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Duluth Campus

Childhood Nature Studies B.A.Sc.

D Applied Human Sciences
College of Education and Human Service Professions
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 58 to 61
  • Degree: Bachelor of Applied Science
The focus of Childhood Nature Studies is supporting all children’s learning, well-being, and unfolding capabilities through an interdisciplinary, nature-based lens. Quality childhood environments, relationships, and experiences, including nature-based experiences, are integral to healthy development and lifelong well-being, as well as to vibrant, socially just, and sustainable communities. This program entails a nature-based, interdisciplinary foundation of theory and practical skills, preparing graduates to work in synergy with professionals across care, education, health, mental health, social service, and environmental/conservation sectors toward providing equitable, coherent, and nature-rich experiences, environments, and services for all children. Students in this program will have the opportunity for: 1 - studying childhood development from an eco-bio-developmental framework, the foundations of healthy development, and the potential for nature to support children’s learning, unfolding capabilities, and life-long well-being; 2 - learning to effectively engage in quality interactions with children and families and provide developmentally, and culturally appropriate experiences for children that support their learning and development, as well as further family and community relationships; 3 - gaining experience in designing and using nature-rich, playful learning environments, such as nature playscapes, early childhood nature play programs, and nature preschools; 4 - integrating theory and practice through immersion experiences, reflection, networking, and action research; and 5 - studying abroad in countries known for innovations in nature-based learning and development.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program or its approved equivalent.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits completed in compliance with University of Minnesota Duluth academic policies with credit limits (e.g., Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory Grading Policy, Credit for Prior Learning, etc).
  4. At least 30 semester credits must be earned through UMD, and 15 of the last 30 credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. At least half of upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits that satisfy major requirements (major requirements includes all courses required for the major, including courses in a subplan) through UMD.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. For certificate programs, at least 3 upper-division credits that satisfy requirements for the certificate must be taken through UMD. If the program does not require upper division credits students must take at least one course from the certificate program from UMD.
  8. The minimum cumulative University of Minnesota (UMN) GPA required for graduation is 2.00 and includes only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UMN GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major, minor, and certificate. No academic unit may impose a higher GPA standard to graduate.
  9. Diploma, transcripts, licensure, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
Learning in Community (1 cr)
Requirement will be waived for transfer students with at least 30 credits taken post high school, for UMD students who started in a UMD collegiate unit where this is not required, and upon request for first-year students with 30 PSEO credits.
UST 1000 - Learning in Community (1.0-2.0 cr)
or EHS 1000 - Into the World [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
Advanced Writing (3 cr)
WRIT 3140 - Advanced Writing: Human Services (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3121 - Advanced Writing: Business and Organizations (3.0 cr)
Child Development (21 - 22 cr)
Lower Division (11 cr)
ECH 2025 - Brain Development: Environments and Relationships [SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
PSY 1003 - General Psychology [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
PSY 2021 - Developmental Psychology [LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division (10 - 11 cr)
ECH 3050 - Early Relationships in Young Children: Observing and Guiding (4.0 cr)
SW 4215 - Trauma Informed Practice with Children and Adolescents (3.0 cr)
SPED 3109 - Supporting Social/Emotional Development Birth-8 (3.0 cr)
or SPED 3103 - Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs (4.0 cr)
Nature-Based Practices (15 - 16 cr)
Lower Division (8 - 9 cr)
ENED 1500 - Children, Nature and Sustainability [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
ENED 1201 - Outdoor Skills I [PE] (2.0 cr)
or ENED 1202 - Outdoor Skills II [PE] (2.0 cr)
or ENED 3341 - Field Interpretive Techniques I (3.0 cr)
or ENED 3342 - Field Interpretive Techniques II (3.0 cr)
ENED 2300 - Teaching and Learning (3.0 cr)
or ENED 4163 - Outdoor Education Methods (3.0 cr)
Upper Division (7 cr)
AHS 3100 - Risk Management (2.0 cr)
ENED 4500 - Early Childhood Nature Experiences and Pedagogies (3.0 cr)
ENED 4600 - Place-based Education (2.0 cr)
Social and Community Contexts (12 - 13 cr)
HLTH 3101 - Community Health (3.0 cr)
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· EDUC 4381 - Teaching Indigenous Students (3.0 cr)
· EDUC 5230 - Indigenous Peoples and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· PSY 2023 - Marriages and Families Worldwide [LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 1201 - Sociology of the Family [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· SW 1000 - Introduction to Social Welfare [SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
· SW 1619 - Race, Class, and Gender in the United States [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian Studies [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4410 - American Indian Philosophies [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
Synthesis (6 cr)
Take for 6 credits.
ENED 4996 - Outdoor Education Internship (6.0-12.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Service Professions

View sample plan(s):
· Childhood Nature Studies BASc Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Childhood Nature Studies B.A.Sc.
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UST 1000 - Learning in Community
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
EHS 1000 - Into the World (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitates the transition into college learning and student life at UMD and the College of Education and Human Service Professions. Introduces the promise and peril of global challenges in the 21st century and relates these challenges to local communities. pre-req: 1st semester CEHSP student
ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. This course explores the global cultural context of sustainability while facilitating the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Examine the topic of environmental sustainability through the context of global culture and affairs. Explore different cultural approaches to solving environmental issues, compare and contrast these approaches with those taken in the US. Investigate the concept of outsourcing with respect to the peoples and ecosystems that are impacted by the practice. pre-req: less than 30 credits earned
LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD while simultaneously fulfilling other core requirements. Examines the topic of Cultural Diversity in the U.S. through the context of language and dialect in American English. Explores the impact language has on the broad spectrum of American culture, and conversely, the ways in which various American cultures and their diverse heritages have influenced the many ways language is spoken in the United States. Investigates concepts of linguistic competency, perceptions and biases toward language, power structures manifested in language, and influences of class, race, ethnicity, and heritage on spoken language. pre-req: less than 30 credits
PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitate the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD; applications of positive psychology across cultures and positive behavior change; the examination of diverse perspectives in positive psychology; the promotion of student well-being, community and inclusivity, and time- and stress-management techniques. pre-req: less than 30 credits
WRIT 3140 - Advanced Writing: Human Services
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of writing for those invested in the disciplines of education and other fields related to human services. Exploration of academic and professional rhetorical situations. Practice with research methods, document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC or AA completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of writing for those invested in the disciplines of social sciences and related fields. Exploration of academic and professional rhetorical situations. Practice with research methods, document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC or AA completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
WRIT 3121 - Advanced Writing: Business and Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of writing for those invested in the disciplines involving business and management of organizations. Exploration of academic and professional rhetorical situations. Practice with research methods, document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC or AA completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
ECH 2025 - Brain Development: Environments and Relationships (SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will address issues related to early brain development and the biological underpinnings of early emotional and cognitive development with attention to the impacts relationships and environments have on developing brain architecture. Current research in areas of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and developmental trauma will be explored with attention to mitigating long-term effects through trauma informed care. A biological view of attachment, social vulnerability, language, reading, math, and creativity will also be explored.
PSY 1003 - General Psychology (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of behavior; current knowledge of biological, social, and cognitive areas of psychology. Assessment, research methods, human development, personality, mental disorders, and therapy.
PSY 2021 - Developmental Psychology (LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major processes in human development, conception through lifespan; biological and cultural influences on physical-motor, cognitive, social, and emotional development; effects of diverse cultural traditions and values; social policy implications.
ECH 3050 - Early Relationships in Young Children: Observing and Guiding
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Observing, recording, and guiding behaviors in children from birth through age eight. Focuses on informal methods for observation. Field experience required for course completion for students in the major. Use of technology for behavioral observation. prereq: Minimum 30 credits
SW 4215 - Trauma Informed Practice with Children and Adolescents
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Course addresses the impact of psychological trauma on children and adolescents, particularly those in the child welfare system. An overview of screening, assessment and intervention strategies to address the mental health needs of children affected by trauma is provided, as well as guidelines for trauma informed practice. pre-req: undergraduate student, minimum 60 credits, no grad credit
SPED 3109 - Supporting Social/Emotional Development Birth-8
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course supports understanding the developmental trajectory of social and emotional competence from birth to age eight. Typical development as well as the developmental consequences of stress and trauma will be addressed. Protective factors and resilience, the development of mental health, and the importance of supportive relationships will also be explored. This course will also provide information needed to evaluate and implement behavior change programs that are appropriate for young children who exhibit maladaptive behaviors. A key assessment strategies will include Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) procedures and a range of trauma informed behavioral supports. pre-req: Minimum 30 credits
SPED 3103 - Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: SpEd 3103/5103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Causation and development of disabling conditions in infants and toddlers. Effective intervention techniques in a variety of settings involving interagency collaboration and family involvement. Field experience required for course completion for students in the major. prereq: Minimum 30 credits
ENED 1500 - Children, Nature and Sustainability (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of the rationale and underpinnings for merging nature, education for sustainability, and early childhood education, as well as practices and possibilities for doing so. Emphasized are the outcomes associated with nature-based experiences for children, including healthy development of children and furthering more sustainable communities.
ENED 1201 - Outdoor Skills I (PE)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: credit will not be granted if already received for REC 1201
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Instruction and practice in skills of fall outdoor activities. Camping, canoeing, hunting, and climbing; equipment, shelters, and navigation. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for REC 1201
ENED 1202 - Outdoor Skills II (PE)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: credit will not be granted if already received for REC 1202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Instruction and practice in skills of winter and spring outdoor activities. Camping, backpacking, dogsledding, and fishing; equipment and navigation. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for REC 1202
ENED 3341 - Field Interpretive Techniques I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Techniques and methods used to interpret natural history of autumn and early winter environments. Emphasizes geomorphology, tree identification, and basic raptor ecology. Primarily field based at sites throughout northeastern Minnesota. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for REC 3341
ENED 3342 - Field Interpretive Techniques II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques and methods used to interpret natural history of winter and spring environments. Ecology of winter, vernal ponds, spring wildflowers, biomes, and migratory birds. Primarily field based at sites throughout northeastern Minnesota. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for EnEd 3342
ENED 2300 - Teaching and Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENED 2300/REC 2300
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learning in the outdoor context is explored via presentation and active consideration of philosophical and theoretical foundations of environmental and outdoor education. Teaching skills for the environmental and outdoor non-formal educational context are presented and developed; for example, instruction in basic educational methodology and accompanying field-teaching experiences is provided. Outdoor classroom management including basic risk management, student behavior management, lesson planning and use of the outdoor classroom are presented and explored. prereq: ENED 1000; credit will not be granted if already received for REC 2300
ENED 4163 - Outdoor Education Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods and theoretical basis for teaching outdoor education. Emphasis on application at outdoor sites. Weekend experience at a regional nature center required. prereq: ENED 3342 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for EDUC 4163
AHS 3100 - Risk Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Proactive approach to managing risks associated with conducting health, physical education, and recreation programs. Emphasis on planning for a safe environment. prereq: Major in Exercise Science or Environmental and Outdoor Education or instructor consent
ENED 4500 - Early Childhood Nature Experiences and Pedagogies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of key characteristics associated with high-quality, nature-based early childhood education programs. This course focuses on developing the skills for supporting young children's learning, development, and well-being through responsive, playful, and immersive nature experience, pedagogies and programs. Nature preschools and natural playscapes are emphasized. pre-req: ENED 1500 and minimum 60 credits
ENED 4600 - Place-based Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is an examination of the relationship between local landscape and community and the development of human perception. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the importance of the development of ecologically- and culturally-appropriate, community-based educational programs in both rural and urban schools that immerse students in local heritage, cultures, landscapes. Priority will be placed upon project-centered programs lending themselves to experiential learning opportunities. The course will include a combination of literature reviews, discussions, curriculum exploration and design, and on-site community exploration of active place-based educational programs. pre-req: minimum 60 credits
HLTH 3101 - Community Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Emphasis on health determinants across the lifespan and their impact upon well-being and disease in communities and populations. Topics include public health history, health and the healthcare system in the U.S., health disparities, and disease prevention/control. Exploration of community-based organizations involved in health promotion efforts to address mental health, alcohol/drug abuse, environmental health and safety, and other issues affecting our communities. prereq: Minimum 30 credits, HLTH 1100
EDUC 4381 - Teaching Indigenous Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDUC 3381/EDUC 4381
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of contemporary and historical Indian education; evaluation of attitudes toward Indian students: direct interaction with Indian parents and students; development of culturally sensitive teaching plans; specific cultural characteristics of indigenous groups; examination of American Indian outcomes. Field experience is required for course completion, prereq: EDSE 4100 or Admission to IESE program and successful completion of Blocks One and Two courses and associated field experiences, no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received credit for EDUC 5381.
EDUC 5230 - Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will examine the intersection of Indigenous peoples, traditional and contemporary practices of sustainability, planetary ecological issues, the impact on Indigenous peoples and the possibilities provided by Indigenous place-based/environmental education. Indigenous peoples cultural relationship to place will also be explored along with a critical examination of the impact colonization, patriarchy and capitalism has had on Indigenous homelands and centers of power. Attention will be given to Indigenous initiatives that are working toward the healing of their homelands and the planet. pre-req: instructor consent
PSY 2023 - Marriages and Families Worldwide (LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Family functions and structures worldwide; impact of expectations, gender roles, race, culture, and values on partner and parenting; love, sex, communication, power, abuse, stress, and satisfaction; small group experiences with focus on strengthening families.
SOC 1201 - Sociology of the Family (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The family as a basic social institution: similarities and variations in family systems, their interrelationships with other institutions, and patterns of continuity and change.
SW 1000 - Introduction to Social Welfare (SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contemporary social welfare problems and the historical development of social services programs designed to address them. Complex social problems, such as poverty, homelessness and child maltreatment examined, as well as the response of social institutions, social policies, and the profession of social work to these problems. Social justice issues and the role of citizen involvement to create change.
SW 1619 - Race, Class, and Gender in the United States (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Race, class, and gender as pivotal dimensions in American society. Similarities and differences between groups, dynamics of discrimination, and efforts to meet needs and achieve potential for all groups in America.
WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Racism, sexism, and classism are major factors which have influenced human relations from past to present. This course examines how the social-historical construction of race, class and gender continues to affect the experience of all people in particular people of color. This course seeks to enable students to understand the processes through which these social oppressions are created, normalized, internalized, maintained and perpetuated. A core element to this course is provoking students to recognize their own contribution in perpetuating oppressive systems, and their responsibility creatively to develop individual and collective acts of resistance to all of the "isms" and to societal transformation towards the just society.
AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian Studies (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course serves non-majors, majors, and minors, introducing them to the history, methodologies, and community-oriented aspirations of American Indian studies. Students will collaboratively explore texts, topics, intellectuals, and issues crucial to the field, thereby preparing themselves and one another to be ethically-engaged residents of the Anishinaabe lands in which our campus is situated, and to excel in other courses both within and well-beyond UMD's AMIN curriculum.
AMIN 4410 - American Indian Philosophies (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
In this course, we examine both historical and contemporary philosophical writings by American Indian thinkers from an array of different tribal nations. Engaging with Indigenous notions of time, gender, environmental interrelationships, and spiritual wellbeing, we explore the implications of these philosophies in addressing contemporary issues of environmental devastation, race/gender inequity, and, most critically, Native cultural and social resurgence in the 21st century. pre-req: minimum 60 credits
ENED 4996 - Outdoor Education Internship
Credits: 6.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised field experience in outdoor education. prereq: Environmental and Outdoor education major, instructor consent; no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for Rec 4996