Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sport Management B.S.

Kinesiology, School of
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 79 to 80
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The sport management major focuses on contemporary sport as a product of social, psychological, and economic phenomena. Because of its prominent role in our culture, economy, and societal behavior, sport is a popular subject for academic inquiry. Graduates may find employment in sport marketing and management, sales and fundraising, coaching, sport administration, and sport or other fitness-related occupations. The program also prepares students for graduate study in sport management. Coursework in sport management addresses such topics as ethics and sport, sport as a sociocultural phenomenon, sport management, sport marketing and promotion, and facility and event management. Features of the program include an 8-credit experiential course, research methods, a senior seminar, and a set of focused electives. Program requirements for the majors at the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) fulfill a number of the University's required liberal education (LE) cores and themes. Students have multiple options for fulfilling remaining LE requirements.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 45 credits before admission to the program.
Successful applicants will have: 45 credits completed or in progress, Earned a 2.00 GPA, or higher, and The required prerequisite coursework completed or in progress. Admission preference is given to students who have: 45 credits completed, Earned a 2.75 GPA, or higher, and/or Completed the required prerequisite courses. All incoming CEHD Freshman must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525W. For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Admission Requirements
KIN 1871 - Survey of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport (3.0 cr)
SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management (2.0 cr)
Computer Literacy and Problem Solving
CI 1871 - Computer Literacy and Problem Solving (4.0 cr)
or CI 5301 - Foundations of Computer Applications for Business and Education (3.0 cr)
or IDSC 3001 - Introduction to Information Technology in Business (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
First Year Experience
All incoming CEHD Freshman must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525W.
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience [WI] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
At least 18 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Foundation Courses
Take a minimum of 14 credits from this group, with the guidance of an advisor.
PE
Take exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming (1.0 cr)
· PE 1012 - Beginning Running (1.0 cr)
· PE 1014 - Conditioning (1.0 cr)
· PE 1015 - Weight Training (1.0 cr)
· PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise (1.0 cr)
· PE 1029 - Handball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1032 - Badminton (1.0 cr)
· PE 1033 - Foil Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1034 - Judo (1.0 cr)
· PE 1035 - Karate (1.0 cr)
· PE 1036 - Racquetball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1037 - Squash Racquets (1.0 cr)
· PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis (1.0 cr)
· PE 1044 - Self-Defense (1.0 cr)
· PE 1045 - Rock Climbing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do (1.0 cr)
· PE 1048 - Bowling (1.0 cr)
· PE 1053 - Ice Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1055 - Golf (1.0 cr)
· PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1058 - Snowboarding (1.0 cr)
· PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics (1.0 cr)
· PE 1067 - Basketball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket (1.0 cr)
· PE 1072 - Soccer (1.0 cr)
· PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1076 - Flag Football (1.0 cr)
· PE 1077 - Lacrosse (1.0 cr)
· PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash (1.0 cr)
· PE 1146 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· PE 1154 - Figure Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving (1.0 cr)
· PE 1262 - Marathon Training (3.0 cr)
· PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education (1.0-3.0 cr)
Public Speaking
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument [WI] (3.0 cr)
or FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Sociology
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America [DSJ, SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
Psychology
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Required Core Courses
Students must complete 8 credits of SMGT 3996.
SMGT 3111 - Sports Facility and Event Management (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3501 - Sport in a Diverse Society [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3601 - Ethics and Values in Sport (2.0 cr)
SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3861 - Sport and Recreation Law (3.0 cr)
KIN 3982 - Research Methods in Kinesiology (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3881W - Senior Seminar in Sport Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3996 - Practicum: The Sport Experience (2.0-8.0 cr)
Focus Electives (23 credits)
Students must take an additional 23 credits of electives in consultation with the sport management advisor. Focus Elective courses must be upper division (3000 level or higher), unless approved by your sport management advisor.
Take 23 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3993 - Directed Study in Sport Management (1.0-4.0 cr)
· SMGT 3741 - Sustainability through Sport (2.0 cr)
· KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 3126W - Sport and Exercise Psychology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 3131W - History and Philosophy of Sport [WI] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4001H - Honors Seminar in KIN, PAHP, + SMGT (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5328 - International Sport: The Impact of the Olympic Games [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5804 - National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Compliance (2.0 cr)
· ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· BLAW 3058 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· CMGT 3001W - Introduction to Construction [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3305 - Learning About Leadership Through Film and Literature (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3401 - Teaching Marketing Promotion (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3424 - Sales Training (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3641 - Introduction to Organization Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3001 - Introduction to History & Philosophy of Youthwork [HIS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers (4.0 cr)
· LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3263W - Media Literacy: Decoding Media Images and Messages [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3441 - Introduction to Organizational Communication (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 3021 - Human Resource Management and Strategy (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 1001 - Media in a Changing World [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· ABUS 4013W - Legal, Ethical, and Risk Issues for Managers [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4701 - Introduction to Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
· BLAW 3062 - Contract Law and Corporate Regulation (2.0 cr)
· BLAW 3061 - Business Law Basics (2.0 cr)
· LAW 3000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4028 - The Impact of the Olympic Games on Los Angeles (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5461 - Issues in the Sport Industry (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· SMGT 3881W - Senior Seminar in Sport Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Education and Human Development

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· Sport Management BS Sample Plan

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· Sport Management B.S.
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KIN 1871 - Survey of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Professional practice and disciplinary dimensions of kinesiology, recreation, and sport. Subdisciplines, relevant issues, practical applications.
SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope/motive of the study of sport from sociological, psychological, historical, economic, and scientific perspective. Issues in sport.
CI 1871 - Computer Literacy and Problem Solving
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1871/PSTL 1571/RM 1203
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Competencies in computer applications used in the social sciences and business to solve problems. Using advanced word processing techniques to create complex documents, electronic spreadsheets to analyze data and present it graphically, database management programs to store, organize, and query data, and presentation software to communicate ideas.
CI 5301 - Foundations of Computer Applications for Business and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Instructional uses of computers/representative business, education, marketing applications. Word processing, databases, spreadsheets, graphic design. Expectations are for demonstrations of skills on apps/understanding of concepts that go beyond basic.
IDSC 3001 - Introduction to Information Technology in Business
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital transformation through new technologies such as artificial intelligence, enterprise systems, electronic commerce, Internet of things, social media; IT strategy and data-driven decision making; privacy and security issues related to the Internet; a must take for students who want to be prepared for the rapidly changing technological landscape as successful professionals
EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing.
PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic aquatic safety, fundamentals of swimming and hydrodynamics. Principles of hydrodynamics and stroke mechanics; five basic strokes; basic rescue techniques with use of pool equipment; hydrotherapy for disabilities and other conditions, opportunities for competitive activities, lifetime enjoyment of aquatics.
PE 1012 - Beginning Running
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This physically active class will expose students to the joys of running. Course topics and physical activities will explore technique, equipment, safety, etiquette, injury prevention, full-body conditioning, endurance, mobility, strength, and long-term training and goal setting. This course is designed for novices who aspire to run 5K.
PE 1014 - Conditioning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of personal fitness. Principles of fitness; health and motor skill components of fitness; principles of training/conditioning programs; nutrition; weight control; common fitness injuries; motivation and consistency in fitness programs; stress management.
PE 1015 - Weight Training
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to weight training. Basic aspects of weight training including exercise selection and technique, charting workouts, program design, nutritional considerations, and safety.
PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Good posture techniques, individual exercises, fitness concepts, and mental techniques. Specific overall sound body and mind techniques to include flexibility exercises, cardiovascular fitness, resistance training, nutrition management, weight control, stress management, and self-thought.
PE 1029 - Handball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hand and eye coordination, footwork in practice and game conditions, and skills and strategies of service and rally for the court sport handball (four-wall version). Novice to intermediate levels of play accommodated.
PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic sabre techniques, movement, an overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1032 - Badminton
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals including etiquette, terminology, game rules for singles and doubles, footwork, shot selection, and strategy.
PE 1033 - Foil Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fending fundamentals, including basic foil techniques, movement, a general overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1034 - Judo
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills for throwing, falling, grappling (matwork), choking, arm and neck techniques; contest judo from Jiu-Jitsu; fundamental rules and scoring of contests. Videotapes used for technique instruction and contest appreciation.
PE 1035 - Karate
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Traditional Japanese Shotokan Karate. Students learn to punch, block, strike, & kick with a focus on proper form, posture, & body mechanics. Students also learn a Kata (choreographed form), techniques with partners, & practical self-defense. Non-contact - no pads, hitting, or throwing.
PE 1036 - Racquetball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of racquetball, including equipment; safety and etiquette; terminology; game rules of singles, doubles, and cutthroat; grips; basic strategies; serves and shots.
PE 1037 - Squash Racquets
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Entry-level technique, basic equipment, international dimension courts, and fitness.
PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental strokes, including forehands, backhands, volleys, lobs, overheads, and serves; introduction to doubles play; terminology, rules, and etiquette.
PE 1044 - Self-Defense
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical, psychological, and de-escalation skills for acting in crisis situations. Distance, body language, and tone of voice are addressed. Physical skills include striking, kicking, shifting, blocking, releasing techniques, floor defenses, and applications to armed attackers and multiple attackers.
PE 1045 - Rock Climbing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Safety, knots, equipment, techniques, and anchor systems used in climbing. Course includes all necessary equipment. prereq: Good general health, no [neck or back] problems
PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Tae Kwon Do. Principles of martial arts, body mechanics of Tae Kwon Do, practical self-defense.
PE 1048 - Bowling
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals, including stance, approach and delivery, scoring, bowling terminology, and etiquette.
PE 1053 - Ice Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic turns, basic stops, balance techniques, and various other skills from both the forward and backward positions. Equipment, safety issues, ice skating terminology.
PE 1055 - Golf
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proper grip, stance, ball address, swing, club selection, psychological management, rules, and etiquette. Basic instruction in analyzing, assisting with, and coaching golf.
PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine skiing. How to stop, turn, and use lifts. Safety, etiquette, and purchase of equipment. Class held at Highland Hills ski area in Bloomington.
PE 1058 - Snowboarding
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine snowboarding. Uses American Teaching System. Classes are split into nine skill levels, beginning through advanced. Held at Hyland Ski and Snowboard School in Bloomington. prereq: Good general health, injury free
PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Rolls, handstands, cartwheels, extensions, handsprings, tucks (flips). Spotting techniques. Skills on bars, vault, and beam.
PE 1067 - Basketball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental skills and rules of basketball, with emphasis on basic court movement and different offensive and defensive strategies.
PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Cricket. Laws of Cricket, bowling/batting techniques, competitive/recreational Cricket opportunities.
PE 1072 - Soccer
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of soccer including sporting behavior both on and off the field, game rules, soccer terminology, participation and competition drills, fundamental soccer skills, practical instruction in strategy.
PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills, team play, rules, officiating, and strategy.
PE 1076 - Flag Football
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to flag football, techniques, field positions, rules/regulations. Students will participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, kicking, and catching.
PE 1077 - Lacrosse
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to lacrosse, techniques, field positions, rules, regulations. Students participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, catching, and stick handling.
PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Stroke mechanics, shot placement, changing pace. Court movement/positioning. Fitness requirements, joint/muscle stresses. Weight training for squash. On-court etiquette. prereq: 1037 or instr consent
PE 1154 - Figure Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Terminology, rules. Basic moves, jumps, spins. On-/off-ice assignments. prereq: 1053 or equiv or instr consent
PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diving equipment, physics, physiology, decompression, emergencies, recreational dive planning, oceans, currents and aquatic life, snorkeling/SCUBA equipment usage, buoyancy control, entries, emergencies. prereq: Ability to swim 400 yds comfortably or instr consent
PE 1262 - Marathon Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Physical challenge achieved through physiological/psychological adaptation. Goal setting that fosters adaptation in many facets of life. Marathon history. prereq: No pre-existing medical condition that would prevent finishing a marathon, instr consent
PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Activities or related opportunities not normally available through regular course offerings.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategies for analyzing, evaluating, generating arguments. Problems in listening/responding to argument.
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1461/OLPD 1461
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course prepares students to present information and adjust their messages based on audience need in a variety of future work contexts. Students interested in majoring in Family Social Science, Education, Youth Studies, and Kinesiology will take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in counseling, community-based organizations, education, and health sciences to convey important, and often sensitive, material to specific audiences.
OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1461/OLPD 1461
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course prepares students to present information and hone their messages based on audience need in a variety of business, leadership, and workplace contexts. Students interested in majoring in Business and Marketing Education (BME), Human Resource Development (HRD), and other majors can take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in training and development, as well as business and industry to convey vital and timely messages.
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1211/PsTL 1211
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to multicultural families using an ecological lens. The institution of the family is recognized globally as a basic unit of a society that produces, develops, socializes, and launches the next generation of its citizenry. This course will focus on families in contemporary America, a society that has grown increasingly diverse, and faces many complex challenges in today?s global environment. Using a human ecological lens allows us to examine families in their nested and interdependent environments--how individuals shape and are shaped by families, their human built environments, their socio-cultural environments, and their natural-physical environments. This is a service learning class.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course introduces students to applied psychology as a discipline and reviews fundamental principles of psychology through the lenses of applied and professional areas that are the foci of CEHD majors. Specifically, through the lenses of education, we review principles of learning, memory, development, intelligence, and interventions; through the lenses of health and wellness, we review personality, biological, social, and cognitive bases of normal and abnormal behavior, as well as treatments; and, through the lenses of business and organizations, we review principles of motivation, sensation perception, and social behavior. Thus, these psychological principles are considered theoretically, empirically, and through examples for application, with lab discussions and projects emphasizing education, business, health and wellness. The course serves as a foundation for future coursework in education, health sciences, and psychology, and is consistent with the APA’s public education effort to demonstrate how the science and application of psychology benefits society and improves lives.
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology. prereq: Honors
SMGT 3111 - Sports Facility and Event Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of managing a sport facility and the events which take place within these facilities. Some of the topics discussed include operations, scheduling, marketing, ticketing, finance, sponsorship, risk, security, and event management. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and present viewpoints as it relates to the management of sport facilities and event management. In addition, students will have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained through lecture and in class exercises by viewing a sports event and critiquing various facility management functions during the event, and by developing a sports event management plan. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of organization, management, and administration within the sport industry. Students will have the opportunity to hear, learn, and share viewpoints as they relate to sport management through lectures, discussions on current events, and case study analysis. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent, and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the business activity of the sports industry. Topics include sports and its business ecosystem, basic economic principles, revenue management, ticketing, sponsorships and other revenue sources, and expenditure management. prereq: SMGT or KIN or REC major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3501 - Sport in a Diverse Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Relationship between sport and contemporary social institutions. Groups/individuals who have historically been marginalized or excluded from sport participation. Race, sex, social class, sexual orientation, physical (dis)abilities.
SMGT 3601 - Ethics and Values in Sport
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In sport management we have many opportunities to ask questions regarding acts and decisions as right or wrong. What does it mean to act in a way that characterizes good behavior? How do we develop morally? What are our personal values and moral orientations? Does sport perpetuate violence in society? What is moral and ethical conduct in sport management? What is meant by the term social responsibility? Do professional sport team owners have a responsibility to the community? How do we make decisions that are good, right and authentic? These questions and other ethical issues in sport will be explored from historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives. The process of critical reading, thinking, writing, and discussion will be emphasized. Thoughtful reflection and respectful dialogue are encouraged. Critical thinking is a learned process and two activities are central to this process: 1) identifying and challenging assumptions and 2) exploring and imagining alternatives (Brookfield, 1987). prereq: SMGT major and 60 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an overview of sport marketing management in sport organizations. The most basic objectives of the course provide you with a broad introduction to sport marketing concepts, the role of sport marketing in society, and the various factors that influence marketing decision making. Like other introductory survey courses, you will be exposed to and expected to learn the "language? of the industry (i.e., terms, concepts, and frameworks) used by practicing marketing professionals. However, it is also expected that by the end of the course you will have a solid understanding of the major decision areas under marketing, the basic interrelationships of those decision areas, and an appreciation of how to apply key frameworks and tools in analysis of customers, competition, and marketing strengths and weaknesses. With this combination, the course should help you develop insight about creative selection of target markets and blending decisions related to product, price, promotion, place, and PR (i.e., the marketing mix) to meet the needs of a target market. It is important that sport management students understand the vital role of marketing within the sport industry. Marketing may take several forms in sport businesses. Students must be able to differentiate between use of marketing to sell sport products and/or services (marketing of sport) from the use of sport and sport personality marketing to sell general or sport-related products or services (marketing through sport). These objectives can only be achieved through a joint effort. I will work to stimulate your interest and learning in these areas, but you will be expected to display initiative and a program of self-study. In that sense, a complementary objective of the course is to provide you with an environment that will encourage and reward your own intellectual effort, while simultaneously maintaining rigorous standards that identify those who are motivated to pursue excellence in their own educational preparation for a sport business career. prereq: SMGT Major or SMGT Minor, or instructor consent AND 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3861 - Sport and Recreation Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to acquaint the students to the US legal system, structure, process and terminology. The course provides an introduction of the legal aspects of contract law, tort law, statutory law, negligence, and constitutional law. A student upon completion of the course will understand basic legal aspects of sport and physical activity and will be able to provide managerial analysis and decision making based upon a legal aspects of sport knowledge, therefore providing a competitive advantage of the organization of which are involved. The course instruction relies heavily on court case studies and the legal implications in a sport setting. prereq: SMGT major or REC major or SMGT minor or Health and Wellness Promotion minor and 60 credits completed or in progress.
KIN 3982 - Research Methods in Kinesiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How to understand/interpret/read research. Research question, study design, quantitative/qualitative methods. Instrumentation, statistical methods, study limitations/implications. Critiquing peer-reviewed articles. Designing a research study. prereq: Kin major or instr consent
SMGT 3881W - Senior Seminar in Sport Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course addresses the applicability of research in the management of sport through the culmination of a senior research project as well as providing students with career development. The course will engage participants in the systematic inquiry into their own understanding of various components in delivering a sports program. A major segment of course work involves working with a team of peers on a collaborative research project that will address an organization?s key business/management problem. Each group will identify a sport organization and work collaboratively with them to develop a plan that addresses the respective problem the organization is experiencing.
SMGT 3996 - Practicum: The Sport Experience
Credits: 2.0 -8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical experience in one or more sport settings. prereq: 3881, SMGT major, instr consent
SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Foundation of revenue production in sport management. Necessary skills related to revenue production and sales processes as they apply to the business of sport. prereq: Sport Management major or minor or instr consent
SMGT 3993 - Directed Study in Sport Management
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students have the opportunity to earn credit while working in a lab or field research setting to carry our scholarly or creative activities while under the guidance of a School of Kinesiology Sport Management faculty member. Students can assist with faculty scholarship or carry out projects of their own. To earn credit in this course, students must talk with the faculty member and then fill out a Directed Activity Contract (z.umn.edu/Directed_Activity) online. This contract is an agreement between the student and faculty member and should establish expectations, credits, and the grading basis for the work.
SMGT 3741 - Sustainability through Sport
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
With the growing globalization of sport and its influence on social and commercial activities worldwide, environmental sustainability has become a critical component of sport management strategy among socially responsible sport organizations. Sport organizations are increasingly seeking opportunities to be positive contributors to their communities with respect to reducing waste, improving energy efficiency, responsibly using land, developing and contributing to responsible supply chains, and conserving water and other natural resources. This course is designed to familiarize students with a wide-range of manners by which sport organizations are able to use their core competencies and elevated positions in their communities to deliver impactful sustainability programs
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of health/wellness. Physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, and financial health. Influence of societal changes on general health/wellness of diverse populations.
KIN 3126W - Sport and Exercise Psychology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of people in physical activity contexts. Foundations approach to theory/research in sport and exercise psychology. prereq: Kin major or instr consent
KIN 3131W - History and Philosophy of Sport (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory description and interpretation of the historical and philosophical development of physical education and sport from primitive societies to 20th century civilization. prereq: Kin major or instr consent
KIN 4001H - Honors Seminar in KIN, PAHP, + SMGT
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will learn how to critically review research articles and how to write a thesis literature review, methods, results, and discussion section. Students will choose to write a systematic literature review or conduct a research study under the guidance of their adviser. Students will write and provide peer reviews for the thesis literature reviews and methods sections. Instruction regarding writing a results and discussion section will be provided.
KIN 5328 - International Sport: The Impact of the Olympic Games (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
In the late nineteenth century, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, a French aristocrat, worked tirelessly to revive the Olympic Games from Greek history. Through Baron de Coubertin's efforts, the first Olympic Games of the modern era took place in 1896 in Athens, Greece. From a small sporting event that hosted a little over 300 athletes from 13 countries the Olympic Games have grown over the last 120 years to one of the most viewed sporting events in the world. Today, the Olympic Games hosts over 10,000 athletes from over 200 countries. The International Olympic Committee (IOC), which runs the Olympic Games, is now one of the most powerful and richest sporting organizations in the world. The Olympic Games have had a profound impact on the world we live in and they provide us with a platform for examining changes in the world's cultural, economic, social and political processes over the last 120 years. This course explores the impact of a specific Olympic Game(s) held on that host city's culture, economy and political landscape. In addition, this course will explore that Olympic Games(s) impact on the world's cultural, social and political processes.
KIN 5804 - National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Compliance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Governance structure, policies, and procedures in intercollegiate athletics. Careers in college athletics as coach, administrator, athletic trainer, counselor, etc. prereq: [Upper div undergrad or grad student] in KIN, instr consent
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to financial accounting for U.S. organizations. Reading financial statements. prereq: Soph
CMGT 3001W - Introduction to Construction (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A wide range of construction-related topics and an overview of the industry itself are presented: type and size of projects, where the industry has come from and where it appears to be heading, and roles and responsibilities of participants. Through assignments and projects, the course defines project and construction sequences, materials and building systems, and project scheduling and delivery methods. Students will conduct research into construction materials, sustainability, and self-selected topics. As a writing intensive course focused on developing skills crucial to professionals, it requires the production and revision of a variety of construction documents, including drawings and specifications.
COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work as a team to plan, script, and shoot video productions in a hands-on multi-camera television studio. By creating their own productions and reviewing the productions of others, students learn how media aesthetics shape the presentation of themes and messages.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 1102/Econ 1102/1105/1112
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aggregate consumption, saving, investment, and national income. Role of money, banking, and business cycles in domestic and world economy. International trade, growth, and development. U.S. economy and its role in the world economy. International interdependencies among nations. prereq: [1101 or equiv], knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/Mgmt 3010
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101
OLPD 3305 - Learning About Leadership Through Film and Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Readings from leadership studies, literature, and film. Ethical dilemmas. Different styles of leadership and their consequences. Intersection of public/private in exercising leadership. Competing loyalties/pressures felt by leaders/followers. Fundamental questions about nature/desirability of leadership.
OLPD 3401 - Teaching Marketing Promotion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 3401/OLPD 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Materials, methods, and approaches to teaching marketing promotion. Advertising, promotion, public relations, direct selling, visual merchandising, and direct marketing.
OLPD 3424 - Sales Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Strategies and techniques for developing effective sales people. A review of review practices related to sales management, business development, selling strategies, and learning objectives essential to developing the skills, knowledge, and abilities to create a competent sales force.
OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human resource development theories, principles, concepts, and practices.
OLPD 3641 - Introduction to Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization development theories, principles, concepts, and practices. How development is used to direct change in an organization.
OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic understanding and personal experience with how e-marketing can be used as part of an overall marketing and promotion plan.
OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of customer relationship management, brand identity, and integrated marketing communications. Comprehensive framework for how organizations interact with their various publics to create goodwill/loyalty.
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 3325W/V/YoSt 3325W/V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Designed for those CEHD learners who seek to fulfill the upper level writing intensive requirement in a way that is relevant to their major and field of study, this course will support you as you manage a larger writing project. Learners in this course will form a community of writers, as each grapples with the challenges of a major project focusing on a meaningful problem or issue in your field of study. Some of the most important and most challenging work you face as you near graduation in your major is the work of bringing your academic training to bear on current issues in your field of study. By focusing on project-based writing, this course supports undergraduate learners in the endeavor to delve into and contribute to the work being done in your field to address a particular problem. You will propose a project, identify an audience, tailor your work to address your audience?s needs, gather relevant information through primary and secondary research, and create a product that engages others and furthers the real-world work of solving problems. Collaborative activities and assignments will support you through the process. The course structure is flexible and designed to be responsive to individual needs and a variety of disciplinary contexts, so that students can receive feedback and guidance during different stages of capstone or thesis writing, or community engagement projects. Thus, you can anticipate that the majority of the work will focus on a project that you will propose based on your interests, needs, or connections to your writing work in your major. Course goals are to develop a writing process, understand the habits of writings, work through a larger research project, develop skill in the APA format, learn to use the University libraries, consider audience needs. In class work include: peer review, active learning activities designed around writing skill development, discussion, lecture, and presentation. Learners are expected to actively engage in the course material, participate in class and give and receive feedback about writing. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major, or instr consent
YOST 3001 - Introduction to History & Philosophy of Youthwork (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course exposes students to a depth of perspectives on young people and youth work. Exploring various historic and philosophical origins of ?normal? childhood, we unveil the way our modern understandings of child, youth, and adolescent draw upon a rich history of sexist, colonialist, and racist science. To do so we explore Indigenous, early European, Middle-Class, and W.E.I.R.D. (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, Democratic) notions of childhood. We explore how these ideas are operationalized into practices on youth/youthwork. We explore how contemporary organizations of American youthwork and youth development, then took up and applied these ideas thus naturalizing modern norms and expectations of child and youth. This course covers the philosophical and historical foundations of youthwork in a critical and interactive way through a review of youth, youthwork, and youth organizations set in the context of the past 500 years. The course is designed to encourage students to examine their familial histories, timelines and geographies and through collaborative and interactive learning, begin to explore how these histories, combined with others, helped to shape the ways that we think about youth and how this thinking collectively shapes youth policy, practice, and the institutions within which we meet and work with young people. All of this with the goal of becoming more effective and thoughtful when working with young people in youthwork settings. Whether you choose to work in youthwork settings or in other human service organization or agency, developing a sense of cultural humility and skills to understand historical data, philosophical frames and current practices will be critical to your success in professional arenas. prereq: YOST 2xxx or instr consent
YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: YoSt 3032/YoSt 5032
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the multitude of theories that have been proposed to describe, understand, and even explain young people in the second decade of life and beyond. Indeed, we will be studying development theories that have been used to explain your own life and experience. This gives us a unique perspective in the class. You have first hand experience that can be used to interrogate the theories and often illustrate both the strengths and weaknesses of each. Over the course of the semester, we describe, discuss, and critique six theories of adolescent and youth development, including: Social Justice Youth Development, Participatory Youth Development, Community Youth Development, Positive Youth Development, Adolescent Development, and Recapitulation. We begin with the most recent theory and then using academic archeology, dig back through time to understand not only the individual theories but also how they connect and join to each other. Along the way, we also discuss the social and cultural events and situations that influenced each theory?s development and often demise. A major goal of this class is to better understand where these theories come from, what they are connected to, and often how they are used to both support and marginalize young people. Class will be interactive, using both small and large group discussion, experiential learning activities, and guest lecturers. The major assignment for the class is a grant writing project, where students will collaborate with a youth-serving organizing to develop a grant proposal that addresses the organization?s needs. This project will be used to deepen understanding of how to apply the theories we learn in class, as well as to develop skills around writing strong grant proposals for youth-serving organizations. prereq: YOST 1001 or 2101, [any Psych or CPsy course], or instr consent
LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine personal views of leadership, differences between personal/positional leadership, leadership ethics/values, personal leadership strengths/skills.
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Historical development and current issues in electronic media technologies and programming. Effects of governmental, industrial, and public organizations on message content. Problem areas of electronic media.
COMM 3263W - Media Literacy: Decoding Media Images and Messages (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of media images/messages. Principles of literacy. Media content/industries. Media and identity. Media effects. Textbook/packet readings, videos, small groups of peer writing workshops, media analyses.
COMM 3441 - Introduction to Organizational Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Functions of communication in work groups, in organizational hierarchies, and between organizations.
HRIR 3021 - Human Resource Management and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the people side of business. We will look at how, through managing and leading people, we can create an engaged, productive workforce in order to achieve organizational strategic objectives. The content of this course is complementary to any major or minor. Major topics in this course: - Managing people in an ethical, legal way that is aligned with corporate strategy and helps organizations reach their goals; - Successfully attracting, recruiting, and selecting talented people; - Creating interesting, engaging jobs and giving meaningful feedback in order to retain great employees; - Rewarding and motivating people through intrinsic and extrinsic methods to encourage the most effective and "right" kind of employee behaviors to create an engaged, productive workforce through people strategies and practices. prereq: ECON 1101, ECON 1102, PSY 1001
JOUR 1001 - Media in a Changing World (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 1001/Jour 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In an era when almost everybody's a content creator and just about every company is connected with media, what makes mass communication different from other forms of message exchange? We'll examine journalism, advertising, public relations, video gaming, music recording, music and more. We'll think about issues like free speech, "fake news," censorship, social media, demographics, psychographics and graphic content. Hear from mass media professionals who provide real-world, real-time material for discussion and debate. This class covers ground that is shifting by the day and uses current cases to help you apply what you learn and sharpen your own media literacy skills.
JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Does the media cause social problems, or just reflect them? Why and how have mass media been feared, bemoaned, used, and dismissed as tools to change public beliefs, attitudes, and behavior? This course explores a century's worth of thinking as to how and when media might have such effects. We examine media influence in a range of contexts, including political advertising, health campaigns, video game violence, pornography, and educational television. We approach the topic largely from a social science perspective (for example, by reviewing experimental tests of the effects of media violence) but we will address some of the advantages and limitations inherent in looking for effects in that way. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From Instagram to YouTube to memes-we live in a visual culture. How can we interpret this flood of images? Learn how to analyze advertisements, photographs, television, and social media from multiple perspectives. Historical, cultural, and ethical approaches unearth the changing role of visual media in society. You'll actively interpret current images to learn how to effectively communicate with visuals.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ever wonder what your brain does when you see an advertisement? Ever wonder why advertisements work? And why sometimes they don't? How does advertising compel you to buy things you don't need and what strategies do you use to resist these messages? In this course we explore a range of theories that explain how advertisements influence memory, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how humans actively process and resist persuasive messages.
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing the operations function within manufacturing and service organizations, and across the supply chains of these organizations. The supply chain is the set of organizations and the work that they complete to collectively create customer-valued goods and services. Course emphasizes decision making in work processes, including decision related to managing processes, quality, capacity, inventory, and supply chain activities. Quantitative and qualitative methods are used for improving management of operations.
STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphical/numerical presentations of data. Judging the usefulness/reliability of results/inferences from surveys and other studies to interesting populations. Coping with randomness/variation in an uncertain world. prereq: Mathematics requirement for admission to University
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
ABUS 4013W - Legal, Ethical, and Risk Issues for Managers (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ABus 4013/CMgt 4013
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Key legal, ethical, and risk frameworks in business activity and civic life. Students will identify areas of exposure within their specific industry and learn about best practices to minimize legal liability and manage risk. The writing-related instruction is designed to develop effective management-level communication skills regarding legal, ethical, and other risks and to develop a thoughtful analytical approach to addressing real-world risks. prereq: CMgt 4011 recommended for CMgt students, 45 semester credits
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Demands on today's managers, with a focus on small to medium-sized organizations. Techniques/ideas beyond traditional studies. Applying management theory at all levels. Managing in a global workplace. Organizational planning and decision making. Organizing resources. Leading/motivating people. Controlling/evaluating organizational activities. This writing intensive designated course will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to this discipline because clear, accurate, and professional communication is essential to organization management. The ability to write effectively in terms of specified audiences ensures, in the professional world, successful communication between team members as well as the success of the projects, companies, and employees they represent. prereq: 45 semester credits recommended
ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects of communication essential for being persuasive/influential. Organizing/presenting ideas effectively, strategies for audience analysis, choosing communication methods, making appropriate use of informal influence methods, handling dissent. Processes for intercultural communication. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Successful leadership via flexible approach. Knowledge, skills, and abilities that leaders develop from eight leadership strategies: academic, bureaucratic, eclectic, economic, fellowship, military, political, social. Ways to lead diverse populations in a global environment. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4701 - Introduction to Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual tools for creating a marketing plan. How marketing relates to other functional areas of business. Importance of an ethical, global view. prereq: [Macroeconomics or microeconomics], 45 cr
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 1102/Econ 1102/1105/1112
Typically offered: Every Spring
Unemployment/inflation, measures of national income, macro models, fiscal policy/problems. Taxes and the national debt. Money/banking, monetary policy/problems. Poverty and income distribution. International trade and exchange rates. Economic growth/development. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3029W/Writ 3029W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course students practice writing and revising common business documents for today?s business world. Students write memos, proposals, cover letters, resumes, and digital and web content as well as practice choice of appropriate formats and media. The course draws from current business practices and stresses workplace collaboration, broader issues of professional literacy, and responsive writing styles. Students practice rhetorical analysis and discuss concepts such as audience, purpose, tone, and context when writing and revising their documents. Students analyze and write from a variety of perspectives and contexts including formal (researched reports, proposals) and informal (email, social media) communication. Students also build a professional online presence through such platforms as LinkedIn.
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students develop oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Areas of study in the course include visual communication, audience analysis, presentation strategies, and presentation of complex research material. The course emphasizes use of digital technologies. Recommend that students take Comm 1101 or equivalent first
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
BLAW 3062 - Contract Law and Corporate Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course highlights topics that are important to any business major, with particular emphasis on publicly-traded companies. NOTE: This course is designed for students who do not have knowledge or experience with any aspect of business law. There is no prerequisite for this course. General topics include: (1) the law of contracts and transactions involving the sale of goods, (2) secured transactions (how creditors can use a debtor?s assets as collateral to secure indebtedness), and (3) the basics of bankruptcy law. Public company subjects include: pros and cons of going public, the IPO process, federal securities laws and SEC regulations regarding public company reporting requirements, insider trading, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and its impact on corporate governance, trends in shareholder democracy rights and shareholder activism, and the role of boards and audit committees. Throughout the course, we will examine the impact of the Supreme Court on American business. NOTE: Students who previously took BLAW 3058 (4 credit course) should NOT take this course.
BLAW 3061 - Business Law Basics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides a broad background in the fundamentals of many business law topics that are important to any businessperson. NOTE: This course is designed for students who do not have knowledge or experience with any aspect of business law. There is no prerequisite for this course. The goal is to provide basic concepts that can be used throughout your career to spot legal issues, identify potential concerns, and with the aid of counsel, solve or avoid problems. General topics include: various legal entities in which business can be conducted, tort law (with emphasis on negligence), real estate law, the law of agency, intellectual property (patents, copyrights, trade secrets and trademarks), warranty law, product liability, employment law, certain discrimination laws (including Minnesota?s fairly recent protections for women in the workplace), alternative dispute resolution and administrative law. Throughout the course, we will examine the impact of the Supreme Court on American business. NOTE: Students who previously took BLAW 3058 (4 credit course) should NOT take this course.
LAW 3000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 3000/Law 5000
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Law pervades all areas of modern life. Yet it remains mysterious to those without legal training. This course will equip you to better answer such questions by exploring the tools that lawyers use to interpret and apply the law. Students will learn to think like lawyers through a series of contemporary case studies that require reading, writing, thinking, and problem solving like a lawyer. Cases will be drawn from topics such as contracts, torts, civil procedure, property, business law, criminal law, sports law, privacy, and law and science.
ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Providing day-to-day leadership. Organizing work, motivating employees. Delegating, coordinating, and achieving results. Front line human resource practices, including selection, induction, and training of new employees, employee appraisal. Handling grievances/discipline. prereq: 45 cr completed
KIN 4028 - The Impact of the Olympic Games on Los Angeles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is an upper-level undergraduate course designed for students to examine the impact of the Olympic Games on Los Angeles, California, and the United States. The city of Los Angeles, California is about to host the Summer Olympic Games for the third time (e.g., 1932, 1984 & 2028). The first Los Angeles Olympic Games were held in 1932 and Los Angeles was just starting to be a city of influence in the United States. A number of countries voiced an objection to the Olympic Games being held in Los Angeles. However, the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Olympic Games proved to be a success. These Olympic Games proved that Los Angeles was an emerging city not only in the United States but in the world. The second Los Angeles Summer Olympics were held in 1984 and followed the 1980 Moscow Summer Olympics, which the United States and other countries boycotted. In retaliation, the Soviet Union as well as other communist countries boycotted the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics. Even with the boycott the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympic Games were a huge success. They demonstrated that the Olympic Games could be hosted and not create a financial calamity for the hosting city, but actually create a legacy for the hosting city to build upon. In 2028 Los Angeles will host the Summer Olympic Games for a third time, joining London, England and Paris, France as the only cities to host the Summer Olympics three times. What will happen to Los Angeles and the United States after they host the 2028 Summer Olympic Games? Will the 2028 Summer Olympic Games be as successful as the previous two Los Angeles Summer Olympic Games? This course will explore the impact of each of these Summer Olympic Games as well as contributions that these Olympic Games have had not only on society in the United States but also the world. In addition, this course will explore the changes in sport that have occurred during this time span in the United States as well as the world.
KIN 5461 - Issues in the Sport Industry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Critical analysis of management issues within sport industry. Strategic management, corporate social responsibility, human resource management/diversity, governance, sport globalization, sport development. prereq: postbac or grad student or instr consent
SMGT 3881W - Senior Seminar in Sport Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course addresses the applicability of research in the management of sport through the culmination of a senior research project as well as providing students with career development. The course will engage participants in the systematic inquiry into their own understanding of various components in delivering a sports program. A major segment of course work involves working with a team of peers on a collaborative research project that will address an organization?s key business/management problem. Each group will identify a sport organization and work collaboratively with them to develop a plan that addresses the respective problem the organization is experiencing.