic concepts in insect biology and behavior; environmental and cultural importance of insects; the role of insect pests in determining human food choice; insect vectors and disease transmission; perception and awareness about humanity?s role in nature.
ESPM 3014 - Tribal and Indigenous Natural Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3014/ESPM 5014
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to develop and refine your understanding of tribal and Indigenous natural resource management, tribal and Indigenous perspectives, and responsibilities natural resource managers have for tribal and Indigenous communities. This course includes one eight-hour weekend field session.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Account of traditional and contemporary food customs and culture. Practice of food choice, preparation, and preservation in the context of worldview, perspectives on diet and health, and belief systems of communities and societies around the world. Major emphasis on US cultures including Native American, Hispanic American, European American, African American, and Asian American. Development of cultural self-understanding and intercultural awareness via food and food habits-related experiences and reflections.
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
BIOC 3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to biochemistry including discussion of the structure and functions of biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), central metabolic pathways, and the mechanisms of enzyme action. This course is intended for students in the College of Biological Sciences. Students from other colleges should register for BIOC 3021. prereq: CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent
NSCI 2001 - Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSci 2001/NSci 2100
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will provide a broad introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on the human nervous system. The course will introduce the structure and function of neurons, the major anatomical parts of the nervous system and the main functional systems. Functional systems will be approached through an understanding of the anatomical circuitry. The fundamental concepts of neurochemical communication studied in general terms in the first part of the course will be re-examined relative to specific functional systems later in the course. Although the major focus of the course will be on the normal nervous system, common diseases will be introduced for each main topic. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of many neurological diseases, which will provide further insight into how the normal nervous system functions. The neuronal substrates of learning/memory, addiction and drug actions will be examined. Through the lectures, discussions and other resources, students will be expected to gain an understanding of the neural circuitry and information processing responsible for the diverse range of human behaviors. The material covered in Nsci 2001 and 2100 is very similar. N2100 is taught only fall semester. It is a traditional lecture course that includes a weekly laboratory. The faculty believe that the laboratory is a valuable part of the course. N2001 is taught only spring semester for those who cannot take the fall course. It does not have a lab, but has the advantage of a flipped format. In N2001, students will be expected to watch the assigned lectures prior to coming to class. Class time will be spent on exercises and discussions that use the material presented in the online lectures. Students who take one of these two courses will not be allowed to take the other course. For more information, see http://mcloonlab.neuroscience.umn.edu/2001/index.htm
NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites. This course is offered in person in the fall and spring semesters and online ONLY in the summer semester. The online summer section covers the same material at the same depth and breadth as the in person fall and spring sections of the course. However, the summer session is 13 weeks (fall and spring are 14 weeks), so the summer course will progress at a slightly faster pace. This is a 3 credit course, so it is expected that students will spend about 150 hours working on course material. This means that the average student can expect to spend ~12 hrs/week on the course. How much time individual students need to spend working on course material will depend on their learning styles.
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, methods, and laboratory exercises for investigating neural mechanisms and examining experimental evidence.
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/3302/3602/3651
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANAT 3658H/3608H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/3302/3602/3651
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 18.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
x prereq: instr consent
ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 5525/Phsl 5525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-day intensive course. Pelvis, perineum, and urinary system with cadaveric dissection. Structure/function of pelvic and urinary organs, including common dysfunction and pathophysiology. Laboratory dissections, including kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, pelvic viscera and perineum (male or female), pelvic floor, vascular and nervous structures. Grand rounds section. prereq: One undergrad anatomy course, one undergrad physiology course, instr consent
NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nurs 2001/Nurs 3690/Nurs 3691
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical, personal, and culturally determined theories on life span development, from prenatal period through death/dying. Psychoanalytical, behaviorism, cognitive, sociocultural, and epigenetic categories of biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains.
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3050/Phsl 3051
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3063/Phsl 3071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: BMEn 3701/Phsl 3701/Phsl 3063/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiments in physiology. Emphasizes quantitative aspects, including analysis of organ systems. prereq: Physiology major
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Bioinformatic analysis is the exploration of molecular sequence, structure, and function using online tools and databases. In this class, we'll learn to use some of the most powerful tools available for biologists to investigate the nature of genes and proteins. We will each explore a gene and the protein it encodes that no one before us has studied. We will learn to analyze and interpret the diverse forms of bioinformatic data we obtain, and we will consider how the data we find allows us to generate and evaluate original hypotheses that can be tested in the laboratory. This is a hands-on course. While the class has no exams, it does require the completion of four problem sets and a summative final project over the course of the semester. It also involves doing some peer review of classmates? work. prereq: introductory course in genetics and cell biology such as Foundations
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: GCD 3033 or BIOL 4004 or instructor consent
GCD 4143 - Human Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human Genetics ? the science of how our genomes function, vary, and shape our unique, individual characteristics ? is a rapidly expanding field with major implications for medical and fundamental research, clinical practice, and many other areas. In this course, students will learn about the principles of human genetics & genomics at the levels of molecules, cells, individuals, and populations. Topics include patterns of inheritance; the molecular causes and biochemical basis of genetic disorders; disease gene identification; the origin and distribution of human genetic variation; genetic influences on common, complex diseases; epigenetics and regulation of gene expression; genomic technologies for understanding human genomes; cancer genetics; behavioral genetics; human ancestry and evolution; applications such as genetic screening, genetic counseling, and gene therapy; and ethical questions raised by emerging abilities to edit the human genome, modify the human germline, and many more. prereq: BIOL 4003 or instructor consent
GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulatory pathways involved in directing normal development of complex eukaryotic organisms, how disruptions of these pathways can lead to abnormal cell growth/cancer. Causes, detection, treatment, prevention of cancer. prereq: Biol 4003
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Developmental biology is the study of the process by which organisms grow and develop from embryo to adult. This field encompasses the biology of morphogenesis, differentiation, regeneration, metamorphosis, and the growth and differentiation of stem cells. Topics focus primarily on animal development to include fertilization, cell specification, body patterning, stem cells, neurogenesis, organogenesis, limb formation, regeneration, sex determination, and developmental timing, as well as environmental impacts on development. Students will learn about genetic models such as fruit flies, nematodes, fish, mice, and plants. Coverage will be extended to human development and disease as appropriate. prereq: BIOL 4003; also recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W
MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora. prereq: Biol 4003
MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4141W/4171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, attachment, entry. Genome replication/mRNA production by RNA viruses. Reverse transcription. DNA virus templates. Replication of DNA virus genomes. Processing of viral pre-mRNA. Translational control. Assembly, host defense, tumor viruses, pathogenesis, HIV, antivirals. prereq: Biol 2003 and Biol 4003 and [MicB 4131 or instructor permission]
MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms. prereq: MICB 3301 AND Microbiology major or minor; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement, and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methods prereq: MicB 3301 and [Biol 4003 or permission]; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors
MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques, experimental methods in microbial genetics, immunology. Virology used to study microbes/interactions with host. prereq: Micb 3301 and [Bioc 3022 or Bioc 4331] and [MicB 4171 prereq or concurrent registration or permission]
PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns. prereq: MicB 3301 required; BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 recommended
PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products. prereq: 3301
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: [Biol 1961 and Biol 2003] or Biol 1009 or instructor permission
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease, cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies. Prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 and [Junior or senior]
VPM 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular, genetic, and cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innage immunity. Antigen recognition by B and T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes and other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology.
ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Archaeology is the study of humans in the past, primarily through the material remains they left behind. It seeks to answer fundamental questions, such as ?When did humans first become dependent on fire??, ?What factors led to the development of agriculture??, or ?How can we explain the rise and fall of early civilizations?? The study of each of these big questions relies on answering many small questions that are asked in the context of archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses. A common theme underlies them: archaeology aims to reconstruct and understand why past human cultures changed. The goal of this class is to provide an understanding of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their investigations. It includes not only hands-on learning of specific analytical techniques, such as faunal and lithic analysis as well as site survey and excavation strategies, but also focuses on the theoretical approaches that guide the questions we ask and the methods we apply to answer them. This class, therefore, prepares students for more upper-level classes in archaeology. It also leads to a new way of thinking. This way of thinking is primarily critical and analytical. It leads one to think about how data are interpreted, and how theoretical frameworks as well as innate biases color these interpretations. Seeking solutions to interpretive problems requires the creative application of multidisciplinary approaches. Therefore, the study of archaeology leads to a new way of thinking about and doing science.
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3004 - Great Controversies in Anthropology (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Notable controversies in anthropology: Is human "reason" the same in all cultures? What makes up evidence/truth when we study people? Whose "voices" should be heard? Should anthropologists support contemporary attempts at economic "development"? Is it possible to agree on a set of universal individual or cultural rights? Can we make qualitative judgments about cultures? What civic/political responsibilities does the anthropologist have at home and with the people whom she or he studies? In-class debates.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3006 - Humans and Aliens: Learning Anthropology through Science Fiction (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 2006/Anth 3006
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Science Fiction has been one of the most popular genres of literature over the last century and a half. Despite its great popularity, however, many fans of the genre do not realize how much it has in common with the discipline of Anthropology. Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human in all times and places. Science fiction, for its part, explores human existence in equally diverse contexts, except that those imagined contexts frequently have not yet happened. Despite this similarity, anthropology is extremely poorly known compared to science fiction. This course uses the stimulating and entertaining literature of science fiction to expose students to anthropology who, having never been exposed to it in high school, are likely to leave university without learning the power of the discipline?s perspective on humanity. Through individual pairings of anthropology texts and science fiction stories, the course explores the relevance of biological anthropology, social anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology to humanity?s future. The course?s juxtaposition of anthropological literature to science fiction stories is designed to provide students with the ability to see how our future is more dependent on how humanity works (as anthropology understands it), than merely what the next technological invention has to offer us. This course introduces students to the breadth of anthropological topics using the literature of such award-winning science fiction (SF) authors as Isaac Asimov, Elisabeth Bear, Jerome Bixby, Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Arthur C. Clarke, Philip K. Dick, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert, Ursula K. Le Guin, Catherine Moore, Mike Resnik, Kim Stanley Robinson, Neil Stephenson, James Tiptree, Jr., and Kurt Vonnegut. While the course is not designed to cover the literary criticism of SF literature nor the social analysis of the SF community of readers and authors, the choice of which SF authors to oppose to select anthropological topics was shaped by my understanding of the historical development of SF literature. Students will thus read stories written from the Golden Age of magazine SF to the most recent post-cyberpunk novelists. The selection of SF stories is of course idiosyncratic but it is designed to reflect the goal of learning something of anthropology while having a blast reading SF.
ANTH 3008 - Introduction to Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on experience in replication of prehistoric stone tools, as basis for archaeological analysis and as art form in itself.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on aspects of southern American vernacular music that came to public attention in the 1920s and 1930s as commercial recordings and field recordings of rural music became available. Although the music had deep roots in the American past, it also underwent dramatic transformations as a result of the coming of industrial capitalism to the south and as a result of the commercial recording process itself. This music continues to profoundly shape popular music today. We will try to consider as many questions as possible during the semester, but we will focus especially on three sets of issues. First, we will consider the music in terms of the historical contexts that shaped it. Second, we will consider the cultural politics surrounding the music as we focus on question of how historical narratives, popular media and popular perceptions, and scholarly works represent and interpret (in often problematic ways) certain genres of popular music and what the politics of those representations might be; and we will consider also how we listen to ?roots music,? how our listening is shaped by contemporary social and political circumstances. Third, we will attempt to understand musical genres in relation to the production of race and class and the experience of racial and class inequalities in the United States, and this may in turn prompt us to think critically about the idea of musical genre itself.
ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological perspectives on death. Diverse understandings of afterlife, cultural variations in death ritual, secularization of death in modern era, management of death in medicine, cultural shifts/conflicts in what constitutes good or natural death.
ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Body-related practices throughout the world. Readings, documentaries, mass media.
ANTH 3043 - Art, Aesthetics and Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
The relationship of art to culture from multiple perspectives including art as a cultural system; the cultural context of art production; the role of the artist in different cultures; methodological considerations in the interpretation of art across cultural boundaries.
ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Romance, aspects of this kind of love relationships from different perspectives in social/biological sciences. Draws on cross-cultural materials.
ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3047W/GWSS 3047W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the concepts of "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" through the scholarship of feminist anthropology, queer anthropology, and their antecedents. Students will read ethnographies that grapple with the contingent and shifting formations of these social constructions - when they emerge, disentangle, re-entangle, submerge, etc. The course will highlight the roles of imperialism, (settler) colonialism, capitalism, racism, heteropatriarchy, ableism, and other forms of social power in shaping these formations as well at the social categories - "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" - themselves.
ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiated "urban" and "non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engege with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically examine the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 3221 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 18.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will explore images of nonWestern peoples and cultures as they have appeared in the movies and in other popular media. It has four aims: l) to introduce the problem of nonWestern peoples in the West from historical points of view, 2) to discuss the relationship between mass media and issue of representation to the marketplace, 3) to introduce the concept of morality in and through collective representations as developed by Durkheim, and 4) to analyze the problem of moral agency in a series of Hollywood and Independent movies which portray nonwestern peoples and cultures. We will watch movies portraying three different groups of cultures, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and the Japanese. In each unit, we will first read important commentary on Western representations of each of these peoples, such as Bernard Smith on Pacific Islanders and Vine Deloria on images of Native Americans and Gina Marchetti on Hollywood?s Japanese.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 3327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 3401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, biogeography. Hands-on examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 3402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct past societies, diets, and environments. Bones and bone fragments to skeletal element (e.g., femur, humerus, tibia), side, age, and taxon (e.g., horse, bison, antelope, hyena). Adaptations and functional morphology of animals¿ anatomy. Tool marks, tooth marks, burning, and types of bone breakage. Past societies' hunting, sharing, cooking practices as well as environmental reconstruction using vertebrates.
ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation/preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans.
ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 5501.
ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An applied learning experience in an agreed-upon, short-term, supervised workplace activity, with defined goals, which may be related to a student's major field or area of interest. The work can be full or part time, paid or unpaid, primarily in off-campus environments. Internships integrate classroom knowledge and theory with practical application and skill development in professional or community settings. The skills and knowledge learned should be transferable to other employment settings and not simply to advance the operations of the employer. Typically the student's work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator or instructor.
ANTH 3980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world, including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia and early Greece and Rome.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNRC 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ANTH 3206 CNES/JwSt/MEST/RelS
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human socieities over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
RELS 3254 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3631/RelS 3631
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From the "Age of Discovery" and the African slave trade, to Malcolm X and the War on Terror, Islam has long been an integral part of the American landscape. In this course, students will examine the history of Islam and social formation of Muslim communities in the United States. We will approach this history in the plural: as histories of Islam in America, paying particular attention to the different local and global dynamics that led to the migration of this racially, ethnically, and class variegated community. This course will explore how racial, national, cultural, and sectarian differences within and between Muslim communities shape and challenge the notion of a singular Islam or Muslim community. We will ask how and why Islam and Muslims have been characterized - both historically and today - as a "problem" in/for America. What does the emergence of terminology like "American Muslim" and "American Islam" tell us about these historical tensions, conceptions of good/bad citizenship, and identity politics more broadly, in the United States today?
RELS 3631 - Islam in America: A History of the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3631/RelS 3631
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
From the ?Age of Discovery? and the African slave trade, to Malcolm X and the War on Terror, Islam has long been an integral part of the American landscape. In this course students will examine the history of Islam and social formation of Muslim communities in the United States. We will approach this history in the plural: as histories of Islam in America, paying particular attention to the different local and global dynamics that led to the migration of this racially, ethnically, and class variegated community. This course will explore how racial, national, cultural, and sectarian differences within and between Muslim communities shape and challenge the notion of a singular Islam or Muslim community. We will ask how and why Islam and Muslims have been characterized - both historically and today - as a "problem" in/for America. What does the emergence of terminology like ?American Muslim? and ?American Islam? tell us about these historical tensions, conceptions of good/bad citizenship, and identity politics more broadly, in the United States today?
ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course considers issues of race, class, gender, “culture," and globality across multiple genres of writing (ethnography, history, fiction, poetry, memoir). We do this by reading the work of writers who, with an ethnographic sensibility, focus on a particular person whose life is lived in obscurity, at the margins. We ask how such an approach that aims to evoke a world through a life might allow the reader to understand how people move across space and time and through their social worlds, in ways that other kinds of ethnographic or historical writing might not. prereq: [1003 or 1005], or instr consent
ANTH 4007 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4007/Anth 4007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Plant remains, material culture, faunal remains, human osteology. Emphasizes lab experience. Instructor consent required. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4009W - Warfare and Human Evolution (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Armed, violent conflict among groups ? warfare ? is a distinctive and devastating trait of many human societies. The practice of warfare brings together a number of unusual characteristics of our species, including the ability to cooperate, to discuss plans, and to make and use weapons, which together combine to create immense human suffering. War has long been a central topic of anthropologists, who have raised many questions. Is warfare a human universal? Are there truly peaceful societies? Why does war occur more often at some times and places than others? How, when and why did warfare evolve? What, if anything, does warfare have to do with intergroup aggression in other animals? What role has warfare, or its more primitive antecedents, played in the evolution of our species? Efforts to explain war have themselves been contentious, with some scholars arguing that war is a recent phenomenon resulting from factors such the development of agriculture, and other scholars arguing that war is an evolutionarily ancient phenomenon with roots in the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees. In this seminar, we will read and discuss classic and recent texts on this broad and often divisive subject. To better assess the arguments presented in survey and theoretical papers, we will read original ethnographic materials, with each student choosing one subsistence society as the focus of their research efforts.
ANTH 4019 - Symbolic Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4019/8211
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Pragmatic/structural aspects of social symbolism cross-culturally. Focuses on power, exchange, social boundaries, gender, and rituals of transition/reversal. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4025 - Studies in Ethnographic Classics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Five types of explanations employed in ethnographic research: diffusionism and theory of survivals; functionalist response; British structuralists; French structuralism; interpretive turn. Problems in ethnographic practice, analysis, and writing. Focuses on several classic monographic examples and associated theoretical writing. prereq: 1003 or 1005
ANTH 4029W - Anthropology of Social Class (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3049W / Anth 4029W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is divided into three parts, each of which has different, but related, purposes. The initial part has general and theoretical goals. First, differences between cultural anthropology and sociology with respect to the study of class difference will be introduced. Secondly, the major theories about hierarchy in pre-state society will be examined. Third, central theories and concepts in the study of stratification in complex societies will be surveyed. In particular, attention will be paid to the relationship between class and individual taste in the work of Pierre Bourdieu. The second part will focus on attitudes about class difference in N. American society. Topics will center on class in everyday life, with special reference to the domains of education, consumption and romantic love. The third part of the course will concern class in nonWestern and/or developing countries, specifically in the Pacific and India. Throughout the course, in addition to readings and lectures, use will be made of representations of class in popular culture, such as magazines and the movies.
ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical application of theories/methods from social/cultural anthropology. Issues of policy, planning, implementation, and ethics as they relate to applied anthropology. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 4003 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
ANTH 4047 - Anthropology of American Culture (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological approaches to contemporary American society/culture. Tensions between market and family. Unity, diversity. Individualism, community.
ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4049/RelS 4049
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Religious beliefs and world views cross-culturally. Religious dimensions of human life through theories of origins, functions, and forms (e.g. myth, ritual, symbolism) of religion in society. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or instr consent
ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems of production/distribution, especially in nonindustrial societies. Comparison, history, critique of major theories. Cross-cultural anthropological approach to material life that subsumes market/nonmarket processes.
ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar course discusses current approaches to historical ecology, the study of human-environmental relationships over time. The course draws on and combines perspectives from the four subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeological anthropology, bioarchaeological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology), and similar disciplines, to understand the varying ways that scholars have analyzed and defined ecologies and environmental problems. It places particular emphasis on theories that define human relationships to the environment as recursive and interdependent. These theories stand in contrast to common Western theological suppositions that see the environment as a framework to which human societies adapt or a set of resources for human communities to exploit. Rather, historical ecologists argue that the environment is a true ecology with humans in it. They contend that human communities are fundamentally and inextricably intertwined with the life cycles and needs of other species, and consequently they study how human-environmental interactions emerge through distinct historical processes and cultural circumstances.
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
ANTH 4077 - Neanderthals: Biology and Culture of Humanity's Nearest Relative
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Paleontological/archaeological record. Students reconstruct behavioral similarities/differences between Neanderthals and modern humans. Why humans alone survived end of Pleistocene. prereq: 1001 or 3001 or 3002 or instr consent
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Archives are not neutral. In order to decolonize them, scholars in anthropology and other disciplines must first understand the ways in which Western settler values have structured them. Who decides acquisition policy? How are items indexed, described, and related to one another? Who has access, and under what conditions? And who is structurally excluded? In this course we decolonize by recontextualizing both the archives as institutions and their contents. In other words, we use methods appropriate for contemporary anthropological archival research. We will consider preservation, curation, organizational bias in archives, analytic scale, voice, and how historical texts are material culture. Students engage in original archival research.
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
ANTH 5008 - Advanced Flintknapping
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Hands-on training in techniques of advanced stone tool production, artifact reproduction, and lithic experimental design for academic/artistic purposes. prereq: [3008 or 5269] or instr consent
ANTH 5009 - Human Behavioral Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth introduction to, and critical review of, human behavioral biology, examining the approaches in anthropology and related fields. Classic texts/recent empirical studies of humans and other species. Theoretical underpinnings of this new discipline/how well theoretical predictions have been supported by subsequent research.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5112 - Reconstructing Hominin Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5112/Anth 8112
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Major hypotheses regarding evolution of human behavior. Combine evidence from realm of biological anthropology as we consider link between bone biology/behavior. Archaeological record. Hypotheses about biocultural evolution regarding tool-use, hunting, scavenging, food sharing, grandmothers, cooking, long distance running. prereq: Previous coursework in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology
ANTH 5113 - Primate Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5113/Anth 8113
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Evolutionary history of primates. Particular focus on origin/diversification of apes/Old World monkeys. prereq: Anthropology major, junior or senior
ANTH 5121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques. prereq: MBA student
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ANTH 5244 - Interpreting Ancient Bone
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5244/8244
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
To Interpret Ancient Bone we must sharpen observational skills, read about observations and analysis by previous workers, and learn to record and analyze complex information. The class combines seminar/discussion formats, in which we read literature about how to best accomplish this type of research, and laboratory time, to give students the opportunity to observe and record modifications to bones that form the basis of archaeological and forensic observations. Students analyze different kinds of tool marks on bone, weathering, carnivore modifications, eco-morphology, ages of death, bone tools, and bones from archaeological sites to infer the "life history" of a bone. We recommend you take the Human Skeleton or Zooarchaeology Laboratory before you take this class, but it is not absolutely required.
ANTH 5255 - Archaeology of Ritual and Religion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3255/Anth 5255/RelS 3254/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course discusses evidence for the origins of religion and its diverse roles in human societies over millennia. It focuses on how artifacts and architecture are essential to religious experience. It asks: What constitutes religion for different cultures? Why is religion at the heart of politics, social life, and cultural imagination?
ANTH 5269 - Analysis of Stone Tool Technology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course offers practical lab experience in analyzing archaeological collections of stone tools to learn about human behavior in the past. Students gain experience needed to get a job in the cultural resource management industry.
ANTH 5401 - The Human Fossil Record
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3401/Anth 5401
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Fossil evidence paleoanthropologists use to reconstruct human evolutionary history. Taxonomy, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, tool use, land use, and biogeography. Examination of fossil casts, readings from primary/secondary professional sources. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 5402 - Zooarchaeology Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists reconstruct the past through the study of animal bones associated with artifacts at archaeological sites. Skeletal element (e.g., humerus, femur, tibia), and taxon (e.g., horse, antelope, sheep, bison, hyena) when confronted with bone. Comparative collection of bones from known taxa.
ANTH 5403 - Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Quantitative methods used by biological anthropologists. Applying these methods to real anthropometric data. Lectures, complementary sessions in computer lab. prereq: Basic univariate statistics course or instr consent
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ANTH 5450 - Spatial Analysis in Anthropology: Research Design and Field Applications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced undergraduate and graduate course introduces students to spatial analyses essential to anthropological ethnography, archaeology, and historical ecology. It builds on introductory courses at UMN, providing students an opportunity to learn anthropological applications of spatial analysis methods, including: research design, field mapping, database management, digital survey platforms, GIS analyses, and integration of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic and historical) data. The structure of the course will follow the trajectory of a typical doctoral-level anthropological project, from pre-field data acquisition and preparation, to in-field data collection, post-field analysis, and presentation. Students who take this course will master skills that are crucial for successful anthropological spatial analysis in the field and laboratory.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5980 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking Period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interaction, art and symbolism, and religion and ritual.
MEST 4043 - Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings: Archaeology of Northern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4043/MeSt 4043
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Archaeology of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and northern continental Europe, from the Romans through the Viking period. Themes to be examined include social and political organization, cross-cultural interactions, art and symbolism, and religion and rituals.
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Cross-cultural perspectives in examining educational patterns. Implicit/explicit cultural assumptions. Methods/approaches to cross-cultural studies in education.
OLPD 5128 - Anthropology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 5128/OLPD 5128
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Insights from educational anthropology for educators to address issues of culture, ethnicity, and power in schools.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 4991 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Under special circumstances and with the approval of the instructor, qualified students may register for a listed course on a tutorial basis. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4992 - Directed Readings
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology through reading materials under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 3993 - Directed Study for Capstone Project Preparation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The Anthropology Independent Capstone Project Planning course is the first semester in a two-semester project sequence. In this first semester course, ANTH 3993, students plan their project and carry out preliminary research in consultation with their faculty mentor. Students and faculty mentors meet throughout the semester. The resulting project typically consists of an annotated bibliography, project proposal, Interdisciplinary Review Board application if appropriate , and/or pilot study. A directed study contract between the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. prereq: [Jr or sr] anth major, instr consent
ANTH 4013W - Capstone Project Writing Seminar (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar is designed for students participating in the Anthropology Senior Capstone Project. The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with instructional support and a structured environment in which to develop their research and writing skills within the practical context of writing a senior thesis for the Capstone. The thesis is based on original research for the Senior Capstone Project conducted by students in consultation with their advisors, and it is advised that students finish conducting research before enrolling in this course. In some cases, it is possible research may continue from the planning course into this seminar. The seminar meets once a week, during which time students engage in active learning exercises, in-class discussions, and peer review as they write their thesis. The goal of this course is to align the writing abilities of students with the writing criteria developed by departmental faculty as part of the Center for Writing?s Writing Enriched Curriculum. This course compliments student?s advisor-advisee relationship for the Senior Capstone Project, and it is required that students set up regular meetings with their advisors to discuss their progress in the course in addition to consulting about the content of their projects. prereq: sr major, instr consent
ANTH 4013H - Capstone Project Writing Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this seminar is to provide Honors students with instructional support and a structured environment in which to develop their research and writing skills within the practical context of writing the Honors Thesis for the Capstone. The thesis is based on original research for the Senior Capstone Project conducted by students in consultation with their advisors, and it is advised that students finish conducting research before enrolling in this course. In some cases it is possible research may continue from the planning course into this seminar. The seminar meets once a week, during which time students engage in active learning exercises, in-class discussions, and peer review as they write their thesis. The goal of this course is to align the writing abilities of students with the writing criteria developed by departmental faculty as part of the Center for Writing?s Writing Enriched Curriculum. This course compliments student?s advisor-advisee relationship for the Senior Capstone Project, and it is required that students set up regular meetings with their advisors to discuss their progress in the course in addition to consulting about the content of their projects. prereq: Sr major, honors student, instr consent
ANTH 4093 - In-Class Capstone Project
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Course that fulfills the senior capstone requirement as an add-on directed study in association with an upper-level 4xxx-5xxx-level ANTH course. Instructor or department consent required.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3034W - Roots Music in American Culture and Society (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on aspects of southern American vernacular music that came to public attention in the 1920s and 1930s as commercial recordings and field recordings of rural music became available. Although the music had deep roots in the American past, it also underwent dramatic transformations as a result of the coming of industrial capitalism to the south and as a result of the commercial recording process itself. This music continues to profoundly shape popular music today. We will try to consider as many questions as possible during the semester, but we will focus especially on three sets of issues. First, we will consider the music in terms of the historical contexts that shaped it. Second, we will consider the cultural politics surrounding the music as we focus on question of how historical narratives, popular media and popular perceptions, and scholarly works represent and interpret (in often problematic ways) certain genres of popular music and what the politics of those representations might be; and we will consider also how we listen to ?roots music,? how our listening is shaped by contemporary social and political circumstances. Third, we will attempt to understand musical genres in relation to the production of race and class and the experience of racial and class inequalities in the United States, and this may in turn prompt us to think critically about the idea of musical genre itself.
ANTH 3046W - Romance and Culture (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Romance, aspects of this kind of love relationships from different perspectives in social/biological sciences. Draws on cross-cultural materials.
ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3047W/GWSS 3047W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the concepts of "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" through the scholarship of feminist anthropology, queer anthropology, and their antecedents. Students will read ethnographies that grapple with the contingent and shifting formations of these social constructions - when they emerge, disentangle, re-entangle, submerge, etc. The course will highlight the roles of imperialism, (settler) colonialism, capitalism, racism, heteropatriarchy, ableism, and other forms of social power in shaping these formations as well at the social categories - "sex," "gender," and "sexuality" - themselves.
ANTH 3145W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiated "urban" and "non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engege with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically examine the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will explore images of nonWestern peoples and cultures as they have appeared in the movies and in other popular media. It has four aims: l) to introduce the problem of nonWestern peoples in the West from historical points of view, 2) to discuss the relationship between mass media and issue of representation to the marketplace, 3) to introduce the concept of morality in and through collective representations as developed by Durkheim, and 4) to analyze the problem of moral agency in a series of Hollywood and Independent movies which portray nonwestern peoples and cultures. We will watch movies portraying three different groups of cultures, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and the Japanese. In each unit, we will first read important commentary on Western representations of each of these peoples, such as Bernard Smith on Pacific Islanders and Vine Deloria on images of Native Americans and Gina Marchetti on Hollywood?s Japanese.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 3327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 4003W - Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course considers issues of race, class, gender, “culture," and globality across multiple genres of writing (ethnography, history, fiction, poetry, memoir). We do this by reading the work of writers who, with an ethnographic sensibility, focus on a particular person whose life is lived in obscurity, at the margins. We ask how such an approach that aims to evoke a world through a life might allow the reader to understand how people move across space and time and through their social worlds, in ways that other kinds of ethnographic or historical writing might not. prereq: [1003 or 1005], or instr consent
ANTH 4009W - Warfare and Human Evolution (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Armed, violent conflict among groups ? warfare ? is a distinctive and devastating trait of many human societies. The practice of warfare brings together a number of unusual characteristics of our species, including the ability to cooperate, to discuss plans, and to make and use weapons, which together combine to create immense human suffering. War has long been a central topic of anthropologists, who have raised many questions. Is warfare a human universal? Are there truly peaceful societies? Why does war occur more often at some times and places than others? How, when and why did warfare evolve? What, if anything, does warfare have to do with intergroup aggression in other animals? What role has warfare, or its more primitive antecedents, played in the evolution of our species? Efforts to explain war have themselves been contentious, with some scholars arguing that war is a recent phenomenon resulting from factors such the development of agriculture, and other scholars arguing that war is an evolutionarily ancient phenomenon with roots in the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees. In this seminar, we will read and discuss classic and recent texts on this broad and often divisive subject. To better assess the arguments presented in survey and theoretical papers, we will read original ethnographic materials, with each student choosing one subsistence society as the focus of their research efforts.
ANTH 4029W - Anthropology of Social Class (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3049W / Anth 4029W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is divided into three parts, each of which has different, but related, purposes. The initial part has general and theoretical goals. First, differences between cultural anthropology and sociology with respect to the study of class difference will be introduced. Secondly, the major theories about hierarchy in pre-state society will be examined. Third, central theories and concepts in the study of stratification in complex societies will be surveyed. In particular, attention will be paid to the relationship between class and individual taste in the work of Pierre Bourdieu. The second part will focus on attitudes about class difference in N. American society. Topics will center on class in everyday life, with special reference to the domains of education, consumption and romantic love. The third part of the course will concern class in nonWestern and/or developing countries, specifically in the Pacific and India. Throughout the course, in addition to readings and lectures, use will be made of representations of class in popular culture, such as magazines and the movies.
ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical application of theories/methods from social/cultural anthropology. Issues of policy, planning, implementation, and ethics as they relate to applied anthropology. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 4003 or grad student or instr consent
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 5045W - Urban Anthropology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3145W/Anth 5045W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class explores anthropological approaches to urban life. On one hand, the course examines the ontological nature of the city by looking into the relation between cities and their environment, and asking whether and how people differentiate "urban" and 'non-urban" spaces. It uncovers the social practices and behaviors that define urban life; urban-rural distinctions; the material and ecological processes that constitute cities; and popular representations of city and/or countryside. On the other hand, the course investigates the spatial and social divisions of the city, seeking to understand the historical struggles and ongoing processes that both draw together and differentiate the people of an urban environment. It studies how cities influence political decision-making, contributing to the uneven distribution of power and resources. It considers: industrialization; urban class conflict; gendered and racialized spaces; and suburbanization. Both of these approaches will also critically consider the city as a social object that we encounter and learn about through our engagement with kinds of media, such as novels and film. Hence, reading for the class will include literature from the social sciences and humanities, as well as critical works of fiction. Students will engage with these broader anthropological issues through an investigation of several global cities, especially Minneapolis-St. Paul, Chicago, Paris, Mexico City, Brasilia, and New Delhi. The class mixes lecture, discussion, and guided research. Lectures will introduce the history of urbanism and urban anthropology. Discussions will critically evaluate the readings, and offer insights and examples to better understand them. By participating in a guided research project, students will uncover hidden aspects of their own city, using ethnography or archaeology to shed light on the urban environment, social struggles over space, or other themes.
ANTH 5327W - Inca, Aztec & Maya Civilizations (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3327W/Anth 5327W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is an intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of native civilizations in ancient America, focusing on the Maya, Aztec, and Inca states. Lectures and discussions examine the culture and history of these Native American civilizations, while also introducing students to anthropological theories of the state, religion, aesthetics, and history.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 3707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
RELS 5707W - Anthropology of the Middle East (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3021W/Anth 5021W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Anthropological field methods of analyzing/interpreting Middle Eastern cultures/societies.
ANTH 3027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.
ANTH 5027W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists/historians analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman Period. Interpreting archaeological evidence from specific sites to understand broad trends in human past.
HIST 3067W - Archaeology of Prehistoric Europe (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3027W/Anth 5027W/Hist 306
Typically offered: Every Fall
How archaeologists analyze/interpret artifacts to develop knowledge about formation of European society, from earliest evidence of human occupation to Roman period.