Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Museum & Curatorial Studies Minor

Art History
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The Museum & Curatorial Studies Minor invites students from diverse majors to engage in the study of museum history and practices including curating, managing collections, and designing exhibitions. The minor provides a foundation of museum history and theory spanning multiple disciplines and professional training through an internship at a local museum, gallery or archive. The methods of collecting and organizing objects for display are shared among the arts, sciences, history centers, and culturally specific institutions that tell stories about the interconnected world and its cultures. Historically, collections of natural history and visual culture were entwined since the premodern era and this minor reveals connectivity across fields to demonstrate the shared work of museums to preserve and present knowledge and culture, whether botanical specimens or ancient sculpture. Through a rigorous combination of coursework and professional experience, this program prepares students for graduate school and/or entry level positions in museums, galleries, and archives. Internships and electives will provide students with opportunities to learn skills such as the collection of object-based data, digital documentation, cataloging objects, and the use of digital tools for spatial planning. They will also learn to conduct scholarly research and to write clearly and concisely for a range of different audiences. Skills learned through the minors curriculum contribute to career readiness for related fields including design, digital communication, writing and journalism, collection management, intellectual property, education, and administration.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Students may earn a bachelor of arts in Art History and a minor in Museum & Curatorial Studies. Only three courses may count toward both the major and the minor. Students may not earn both a minor in Art History and a minor in Museum & Curatorial Studies.
Foundation Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
Professional Experience
Students must take this course for a minimum of two credits to count toward this requirement.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 2 - 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience (1.0-2.0 cr)
or ARTS 3896 - Internship (1.0-3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Museum-Related Electives
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 3 - 7 credit(s) from the following:
· ADES 2213 - Textile Analysis (4.0 cr)
· AMST 4401 - Inclusion in Public History and Museums (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4671 - Historic Preservation (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4672 - Historic Building Conservation (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4674 - World Heritage Conservation (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3404W - Professional Practices in the Arts [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3481 - Curatorial Practice Field Experience (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
· MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy (3.0 cr)
· MST 5012 - Museum Practices (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3003 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
· Learning Abroad Courses
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· FLOR 3004 - Photography: Exploring Society Through the Camera's Lens (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3012 - Florence and the Mediterranean: A Sea of Culture (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3240 - Arts Administration: The Creative Industries in a Digital World (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3243 - London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3251 - Strategic Communication and Social Media: Theory and Practice [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Art History Electives
Students pursuing this minor who are interested in a graduate career in art history are encouraged to take two electives in Art History in consultation with the departmental advisor.
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 3 - 7 credit(s) from the following:
North America and Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3005 - American Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3609 -  Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5315 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3708 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3706 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
· Middle East and/or Islamic World
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans (3.0 cr)
· South and/or East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AMES 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds (3.0 cr)
 
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ARTH 1002W - Why Art Matters (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to history of topics that investigate power/importance of art both globablly and in its diverse forms, from architecture and painting to video and prints. Sacred space, propaganda, the museum, art/gender, art/authority, tourism.
ARTH 3896 - Directed Professional Experience
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internship or research assistantship in approved program, art institution, business or museum. prereq: instr consent
ARTS 3896 - Internship
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Field work at local, regional, national, or international arts organization or with professional artist provides experience in activities/administration of art/art-based organizations. prereq: BFA Art major, instr consent
ADES 2213 - Textile Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of fibers, yarns, textile structures, and finishes. Their effect on performance/appearance of textile products, including apparel, interior, and industrial textiles. prereq: DHA major or pre-major or instr consent
AMST 4401 - Inclusion in Public History and Museums
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inclusion in Public History and Museum is designed to engage students in studying the challenges related to the under-representation of communities of color and American Indian Nations in historical organizations and public history graduate programs. The course serves as a foundation into a summer internship program made possible through the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Class sessions will provide a philosophical understanding of museum practice, your summer internship at the Minnesota Historical Society will provide practical experience inside the workings of a major state historical organization. The course is critical part of the History Museum Fellows Program, in identifying and addressing issues of how traditionally marginalized communities are represented in the traditional narrative of history ? both in Minnesota museums and in museums with national audiences. The course and associated Fellowship Program will create a unique opportunity for students to strengthen undergraduate coursework with a one-of-a-kind seminar, explore career interests and receive assistance in exploring options for graduate training as a museum professional.
ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 5501.
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Archives are not neutral. In order to decolonize them, scholars in anthropology and other disciplines must first understand the ways in which Western settler values have structured them. Who decides acquisition policy? How are items indexed, described, and related to one another? Who has access, and under what conditions? And who is structurally excluded? In this course we decolonize by recontextualizing both the archives as institutions and their contents. In other words, we use methods appropriate for contemporary anthropological archival research. We will consider preservation, curation, organizational bias in archives, analytic scale, voice, and how historical texts are material culture. Students engage in original archival research.
ANTH 5448 - Applied Heritage Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contexts of cultural heritage applicable to federal/state protection. Approaches to planning/management. Issues of heritage/stakeholder conflict.
ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 3611/Arch 5611
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to design, design process. Developing/understanding ways of seeing, thinking, and acting as a designer. Changes in design being wrought by digital technology. Team design project.
ARCH 4671 - Historic Preservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 4671/Arch 5671
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophy, theory, origins of historic preservation. Historic archaeology, research, descriptive analysis, documentation. Government's role, standards/guidelines, building codes, neighborhood preservation, advocacy. Using primary/secondary resources. Controversial aspects. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ARCH 4672 - Historic Building Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 4672/Arch 5672
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historic building materials, systems, methods of conservation. Structural systems, building repair/pathology. Introducing new environmental systems. Conserving interiors. Research on materials/techniques, using primary/secondary resources. Documenting with photography/measured drawings. prereq: 4671 or concurrent enrollment in 4671 or instr consent
ARCH 4674 - World Heritage Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Design/planning options for conservation of historic buildings/cultural heritage sites. Case studies link current practices, methods/solutions with expert preservationists, site conservationists, local communities in development/design of conservation proposals. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ARTS 3404W - Professional Practices in the Arts (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Professional Practices in the Arts is a course that examines practical applications of presentation, documentation, business skills, and career planning specific to studio art. It provides a foundation of practical information to assist undergraduate and graduate studio majors in building a successful career. The course consists of lectures, discussions, readings, presentations, and demonstrations. The class will spend a significant amount of time discussing different types of art venues and the appropriate contexts for different types of work. Additionally, we will assess and interpret individual students' work as a means to generating appropriate questions and insights for artists statements. prereq: Grad student or [Art BFA student or Art Major, jr or sr]
ARTS 3481 - Curatorial Practice Field Experience
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course looks at current critical questions of curating and exhibition making. We explore the process of developing an exhibition, building working relationships with artists and understanding how to e?ectively communicate ideas to turn a concept into a project. The course assumes that curating has also evolved from a practice associated with a museum art expert to something that is increasingly framed as a creative marketable skill related to cultural production. Discussions, readings, and coursework include consideration of gallery and public space and audience experience. Curatorial trends will be explored via site visits to established and alternative exhibit spaces. Students are introduced to a wide variety of artists and how their work is contextualized by the exhibition format. Site visits to exhibition spaces and conversations with professional curators reinforce the course material. Through practice and application, students examine the evolving de?nitions and responsibilities of a curator, and a variety of issues related to the development of a coherent and relevant exhibition. Students participate in hands-on, curatorial workshops, and curate a professional, public presentation using a nontraditional space, gallery space, digital space or other local venue.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
MST 5011 - Museum History and Philosophy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical and philosophical roots of museums and emerging philosophical issues faced by museums today - from art, history, science, and youth to living collections, living history sites, and historic houses. Field trips to area museums.
MST 5012 - Museum Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad student or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical aspects of museum work. Standards, practices, responsibilities, issues, all set in greater museum context. Curatorial/educational duties, collections management, security, funding, boards, public relations, installation, budgeting. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
AMIN 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, and websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities. prereq: instr consent
AMST 3003 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities.
HIST 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities. prereq: instr consent
FLOR 3004 - Photography: Exploring Society Through the Camera's Lens
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
FLOR 3012 - Florence and the Mediterranean: A Sea of Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
During the Middle Ages and in the early Modern Age, three great civilizations clashed for the control of the Mediterranean basin: the Latin West, the Byzantine Empire, and the Muslim world. But the sea was not just a theatre of war, it was also a lively economic area, with trade routes crossing it from north to south, from east to west. Moreover, it was the place where different cultures met: This course will explore their reciprocal influence, with a special focus on art history and a mainly Italian and Florentine point of view. Topics will include: the impact of Islamic art on Western culture; the role of Byzantine art in the development of Florentine painting; the rediscovery of Greek classical culture and its importance in Renaissance civilization; the consequences of the fall of Constantinople and of the expansion of the Ottoman Empire. Students will explore Florentine churches, palaces, and museums in search of visual evidence of the links between the city and the diversity of Mediterranean culture.
LNDN 3240 - Arts Administration: The Creative Industries in a Digital World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Arts and culture are rapidly growing sectors of the economy in the UK and worldwide. This course will focus on the ways in which the Creative industries are structured, and how arts administrators successfully share creativity with the public and lever-age the commercial opportunities of creative production. Key topics to be explored will include the arts as a business; managing financial imperatives and the artistic process; promoting and presenting cultural products. Case studies will be drawn from a variety of fields such as film, digital media, gaming, theatre, museums, and publishing, and students will have the opportunity to engage directly with practitioners successfully working in various fields of arts and culture and those managing the interface between creativity and business in London. It is an industry that is growing year on year, but it can be a difficult market to navigate and capture economical value, as "cultural goods" are less fixed, or less concrete than other measurable areas of ex-change. Students will examine the history of the Creative Industries to understand the current environment in an historical context. They will focus specifically on the shifting creative industries in a digital world with the advent of social media, streaming services, revolutionary marketing techniques, crowd-sourcing, and audience creation. Students will explore key concepts and theories, but they will also explore the practical applications of the industries in action. They will gain a deeper understanding of the media they consume via interaction with professionals, venues, and event opportunities highlighted in this module. Throughout this course, students will be encouraged to explore their own interests of the Creative Industries. By bringing personal experience and interest into an analytical environment, this module will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of media artifacts, and provide them with the tools and skills to expand their understanding and engagement with their chosen sectors.
LNDN 3243 - London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the early twenty-first century, museums are becoming increasingly more relevant to all parts of society, exhibition displays are often controversial and politically charged. This course is an introduction to both British society, culture and museology. The course considers museums as reflections of the British psyche, unique cultural constructs that help us understand "Britishness". We will also be looking at museums as institutions of "global" heritage in the context of a global city, with a unique British perspective. As an introduction to museology, the course will look at the development of the modern museum and its operation, as well as interrogate the different types of museums. We will look at the impact British history, society and politics have had on London museums, their creation and their day to day operations and audiences. Taking advantage of our location, we will do field work in eight different museums, from the famous and vast "global" British Museum to the small and privately-owned Saatchi Gallery. Students will analyze the ways in which imperialism and its legacy, as well as Britain's global relationships have influenced museum development and how this gives rise to the politics of patrimony. We will look at questions of cultural appropriation and the political debate on repatriation versus protection. This debate has recently been energized by the depredations of IS on what many would call the global heritage of Iraq and Syria. We will also be looking at material culture and what it says about individuals and society. Students will examine the choices, ethics and political and social meanings of both creating material culture and collecting it, and the ethics of preservation and restoration. While the creation of material culture has specific psychological, social and often political meanings; collecting, preserving and displaying one particular object involves a very complex decision-making process which is influenced by the cultural values of the decision maker. We will examine, for example, the impact of the Classical period on British society in the past and present, its importance to class and education in Britain, and how this is reflected in museum collections. Students will also look at the complex decision making of conservators and restorers. These decisions have social and political impact, choosing to emphasize one period and use over another. The course will also look closely at decision makers and their role in the museum industry, the origins of museums from individuals to trade exhibitions and current museum professionals, as well as the impact museum audiences have on the work of museums. Students will also examine the impact of communities on museum development, on exhibition creation, how engaged museums are with their communities, and how the unique diversity of London is reflected (or not) in its museums.
LNDN 3251 - Strategic Communication and Social Media: Theory and Practice (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This class combines theoretical analysis, case studies, and hands-on practice to understand and execute traditional and online communications strategies. The course will begin with a literature review of theories and principles relevant to the practice of strategic communication and social media practices including media effects, Internet effects, and uses and gratification theory. Second, cases studies will be utilized to investigate the effectiveness of messaging strategies employed by not-for-profit and commercial organizations as well as individual actors such as businesses, politicians, and influencers. Finally, students will work for a real-world client and their own portfolios to formulate an overarching communication strategy inclusive of recommendations for messaging strategies across all platforms (traditional messaging, website, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, press releases, e-blasts, and speeches.)
ARTH 3005 - American Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Artistic practice in the United States: colonial period to cold war. America as idea/identity shaped, expressed, represented, and contested through art. Canon of American art history. Works by individuals outside of traditional channels of art instruction/reception. Questions about what does/does not count as art history.
ARTH 3012 - 19th and 20th Century Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major monuments/issues of modern period. Sculpture, architecture, painting, prints. Neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, evolution of modernism, symbolism, fauvism, cubism, dadaism, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptualism, postmodernism.
ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3013/EAS 3013
Typically offered: Every Fall
A selective examination of works of art produced in China, Korea and Japan from the neolithic era to modern times. Nearly every major type of object and all major styles are represented.
ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of visual representations in fine arts and popular media, in context of social issues. Obscenity, censorship, democracy, technology, commerce, the museum, propaganda, social role of artist. Understanding the contemporary world through analysis of dominant aesthetic values.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Broad chronological overview of U.S./international art movements since 1945. Assessment of critical writings by major theoreticians (e.g., Clement Greenberg) associated with those movements. Theoretical perspective of postmodernism.
ARTH 3577 - Photo Nation: Photography in America (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of photography, from 19th century to present. Photography as legitimate art form. Portraits/photo albums in culture. Birth of criminal justice system. Technological/market aspects. Politics of aesthetics. Women in photography. Ways in which idea of America has been shaped by photographs.
ARTH 3921W - Art of the Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will engage with the history of film as an art form through a selection of significant movements, styles, filmmakers, institutions, and, of course, individual films from around the world. While this will not be a comprehensive study, it will address both mainstream, commercial films as well as oppositional, experimental, underground, and otherwise challenging works. Some of the wide-ranging selection of films we will watch and discuss: Germaine Dulac?s La Coquille et le Clergyman (The Seashell and the Clergyman) (1922), Gillo Pontecorvo?s The Battle of Algiers (1966), Julie Dash?s Daughters of the Dust (1991), and Alfonso Cuarón?s Roma (2018).
ARTH 3929 - Cinema Now (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Course examines contemporary cinema, including fiction films, documentaries, animation, and avant-garde experiments. Focuses on feature-length theatrical films, but will also consider other aspects of the contemporary media world: graphic novels, video games, television series and the Internet (e.g., Youtube). Examines media production, distribution, marketing, exhibition, and reception. Course will also present a survey of developments in contemporary cinema studies, since the choice of films will support a variety of critical approaches including economic, aesthetic (generic, auteurist, formalist), ideological (race, class, gender), and reception studies.
ARTH 5411 - Gender and Sexuality in Art Since 1863
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of art from late 19th to early 21st century. How gender/sexuality have been central to that period?s artistic production, art criticism, and aesthetic theorization. How gender/sexuality are important themes for artists. How the writing of history reveals assumptions about gender/sex. Critical reading/writing.
ARTH 5413 - Alternative Media: Video, Performance, Digital Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In-depth examination of development of alternative media in 20th/21st century art. Video technologies. Performance, time based art. Digital art. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5417 - Twentieth Century Theory and Criticism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Trends in 20th-century art theory, historical methodology, criticism. Key philosophical ideas of modernism/postmodernism: formalism, semiotics, poststructuralism, feminism, marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
MEST 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
RELS 3609 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Introduction to history of Roman art, from formation of city-state of Rome under Etruscan domination, to transformation of visual culture in late antiquity under peoples influenced by the Romans.
CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to art and material culture of Roman world: origin, change, continuity. Progress/decay in later empire, its legacy to modern world.
ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W/Chic 512
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
ARTH 3313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 5313 - Spanish Baroque Masters: Tradition and Experimentation in Golden Age Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3313/ArtH 5313
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar focuses on some of the major masters of Spanish Baroque art, including Francisco de Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Jusepe de Ribera, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and Juan Sánchez Cotán. We will explore their works from a variety of perspectives in an effort to understand the unique character and contributions of the art of the Spanish Golden Age.
ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 5315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 3708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3315/HIST 3708/ARTH 5315/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Diverse ways in which making of art and scientific knowledge intersected in early modern Europe. Connections between scientific curiosity and visual arts in major artists (e.g., da Vinci, Durer, Vermeer, Rembrandt). Artfulness of scientific imagery/diagrams, geographical maps, cabinets of curiosities, and new visual technologies, such as the telescope and microscope.
ARTH 3335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 5335 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
HIST 3706 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 3612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
RELS 5612 - Baroque Rome: Art and Politics in the Papal Capital
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3335/Rels 3162/Hist 3706/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Center of baroque culture--Rome--as city of spectacle and pageantry. Urban development. Major works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Ecclesiastical/private patrons who transformed Rome into one of the world's great capitals.
ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya/mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 5422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3422/ArtH 5422
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya, mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
African American cinematic achievements, from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
ARTH 3018 - Art of the Ottoman Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to visual culture under the Ottoman Empire. Initially formed as a small principality at the beginning of the fourteenth century in Anatolia, the Ottoman polity established itself as a major political and military power through the early modern period and beyond. With emphasis placed upon key monuments and objects, we will examine an array of artistic media, ranging from manuscript illumination and calligraphy to ceramics, textiles, metalwork, glasswork and jewelry. Major themes include the urban transformation of the Byzantine capital; the formation of imperial ideology and its visual articulation, the formation of a distinctive imperial style across media; the operation of court ateliers and societies of artists and artisans; contacts and interactions with the European and Islamic contemporaries; and cultural and artistic "decline."
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5783 - Art, Diplomacy and Empire
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5783/ArtH 8783
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the mobility and agency of objects and people in diplomatic practice. An emerging body of scholarship within Renaissance and early modern studies explores the exchange and global circulation of objects and their role in cultural encounters. The possibilities offered by this 'material turn' highlight the potential of objects to enable cultural contact, conversion and exchange across traditional political and cultural boundaries. At the same time, recent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to exchange highlight cultural aspects of the diplomatic encounter. As a result, the roles of diplomats, interpreters, merchants as well as various types of objects and services continue to be interpreted in new ways. This course will introduce students to canonical texts associated with gift-exchange and reciprocity, and will explore their relevance to the disciplines of history and art history particularly with regard to imperial encounters and exchanges.
ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
RELS 3706W - Art of Islam (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3015W/ClCv 3015W/RelS 370
Typically offered: Every Fall
Architecture, painting, and other arts from Islam's origins to the 20th century. Cultural and political settings as well as themes that unify the diverse artistic styles of Islamic art will be considered.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
RELS 5781 - Age of Empire: The Mughals, Safavids, and Ottomans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5781/RelS 5781
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Artistic developments under the three most powerful Islamic empires of the 16th through 19th centuries: Ottomans of Turkey; Safavids of Iran; Mughals of India. Roles of religion and state will be considered to understand their artistic production.
ARTH 3013 - Introduction to East Asian Art (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3013/EAS 3013
Typically offered: Every Fall
A selective examination of works of art produced in China, Korea and Japan from the neolithic era to modern times. Nearly every major type of object and all major styles are represented.
ARTH 3019 - Buddhist Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class provides an introduction to Buddhist art and architecture, from the sixth-century BCE to the present. Beginning with the life of the historical Buddha (563-483), it will follow the development of Buddhist art in India before tracing it across the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan. The class will consider how art and architecture evolved to serve the needs of Buddhism as its doctrine and practice evolved. At the same, we will consider how Buddhist cosmology and metaphysics were translated into culturally specific modes that served the multifarious cultural and artistic traditions of Asia.
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical development of land, earth, and environmental art since 1968. Artists' engagement with environmental problems. Responses to changing aesthetic, political, biological, economic, agricultural, technological, and climactic conditions from global perspective.
ARTH 3464 - Art Since 1945 (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Broad chronological overview of U.S./international art movements since 1945. Assessment of critical writings by major theoreticians (e.g., Clement Greenberg) associated with those movements. Theoretical perspective of postmodernism.
ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTH 3779/RELS 3779
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the development and diversity of the Indian temple, focusing the ways in which people interact with sacred space and how religious art addresses its viewers. We primarily focus on Hinduism, but also include Buddhism and Jainism. We will discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, dance, and food within the temple. We will also examine how the legacy of colonial and orientalist scholarship inflects our study of these traditions and monuments. Although the architecture of both structural and rock-cut temples will be our main object of study, we will also discuss the role of sculpture, painting, textiles, and food within the temple. Our consideration of the structures will be attentive to the ways in which people interact with the space and how objects of sacred art address their viewers. In classroom discussions we will work together to create an interpretive model that is synthetic, critical, and appreciative of the enormously diverse field that is South Asian Art. Lectures will move from explanatory descriptions of objects and histories that are covered in the textbook to critical interpretations of the historiographies that shape their contemporary reception. Class discussions and assignments are intended to encourage students to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material. No prior experience in the history of art or religions of South Asia is required for this course.
ARTH 5466 - Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Survey of the art and important critical literature of the period after 1970. Origins and full development of postmodern and subsequent aesthetic philosophies. prereq: 3464 or instr consent
ARTH 5773 - Making Place: Concepts of Space in Indian Art and Architecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating theories and representations of space and place in South Asia. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia (Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism) and across media such as murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. Critical theory since the 1980s has come to understand space ?as a variegated, complex, often bewildering series of different types of locations: physical, mythological, symbolic, imagined, linguistic, cartographic, perceptual, representational, i.e., space as suspended between matter and meaning? (Warf and Arias, 2009). This course will consider the complexity and historical and cultural specificities of notions of space and place in the art and architecture of South Asia. We will survey the diversity of representations and concepts of space, such as painted banners, murals, poetry, architecture, and urban form. We will examine works of art from the major religious traditions of South Asia: Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, and Buddhism. Course readings will interweave theoretical or methodological texts with historical examples. We will closely examine the transformation of sacred sites and networks and their reuse and appropriation by successive patrons and populations; pilgrimage, both physical and notional, as constitutive of differing notions of space; city planning that reflects ideas about sacred topographies, and the built environment of the city as expressive of identity. This course introduces students to major monuments, sites, and media of South Asian art and religion by investigating how those objects have been understood in the physical and notional environments of their production and reception.
ARTH 5774 - The Body in Indian Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the concept of embodiment and the nature of representation, from images of gods to human portraits, in Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Muslim, and courtly contexts. We consider diverse media from ancient to modern periods, including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and literature. This course explores the concept of embodiment in the diverse artistic traditions of South Asia. We will consider how ideas of representation of an individual have been understood and expressed differently across the history of South Asian art and religions. The course will consider the embodied representation of deities and semidivine figures along with those of ?real? people; we will consider, given the ontologies of such representations in their religious and cultural contexts. Representation of an individual ? a portrait ? is a foundational subject in the canon of art history. What does the very idea of a portrait mean so far outside the canon of (Western) art history? As we survey the diverse traditions and media of images of the body, we will be attentive to questions such as, Does media make meaning for these types of images? Can a ?portrait? be textual? Is verisimilitude essential to the depiction of a person? In what ways are practices of depiction informed by other modes of image-making, such as images of religious devotion, and traditions of representation encountered through trade or gift? We will consider diverse media from Ancient India to the modern period, including painting, stone and metal sculpture, photography, architecture, inscriptions, and even a Sanskrit play.
ARTH 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
AMES 3014W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to the present day.
RELS 3415W - Art of India (AH, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3014W/ArtH 3014W/RelS 3415
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting, from prehistoric Indus Valley civilization to present.
ARTH 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
ARTH 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
RELS 3777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact. There are no prerequisites for this course.
RELS 5777 - The Diversity of Traditions: Indian Empires after 1200
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3777/ArtH5777/RelS 5777
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class considers the development of Indian and Pakistani art and architecture from the introduction of Islam as a major political power at the end of the 12th century to the colonial empires of the 18th century. We will study how South Asia?s diverse ethnic and religious communities interacted, observing how visual and material cultures reflect differences, adaptations, and shared aesthetic practices within this diversity of traditions. Students in this class will have mastered a body of knowledge about Indian art and probed multiple modes of inquiry. We will explore how Muslim rulers brought new traditions yet maintained many older ones making, for example, the first mosque in India that combines Muslim and Indic visual idioms. We will study the developments leading to magnificent structures, such as the Taj Mahal, asking why such a structure could be built when Islam discourages monumental mausolea. In what ways the schools of painting that are the products of both Muslim and Hindu rulers different and similar? The course will also consider artistic production in the important Hindu kingdoms that ruled India concurrently with the great Muslim powers. In the 18th century, colonialist forces enter the subcontinent, resulting in significant innovative artistic trends. Among questions we will ask is how did these kingdoms influence one another? Throughout we will probe which forms and ideas seem to be inherently Indian, asking which ones transcend dynastic, geographic and religious differences and which forms and ideas are consistent throughout these periods of political and ideological change. To do all this we must constantly consider how South Asia's diverse ethnic and religious communities interact.
ARTH 3778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3778/ArtH 5778
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course surveys the rich diversity of painted media in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal, from 5th-century murals to contemporary canvases that travel the world. We will locate the works in their physical, ritual, and intellectual contexts. We will explore how the familiar categories with which we describe painting, such as Landscape, Portraiture, Narrative, and even Modern, might be productively reassessed in light of South Asian aesthetic traditions by locating the works in their physical, ritual, and intellectual contexts. The course culminates in the contested spaces of contemporary art, where questions of politics, identity, and intention come to the fore. Although mainly focusing on the painting traditions of India, the course will include painting from Pakistan, the Himalayas, Sri Lanka, and the South Asian diaspora. The humanities sharpen our ability to develop critical questions and to judge why and how one answer or interpretation may be stronger than another. Humanistic thinking is developed in dialogue; it emerges between individuals in conversation with each other and with their objects of study. This course asks you to boldly bring your curiosity, convictions, and blind-spots to our collective conversation, close reading, and individual writing. The course consists of two weekly meetings, and one or two trips to nearby museums or galleries.
ARTH 5778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3778/ArtH 5778
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course surveys the rich diversity of painted media in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal, from 5th-century murals to contemporary canvases that travel the world. We will locate the works in their physical, ritual, and intellectual contexts. We will explore how the familiar categories with which we describe painting, such as Landscape, Portraiture, Narrative, and even Modern, might be productively reassessed in light of South Asian aesthetic traditions by locating the works in their physical, ritual, and intellectual contexts. The course culminates in the contested spaces of contemporary art, where questions of politics, identity, and intention come to the fore. Although mainly focusing on the painting traditions of India, the course will include painting from Pakistan, the Himalayas, Sri Lanka, and the South Asian diaspora. The humanities sharpen our ability to develop critical questions and to judge why and how one answer or interpretation may be stronger than another. Humanistic thinking is developed in dialogue; it emerges between individuals in conversation with each other and with their objects of study. This course asks you to boldly bring your curiosity, convictions, and blind-spots to our collective conversation, close reading, and individual writing. The course consists of two weekly meetings, and one or two trips to nearby museums or galleries.
ARTH 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.
CNES 5787 - Visual Cultures in Contact: Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient and Early Medieval Worlds
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 5787/CNES 5787
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evaluate critical perspectives from variety of interdisciplinary conversations. Framework for studying cross-cultural interaction among ancient visual cultures that integrates practical, cognitive, object oriented approaches. Cross-continental movement/selective appropriation of objects/motifs.