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Morris Campus

Environmental Studies B.A.

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Academic Affairs
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54 to 57
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
This is an interdisciplinary major under the authority of the vice chancellor for academic affairs and dean. The program is administered by the environmental studies program coordinator. Objectives: The environmental studies major is designed to serve those interested in a broad knowledge of the natural environment and the role of humans in it. Students acquire a foundation of knowledge in economics, policy, science, humanities, and statistics. Carefully chosen electives, a required practical internship or research experience, and a capstone seminar provide depth of experience and help students prepare for graduate and professional programs, as well as for careers in education, government service, and the private sector. Program Student Learning Outcomes: 1 - Environmental competency: Students will be able to analyze their own impact on the environment, so as to think critically about the consequences of their individual and collective choices 2 - Environmental issues as multifaceted and multidisciplinary: Students will be able to apply a multidisciplinary lens to the underpinnings of modern environmental movements and problems 3 - Knowledge of major environmental challenges: Students will be able to articulate major intertwined challenges and how to effectively address them 4 - Research methods and creative expression: Students will be able to apply qualitative and quantitative methods to research projects in environmental studies 5 - Cultivating an understanding of place in global context: Students will be able to articulate the interactions among biophysical, economic, and social aspects of particular places or regions and their connections to larger global forces or issues
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Requirements for the major include successful completion of two elements: Element 1: The Environmental Studies Core Element 2: The Environmental Studies Elective Block Selection of electives must be intentional and done in close consultation with an environmental studies advisor. Students submit an elective plan during the EnSt 3988 Pre-internship Seminar. Elective plans must be designed to ensure that there is sufficient depth of coverage in the chosen ENST electives. For many students, a second major (or minor) in a closely related discipline is desirable. Electives often can be selected in such a way that they also count toward the second major. Elective courses, other than those listed below, may be appropriate to add depth and/or provide more theoretical context for the environmentally focused coursework. Approval of alternative electives requires written consent of the program coordinator. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S/N, unless offered S/N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Element 1: The Environmental Studies Core
Students must successfully complete each of the following requirements in order to satisfy this element of the major.
BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development [SCI] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 2106 - Topics in Writing: The Environmental Imagination: Reading and Writing about the Natural World [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
ENST 1101 - Environmental Problems and Policy [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
ENST 3988 - Environmental Studies Pre-Internship Seminar (1.0 cr)
ENST 3989 - Environmental Studies Post-Internship Seminar (1.0 cr)
ENST 4901 - Senior Capstone Experience (4.0 cr)
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Element 2: Environmental Studies Elective Block
Students must successfully complete at least 24 credits from the electives listed below, subject to the following restrictions: 1. Courses used to satisfy this element may not be used to complete the Core element. 2. At least 16 credits must come from the Upper Division Electives Block. 3. At least 4 credits of the Upper Division Electives must come from Category A. 4. At least 4 credits of the Upper Division Electives must come from Category B.
Lower Division Electives
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· CHEM 1001 - Chemistry for the Curious Citizen: The Role of Chemistry in the Environment and Everyday Life [SCI-L] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1006 - The Chemical World [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· CHEM 2201 - Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 2202 - Introduction to Green Chemistry (2.0 cr)
· ENGL 2106 - Topics in Writing: The Environmental Imagination: Reading and Writing about the Natural World [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2173 - The Nature Essay: Writing and Reading Creative Non-fiction about the Natural World [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 1801 - Introduction to Sustainability through Science Fiction [IC] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
· ENST 2201 - Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture (2.0 cr)
· GEOL 1801 - The Value of Dark Skies [IC] (2.0 cr)
· GEOL 1802 - Earth and the Silver Screen [IC] (2.0 cr)
· GEOL 2001 - Natural and Unnatural Geologic Hazards [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· GEOL 2161 - GIS and Remote Sensing [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2451 - The American West [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Elective Courses
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
Category A: Science and Mathematics Electives
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3131 - Ecology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4131 - Vertebrate Natural History (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4151 - Entomology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4172 - Plant Systematics (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4191 - Freshwater Biology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4242 - Microbial Ecology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4302 - Plant Physiology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4351 - Conservation Biology (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 3101 - Analytical Chemistry [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 3201 - Sustainable Synthetic and Solid State Methods (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 4201 - Chemistry and Sustainable Applications to Global Problems (4.0 cr)
· GEOL 3011 - Earth Resources [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· GEOL 3012 - Global Change: Past and Present (4.0 cr)
· GEOL 3501 - Hydrology [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 3004 - Atmospheric Physics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· Category B: Social Science Electives
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3761 - Human Fossil Record [SCI] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3136 - Economics of the Green Power Transition: New Business Models and Regulatory Strategies [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ENST 3001 - Water Resources Policy [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3101 - Industrial Ecology (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3302 - Representation and the Anthropocene (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· Category C: Humanities Electives
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3062 - Carbon Energy Literatures: Energy, Climate, and Crisis in the 20th and 21st Century [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3063 - Environmental Justice Literatures [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3112 - Climate Change and Moral Responsibility [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 3201 - Environmental Justice [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3507 - Modern Studies: French for Sustainability [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· IS 3053 - Irish Texts and Contexts [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
 
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BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development (SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to scientific methods and the history of biology, with an emphasis on mechanisms of inheritance, development, and descent with modification. Overview of pre-Darwinian scientific thought; the theory of evolution; a qualitative introduction to genetics and molecular biology; and a summary of developmental biology. (two 75-min lect) prereq: biol major/minor or chem major or any health sciences preprofessional program or ElEd or SeEd major with middle school science specialties or instr consent
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of evolutionary trends using historical and contemporary evidence. Principles of classification and phylogenetic reconstruction. Includes laboratory survey of the major groups of organisms. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab) prereq: C- or better in 1111 or instr consent
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ENGL 2106 - Topics in Writing: The Environmental Imagination: Reading and Writing about the Natural World (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Writing about the environment. Students learn to use the rich possibilities of language to express their responses to nature and convey to others the importance of close contact with the natural world. Readings in poetry and prose, discussion of technique, and experimentation with a variety of styles and literary forms. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
ENST 1101 - Environmental Problems and Policy (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the ways in which state, national, and international political systems deal with environmental issues and goals. The development of environmental governance, the regulatory and economic tools of environmental policy, and the impact of institutions, culture, social movements, and historical development.
ENST 3988 - Environmental Studies Pre-Internship Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Preparation for the environmental studies internship, including attending and writing reflections on presentations by post-internship students, and developing ideas and opportunities for the ENST internship. Students should enroll in this course in fall of sophomore or junior year prior to completing the ENST internship. prereq: 1101
ENST 3989 - Environmental Studies Post-Internship Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: 3988 or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Culmination of the environmental studies internship. Includes preparing a final paper and delivering a public presentation on the internship experience. Assessment is based on the quality of the final products and on class participation. prereq: 3988 or instr consent
ENST 4901 - Senior Capstone Experience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 3989 or 3996, sr status or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students engage in an individual and/or group problem solving project on a multidisciplinary topic germane to Environmental Studies and present results in a public forum. prereq: 3989 or 3996, sr status or instr consent
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the materials that make up the Earth and the structures, surface features, and geologic processes involved in its origin and development. Lab work includes study of the major constituents of the Earth's crust, including the important rocks and minerals; study of surface and geologic features using aerial photographs, topographic maps, and satellite imagery. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies.
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
CHEM 1001 - Chemistry for the Curious Citizen: The Role of Chemistry in the Environment and Everyday Life (SCI-L)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1001/1006/1007/1801
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
The central nature and relevance of chemistry to the environment and everyday life. Air quality, the ozone layer, global warming, energy resources, acid rain, and nutrition. Discussion and debate of current events related to these topics. Select readings on significant historical chemical discoveries in these areas that still resonate today. Basic chemistry lab principles and techniques. This course is intended for non-science majors. [Note: may not count toward chem major or minor. credit and general education designation will not be granted if credit has been earned in Chem 1006, 1007, 1801]
CHEM 1006 - The Chemical World (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1001/Chem 1006/Chem 1007
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introductory course intended for non-science majors and science majors seeking to enhance their problem solving skills. Course introduces the basic principles of chemistry with special emphasis on every day life and sustainability. Topics reflect a variety of current societal and technological issues and the chemical principles embedded in them. [Note: recommended for non-science majors to fulfill the Gen Ed science requirement, credit and general education designation will not be granted if credit has been earned in Chem 1001 or Chem 1007] prereq: high school or higher math
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Scientific method, measurements, nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, thermochemistry, chemical periodicity, introduction to chemical bonding, and properties of common elements and ions. Development of scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. Laboratory exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: Math 1010 or placement beyond Math 1010 using ACT/placement exam score
CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Chem 1101. Chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, acid-base chemistry, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, quantum theory, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Lab exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: 1101
CHEM 2201 - Introduction to Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the chemistry of four Earth subsystems lithosphere (land), hydrosphere (water), biosphere (living things), and atmosphere (air) and the intersection of those with the anthroposphere (human activities). Principles of Green Chemistry. prereq: 1102
CHEM 2202 - Introduction to Green Chemistry
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Principles of green chemistry and toxicology; green chemistry metrics, green synthetic methods; alternative feedstocks; waste; green chemistry and industry. prereq: 1102
ENGL 2106 - Topics in Writing: The Environmental Imagination: Reading and Writing about the Natural World (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Writing about the environment. Students learn to use the rich possibilities of language to express their responses to nature and convey to others the importance of close contact with the natural world. Readings in poetry and prose, discussion of technique, and experimentation with a variety of styles and literary forms. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv
ENGL 2173 - The Nature Essay: Writing and Reading Creative Non-fiction about the Natural World (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students write creative non-fiction centered on the natural world and read the work of noted essayists in the field such as Henry David Thoreau, Gretel Ehrlich, Scott Russell Sanders, Kathleen Dean Moore, and Terry Tempest Williams. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv
ENST 1801 - Introduction to Sustainability through Science Fiction (IC)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Learn about sustainability by considering a variety of works of science fiction. Through review and discussion of comic books, literary works, movies, and TV shows, students think about how human or societal development can happen in a way that enables future generations to thrive.
ENST 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (ENVT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, and conventional systems. History of production systems and their implications for producer lifestyles, social and natural environments, and economics at local to global scales. Includes farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, and classroom presentations and debates in addition to lectures and readings. Includes a two-week capstone session at the West Central Research and Outreach Center, Morris.
ENST 2201 - Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Hands-on practical experience on a sustainable farming operation. Topics may include fencing, composting, nutrient management, nutrition management, breeding, companion planting, plant propagation, pruning, pest management, viticulture, and others.
GEOL 1801 - The Value of Dark Skies (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Go beyond looking at the impact of light pollution on the aesthetics of night-time skies by examining its effects on human health, ecosystems, energy demands, and other societal concerns. prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
GEOL 1802 - Earth and the Silver Screen (IC)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Geology and earth science have long been fixtures in cinematic films, whether presenting the majesty of open landscapes, exploring geologic problems, or surviving natural hazards. Utilizing selected scenes and full features, students will assess and discuss films' scientific and cinematic strengths and weaknesses, and the role of fictional films in shaping public perceptions and comprehension of the earth sciences. [Note: may require time outside of class to view full-length films] (two 50-minute lect) prereq: new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM
GEOL 2001 - Natural and Unnatural Geologic Hazards (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the more significant interactions between humans and geologic environments and processes. Earthquake and volcanic hazards, river flooding, mass movements and slope stability, coastal hazards, and water resources and pollution. Lectures and problems sets emphasize the quantitative approaches used to determine the likelihood and frequency of natural hazards, assess associated risks, and mitigate damage. prereq: 1001 or 1101
GEOL 2161 - GIS and Remote Sensing (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to design, development, and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS); overview of acquisition and utility of satellite data and imagery; emphasis on applications in Earth and environmental sciences; lab component focuses on practical aspects of GIS development and use and involves original semester projects designed and implemented by individual students. prereq: 1101 or Biol 1101 or Biol 1111 or instr consent
HIST 2451 - The American West (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3451/Hist 2451
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The American West has loomed large in the imagination of the public since the first Europeans set foot on what would become the United States of America. Historian Frederick Jackson Turner argued that the frontier of the West was what distinguished Americans from their European counterparts. However, the West was already home to complex and sophisticated cultures long before the first fur trapper, gold miner, missionary, or cowboy arrived. Disagreements over the future of the West fueled violent confrontation, disagreements that continue to reveal themselves on contemporary relations among a variety of ethnic, class, and cultural backgrounds. Explore the historical underpinnings of confrontations between settlers and indigenous inhabitants, farmers and ranchers, and the federal, state, private, environmental, and tribal interests in the West. These historical underpinnings help to re-imagine the West and the American identity, and continue to shape contemporary controversies.
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of food and society. Examines the complexities of food, health, and power relations as well as the intersections of food with race, class, gender, and sexuality. Explores patterns of consumption and embodiment. Applies a sociological lens to food in relation to globalization, systems of inequality, and social change. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
BIOL 3131 - Ecology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic principles and models of population biology, community structure and function, and ecosystem dynamics. Lab exercises emphasize field work, techniques for characterizing local plant and animal communities, and experimental investigation of topics such as competition and behavioral ecology. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab and field study; weekend field trip required) prereq: C- or better in Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
BIOL 4131 - Vertebrate Natural History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Survey of vertebrates, including their evolution, systematics, and ecological relationships. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab or field study) prereq: Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101 or instr consent
BIOL 4151 - Entomology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Structure, life histories, habits, and classification of common families of insects, including their economic significance. (two 65-min lect, 180-min lab) prereq: Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101 or instr consent
BIOL 4172 - Plant Systematics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of vascular plant taxa, with an emphasis on the flowering plant families and their evolutionary relationships. Lab emphasizes use of keys for identification of Midwestern plant families and genera. (two 65-min lect, 180-min lab) prereq: 2101 or EnSt 2101 or instr consent
BIOL 4191 - Freshwater Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Structure, function, and biota of freshwater ecosystems, including lakes, streams, and wetlands. Lab emphasizes independent research and field study in local habitats. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab; all day field trip required) prereq: Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101, 2111 and prereq or coreq Stat 1601 or 2601 or instr consent
BIOL 4242 - Microbial Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Microbes affect everything on this planet, from human health to carbon cycling to agriculture. In this course, discussions of classic and cutting edge scientific papers will introduce students to microbial ecology, a rapidly expanding field. Students will develop hypotheses about forces shaping microbial communities in the environment or the human body, and test them by analyzing publicly available data. prereq: 3131
BIOL 4302 - Plant Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Basic principles of plant physiology and development. Emphasis is placed on anatomical features, water and solute transport, biochemical and metabolic activity, embryogenesis, growth, floral development, and response to the environment. prereq: 2111
BIOL 4351 - Conservation Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Conservation theory and practice, including threats to biodiversity and approaches to overcoming them. Topics include: habitat loss and fragmentation, overexploitation, climate change and invasive species, population viability analysis using demographic and genetic models, reserve design and management and ex situ measures. Emphasis on primary literature. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab). prereq: Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101, Biol 3131 or instr consent
CHEM 3101 - Analytical Chemistry (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The application of chemical equilibria to chemical analysis with emphasis on the fundamental quantitative aspects of analytical chemistry. Acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and complexometric titrations, introduction to electrochemical and spectrophotometric analyses and separations. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab) prereq: 1102
CHEM 3201 - Sustainable Synthetic and Solid State Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Methods for preparing and characterizing compounds and materials with an emphasis on sustainable approaches (two 65-min lect, one 3.5 hour lab) prereq: 2321
CHEM 4201 - Chemistry and Sustainable Applications to Global Problems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Exploration of advanced chemical concepts underlying challenges facing society. Topics will include: carbon capture and utilization, green energy solutions, environmental remediation, alternative carbon sources for materials, and others. prereq: 2302 or 2304
GEOL 3011 - Earth Resources (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Geology of mineral (base metals, precious metals, and non-metals), energy (fossil fuels, uranium, and alternatives), and other (water and soil) resources; overview of techniques for resource identification, delineation, and extraction; discussion of issues (e.g., environmental, political, and social) surrounding resource identification, extraction, and use; global resource distribution, historical trends, and future outlook. prereq: any 1xxx or 2xxx Geol course or instr consent
GEOL 3012 - Global Change: Past and Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of major changes in global environmental systems that have been documented in the geological past, and culminating with an examination of current global change. Topics include but are not limited to the evolution of Earth as a planetary body, the Great Oxygenation Event, Snowball Earth, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Quaternary glaciations, mass extinctions, and evidence, modeling,and consequences of 20th -21st century warming. prereq: 1001 or 1101
GEOL 3501 - Hydrology (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An examination of the hydrological cycle; evapotranspiration and precipitation; processes of infiltration; rainfall-runoff relationships and the generation of overland flow; response of the drainage basin to storm events; flood-frequency analysis; elements of groundwater flow and evaluation of aquifer characteristics; water quality, contamination, and contaminant transport. (three 65-min lect) prereq: Math 1021 or Math 1101 or instr consent
PHYS 3004 - Atmospheric Physics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to atmospheric physics with an emphasis on thermodynamics. Atmospheric thermodynamics including gas laws, phase transitions, laws of thermodynamics, two-component systems, atmospheric stability; radiative transfer including atmospheric optics and remote sensing; some aspects of atmospheric chemistry such as aerosols, chemical cycles, traces gases; cloud microphysics including nucleation and growth; and atmospheric dynamics including equations of motion for fluid flow; applications to weather systems. (4 hrs lect) [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Phys 2301] prereq: 1092 or 1102, Math 1102
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines food access, production, and consumption from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis on varying uses of and relationships to food including issues of sustainability, industrial food production systems, food as harmful or medicinal, religious meanings of food, social class, food marketing, gender, and nationalism. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or Psy 1051 or instr consent
ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3251/Anth 3206
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Exploration of human ecology with an emphasis on human health and demographics, the relationship between socio-environmental factors and human health/demographics, and the evolution of human adaptations. prereq: any Anth 1xxx course
ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods. prereq: 1201 or Biol 1111
ANTH 3761 - Human Fossil Record (SCI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In-depth exploration of the human evolution through the fossil record, from the last common ancestor with chimpanzees (around 6 million years ago) up to the extinction of the last pre-modern human (sub)species. prereq: 1201
ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of the causes and consequences of environmental pollution. Emphasis on the role of market failures as the root cause of pollution, and on regulatory approaches to solve those problems. Case studies of incentive regulation (emissions taxes & tradeable discharge permits) in practice, in the U.S. and beyond. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The economic analysis of sustainability, focusing on market designs to discourage over-exploitation of both renewable and exhaustible natural resources. Topics include markets for water, fisheries, and energy. prereq: 3007 or instr consent
ECON 3136 - Economics of the Green Power Transition: New Business Models and Regulatory Strategies (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines "Utility 2.0" business models and new regulatory approaches that aim to encourage rapid de-carbonization of the electricity system. prereq: 1111
ENST 3001 - Water Resources Policy (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An examination of fundamental contemporary water resource challenges. Units on water quality (e.g., drinking water) and quantity (e.g., irrigated agriculture) encourage critical evaluation of local, national, and international water resources policy in the contexts of environmental quality, human health, and technology. (two 100 min discussions) prereq: 1101 or Pol 1201 or Pol 1401 or instr consent
ENST 3101 - Industrial Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Systems thinking in the context of industrial/environmental issues. Methods or frameworks including life cycle analysis and design for disassembly, guide an examination of product design, material choice, and flows of energy and resources into, through, and from industrial cycles. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for EnSt 4101] prereq: 1101, Econ 1111, Geol 1101, Stat 1601, or instr consent
ENST 3302 - Representation and the Anthropocene
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In what ways can we discover, find wonder in, and produce creative, engaging work about climate change and the Anthropocene. What does it mean to foreground humans in a geologic epoch, and how do we consider non-human beings? This interdisciplinary environmental studies/art course will teach students new ways of seeing and representing climate change in the landscape, locally and beyond. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A broad examination of how humans interacted with their natural world throughout American history. Combined emphasis on cultural ecology (the study of how various cultural groups shaped the American landscape) with political ecology (the role of the nation's political economy in driving environmental change). Possible topics include: the Columbian Exchange, European and American Indian conflict, Thoreau and the creation of an environmental ethic, the slaughter of the bison as an ecological tragedy, urbanization and environmental racism, conservation as a political movement and the development of environmental policy, eco-feminism, American religion and the environment, the politics of global climate change. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Hist 2361]
POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Exploration of the domestic and international politics of environmental and energy policy making. Focus on theoretical frameworks for policy making and political behaviors surrounding development of environmental and energy policies. Includes the applications of political dynamics and principles to specific areas of environmental and energy policy. Emphasis also given to politics of policy implementation. prereq: 1101 or 1201 or 1401
POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
An examination of political understandings of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Topics include international perspectives on the natural environment, technological optimism and survivalism, the tragedy of the commons, environmental direct action movements, the environmental justice movement, and theories of green democracy and citizenship.
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ENGL 3062 - Carbon Energy Literatures: Energy, Climate, and Crisis in the 20th and 21st Century (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rapid rise of the fossil fuel industry has been a defining historical condition of the last century. As a consequence, we face global climate change. In this context, students will study the relationship between energy production and consumption, labor and capital, and human environmental impact as they are represented in literature. Prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3063 - Environmental Justice Literatures (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Environmental justice is the struggle for equity and fairness in the distribution of environmental risks and benefits. This class examines the literature of this struggle. In the process of reading fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, films, visual art, and other types of texts, students learn to bring social, political, and ethical questions of environmental studies to representations of humans in their relationships to nature. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENST 3112 - Climate Change and Moral Responsibility (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 4 cr of EnSt or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Considers the moral responsibilities that citizens have regarding climate change. Includes: 1) tours and discussion of local green infrastructure; 2) panel discussions by professionals and practitioners from the community who will share their expertise; and 3) discussion of the most recent work on climate ethics. prereq: 4 cr of EnSt or instr consent
ENST 3201 - Environmental Justice (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 4 cr of EnSt or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Environmental justice has shifted the way that scholars, activists, and policy makers understand and address environmental problems. Core environmental concerns such as pollution and climate change are now also understood to be social justice problems. Considers development of the environmental justice movement and key contemporary environmental justice problems. prereq: 4 cr of EnSt or instr consent
FREN 3507 - Modern Studies: French for Sustainability (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
France's engagement with sustainable development with regard to biodiversity, food systems, renewable energy, and air and water quality, especially as these intersect with social and economic disparities. The course draws upon UMM's unique institutional strengths and prepares students with the tools and skills they need in order to work in the sustainability sector in a global, bilingual setting. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
IS 3053 - Irish Texts and Contexts (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This study abroad course explores the intimate relationship between Irish literature and the spaces in which it developed, from the geographical features that gave prehistoric Irish myths their shape to the large estates that produced poets like William Butler Yeats. The course involves three weeks of travel to many different locations throughout Ireland.