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Crookston Campus

Sustainability Minor

Math, Science and Technology
Academic Affairs
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits in this minor: 22 to 24
The minor in sustainability is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the three pillars of sustainability-economic growth, environmental stewardship, and social progress-allowing graduates to fully understand, articulate, and implement sustainable practices that will help our society face sustainability-related challenges.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
  • completely online (all program coursework can be completed online)
Minor Requirements
Core
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 13 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BM 3008 - Sustainability and Compliance (3.0 cr)
· ENSC 3003 - Sustainable YoU, Sustainable World [GLOB PERSP, PEOPLE/ENV] (3.0 cr)
· NATR 1226 - Environmental Science and Sustainability [BIOL SCI, PEOPLE/ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SUST 3900 - Sustainability Field Experience (2.0 cr)
· SUST 4100 - Sustainability Capstone (2.0 cr)
Economics and Public Policy Electives
Take 3-4 credits from the following:
BM 3025 - Lean Six Sigma (4.0 cr)
or FIN 3120 - Money, Financial Markets and Institutions (3.0 cr)
or FIN 3125 - Investments (3.0 cr)
or NATR 3344 - Land Use Planning (3.0 cr)
or NATR 4699 - Integrated Resource Management (3.0 cr)
Social Science and Humanities Electives
Take 3 credits from the following: PUBH 3331- Health Equity and Social Determinants (3.0 cr Rochester) or
COMM 3001 - Human Relationships and Leadership [HUMAN DIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3431 - Persuasion (3.0 cr)
or COMM 4802 - Publication Design and Management (3.0 cr)
or GBUS 3500 - Business Ethics (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 2002 - Introduction to Ethics [HUMANITIES, ETH/CIV RE] (3.0 cr)
Stewardship through Technology and Design
Take 3-4 credits from the following: BBE 3201 Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (3.0 cr Twin Cities) or
ANSC 3004 - Livestock Facilities and Environmental Systems (3.0 cr)
or ASM 3360 - Applications in Precision Agriculture (2.0 cr)
or BIOL 3420 - Ecotoxicology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3722 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
or ENSC 3124 - Environmental Science and Remediation Techniques (3.0 cr)
or ENSC 4022 - Risk Assessment and Environmental Impact Statements (3.0 cr)
or GNAG 3203 - Ag Products and Processing (3.0 cr)
or HORT 3030 - Landscape Design (4.0 cr)
or ITM 3733 - Green Technology Solutions [PEOPLE/ENV] (3.0 cr)
or NATR 3374 - Ecology [BIOL SCI] (4.0 cr)
or SWM 3224 - Soil and Water Conservation (4.0 cr)
or SWM 3225 - Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Online
The online minor in sustainability is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the three pillars of sustainability-economic growth, environmental stewardship, and social progress-allowing graduates to fully understand, articulate, and implement sustainable practices that will help our society face sustainability-related challenges.
The sustainability minor online degree has identical degree requirements as the sustainability minor on-campus degree.
 
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BM 3008 - Sustainability and Compliance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to strategies used by businesses to achieve/maintain compliance with environmental laws/sustainability goals. Focus upon environmental due diligence, value of environmental auditing to identify compliance/sustainability issues in operations, and leveraging it to secure a competitive advantage in a marketplace.
ENSC 3003 - Sustainable YoU, Sustainable World (GLOB PERSP, PEOPLE/ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sustainability exists where social equity, environmental integrity and economic prosperity intersect. We will approach sustainability using multiple lenses of understanding to enable students to become more informed about how to become sustainable students, members of the University community and citizens of the world.
NATR 1226 - Environmental Science and Sustainability (BIOL SCI, PEOPLE/ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary course. Applying ecological principles to social systems. Food/fiber production. Economic considerations of land use and rural communities. Pollution, global warming, energy production, biodiversity.
SUST 3900 - Sustainability Field Experience
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Internship within a student's chosen field with a focus on Sustainability. This course allows students to experience how Sustainability is relevant to their chosen field of study. prereq: department approval, consent of instructor
SUST 4100 - Sustainability Capstone
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explore the United Nations Sustainability Development Goals. A capstone project utilizing these goals will be done and presented to class at end of semester. prereq: Sr
BM 3025 - Lean Six Sigma
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current lean six sigma philosophies, methods, and techniques relevant to manufacturing, service, quality, and productivity. DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) framework, lean methodology, project management, leadership and organizational methods. prereq: Math 1150
FIN 3120 - Money, Financial Markets and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles/roles of money, banking, financial system. Interest rate, monetary policies of central banks. Financial instruments, asset pricing, determination/behavior of interest rates/exchange rates. Management, structure regulation of banking system.
FIN 3125 - Investments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Key concepts in investment theory from perspective of portfolio manager. Investment theory/problems. Current academic work/application for portfolio choice. prereq: Mgmt 3100
NATR 3344 - Land Use Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological, economic, and legal principles applied to land use planning in relation to agricultural, industrial, residential, wild land, forestry, recreational, and transportation needs. Legislative, agency, and citizen involvement in environmental law formulation and enforcement. Case studies. prereq: Jr or Sr status
NATR 4699 - Integrated Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team study exploring synthesis of environmental, technical, economic, political, and administrative principles as applied to case studies and current management situations. Emphasis on decision-making process. prereq: Sr or instructor consent
COMM 3001 - Human Relationships and Leadership (HUMAN DIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Anti-relational/relational communication, interpersonal/group processes, conflict management, collaboration, team building, and leadership.
COMM 3431 - Persuasion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Persuasion in interpersonal, organizational, intra-/inter-cultural relationships. Contemporary persuasion with historical segments. Argumentative claims, how to analyze/respond coherently to them.
COMM 4802 - Publication Design and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Applying project management principles to manage publication from concept to final product. Design principles, desktop publishing software, audience analysis, usability testing, production. Using table presentations to communicate process, final product to clients/guests.
GBUS 3500 - Business Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ethics as compelling responsibility of today's business organizations. Moral principles/models for ethical decision making. Challenges of ethical business practices. prereq: Mgmt 3200 and Mktg 3300 or instructor consent
PHIL 2002 - Introduction to Ethics (HUMANITIES, ETH/CIV RE)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Foundational concepts of ethics. Applications in various contexts.
ANSC 3004 - Livestock Facilities and Environmental Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Effects of environment on animal production. Principles of environmental control. Planning open, partial, and total environmentally controlled systems for livestock. Functional, economic, and environmental considerations. Feed handling systems, waste management alternatives. prereq: Math 1031, or instructor consent
ASM 3360 - Applications in Precision Agriculture
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to applications of precision agriculture. Making data-driven on-farm decisions using the knowledge and tools of crop science and agricultural engineering. prereq: Soil 1293
BIOL 3420 - Ecotoxicology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of ecotoxicology ranging from molecular to global issues. Major classes of contaminants, bioaccumulation, toxic effects, and risks. Lab. prereq: CHEM 1001
BIOL 3722 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Description/analysis of events in lakes, streams, and ponds, beginning with their origins and progressing through their physics, chemistry, and biology. These parameters interrelated with population of aquatic environment. prereq: Biol 2022, Chem 1001, Phys 1012, Math 1031 or 1131 or 1150
ENSC 3124 - Environmental Science and Remediation Techniques
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Advanced understanding of environmental science. Issues surrounding ecosystem management, risk assessment, sustainable energy, water quality, air quality. Remediation techniques(traditional/nontraditional), environmental laws.
ENSC 4022 - Risk Assessment and Environmental Impact Statements
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Environmental risk assessments, including cost benefit analysis, risk analysis, risk characterization. Develop environmental impact statements. Toxicity assessment, uncertainty analysis, risk management.
GNAG 3203 - Ag Products and Processing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Survey of raw agricultural products produced in Upper Midwest. Transport, processing, packaging, wholesale/retail distribution and sales. Quality factors, food laws/regulations, sanitation, food safety, environmental concerns. prereq: Jr
HORT 3030 - Landscape Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application of aesthetic, environmental, and functional design principles to creative planning/development of residential/commercial landscapes. Emphasizes low impact and sustainability. prereq: 1021
ITM 3733 - Green Technology Solutions (PEOPLE/ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine a wide variety of green technologies and analyze the potential impact of green technologies on global energy usage.
NATR 3374 - Ecology (BIOL SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interactions among plants, animals, and the physical environment; structure and function of ecosystems; population dynamics, biotic communities; principles of biotic succession and ecosystem management. prereq: Biol 1009, Soil 1293
SWM 3224 - Soil and Water Conservation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management principles and practices used to increase productivity and conserve soil and water resources for agronomic crops. Maintaining wildland and environmental quality through use of shelterbelts. prereq: Soil 1293, jr, or instructor consent
SWM 3225 - Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Precipitation, infiltration, evapo-transpiration, runoff from small watersheds. Application to design of structures, water/wind erosion practices. Design principles/techniques in constructing small impoundments and waste holding facilities, and in restoring wetlands. Selecting/applying irrigation/drainage systems.