Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Agricultural & Food Education Minor

Applied Economics
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 15 to 16
The Agricultural & Food Education Minor provides a non-licensure option to explore education for students to engage their understanding of agricultural, food, and natural resources around the nexus of society, communication, and education. Professional courses in agricultural education and communication prepare students to become effective and successful educators in formal and non-formal contexts. Experiential learning is emphasized as students spend time in various education contexts applying course concepts and learning from effective educators across agriculture. We aim to develop a rich cohort of agriculturalists focused on educating through their career and to focus on education within their chosen major. Graduates of the AFE minor will be well equipped to: 1. Understand orientation of Agricultural Education to career opportunities, areas and expectations of specialization, and issues in the field 2. Analyze occupations, employment potential, expectations for work, and readiness for careers 3. Understand and apply principles of teaching & learning, practice instructional strategies, and develop pedagogical content knowledge 4. Develop curricula for non-formal contexts 5. Engage in a directed study/internship in community-based education Students majoring in Agricultural Education cannot minor in AFE due to course overlap.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Required Courses
AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
AECM 5135 - Instructional Methodology for Agricultural Education (3.0 cr)
AECM 3125 - Ag, Food, and You: Exploring Minnesota Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Pathways (3.0 cr)
or FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
or FDSY 1016W - Growing Food & Building Community: Urban Agriculture in the Twin Cities [WI] (3.0 cr)
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
· BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 2401 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 4101 - Holistic Approaches to Improving Food Systems Sustainability (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture [GP] (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 1014 - The Edible Landscape [TS] (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3202 - Introduction to Strategies for Teaching Adults (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3621 - Introduction to Training and Development (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 1005 - Plants Get Sick Too [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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AECM 5125W - Designing Curriculum & Instruction for Agricultural Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students an opportunity to understand, observe, and experience the process of developing curriculum and instruction for school-based agricultural education. Through coursework and a part-time clinical field experience (minimum of 25 hours at an assigned placement) in a school setting (grades 5-12), students will engage in the development of middle and secondary school agricultural education curricula. Special consideration in planning will be given to identifying regional, state, and community needs as well as student interest and prior knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to determine a programmatic framework, outline a scope and sequence of courses within a school-based agricultural education program, develop course outlines and materials, and create units, sub-units, and daily lessons for a variety of content areas. Additionally, using the integrated program model, curricular and instructional opportunities related to experiential learning (Supervised Agricultural Experience ? SAE) and leadership development (FFA) will be addressed. prereq: Jr or Sr Ag Ed student, or Ag Ed MS IL student.
AECM 5135 - Instructional Methodology for Agricultural Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on instructional methodology for use in school-based agricultural education. Students will understand and apply psychological principles of teaching and learning, practice a variety of instructional strategies, develop pedagogical content knowledge, and apply the integrated program model of agricultural education to classroom teaching. Prerequisites: Junior or senior Ag Ed student or Ag Ed MS IL student
AECM 3125 - Ag, Food, and You: Exploring Minnesota Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Pathways
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course is designed to introduce students to the breadth and diversity of Minnesota agriculture, food, and natural resource pathways and industries. Students will participate in activities designed to broaden personal perspectives of agriculture and food production and enhance their ability to work across differences. Students will learn about themselves and explore valuable characteristics needed to succeed as professionals in agricultural, food, and natural resources. In addition to the regularly scheduled class time, attendance on two full-day experiential field trips is required. *Course fee required.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, and conventional systems. History of production systems and their implications for producer lifestyles, social and natural environments, and economics at local to global scales. Includes farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, and classroom presentations and debates in addition to lectures and readings. This multidisciplinary course is offered at the University of Minnesota-St. Paul campus, West Central Research and Outreach Center and the University of Minnesota-Morris campus.
FDSY 1016W - Growing Food & Building Community: Urban Agriculture in the Twin Cities (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The capacity and support for urban agriculture is expanding globally. It is estimated that 25-30% of urban dwellers worldwide are involved in agriculture. In the future, we can expect that more of our food will be grown in urban centers. Urban farms and food businesses, food hubs, neighborhood community gardens, schoolyard and residential gardens are all part of the current urban food movement. As the first year colloquium for food systems majors, this course will integrate academic and orientation learning objectives and allow students to gain practice in systems thinking-- exhibited through in-class discussion and writing-- using urban agriculture as a framework. In this course, we will evaluate the direct and indirect benefits and challenges of urban agriculture by looking through environmental, political and social lenses. Class field trips and a service learning activity are used to demonstrate the various ways food is grown and how food may be used as a vehicle to achieve social goals. We will discuss a broad array of topics including horticultural production practices, soil health and environmental sustainability issues, social justice and food access, and public policy and regulations constraining urban farms, with an emphasis on the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area. Students in this course will deepen their understanding of the complexity of urban food systems, while also recognize social differences of race, ethnicity and class; improve intercultural competence skills as a foundation for positive cross-cultural relationships; and gain an awareness of how urban agriculture can be a force for change.
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.  Lectures for this course will be online, while discussion sections will be held in-person.
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Planning/strategy for communication campaigns related to food/agriculture. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation.
AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is broken up into five thematic and progressive modules. Module 1 will provide the opportunity for students to investigate contemporary and historical manifestations oppression and inequities within Agricultural, Food and Natural Resource Sciences (AFNR) with a special focus on community and educational spaces. Module 2 will support students to explore oppression, power, privilege, and white supremacy. Students will explore how these show in society at large, as well as how they personally embody and enact these very things. Module 3 will prompt students to consider the nature of knowledge that is legitimized and knowledge that is suppressed. We will then learn about diverse knowledge systems and decolonizing work. Module 4 will support students to explore culture, identity, intersectionality, and positionality ? their own and those of other cultural groups. We will consider how some cultures are lifted while others are marginalized in different spaces. Module 5 brings us to learning about methods of bring culturally responsive and anti-racist in AFNR work in educational and community spaces. We will employ the use of equity audits to assess various organizations and to design plans moving forward.
AGRO 1101 - Biology of Plant Food Systems (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Designed for students who are not majors in a life science program, but who wish to acquire a better understanding of biological concepts especially as they relate to their lives. We examine current issues related to food, food production and the environment which provide the context to investigate fundamental concepts of biology including productivity, energy, genetic change in populations, and environmental responses to human activity. We use a problem-based learning approach to explore three contemporary issues of great importance: risks and benefits of GMOs, farming and food, and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Lab, greenhouse, field, and classroom discussions.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. Meets CFANS interdisciplinary requirement.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
There is a growing sense of national and global urgency regarding carbon and climate change with particular emphasis on our energy system. Unfortunately, the answers are not simple. In this course, students explore our wide range of traditional and renewable energy sources and how these options impact our environment and society. Students are also exposed to the complex and compelling ethical issues raised by global, national, and local changes in how we produce and use energy. This course informs and engages students to be thoughtful, rather than passive consumers of energy. Students gain the knowledge necessary to be articulate in career, community, and personal arenas regarding renewable energy resources. In addition, students develop the ability to evaluate and respond to present and future technological changes that impact their energy use in the workplace, at home, and in the community. This course was designed and offered as an online course since 2011. For more details on the course please look at the syllabus and some comments from previous students by going to bbe2201.cfans.umn.edu
BBE 3201 - Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.
CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classroom management, instructional planning, working with families in elementary classroom. Assigned readings, lectures, classroom activities, assignments. prereq: [Elementary ed or early childhood ed foundations major], concurrent practicum experience
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, and assessment. Topics: behaviorism, cognitive and social constructivism, human information processing theory, intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability, validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, and portfolios.
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Environmental issues facing the world today are increasingly complex. Challenges such as global climate change, air and water quality impairments, land use change for forest and agricultural production, and species conservation require an ability to conceptualize problems broadly so that solutions are crafted in a manner that addresses a multitude of perspectives and considerations. This course will use an interdisciplinary case-study approach to expose students to the most important environmental problems facing society today as well as innovative solutions. The case studies include investigations of ecosystem services, invasive species and pollution remediation, with world experts on these topics leading the discussions. Throughout, a focus on interdisciplinary analysis, including linkages to environmental grand challenges will be emphasized. An interactive approach will be utilized as well, in which students work in groups and engage in class discussions as ways to internalize and conceptualize information. prereq: 1011, ESPM major
FDSY 4101 - Holistic Approaches to Improving Food Systems Sustainability
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students in this capstone course address food system sustainability challenges both in the classroom and via service-learning, where they spend 45 hours engaged with a food justice-based community organization. Requires off-campus work at the community partner site. Prerequisites: FDSY 1016W and APEC 3202; or instructor consent
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4501/FNRM 5501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management concepts for green infrastructure of cities, towns, and communities. Urban forest as a social/biological resource. Emphasizes management of urban forest ecosystem to maximize benefits to people. Tree selection, risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, landscape planning, values, perceptions. How urban forestry can be a tool to improve community infrastructure.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2001 - A Food Systems Approach to Cooking for Health and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is a fun, hands-on cooking class. It is also an Experiential Learning (EL) course which meets the EL requirement for all CFANS students. This lecture /lab format course will give students the confidence to cook healthful whole foods as they learn about the food system. Subject matter will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective. Concepts covered include fundamental concepts of nutrition, food sources, food safety, the food system; skills/resources for food choices based on nutritional, environmental, local and global societal implications. We will examine the ethical and civic themes that guide food choices. We will discuss and write about how environmental, cultural, social, and health issues impact personal food choices. prereq: [soph, jr, sr] or instructor consent
FSCN 2512 - Food Customs and Culture (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Account of traditional and contemporary food customs and culture. Practice of food choice, preparation, and preservation in the context of worldview, perspectives on diet and health, and belief systems of communities and societies around the world. Major emphasis on US cultures including Native American, Hispanic American, European American, African American, and Asian American. Development of cultural self-understanding and intercultural awareness via food and food habits-related experiences and reflections.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the ecological basis for management of wildlife, including biological and sociological factors that influence management. Goals include: understanding the ecological mechanisms influencing the distribution and abundance of wildlife, learning the ecological and historical foundations of wildlife management and the ecological and social ramifications of management actions, thinking critically and logically about current wildlife issues, honing writing skills, and developing technical skills in key areas. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3013/GCC 5013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester.
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
HORT 1014 - The Edible Landscape (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Tracing our relationship with edible landscapes traces to our hunting-gathering origins. Technological/social changes that have distanced us from our food. Integrating food plants into pleasing, sustainable, and edible landscapes in yards, neighborhoods, and cities.
OLPD 3202 - Introduction to Strategies for Teaching Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of adult learning, learning/teaching styles, methods/perspectives of teaching, applications of teaching in various settings.
OLPD 3621 - Introduction to Training and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes to carry out theoretically sound training/development practices, within the context of systemic relationship with host organization or system.
PLPA 1005 - Plants Get Sick Too (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology of plant disease and plant-disease-causing organisms. Effects of plant disease on agriculture, human health/welfare, and the environment. Management/control of plant disease. Lecture, Internet, lab.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SSM 4504W/SSM 5504
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of new-product development and product management, their application to biobased products. prereq: Jr or Sr or instr consent
YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores issues faced by youth, especially those who live in or are characterized by our understanding of urban areas. We explore by asking questions like: ?Which youth are labeled as 'urban' and by whom?? ?What has contributed to notions of ?urban? and ?suburban?"? "What are the associated myths and stereotypes?? and ?How are urban communities policed and what are the consequences of this policing?? We will critically examine what the term ?urban youth? means, how it has evolved over time and place, its relationship to power and privilege, and its use as a ?code word? with implicit associations of race, poverty, and violence. Using a critical Youth Studies framework, which engages with the role of historical, social, cultural, geographical, and political contexts, we seek to understand how each of these axes of power-relations influence the opportunities and struggles of young people, their interaction with institutions and the construction of their identities in particular places. This class is a part of the Community Engaged Learning (CEL) program. Students will combine direct work with youth in the community with classroom learning. The objective is for students to make valuable contributions to communities, gain practical experience and apply the knowledge gained in the classroom to their service learning work. Students will also be able to discuss, reflect and write about their community ?engaged experiences. This class offers a unique opportunity to engage with diverse youth in different settings thus gaining valuable skills that can be useful for future professional practice in many fields including, education, recreation, mental health, and youth work. prereq: YOST 1001 or instr consent
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.