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Twin Cities Campus

Educational Psychology Research Minor

Educational Psychology
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 14
The Educational Psychology Research Minor is unique from other minors at the University in that students would take their coursework in a very specific and meaningful sequence. Students will gain an understanding basic research methodologies, utilizing the library system, and how to connect with faculty researchers culminating in creating a Faculty Directed Research contract that spans two semesters. In addition, students will learn statistical methods that will aid in understanding various statistical analyses encountered in both the research experience and in the literature. As students continue in their research experience, they expand their knowledge around research methodology in practice. This course would also include topics around connecting research to practice culminating in a presentation at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. The Educational Psychology Research Minor has two courses designated as honors courses, but is not exclusive to honors students. The minor is open to any undergraduate student in the university. Students may combine the Educational Psychology Research Minor with any other major or minor.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Required Courses (14 credits)
EPSY 2201 - Basics of Research Methods (2.0 cr)
or EPSY 2201H - Basics of Research Methods for Honors Students (2.0 cr)
EPSY 4994 must be taken twice for 3 credits each.
EPSY 4994 - Faculty Directed Research in Educational Psychology (1.0-6.0 cr)
EPSY 1261 - Understanding Data Stories through Visualization & Computing [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 3303H - Honors Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 3303 - Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum (3.0 cr)
 
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EPSY 2201 - Basics of Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 2201 / EPsy 2201H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As part of a society that is saturated with "research," we have all at some point encountered at least one form of research--whether it is via election polls, market surveys, investigative findings reported on the 10pm news, or academic research for your papers. There is sometimes too much research to make sense of it all. As an undergraduate student, you have likely found many examples of research, and it will only become more important in your own academic career, and if you choose to pursue an academic route, in your own development as a scholar. Therefore, learning the basics of research--how it is conducted, how it can be used to answer everyday questions, and what makes it good quality--will make you not only a better researcher, but also a better consumer of academic and popular research.
EPSY 2201H - Basics of Research Methods for Honors Students
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Epsy 2201/Epsy 2201H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As part of a society that is saturated with "research," we have all at some point encountered at least one form of research--whether it is via election polls, market surveys, investigative findings reported on the 10pm news, or academic research for your papers. There is sometimes too much research to make sense of it all. As an undergraduate student, you have likely found many examples of research, and it will only become more important in your own academic career, and if you choose to pursue an academic route, in your own development as a scholar. Therefore, learning the basics of research--how it is conducted, how it can be used to answer everyday questions, and what makes it good quality--will make you not only a better researcher, but also a better consumer of academic and popular research. This course aims to introduce you, as an honors student, to these topics.
EPSY 4994 - Faculty Directed Research in Educational Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 20.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Arranged independently with individual faculty members. prereq: instr consent
EPSY 1261 - Understanding Data Stories through Visualization & Computing (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 1261/PSTL 1004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Academics and researchers have long used data & visualization to support and illuminate particular narratives in their scholarship. Today, data visualizations are found not only in the pages of academic journals; many non-academics, including journalists and activists, use increasingly complex data visualizations and statistical summaries to convey salient information and storylines. This course will help students build on their statistical thinking and understanding learned in high school to think critically about the use of summaries and visualization and their role in the data narrative. It will also cover the use of computational tools and methods for creating data summaries and visualization that facilitate seeing patterns and relationships in data, and producing better narrative through communicating with data. Students will learn course material through in-class activities and projects conducted in cooperative learning groups and through assignments requiring the application of concepts and technology presented in class to additional real-world examples of data visualization.
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, principles, and methods in educational/psychological measurement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, score reports (e.g., grades). Modern measurement theories, including item response theory and generalizability theory. Emphasizes construction, interpretation, use, and evaluation of assessments regarding achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes, personality, and exceptionality.
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
EPSY 3303H - Honors Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3303/EPsy 3303H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This culminating course familiarizes students with the principles and practice of applied psychology in educational and community settings. Through supervised fieldwork experiences in either research or practice settings, students will develop an understanding of ethical considerations in educational psychology and explore how psychological research can be used to advance the practice of psychology in applied settings. This course is designed for undergraduate students completing an Educational Psychology undergraduate minor or the Special Education major. The course meets for 120 minutes weekly, and students complete 90 hours of fieldwork (approximately 8-10 hours/week). Honors students will be involved in Directed Faculty Research conducted with an approved Educational Psychology faculty member. The research project will be used to direct the honors thesis. In addition, honors students will present their research at the Undergraduate Research Symposium Note: students in the special education major must complete fieldwork related to disabilities and/or special education.
EPSY 3303 - Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3303/EPsy 3303H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This culminating course familiarizes students with the principles and practice of applied psychology in educational and community settings. Through supervised fieldwork experiences in either research or practice settings, students will develop an understanding of ethical considerations in educational psychology and explore how psychological research can be used to advance the practice of psychology in applied settings. This course is designed for undergraduate students completing an Educational Psychology undergraduate minor or the Special Education major. The course meets for 120 minutes weekly, and students complete 90 hours of fieldwork (approximately 8-10 hours/week). This is a community-engaged learning course. Fieldwork experiences can include: * A research experience conducted with an approved Educational Psychology faculty member. * A practical experience in an approved community engaged service-learning setting. Note: students in the special education major must complete fieldwork related to disabilities and/or special education.