Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Forest and Natural Resource Management B.S.

Forest Resources
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 83 to 91
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The forest and natural resource management curriculum prepares students to plan, implement, and research the management, protection, and sustainable use of forest and related natural resources and environments, including vegetation, timber, water, wildlife, recreation, and aesthetic resources. The curriculum provides a unique integration of the physical, biological, and social sciences with managerial sciences and policy, field skill development, and technologies for measuring and monitoring natural resources for ecological, economic, and social benefits. Students are also trained in problem solving approaches to address specific local, regional, and global issues. Students select one of three tracks: 1) forest ecosystem management and conservation, 2) park and protected area management, or 3) urban and community forestry. Students should choose one of these tracks early in their college careers. Minors are also available for each track. Graduates find positions as foresters; forest, park, river or wilderness rangers; urban foresters; land and water managers; protected area managers; habitat managers; resource-based tourism providers; specialists in forest fire protection, ecology, ecosystem health, harvesting and silviculture; nursery managers; geographic information specialists; resource analysts/consultants; environment and natural resource law and policy analysts; land acquisition specialists; environmental and natural resource planners; outdoor recreation planners; heritage preservation specialists; conservationists; and educators and researchers. Principal employers are federal, state and local forestry, wildlife, parks, wilderness, conservation and related natural resource management agencies; forest products industry and related natural resource firms; landowner organizations; consulting firms; nongovernmental conservation organizations and international development agencies. Additionally, the curriculum provides excellent preparation in the fundamental and applied sciences that is essential for graduate study and careers in research and teaching. Opportunities for experiential learning through internships and field courses, as well as international study abroad programs, are available.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All major requirements must be taken A-F (unless only offered S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C- or better.
Communication Skills
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Economics and Policy
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Professional Courses
FNRM 1001 - Orientation and Information Systems (1.0 cr)
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
or HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
or URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Forest Ecosystem Management and Conservation
Students pursuing the forest ecosystem management and conservation sub-plan learn the principles, practices, and techniques of forestry and related natural resource management. The sub-plan prepares students to become directly involved in forest ecosystem management or further specializations, such as resource analysis, conservation planning, timber harvesting, forest protection, or policy analysis. Principal employers are federal, state and county forestry, wildlife, and conservation agencies; forest products companies; consulting firms; international agencies; and nongovernmental conservation organizations. This sub-plan is accredited by the Society of American Foresters. Further, successful completion of sub-plan course work qualifies a student for the Society of American Foresters' Candidate Certified Forester program.
All required courses in this sub-plan must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Mathematical Thinking
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Forest Ecosystem Management and Conservation Core
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3431 - Timber Harvesting and Road Planning (2.0 cr)
FNRM 3471 - Forest Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 5413 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture Lab (1.0 cr)
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
Field Training in the Biology and Assessment of Forests
Courses are taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Advanced Field Training in the Assessment and Management of Forests
Courses are taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center A minimum of 2 courses required:
Take 2 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· FNRM 4511 - Field Silviculture (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 4515 - Field Remote Sensing and Resource Survey (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 4521 - Field Timber Harvesting and Road Planning (2.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
FNRM 4232W Managing Recreational Lands, FNRM 2102 Northern Forest Field Ecology, or one course approved by the major coordinator.
Interdisciplinary Learning
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or BBE 4412W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants [TS] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices [WI] (3.0 cr)
Park and Protected Area Management
The park and protected area management sub-plan prepares students to plan for and manage natural resources, especially protected areas such as parks, forests, wild lands, and water resources, for multiple benefits including those attained by visitors, resource-dependent communities, and society as a whole. The curriculum emphasizes natural and managed protected areas; natural resources-oriented recreation programs in public and private sectors; social science aspects of natural resource use; and skills in communication, planning, and management. Graduates often serve as park, river or wilderness rangers; protected area managers; outdoor recreation planners; resource-based tourism providers; heritage preservation specialists; and outdoor educators. Typical employers include protected area management and planning agencies within federal, state, and local parks; forestry; wildlife; nature conservation; and related non-governmental organizations. Additionally, this curriculum provides excellent preparation for graduate training in the human dimensions of natural resources. A minor is also available. Students may also apply credits toward the international ecotourism certificate.
All required courses in this sub-plan must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Mathematical Thinking
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1051 - Precalculus I [MATH] (3.0 cr)
Social Sciences
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
PSY 3201 - Introduction to Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3721 - Principles of Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
Management of Biophysical Resources
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
or FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
Park and Protected Area Management Core
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation (3.0 cr)
Field course(s) or Internship
Requirement ranging from 2-4 credits
CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship (1.0 cr)
or FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies (2.0 cr)
or Introductory Cloquet Field Session
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
FNRM 4232W Managing Recreational Lands or one course approved by the major coordinator.
Interdisciplinary Learning
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or BBE 4412W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants [TS] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices [WI] (3.0 cr)
Urban & Community Forestry
The urban and community forestry sub-plan prepares students for planning and managing vegetation and related natural resources in or near urban communities, and for specializations, such as urban planning and environmental education. Urban forests include areas along streets, in parks, private lands, greenbelts, and open spaces. Graduates help plan, design, and protect these forests including supervision of tree selection, planting, and plant health care programs. Employers include city government, tree care/arboricultural firms, state and federal forestry agencies, nurseries, and utility companies. Graduates may also qualify for traditional forestry positions. This sub-plan is also accredited by the Society of American Foresters.
All required courses in this sub-plan must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Mathematical Thinking
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Urban and Community Forestry Core
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants (4.0 cr)
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People (3.0 cr)
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments [WI] (4.0 cr)
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
or URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
or URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Field Training in the Biology and Assessment of Forests
Courses are taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
FNRM 4232W Managing Recreational Lands, FW 2102 Northern Forests Field Ecology, or one course approved by the major coordinator.
Interdisciplinary Learning
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
or APEC 4103 - World Food Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or BBE 4412W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants [TS] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
or PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· Forest Ecosystem Management and Conservation Sample Plan
· Park and Protected Area Mgmt Sample Plan
· Urban and Community Forestry Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Forest and Natural Resource Management B.S.
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COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Biological diversity from genetic variation to diversity of species/ecosystems. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes governing biological diversity. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives on issues concerning human diversity, human population growth, health, agriculture, and conservation. Lab.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry; 1 term college chemistry recommended
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Prerequisites: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, Internet access; high school physics recommended; CHEM 1015 is a 3-credit, lecture-only course, with the lectures delivered online via Moodle, and exams taken in person on campus. Internet access is required. Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lectures online, exams on campus. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00362 - ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles, their application to natural resource management problems. Tools to address market failure, project analysis. Economic/financial considerations. Benefit/cost analysis. Valuation/assessment methods for property/market/non-market benefits. Planning/management problems. Managing renewable natural resources. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
FNRM 1001 - Orientation and Information Systems
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Forest resources, recreation resource management, urban forestry programs. Forestry and natural resource careers. Qualification requirements for government positions, competencies, internships, and experiences to compete for jobs in industry. Course planning, mentoring, alumni contacts. Leadership, organization, process. Lab equipment/software, GUIs, the Internet, spreadsheets, Lumina, periodical indexes.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02339
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite and aerial imagery and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory statistics is recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
FNRM 3431 - Timber Harvesting and Road Planning
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02340
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to forest operations. Terminology, basic engineering, equipment and harvesting system options, productivity/costs. Relationship to forest management and silviculture. Road planning, forest management guidelines, approaches for mitigating potential impacts to soil/water resources. Environmental implications of method/equipment choices. Selling timber. Sale design, layout, and administration. Two all-day field trips. prereq: FNRM 3411 or instr consent
FNRM 3471 - Forest Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00373
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management science as applied to forest decision-making to help develop better forest management plans. Helps students develop a basic understanding of common analytical tools from operations research and how they are applied to forestry problems to help explore many potential solutions. Also reviews traditional approaches based on simulation. Emphasizes trade-off information, interpretation of model results, and linkages between stand-level economic analysis and forest-wide planning. Reviews recent modeling efforts in Minnesota. Includes synthesis of information from multiple natural resource disciplines. Guest speakers demonstrate value of analyses in planning. Emphasizes homework assignments with some group work. An individual project requires an informal class presentation. prereq: recommended ESPM 3261 and [3218 or 3411]
FNRM 5413 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture Lab
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM major or minor or grad student; FNRM-FEMC track students should take FNRM 3411/5411 concurrently or instructor consent
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of silvicultural prescriptions to achieve various landowner objectives. Timber cruise, growth/yield simulations, stand density management diagrams, thinning schedules, use of forest vegetation simulator. Field trips, computer labs, lectures. prereq: FNRM major or minor or grad student; FNRM-FEMC track students should take FNRM 3411/5411 concurrently or instructor consent
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diseases of trees in urban and forested areas. Biology, ecology and control of tree diseases. Labs provide experience identifying disease agents and learning appropriate integrated control procedures.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 4511 - Field Silviculture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02375 - FNRM 4511/FNRM 5611
Typically offered: Every Summer
Collection of field data to prepare/write silvicultural prescriptions for regeneration, thinning, and harvesting in context of landscape, watershed, and wildlife habitat issues. Field exercises in forest entomology, pathology, tree improvement, and non-timber forest products. Tree planting. Marking stands for harvest. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. Field trips to forests managed by state/industry.
FNRM 4515 - Field Remote Sensing and Resource Survey
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02376 - FNRM 4515/FNRM 5615
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field applications of remote sensing, sampling/measurement methods for inventory/mapping of forest and other natural resources. Offered at the Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 4521 - Field Timber Harvesting and Road Planning
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02377 - FNRM 4521/FNRM 5621
Typically offered: Every Summer
Design, layout, and administration of timber sales. Forest road planning and design. Protecting residual trees during harvesting operations. Timber appraisal, forest management guidelines. Road location and profiling. Planning/layout considerations. Field trips to visit timber harvesting and road planning sites with public and private organizations. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simulations of environmental problem. Student teams develop strategy for kinds of data needed, analyzing data, and integrating findings. International perspectives on environmental problems/solutions. prereq: 1011, ESPM major
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group. prereq: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136 - Agro4103/ApEc 4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
APEC 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/ApEc/FScN/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts of ecology/evolution to address challenges in managing insects/microbes. Grapple with real problems/debate current controversies.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impacts that microbes have made on course of human civilization. Negative influences of major human/plant infectious disease. Positive benefits attained by harnessing power of microbes. Scale of history includes prehistoric to present day. Projected future impacts.
SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01238
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students will learn about ways in which companies are embracing sustainability in their strategy and operations to increase growth and global competitiveness, including manufacturing processes for major sustainable products and biobased products. This includes processes and approaches for environmental mitigation and "green" manufacturing, reduce industrial waste and emissions, environmental footprint, and associated costs through more efficient manufacturing practices and incorporate bio-based product formulation. Students will acquire a working knowledge of management policies, tools and techniques to improve operational and environmental performance. prereq: Junior/Senior Status, Introductory Chemistry or instr consent
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1051 - Precalculus I (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions with applications; zeroes of polynomials; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; coverage beyond that found in the usual 3 years of high school math. prereq: 3 yrs of high school math or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00518 - PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
PSY 3201 - Introduction to Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of theories/research in social psychology. Attitudes/persuasion, social judgment, the self, social influence, aggression, prejudice, helping, and applications. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
SOC 3721 - Principles of Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Social psychology is at the intersection of macro and micro sociology, linking social structures, interpersonal relationships and interactions, attitudes, values and the self-concept. Principles of social psychology are drawn from multiple theoretical perspectives, including symbolic interactionism, expectation states theory, social structure and personality, and the life course. This course covers a broad range of topics as well as the diverse methods that social psychologists use to study them (for example, experiments, surveys, ethnographic observation). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01229 - ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interaction of resource based tourism with cultural/natural environments. Impacts of tourism on environment.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an on-line course.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02374
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of interpretation. Nonformal teaching pedagogy. Interpretive talks, walks, and programs. Camp leadership, oral presentation. Newsletter development, Website design. Development of self-guided trail guides, brochures, and exhibits. Planning, evaluation. Interpretive work in private, state, or federal agencies. First-hand experience.
CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Enhance quality internship experience. Insight about self, world of work, individual learning styles. Communicate skills/learning. prereq: Secured internship, instr consent
FNRM 3206 - Park and Protected Area Management Field Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02284
Prerequisites: Sophomore status or higher
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Directed field study of park/protected areas. Recreation planning/visitor management, cultural/natural resource management, nature-based tourism management, resource interpretation. Communication across local, state, federal, tribal park, protected areas in northern Minnesota. prereq: Sophomore status or higher
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simulations of environmental problem. Student teams develop strategy for kinds of data needed, analyzing data, and integrating findings. International perspectives on environmental problems/solutions. prereq: 1011, ESPM major
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group. prereq: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136 - Agro4103/ApEc 4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
APEC 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/ApEc/FScN/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts of ecology/evolution to address challenges in managing insects/microbes. Grapple with real problems/debate current controversies.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impacts that microbes have made on course of human civilization. Negative influences of major human/plant infectious disease. Positive benefits attained by harnessing power of microbes. Scale of history includes prehistoric to present day. Projected future impacts.
SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01238
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students will learn about ways in which companies are embracing sustainability in their strategy and operations to increase growth and global competitiveness, including manufacturing processes for major sustainable products and biobased products. This includes processes and approaches for environmental mitigation and "green" manufacturing, reduce industrial waste and emissions, environmental footprint, and associated costs through more efficient manufacturing practices and incorporate bio-based product formulation. Students will acquire a working knowledge of management policies, tools and techniques to improve operational and environmental performance. prereq: Junior/Senior Status, Introductory Chemistry or instr consent
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to identify plants around the world. A few hundred of the most important cultivated plants for northern climates, their distinguishing features, common uses, cultural specificities, and notable cultivars.
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 4501/5501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management concepts for green infrastructure of cities, towns, and communities. Urban forest as a social/biological resource. Emphasizes management of urban forest ecosystem to maximize benefits to people. Tree selection, risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, landscape planning, values, perceptions. How urban forestry can be a tool to improve community infrastructure.
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
PLPA 3003 - Diseases of Forest and Shade Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Diseases of trees in urban and forested areas. Biology, ecology and control of tree diseases. Labs provide experience identifying disease agents and learning appropriate integrated control procedures.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02339
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
HORT 4141W - Scheduling Crops for Protected Environments (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the identification, scheduling and cultural requirements of commercially produced potted plants, gain experience in growing them, and conduct experiments to understand current problems. The course builds on knowledge obtained in Hort 1001 or Hort 1015, by adding in additional factors of plant growth coupled with scheduling and growing a of crops which commercial growers would experience. The role of ornamental plants in the human environment will be discussed, with special emphasis on future issues. Writing is an integral component of this course; one major paper is revised and expanded multiple times plus other course writing fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Through the use of interactive learning, field trips, written assignments, and in-class discussions students learn crop requirements and the interactions between the marketing distribution system of breeders, producers, distributors, growers, retailers, and consumers.
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simulations of environmental problem. Student teams develop strategy for kinds of data needed, analyzing data, and integrating findings. International perspectives on environmental problems/solutions. prereq: 1011, ESPM major
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group. prereq: ESPM 2021 and ESPM Sr
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3305 - Agroecosystems of the world (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore four different areas of world (Minnesota, Morocco, Nepal, Costa Rica) by networking with locals on ground in each region through online interactions. Food, agriculture, environment. Biophysical/socio-cultural aspects of agroecosystems through unique multi-disciplinary lens.
AGRO 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136 - Agro4103/ApEc 4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
APEC 4103 - World Food Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/ApEc/FScN/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall
Multidisciplinary look at problems and possible solutions affecting food production, storage, and utilization in developing countries. Presentations and discussions introduce conflicting views on population, technology, and ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts of ecology/evolution to address challenges in managing insects/microbes. Grapple with real problems/debate current controversies.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impacts that microbes have made on course of human civilization. Negative influences of major human/plant infectious disease. Positive benefits attained by harnessing power of microbes. Scale of history includes prehistoric to present day. Projected future impacts.
SSM 4407W - Sustainable Manufacturing Principles and Practices (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01238
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students will learn about ways in which companies are embracing sustainability in their strategy and operations to increase growth and global competitiveness, including manufacturing processes for major sustainable products and biobased products. This includes processes and approaches for environmental mitigation and "green" manufacturing, reduce industrial waste and emissions, environmental footprint, and associated costs through more efficient manufacturing practices and incorporate bio-based product formulation. Students will acquire a working knowledge of management policies, tools and techniques to improve operational and environmental performance. prereq: Junior/Senior Status, Introductory Chemistry or instr consent