Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Urban and Community Forestry B.S.

Forest Resources
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Students will no longer be accepted into this program after Spring 2007. Program requirements below are for current students only.
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 120
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The urban and community forestry curriculum prepares students for careers in planning and managing vegetation and natural resources in or near urban communities, and for direct involvement in resource management or for specialized supporting roles in areas such as urban planning and environmental education. Urban forests include areas along streets and in parks, private lands, greenbelts, and open spaces. Urban foresters help communities plan, design, or protect urban and peri-urban forests; supervise tree selection and planting; and design insect control/disease protection and plant health care programs. Principle employers for graduates in urban and community forestry include city governments, private tree care and arboricultural consulting companies, state and federal forestry agencies, nurseries, and utility companies. Graduates may also be qualified for traditional forestry positions, including those in the federal government.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major or minor in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major or minor (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students going into consulting or private business should choose courses in the forest health and cultural practices of urban forestry. Students interested in managing the urban landscape should concentrate on courses in the management and administration areas. All required courses must be taken A-F, and students must earn a grade of at least C-.
Communication Skills
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 1223 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Mathematical Thinking
ESPM 1145 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
Social Sciences
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 - The Soil Resource [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Professional Courses
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
FNRM 1001 - Orientation and Information Systems (1.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People (3.0 cr)
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants (4.0 cr)
HORT 5041W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
or FR 4118 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
(taught at Cloquet Forestry Center)
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests: Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Additional Professional Courses
Select courses from the list below in consultation with a faculty adviser.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3041 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· BBE 1002 - Biorenewable Resources [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3703 - Agroforestry in Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 4021 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3266 {Inactive} [C/PE] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Honors
This is an honors sub-plan.
CFANS students may participate in honors at both the freshman/sophomore level and the junior/senior level.
At the freshman/sophomore level, students participate in specially designed honors courses and honors colloquia focusing on current issues in their chosen field. Students complete three honors courses in their first two years; one must be an honors colloquium (CFAN 1000H). Completion of the freshman/sophomore honors program is recognized by a certificate and by designation on a student?s transcript. The heart of the junior/senior level honors program is an honors project supervised by a faculty mentor. Students also participate in other honors options designed to enhance their academic experiences. Graduation with honors is determined by GPA in the last 60 credits of A-F registration (including transfer coursework). Minimum GPAs are specified below. Transcripts of students graduating with honors show one of the following: Cum laude (minimum GPA: 3.50) Magna cum laude (minimum GPA: 3.66) Summa cum laude (minimum GPA: 3.75) Students also receive recognition during commencement. To achieve the honors notation on their transcripts, students must be admitted to the junior/senior Honors Program, meet the GPAs stated above and complete all Honors Program requirements--which for most students comprises one semester of the Honors Colloquium, a second honors registration or approved Honors Option, and Honors Research. Admission to the Honors Program provides an opportunity for students to explore honors classes from other programs. The honors option offers students the flexibility to tailor a portion of the program to meet their unique needs and interests. Registration in honors courses requires admission to the Honors Program and college office approval.
Honors Focus
Honors (Freshman/Sophomore)
Freshman/sophomore honors students must complete at least one registration of CFAN 1000H and two additional honors courses by their 60th credit. Additional courses may be taken from CFAN 1000H, CFAN 3101H, or other University-wide honors coursework. Students may propose an honors "option" in place of one required honors registration.
CFAN 1000H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
CFAN 3101H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or other honors designated coursework
-OR-
Honors (Junior/Senior)
Junior/senior honors students must complete one registration of CFAN 3101H. They must complete one additional registration in either CFAN 3101H or another University-wide honors class, or propose an honors "option" (this must be approved by the honors committee). Students must also complete CFAN 3100H. This faculty-mentored honors project is submitted to the honors committee for approval prior to registration.
CFAN 3101H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
CFAN 3100H - Honors Experience (2.0-3.0 cr)
an honors designated course
or approved honors "option"
 
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· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

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· Urban and Community Forestry
· Urban and Community Forestry Honors

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· Urban and Community Forestry B.S.
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COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 2211/Stat 3011/5021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 2211/Stat 3011/5021
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 3011; College algebra or instr consent; Stat course recommended
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00362
Prerequisites: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles, their application to natural resource management problems. Tools to address market failure, project analysis. Economic/financial considerations. Benefit/cost analysis. Valuation/assessment methods for property/market/nonmarket benefits. Planning/management problems. Managing renewable natural resources. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640 - Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Biological diversity from genetic variation to diversity of species/ecosystems. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes governing biological diversity. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives on issues concerning human diversity, human population growth, health, agriculture, and conservation. Lab.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry; 1 term college chemistry recommended
SOIL 1125 - The Soil Resource (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 1125/2125/5125/AgUM 2251
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification and principles of soil fertility. Soil survey information (WEB Soil Survey) used to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 1125/2125/5125/AgUM 2251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/6021/Biol 3021
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry/biochemistry outlining structure/metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009, credit not granted if received for 3021
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
FNRM 1001 - Orientation and Information Systems
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Forest resources, recreation resource management, urban forestry programs. Forestry and natural resource careers. Qualification requirements for government positions, competencies, internships, and experiences to compete for jobs in industry. Course planning, mentoring, alumni contacts. Leadership, organization, process. Lab equipment/software, GUIs, the Internet, spreadsheets, Lumina, periodical indexes.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form/function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics/dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or 1009; 1 semester college chemistry recommended
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00373
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. prereq: [5413, FNRM [major or minor]] or instr consent
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change. prereq: [1101 or Hort 1012], Biol 2022
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 4501/5501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management concepts for green infrastructure of cities, towns, and communities. Urban forest as a social/biological resource. Emphasizes management of urban forest ecosystem to maximize benefits to people. Tree selection, risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, landscape planning, values, perceptions. How urban forestry can be a tool to improve community infrastructure. prereq: [1101, 3501, Ent 4251, PlPa 3003, [UF major or minor]] or instr consent
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to identify plants around the world. A few hundred of the most important cultivated plants for northern climates, their distinguishing features, common uses, cultural specificities, and notable cultivars.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diseases of trees in urban and forested areas. Biology, ecology and control of tree diseases. Labs provide experience identifying disease agents and learning appropriate integrated control procedures.
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3114/5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest management and other land use patterns/activities on water yield, stormflow, erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Economic/social factors. National/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: [Biol 1001 or Biol 1009]; 1101, Biol 2022 recommended
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests: Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ANTH 3041 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3041/5041/8213
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Concepts, theories, and methods of ecological anthropology (cultural ecology).How humans interact with biophysical environment. Compares biological/cultural interactions with environment. Examines adaptive strategies cross-culturally. prereq: 1003 or instr consent
BBE 1002 - Biorenewable Resources (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Environmental/social impacts of materials used to make a product. Biorenewable resources, using wood and agriculture-based biomass. Environmental, technological, social, and economic implications of the use of these resources.
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3031/5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course, [jr or sr]
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3202W/5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3703 - Agroforestry in Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3703/5703
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Biological, physical, and environmental attributes of agroforestry as pertains to watershed management. Coupling production with watershed protection benefits. Implications for policy, economics, and human dimensions in sustainable development. Examples, case studies from North America and from developing countries.
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3204/5204
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3262/5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/techniques of remote sensing and its applications to mapping/monitoring land/water resources from local to global scales. Forest and natural resource inventory. Forest cover and soil mapping. Landuse/global change analysis. Lab provides hands-on experience working with aerial photography and digital sensing imagery.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects/characteristics of organizations, their members. Why people/groups feel/behave as they do. Processes/methods that improve behavior/attitudes/effectiveness of members. Member/manager skills. Guest speakers, group presentations, films.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/1011V/1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human societies/behavior. Major theories, methods, concepts, research findings. Characteristics of basic social units, their patterns of interrelation, processes of change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02113
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, cultural foundations of modern city. Theories/models of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation, social control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban divide. Decline of urban liberalism. "Brazilianization" of American city. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 2125
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems.
CFAN 3100H - Honors Experience
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Developed by student and CFANS faculty mentor. May include foreign study-travel, research, position or policy paper, or any experience demonstrating advanced study/service/understanding. prereq: instr consent