Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Physical Activity and Health Promotion B.S.

Kinesiology, School of
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 56
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Physical Activity and Health Promotion is an area of study that explores how individuals and families can increase physical activity and improve healthy lifestyles to help prevent disease and/or the progression of chronic disease. Health Promotion professionals are trained to collect and analyze data to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate programs designed to encourage physical activity and healthy lifestyles. Graduates will have the knowledge and skills to utilize scientific findings to understand the effect of physical activity and healthy lifestyles on improving physical and mental health. Examples of careers related to this major include health coaching, worksite wellness, personal fitness training, and other health promotion related fields.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 30 credits before admission to the program.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Psychology
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Biology Course with Lab
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1012 - Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues [BIOL, CIV] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1015 - Human Physiology, Technology, and Medical Devices [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
or FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Chemistry Course
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Introduction to Kinesiology
KIN 1871 - Survey of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
First Year Experience
All incoming CEHD Freshmen must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525.
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EDHD 1525V - CEHD First Year Experience [WI] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
To be eligible to apply to the major, students must have at least 30 credits completed or in progress and have completed one course from 3 of the 4 prerequisite course categories. Students must complete 30 credits before admission to the program. A GPA above 2.0 is required. All incoming CEHD Freshman must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525W. For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website. At least 21 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.
Core Requirements
Students must take at least 3 credits of KIN 3696: Supervised Practical Experience.
Take 10 or more course(s) from the following:
· KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 3027 - Human Anatomy for Kinesiology, Physical Activity, and Health Promotion (4.0 cr)
· KIN 3385 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· KIN 3982 - Research Methods in Kinesiology, Physical Activity, Health Promotion + Sport (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4214 - Health Promotion (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4385 - Exercise Physiology (4.0 cr)
· KIN 3696 - Supervised Practical Experience (1.0-10.0 cr)
· EPSY 3801 - The Science of Human Resilience and Wellbeing: Foundational Knowledge for Career and Life Success [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· Applied Nutrition or similar
· KIN 5142 - Applied Nutrition for Sport Performance and Optimal Health (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition [TS] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Sport in a Diverse Society or Similar
· SMGT 3501 - Sport in a Diverse Society [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SMGT 3501H - Sport in a Diverse Society: Honors [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Physical Activity Course Requirement
Take 3 credits of physical activity coursework.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming (1.0 cr)
· PE 1012 - Beginning Running (1.0 cr)
· PE 1014 - Conditioning (1.0 cr)
· PE 1015 - Weight Training (1.0 cr)
· PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise (1.0 cr)
· PE 1029 - Handball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1032 - Badminton (1.0 cr)
· PE 1033 - Foil Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1034 - Judo (1.0 cr)
· PE 1035 - Karate (1.0 cr)
· PE 1036 - Racquetball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1037 - Squash Racquets (1.0 cr)
· PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis (1.0 cr)
· PE 1044 - Self-Defense (1.0 cr)
· PE 1045 - Rock Climbing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do (1.0 cr)
· PE 1048 - Bowling (1.0 cr)
· PE 1053 - Ice Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1055 - Golf (1.0 cr)
· PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1058 - Snowboarding (1.0 cr)
· PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics (1.0 cr)
· PE 1067 - Basketball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket (1.0 cr)
· PE 1072 - Soccer (1.0 cr)
· PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1076 - Flag Football (1.0 cr)
· PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash (1.0 cr)
· PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving (1.0 cr)
· PE 1262 - Marathon Training (3.0 cr)
· PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education (1.0-3.0 cr)
· DNCE 1331 - Yoga (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1335 - T'ai Chi Ch'uan (1.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· KIN 3131W - History and Philosophy of Sport [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Writing in the Workplace or similar
· OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
or YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Focus Electives
Students must take 6 credits of Focus Electives, at least 3 of which must be from the identified list below. Students can take an additional 3 credits from the identified list below or work with their Physical Activity and Health Promotion advisor to identify other courses to be used towards the remaining credits of required Focus Electives.
Course List 0
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· KIN 3993 - Directed Study in Kinesiology (1.0-10.0 cr)
· KIN 4001H - Honors Seminar in KIN, PAHP, + SMGT (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4641 - Training Theory & Analytics I for Exercise & Sport Performance (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5123 - Motivational Interventions in Physical Activity (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5125 - Advances in Physical Activity and Health (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5141 - Nutrition and Exercise for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3.0 cr)
· KIN 5202 - Current Issues in Health (2.0 cr)
· KIN 5203 - Health Media, Consumerism, and Communication (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5121 - Planetary Health & Global Climate Change: A Whole Systems Healing Approach (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5706 - Lifestyle Medicine (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5431 - Functional Nutrition: An Expanded View of Nutrition, Chronic Disease, and Optimal Health (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5708 - Mind-Body Science and the Art of Transformation (1.0 cr)
· CSPH 5713 - Health Coaching for Health Professionals (2.0 cr)
· FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health (2.0 cr)
· YOST 4323 - Work with Youth: Groups (2.0 cr)
· Presentations at Work or similar
· FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
 
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PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology. prereq: Honors
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course introduces students to applied psychology as a discipline and reviews fundamental principles of psychology through the lenses of applied and professional areas that are the foci of CEHD majors. Specifically, through the lenses of education, we review principles of learning, memory, development, intelligence, and interventions; through the lenses of health and wellness, we review personality, biological, social, and cognitive bases of normal and abnormal behavior, as well as treatments; and, through the lenses of business and organizations, we review principles of motivation, sensation perception, and social behavior. Thus, these psychological principles are considered theoretically, empirically, and through examples for application, with lab discussions and projects emphasizing education, business, health and wellness. The course serves as a foundation for future coursework in education, health sciences, and psychology, and is consistent with the APA’s public education effort to demonstrate how the science and application of psychology benefits society and improves lives.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1012 - Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues (BIOL, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1010/Biol 1015/PSTL 1135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
One semester exploration of human anatomy and physiology within the context of ethics; topics such as human genetic diversity, organs and tissues, disease and reproduction. Weekly policy debates. Active learning format. Animal dissections required. Suitable for students in any major. Does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs. This course explores several interdisciplinary questions, each of which addresses biology through an ethical and societal lens. In ?What makes humans unique?? we will consider the evolution of human traits, how the concept of race relates to human genetic diversity, and the fallibility of human memories. In ?How does blood and organ donation work?? we will examine how our bodies can recognize and respond to foreign materials, how vaccines work, and who should have access to life saving tissue and organ transplants. In ?How do stress, diet and exercise affect health?? we will consider disparities in access to adequate nutrition, exposure to stress, and exercise, and how these affect our bodies and our mental health. Lastly, in ?How does a unique individual develop from a single cell? we will examine how a single cell develops into a fully functional human being, and how similar processes lead to cancer. We will also consider the role of genes and hormones in human reproduction and the development of reproductive structures in embryos, while explicitly addressing the ethics of the distinctions between the concepts of sex characteristics, sex assigned at birth, and gender. We will learn how a cell can become cancerous, as well as how a cell develops into a fully functioning human being. Additionally, we will consider the role of hormones in the development of male, female, and intersex organs, while being explicit about the differences between gender, sexual orientation, and sex assigned at birth. In lecture, instructors and teaching assistants will support students as they evaluate data and work through concepts in teams. Students will also dedicate significant time to the consideration of ethical questions in human biology, and work with teammates to organize and present a position on a policy related to an ethics question. In lab, students will further explore human anatomy and physiology, connecting structure and function through several dissections and activities. Students will read and share scientific papers, make observations, design experiments and analyze data. Students will work in teams to complete a multi-week project on the physiology of stress. We will continue our exploration of ethics topics in lab, where we will discuss and apply ethics in human subjects research and research on non-human animals. About ? of the course grade will be based on four traditional lecture exams and a final lab exam. The remainder of the course grade is comprised of open notes quizzes, in class team assignments, individual assignments, and team projects. Course grading is based on mastery of concepts and skills, and students are encouraged to collaborate in understanding course material.
BIOL 1015 - Human Physiology, Technology, and Medical Devices (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1010/PSTL 1135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Course is organized around homeostasis, information flow, and other concepts in physiology. For non-biology majors who wish to explore interests in health care or medical device engineering. Active learning format. Labs focus on data collection and simple organ dissections. Does not fulfill prerequisites for most biomedical graduate programs.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS honors students
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
KIN 1871 - Survey of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Professional practice and disciplinary dimensions of kinesiology, recreation, and sport. Subdisciplines, relevant issues, practical applications.
EDHD 1525W - CEHD First Year Experience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing.
EDHD 1525V - CEHD First Year Experience (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing. prereq: CEHD student, honors, 1st-term fr
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of health/wellness. Physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, and financial health. Influence of societal changes on general health/wellness of diverse populations.
KIN 3027 - Human Anatomy for Kinesiology, Physical Activity, and Health Promotion
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Kinesiology 3027 is a 4-credit introduction to human anatomy with two 50-min lectures and one 100-min lab per week. Upon completing this course, students will be able to use proper anatomical terminology and identify the majority of the human anatomical structures and their functions. The lecture series is organized around an organ systems approach and currently follows the text of Human Anatomy. The lectures are divided into basic anatomy and human development principles and the major anatomical systems: skin, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, neurological, endocrine, immune, and digestive. Each section proceeds an anatomic description from the microscopic or cellular level to the key features of tissues that aggregate into organ anatomy (bottom up). The kinetic anatomy perspective describes organ systems' dynamic and functional characteristics based on their component organ anatomy and interactions (top-down). The context for course material covered will reflect a kinesiology focus on human movement in exercise and sports. This will better prepare students for graduate school courses in the health sciences, movement sciences, and Athletic Training. In addition, students will be encouraged to learn their anatomy as a health and preventive medicine skill. The laboratory component is divided into two; one identifies cells, tissues, and bones and the different bone parts. These activities are performed in the Human Performance Teaching Laboratory (HPTL) in Mariucci Arena 141. Laboratory activities include using light microscopes to identify cells and tissues and working with individual bones and intact skeletons. The second component is the cadaver lab at the Anatomy Bequest Program. Students will have the opportunity to visualize and identify anatomical structures in cadavers and cadavers specimens during these labs. The cadaver labs provide students with the three-dimensional organization of the human anatomy and the association with neighboring anatomical structures. The instructors will demonstrate the functional anatomical aspects and clinical anatomical correlations. Students are able to further complement their understanding of human anatomy by using anatomy and physiology virtual labs.
KIN 3385 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This four-credit course is divided into two weekly 75-minute lectures and one 60 minute lab session once per week. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to describe the function of the different organs and systems in the body, explain the biophysical mechanisms and describe the interactions and feedback processes to achieve a steady-state. This course provides the biological principles for how the body works, from the function of intracellular organelles to the interactions between systems and the role of each organ. It explains the relationship between structure and function and describes the development of diseases when the physiological systems become impaired. This course in human physiology builds on knowledge obtained using the basic sciences of math, chemistry, and physics. Thus, understanding some of these sciences' basic principles is essential to fully understanding the physiological principles during this course. The lab component of this course takes place at the Human Performance Teaching Laboratory (HPTL). Lab activities are an interactive component of the course. During labs, students will perform a series of experiments, record data, and will provide a physiological interpretation for the results. The combination of lecture material and laboratory experience will allow students to understand disease mechanisms, comprehend the strategies to prevent and treat the most frequent medical conditions, and live a healthy life. The instructor's goal is not just to teach the most up-to-date knowledge on human physiology but also to arouse your curiosity so you continue learning beyond this course. prereq: [[Kin 3027 or Anat 3001 or Anat 3601 or Anat 3611], Kin or Physical Activity and Health Promotion Major] or instr consent
KIN 3982 - Research Methods in Kinesiology, Physical Activity, Health Promotion + Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to prepare students to read, understand, interpret, evaluate, and critique research with a specific emphasis on research in the kinesiology discipline and relevance of research methods in students' everyday lives. The course will cover reviewing research articles and their relation to study design and methods. Other topics include ethical considerations in research, quantitative and qualitative design, sampling, measurement validity and reliability and basic statistics for analyzing research questions. Students will write a literature review on a topic of interest and design a research study. Prerequisites: Kinesiology Major or Physical Activity and Health Promotion Major or Sport Management Major
KIN 4214 - Health Promotion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the professional and academic field of health promotion and is designed to give students a working knowledge of health promotion concepts and methods and their application to health and health behaviors. Special emphasis will be placed on the philosophical and theoretical foundations of health promotion, specific theories of health promotion, and select health habits and the individual and environmental forces related to these behaviors. Students will also establish a foundation for developing health promotion programs for disease prevention and will focus on the process involved in developing and evaluating health promotion programs. Examples of prevention programs will be presented and evaluated including various aspects of physical activity (i.e., intrapersonal, interpersonal, community, environmental). Topics in the course focus not only on evidence-based strategies but also on key approaches to program development, implementation, and evaluation. This course is designed for declared Kinesiology B.S. and Health and Wellness Promotion Minor students in their third or fourth year of study.
KIN 4385 - Exercise Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Information and learning experiences presented in this class will cover specific areas within the discipline of Exercise Physiology. This course is designed for the advanced undergraduate student in Kinesiology, as well as advanced students in such complementary areas as public health, nutrition, physiology, biology, biochemistry, or any sport? related areas. It creates a great opportunity to combine the science of biological, biochemistry, physics and physiology with the study of health, fitness, wellness, human performance, and sport. Emphasis is placed on basic human physiological systems and the responses of those systems to the challenge of physical activity: from moderate to extreme intensities. The biochemical bases of these responses will be presented. Historical, psychological, sociological, and philosophical implications of these topics will be integrated into many of the lecture/discussions. In addition to lecture information, students will be provided a "hands on", small group laboratory experience that is carefully orchestrated to track lecture material and presentations. prereq: KIN 3385 or PHSL 3051 and Kinesiology Major or Physical Activity and Health Promotion Major
KIN 3696 - Supervised Practical Experience
Credits: 1.0 -10.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
On-the-job supervised practical experience in the fields of sport and exercise under a specialist in a particular area of study or emphasis. prereq: instr consent
EPSY 3801 - The Science of Human Resilience and Wellbeing: Foundational Knowledge for Career and Life Success (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is for any undergraduate student interested in learning about and applying the theory and practice as it relates to resilience and wellbeing. This course integrates key cross-cutting, scientific findings from a range of psychological disciplines, including positive psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, neuropsychology, and social psychology. Stated simply, resilience refers to the human capacity and ability to both survive and thrive in the face of life circumstances. Students will develop a deep understanding of the theoretical concepts of stress, resilience, and wellbeing, as well as specific resilience practices scientific research has shown enable people to better manage and bounce back from stressful situations and enhance their social, emotional, and behavioral functioning in career and personal aspects of life.
KIN 5142 - Applied Nutrition for Sport Performance and Optimal Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for students interested in nutrition as it relates to health, exercise and athletic training. Evidenced based information is used to apply current nutrition concepts to improve health, physical and athletic performance. Case studies as well as personal data are employed throughout course to support concepts of lecture.
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, and food sources. We will learn about evaluating nutrition information and food safety, and investigate the role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment. Nutrition is both a science and social science. This class involves social aspects, but mainly concerns the biochemistry and physiology of how food is processed in the body. The chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism especially built on biology and physiology. Course topics include: 1. essential nutrients (macro-and-micro-nutrients) needed from the diet; 2. major functions of nutrients and physiological changes with deficiency or excess; 3. digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; 4. weight management; 5. scientific method and nutrition; 6. life cycle issues; 7. food safety issues 8. nutrition for sports Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
FSCN 3612 focuses on nutritional requirements and common issues during different stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adulthood, and aging. There are no required courses for this class; however, it is best to take a basic nutrition class beforehand, such as FSCN 1112 Principles of Nutrition or an equivalent.
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
SMGT 3501 - Sport in a Diverse Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Relationship between sport and contemporary social institutions. Groups/individuals who have historically been marginalized or excluded from sport participation. Race, sex, social class, sexual orientation, physical (dis)abilities.
SMGT 3501H - Sport in a Diverse Society: Honors (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Pervasive and significant relationships between social constructions of sport and physical activity to contemporary social institutions such as politics, religion, economics, education, and mass media. Social issues related to sport. How specific social categories (e.g., age, gender, race, social class) intersect to influence participation/experiences of individuals within sport/physical activity contexts. prereq: Honors student
PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic aquatic safety, fundamentals of swimming and hydrodynamics. Principles of hydrodynamics and stroke mechanics; five basic strokes; basic rescue techniques with use of pool equipment; hydrotherapy for disabilities and other conditions, opportunities for competitive activities, lifetime enjoyment of aquatics.
PE 1012 - Beginning Running
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This physically active class will expose students to the joys of running. Course topics and physical activities will explore technique, equipment, safety, etiquette, injury prevention, full-body conditioning, endurance, mobility, strength, and long-term training and goal setting. This course is designed for novices who aspire to run 5K.
PE 1014 - Conditioning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of personal fitness. Principles of fitness; health and motor skill components of fitness; principles of training/conditioning programs; nutrition; weight control; common fitness injuries; motivation and consistency in fitness programs; stress management.
PE 1015 - Weight Training
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to weight training. Basic aspects of weight training including exercise selection and technique, charting workouts, program design, nutritional considerations, and safety.
PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Good posture techniques, individual exercises, fitness concepts, and mental techniques. Specific overall sound body and mind techniques to include flexibility exercises, cardiovascular fitness, resistance training, nutrition management, weight control, stress management, and self-thought.
PE 1029 - Handball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hand and eye coordination, footwork in practice and game conditions, and skills and strategies of service and rally for the court sport handball (four-wall version). Novice to intermediate levels of play accommodated.
PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic sabre techniques, movement, an overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1032 - Badminton
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals including etiquette, terminology, game rules for singles and doubles, footwork, shot selection, and strategy.
PE 1033 - Foil Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fending fundamentals, including basic foil techniques, movement, a general overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1034 - Judo
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills for throwing, falling, grappling (matwork), choking, arm and neck techniques; contest judo from Jiu-Jitsu; fundamental rules and scoring of contests. Videotapes used for technique instruction and contest appreciation.
PE 1035 - Karate
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Traditional Japanese Shotokan Karate. Students learn to punch, block, strike, & kick with a focus on proper form, posture, & body mechanics. Students also learn a Kata (choreographed form), techniques with partners, & practical self-defense. Non-contact - no pads, hitting, or throwing.
PE 1036 - Racquetball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of racquetball, including equipment; safety and etiquette; terminology; game rules of singles, doubles, and cutthroat; grips; basic strategies; serves and shots.
PE 1037 - Squash Racquets
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Entry-level technique, basic equipment, international dimension courts, and fitness.
PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental strokes, including forehands, backhands, volleys, lobs, overheads, and serves; introduction to doubles play; terminology, rules, and etiquette.
PE 1044 - Self-Defense
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical, psychological, and de-escalation skills for acting in crisis situations. Distance, body language, and tone of voice are addressed. Physical skills include striking, kicking, shifting, blocking, releasing techniques, floor defenses, and applications to armed attackers and multiple attackers.
PE 1045 - Rock Climbing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Safety, knots, equipment, techniques, and anchor systems used in climbing. Course includes all necessary equipment. prereq: Good general health, no [neck or back] problems
PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Tae Kwon Do. Principles of martial arts, body mechanics of Tae Kwon Do, practical self-defense.
PE 1048 - Bowling
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals, including stance, approach and delivery, scoring, bowling terminology, and etiquette.
PE 1053 - Ice Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic turns, basic stops, balance techniques, and various other skills from both the forward and backward positions. Equipment, safety issues, ice skating terminology.
PE 1055 - Golf
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proper grip, stance, ball address, swing, club selection, psychological management, rules, and etiquette. Basic instruction in analyzing, assisting with, and coaching golf.
PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine skiing. How to stop, turn, and use lifts. Safety, etiquette, and purchase of equipment. Class held at Highland Hills ski area in Bloomington.
PE 1058 - Snowboarding
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Snowboarding is an exciting winter sport that is engaging and approachable to the true novice, which this course is designed for. This course is a beginning level, physically active course designed for students of all abilities. Students will develop a working knowledge of the etiquette, sportspersonship, rules, safety concerns, safe/healthy techniques, sports culture, and regulations of the international winter sport of Snowboarding. Physical literacy will be developed through in-class activities and drills that support the development of techniques and agilities in relation to the sport that students will be able to utilize in multiple environments that benefit the healthy development of the whole person. The pursuit of this lifelong activity is the ultimate goal, so students will have out-of-the-classroom opportunities to engage in this sport culture. This will expose students to the exciting local, national, and international competitive and basic engagement opportunities for individuals interested in this physical activity. This course is ideal for students interested in learning more about a growing and inclusive physical activity and a unique way to encourage a physically active lifestyle. This course takes place off-campus at an area ski hill so students need to make arrangements for their own transportation. Snowboarding equipment is available to rent at the facility for those who need it. Cold weather gear will be essential as class will take place as long as the ski hill is open.
PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Rolls, handstands, cartwheels, extensions, handsprings, tucks (flips). Spotting techniques. Skills on bars, vault, and beam.
PE 1067 - Basketball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental skills and rules of basketball, with emphasis on basic court movement and different offensive and defensive strategies.
PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Cricket. Laws of Cricket, bowling/batting techniques, competitive/recreational Cricket opportunities.
PE 1072 - Soccer
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of soccer including sporting behavior both on and off the field, game rules, soccer terminology, participation and competition drills, fundamental soccer skills, practical instruction in strategy.
PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills, team play, rules, officiating, and strategy.
PE 1076 - Flag Football
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to flag football, techniques, field positions, rules/regulations. Students will participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, kicking, and catching.
PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Stroke mechanics, shot placement, changing pace. Court movement/positioning. Fitness requirements, joint/muscle stresses. Weight training for squash. On-court etiquette. prereq: 1037 or instr consent
PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diving equipment, physics, physiology, decompression, emergencies, recreational dive planning, oceans, currents and aquatic life, snorkeling/SCUBA equipment usage, buoyancy control, entries, emergencies. prereq: Ability to swim 400 yds comfortably or instr consent
PE 1262 - Marathon Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Physical challenge achieved through physiological/psychological adaptation. Goal setting that fosters adaptation in many facets of life. Marathon history. prereq: No pre-existing medical condition that would prevent finishing a marathon, instr consent
PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Activities or related opportunities not normally available through regular course offerings.
DNCE 1331 - Yoga
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theory/practice of Yoga. Standing postures, forward bends, twists, balancing, seated postures, inversions, back bends, guided relaxation/meditation. Proper alignment, weight placement, body awareness, relaxation, breathing techniques. Midterm paper, movement demonstration final.
DNCE 1335 - T'ai Chi Ch'uan
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Ancient Chinese slow-motion exercise. Helping body/mind to become relaxed/centered. Natural movement patterns, deep breathing, tranquil stress-free mind. Self-defense applications of movements. Non-competitive, non-aggressive.
KIN 3131W - History and Philosophy of Sport (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory description and interpretation of the historical and philosophical development of physical education and sport from primitive societies to 20th century civilization. prereq: Kin major or instr consent
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Demands on today's managers, with a focus on small to medium-sized organizations. Techniques/ideas beyond traditional studies. Applying management theory at all levels. Managing in a global workplace. Organizational planning and decision making. Organizing resources. Leading/motivating people. Controlling/evaluating organizational activities. This writing intensive designated course will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to this discipline because clear, accurate, and professional communication is essential to organization management. The ability to write effectively in terms of specified audiences ensures, in the professional world, successful communication between team members as well as the success of the projects, companies, and employees they represent. prereq: 45 semester credits recommended
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 3325W/V/YoSt 3325W/V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Designed for those CEHD learners who seek to fulfill the upper level writing intensive requirement in a way that is relevant to their major and field of study, this course will support you as you manage a larger writing project. Learners in this course will form a community of writers, as each grapples with the challenges of a major project focusing on a meaningful problem or issue in your field of study. Some of the most important and most challenging work you face as you near graduation in your major is the work of bringing your academic training to bear on current issues in your field of study. By focusing on project-based writing, this course supports undergraduate learners in the endeavor to delve into and contribute to the work being done in your field to address a particular problem. You will propose a project, identify an audience, tailor your work to address your audience?s needs, gather relevant information through primary and secondary research, and create a product that engages others and furthers the real-world work of solving problems. Collaborative activities and assignments will support you through the process. The course structure is flexible and designed to be responsive to individual needs and a variety of disciplinary contexts, so that students can receive feedback and guidance during different stages of capstone or thesis writing, or community engagement projects. Thus, you can anticipate that the majority of the work will focus on a project that you will propose based on your interests, needs, or connections to your writing work in your major. Course goals are to develop a writing process, understand the habits of writings, work through a larger research project, develop skill in the APA format, learn to use the University libraries, consider audience needs. In class work include: peer review, active learning activities designed around writing skill development, discussion, lecture, and presentation. Learners are expected to actively engage in the course material, participate in class and give and receive feedback about writing. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major, or instr consent
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3029W/Writ 3029W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course students practice writing and revising common business documents for today?s business world. Students write memos, proposals, cover letters, resumes, and digital and web content as well as practice choice of appropriate formats and media. The course draws from current business practices and stresses workplace collaboration, broader issues of professional literacy, and responsive writing styles. Students practice rhetorical analysis and discuss concepts such as audience, purpose, tone, and context when writing and revising their documents. Students analyze and write from a variety of perspectives and contexts including formal (researched reports, proposals) and informal (email, social media) communication. Students also build a professional online presence through such platforms as LinkedIn.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to technical and professional writing through various readings and assignments in which students analyze and create texts that work to communicate complex information, solve problems, and complete tasks. Students gain knowledge of workplace genres as well as to develop skills in composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing genres such as memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations. Students work in teams to develop collaborative content and to compose in a variety of modes including text, graphics, video, audio, and digital. Students also conduct both primary and secondary research and practice usability testing. The course emphasizes creating documents that are goal-driven and appropriate for a specific context and audience. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.
KIN 3993 - Directed Study in Kinesiology
Credits: 1.0 -10.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students have the opportunity to earn credit while working in a lab or field research setting to carry out scholarly or creative activities while under the guidance of kinesiology faculty members. Students can assist with faculty scholarship or carry out projects of their own. To earn credit in this course, students must talk with the faculty member and then fill out a Directed Activity Contract (z.umn.edu/Directed_Activity) online. This contract is an agreement between the student and faculty member and should establish expectations, credits, and the grading basis for the work.
KIN 4001H - Honors Seminar in KIN, PAHP, + SMGT
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will learn how to critically review research articles and how to write a thesis literature review, methods, results, and discussion section. Students will choose to write a systematic literature review or conduct a research study under the guidance of their adviser. Students will write and provide peer reviews for the thesis literature reviews and methods sections. Instruction regarding writing a results and discussion section will be provided. Students are encouraged to register for this course the semester before their expected graduation term. Prerequisites: Honors student and Kinesiology major, PAHP major, or SMGT major
KIN 4641 - Training Theory & Analytics I for Exercise & Sport Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course prepares students to understand and systematically design training & conditioning programs for health and/or performance. The course addresses general training principles, such as periodization, adaptation, accommodation, specificity, and overload, and explores how an understanding of the 3 energy systems responsible for producing energy for exercise (the aerobic, anaerobic glycolytic, and ATP-PCr systems) can be applied to training and conditioning. Additional topics include the muscular and neuromuscular systems, physiological, and performance adaptations, repeated sprint ability, energy system interaction, measurement and evaluation of fitness, and strategies for maximizing adaptation to training. Students will gain an understanding of physiological adaptations and apply them to improving health and performance in sport and physical fitness. Enforced Prerequisite: Enrolled in Kinesiology Major, Physical Activity and Health Promotion Major, Sports Coaching Minor, Physical Activity and Promotion Minor, Sport and Exercise Science M.Ed, Physical Activity and Health M.Ed, or Integrated Degree Program
KIN 5123 - Motivational Interventions in Physical Activity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course prepares students to critically evaluate theory, motivational interventions, and psychological principles related to physical activity. Environmental and policy influences on physical activity behavior and intervention components, design, and evaluation will be discussed. The influence of physical activity on mental health, self-perceptions, stress, anxiety, depression, emotional well-being, cognitive function, and health-related quality of life will be reviewed. This course will help students to better understand and modify exercise behavior and review the most commonly studied psychosocial influences and consequences of physical activity. This class integrates theoretical principles and the latest research with intervention strategies that students can apply in real-world settings.
KIN 5125 - Advances in Physical Activity and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course exposes students with accurate and up-to-date information regarding physical activity as it relates to health in the United States. It is intended to enhance students? ability to identify important issues pertinent to physical activity and health, as well as develop and maintain a physically active lifestyle.
KIN 5141 - Nutrition and Exercise for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Requirements/physiologic roles of nutrients/physical activity in promotion of health. Assessment of energy requirements. RDAs, food composition/safety, weight management. Prevention of chronic diseases. Coronary heart disease. prereq: FScN 1112 or equiv
KIN 5202 - Current Issues in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Critical thinking for health issues in research/media. Issues specific to conflict, stress, public policy, and communication. Projects, debates.
KIN 5203 - Health Media, Consumerism, and Communication
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of media, consumerism, technology, and health related issues. Students form/defend opinions on positive/negative aspects of how health information is disseminated and how individual health decisions are made.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is your opportunity to examine, challenge and critically reflect upon your thinking about health. The class meets in a hybrid model that includes in-person, field-trip ?micro-immersion experience? to explore different understandings of health through visits to cultural communities. We include with field trips virtual experiential glimpses into fundamentally different systems of knowledge often conflicting with the scientific/professional models emphasized in many professional fields on campus. Frameworks for critical thinking, critical self-reflection, cultural self-study, intellectual virtues and supplemental readings are offered to support your effort to step into culturally different knowledge systems and mental models of health and well-being. These frames and approaches offer you a mirror through which your own perspective, thinking and background assumptions of health become more visible and explicit. I ask you to challenge your own thinking and better recognize the culture you carry in your thinking as you attempt to inhabit different cognitive worlds. You will also apply this examination to the professional fields of your interest, sharing your insights with learners in other professions. In this way, we bring together interdisciplinary and intercultural learning. On the dates that we meet virtually, our goal is to create a space that encourages us to share with sincerity our thoughts and emerging insights with one another in Zoom conversations. The synchronous Zoom sessions allow you to benefit from each other?s personal and professional take on the immersion experiences as you develop your philosophy, narrative and understanding of health. prereq: jr, sr, grad, or instr consent
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
CSPH 5121 - Planetary Health & Global Climate Change: A Whole Systems Healing Approach
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Our personal health, along with the health of the human social systems we inhabit, are inextricably entwined with the wellbeing of local and global environmental systems. Living systems (including social, biological, and environmental) are complex adaptive systems that are self-organizing and give rise to emergent properties within a wider ?ecosystemic? context. To effect beneficial and sustainable changes within such systems, leaders must apply (and embody) ecosystemic principles. This course will help students learn how to understand?and to effect sustainable change in?the complex systems in their lives: personal, social, and environmental. Students will explore and develop leadership strategies and skills, using complexity theory as a theoretical framework. We are facing a multifaceted global/planetary crisis. The evidence is clear that Global Climate Change is primarily driven by human behaviors. Drawing upon the new science of Complex Systems, it is also evident that human social systems (economic, political, and cultural) are impelling us towards a planetary ?bifurcation point.? Our only hope to avoid multiple systems collapse is to make deep changes in these systems. Rigid, top-down approaches based on linear and mechanistic paradigms are ill-suited to transformative leadership, which facilitates an open-ended process of organic change. This course helps students develop transformative leadership capacities that are applicable within all types of organizations, within a wide variety of roles and positions. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student, or instructor consent
CSPH 5706 - Lifestyle Medicine
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course provides a foundation in the theory and clinical application of lifestyle medicine. Lifestyle medicine aims to address the behavioral and lifestyle bases of common illnesses through health promoting activities and reducing harmful behaviors. In this course, we will explore optimal nutrition, lifestyle, physical activity, and attitude. We will examine the emerging evidence base of lifestyle medicine and how it relates to health promotion and disease prevention. Participants will be introduced to common laboratory and imaging findings, and how they relate to optimal health. prereq: jr or sr or grad, or inst consent
CSPH 5431 - Functional Nutrition: An Expanded View of Nutrition, Chronic Disease, and Optimal Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will present a novel approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to optimal health and the prevention, control or intervention in a disease process. This is a model of nutrition application that complements and expands beyond normal growth and development, an approach that attempts to reduce chronic disease by looking for underlying factors or triggers of disease. This model of nutrition considers system dysfunction a pre-disease state and looks for ways to apply nutrition and restore function. The purpose of the course is to provide an overview of this novel application of nutrition. The course will emphasize the importance of nutrition as a component of self-care. prereq: [Jr or sr or grad student] in Health Sciences or instr consent
CSPH 5708 - Mind-Body Science and the Art of Transformation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Modern technology has provided deeper insight into how our minds and bodies change based on our focus, intentions, cell environment, habits, stress, and behaviors. We will investigate these new perspectives and how to apply them through transformative practices to change our thoughts, beliefs, bodies, emotions, and paradigms to create sustainable shifts towards optimal health, wellness, and living. Prereq: Jr or Sr or Grad; or instructor consent
CSPH 5713 - Health Coaching for Health Professionals
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will explore the basic tenets of 4 Pillars of Health Coaching model--self-awareness, mindful presence, authentic communication, and safe/sacred space. Students will learn to identify/benchmark stages/patterns of change, respectfully collaborate with interdisciplinary health care providers and facilitate clients? ability to achieve sustainable lifestyle changes. Consistent, nonjudgmental application of a holistic perspective of optimal health and wellbeing in patient encounters will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will have the opportunity to see demonstrated and to practice applying tools and practices from motivational interviewing, appreciative inquiry, non-violent communication, and other authentic communication tools. Interprofessional dialogues and exercises will be guaranteed through targeted participation of second year Health Coaching students, who are not taking this course for credit but are volunteering to increase the interprofessional understanding of coaching and team work. This course is not considered preparatory for becoming a professional health coach and does not meet educational hour requirements toward eligibility for the National Board of Health and Wellness Coaching exam, or for Continuing Education hours for NBHWC recertification. Prereq: Admitted to the Doctor of Nursing Practice-Integrative Health and Healing specialty; Admitted to other Doctor of Nursing Practice specialties; Graduate or professional students in health sciences programs; Practicing health professionals; or instructor consent.
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the impact of “immigration” (i.e., refugee vs. various types of immigration statuses) on family relationships, specifically how culture of origin and acculturation processes influence individuals and families over time; explores issues faced by various immigrant family systems, including a consideration of generational status, gender identities, social classes, and ethnic/racial group identities; develops intercultural interaction skills that prepare students to effectively engage with diverse immigrant families in multiple contexts; and builds practical skills that enhance students’ abilities to work in and collaborate with community-and faith-based organizations to strengthen cultural resources while overcoming barriers to increase service utilization.
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3001/PubH 3003/PubH 3004/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3001/PubH 3004/PubH 3005
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of health conservation and disease prevention.
YOST 4323 - Work with Youth: Groups
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: YoSt 4323/YoSt 5323
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Humans are social creatures. Throughout the evolution of the human species, the ?group? has been instrumental in survival and the transmission of culture between generations. It is generally accepted that the ?group? is a key building block of the human experience and it has been argued that the ?individual? only knows itself in relation to the ?group?. Because of its fundamental nature in human existence, the group has been a popular topic of study. Until recently, attempts to chronicle the phenomena of groups have been hampered by a ?reductionistic? framework. This attempt to reduce complex phenomena into small measurable parts to be studied has inhibited the ability to capture the ?systemic? nature of groups. The power of the group is the dynamic interaction and interrelation of its component parts. Advances in general systems and chaos theory have increased our ability to fully grasp the essence of a group. There is a difference between group process and group work. Group processes are naturally occurring phenomena present when a collection of individuals form around a purpose. Group work is the purposeful and intentional effort on the part of a practitioner to use group process to achieve a goal. This demands that the practitioner develop a working understanding of group process and develop the skills to effect group functioning. Numerous group work models have been developed to describe group process and subsequently prescribe the role of the practitioner as facilitator. Although group work?s heritage is tied to the field of Social Work, the preponderance of these models are based upon a therapeutic framework. Currently, the field of Youth Development is utilizing a solution-oriented participant centered perspective. This perspective is more in line with the early understanding of group work and is proving to be effective in helping youth develop the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to be successful. There are a number of challenges for the practitioner serious about developing their group work ability when working with youth: 1. Whereas developing an understanding of group process may be obtained in a classroom setting, facilitation skills are best learned and honed through experience in real life settings. Group work is both a science and an art. 2. Not only must a practitioner develop a working understanding of groups, they must also have a working understanding of individuals because of the dynamic interplay between individual needs and group phenomena. 3. The developmental needs of youth dictate that the practitioner's role in working with groups of youth is different than if they were working with adults. 4. It is virtually impossible to be objective in working with people: a practitioner's own "life history" acts as a lens and filter that influences their interpretation of and strategies for interacting with the group. This is especially true in youth work where the practitioner, through interaction with youth, is confronted with their own adolescence. prereq: [1001, 4321 or 4322] or instr consent
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 1461/OLPD 1461
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course prepares students to present information and adjust their messages based on audience need in a variety of future work contexts. Students interested in majoring in Family Social Science, Education, Youth Studies, and Kinesiology will take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in counseling, community-based organizations, education, and health sciences to convey important, and often sensitive, material to specific audiences.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation. prereq: Honors