Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology B.S.

Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 72 to 86
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology curriculum gives students a broad science background emphasizing biological and environmental sciences and other coursework needed for careers in fisheries, wildlife, conservation biology, and other natural resource and environmental fields. Graduates are prepared to research, plan, and implement the management, protection, and enhancement of fisheries and aquatic resources, wildlife resources, and biological diversity. Graduates find employment as fisheries and wildlife scientists and managers, naturalists, zoo biologists, environmental biologists, environmental educators, and other natural resource professionals. The program also provides students with the fundamental science background needed to enter a wide variety of graduate programs in biological and natural resource sciences, as well as professional programs in veterinary medicine, environmental law, and environmental education. Students select an area of specialization, usually by the end of the sophomore year. Areas of specialization include conservation biology, fisheries and aquatic sciences, and wildlife.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
After completing a core curriculum that includes liberal education, communications, basic science, mathematics, and an orientation to the fields of fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology, students complete additional credits in one of three areas of specialization: fisheries and aquatic sciences, wildlife, or conservation biology. Some of the core curriculum courses also fulfill diversified core and designated theme requirements. Electives to complete the required 120 credits are chosen in consultation with a program advisor. Students may also fulfill the minimum requirements for admission to the University's College of Veterinary Medicine and other colleges of veterinary medicine by completing a bachelor's degree in fisheries and wildlife within any of the three areas of specialization. All major requirements must be taken A-F (unless only offered S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C- or better.
Mathematical Thinking
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· FW 4001 - Biometry (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Chemical and Biological Sciences
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
FW 4301 - Conservation Genetics (3.0 cr)
or GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology Courses
FW 1001 - Orientation in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (1.0 cr)
FW 3106 - Vegetation Sampling for Habitat Assessments (1.0 cr)
FW 3108 - Field Methods in Research and Conservation of Vertebrate Populations (3.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Professional Experience
All students must take either CFAN 3096 or ESPM 4096. Students have three options for fulfilling the professional experience required in these courses: an official internship, a supervised research experience of at least 100 hours (e.g. UROP), or a major capstone research project in a study abroad program. Study abroad option must be discussed and approved by the FWCB major coordinator. Research option must be discussed and approved by a FWCB faculty supervisor.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
or CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship (1.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
FW 2001W fulfills this requirement.
Experiential Learning
CFAN 3096 or ESPM 4096 fulfills this requirement.
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Conservation Biology
The conservation biology specialization is for students interested in careers dealing with a broad range of conservation issues in aquatic or terrestrial habitats. Positions typically focus on protection of endangered species and management for biodiversity. Careers as environmental educators or naturalists are also options. All required courses in the specialization must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Communications
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Policy, Human Behavior, and Planning
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
Take exactly 2 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Organismal Biology
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5021 - Insect Biodiversity and Evolution (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
Ecosystem Ecology
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Conservation Biology
All courses are required.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
or FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis (3.0 cr)
Management and Restoration
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
Additional Course
Students must select at least one additional course from any of the following course groups: 2. Organismal Biology, 3. Ecosystem Ecology, or 4. Management and Restoration.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5021 - Insect Biodiversity and Evolution (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology (4.0 cr)
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
The fisheries and aquatic sciences area of specialization is for students who wish to pursue careers in fisheries and aquatic resource science, management, and administration, fish hatchery management, or aquaculture, aquatic education, and aquatic environmental assessment. The curriculum meets the education criteria for the Certified Fisheries Professional designation established by the American Fisheries Society, the major professional organization for fisheries scientists and managers in North America. All required courses in the specialization must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Communications
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Human Dimensions
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Fisheries and Aquatic Biology
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FW 5459 - Stream and River Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis (3.0 cr)
Principles
FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
FW 4107 - Principles of Fisheries Science and Management (3.0 cr)
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)
Other Biological Courses
Community and Ecosystem Ecology
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· HORT 4601 - Aquaponics: Integrated fish and plant food systems (4.0 cr)
· VPM 3102 - Aquatic-Sediment Ecological Toxicology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals (3.0 cr)
Physical Sciences
Depending on your course selection, you will need to take 3 or 4 courses to meet the minimum 11-credit requirement.
Recommended for students interested in a graduate degree or planning a career focused on research.
PHYS
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
CHEM
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3131 - Environmental Physics (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or Recommended for students planning on a career in professional or managerial fields such as the fisheries aspects of watershed management, applied fisheries management or fisheries within the broader ecosystem. 11-13 cr.
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment [PHYS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
Wildlife
The wildlife specialization is for students who wish to pursue careers in wildlife science, management, and administration, zoo biology, terrestrial ecology, environmental assessment, or education. With proper selection of electives, students can meet the education criteria for the Certified Wildlife Biologist designation established by the Wildlife Society, the major professional organization for wildlife scientists and managers in North America. All required courses in the specialization must be taken A-F and completed with a grade of at least C-.
Communications
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Human Dimensions
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
Animals and Plants
BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology (4.0 cr)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
Community and Ecosystem Ecology
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
or HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
Wildlife
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
Physical Sciences
Take 1 or more course(s)
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment [PHYS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
This sub-plan is optional and does not fulfill the sub-plan requirement for this program.
The doctor of veterinary medicine degree (DVM) is a rigorous four-year professional program preceded by three to four years of pre-professional study. Although a bachelor's degree is not required for admission to the DVM program, approximately 70 percent of the students entering the program each year have completed their bachelor's degree. Fisheries and wildlife is one of the primary college majors at the University of Minnesota that offers a pre-veterinary program.
The following courses are required in addition to the fisheries and wildlife core requirements and courses in one of three areas of specialization. These courses may be substituted for the "suggested courses" in the areas of specialization.
Required Courses
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
or MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
or MICB 3303 - Biology of Microorganisms (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Other Recommended Courses
The following courses are not required to complete the pre-vet requirements.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· Fish, Wildlife, & Cons Bio BS Sample Plan
· Conservation Biology
· Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
· Wildlife
· Pre-Veterinary Medicine

View checkpoint chart:
· Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology B.S.
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MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
FW 4001 - Biometry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the basic foundations of statistical methods. In contrast to traditional methods of teaching statistics based on analytical formulas and hand-calculations, we will initially emphasize simulation-based methods (randomization tests, bootstrapping) for analyzing data. Students will learn how to implement common statistical methods (e.g., one and two sample tests, interval estimation techniques, linear regression) in the R programming language, and gain experience analyzing real data from a variety of fields, with particular emphasis on biological examples and applications.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
FW 4301 - Conservation Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course introduces students to fundamental principles of population genetics and molecular phylogenetics and explores their applications to problems in the conservation, management, and restoration of biodiversity.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
FW 1001 - Orientation in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of technical requirements and education needed for careers in fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology. Introduction to fields of work, problems, career opportunities.
FW 3106 - Vegetation Sampling for Habitat Assessments
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Common vegetation sampling methods used for habitat assessments. Identify approximately 75 vascular plant species typical of Minnesota terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems using taxonomic keys and readily observable traits. Importance of plants for providing food, cover, and nesting habitat.
FW 3108 - Field Methods in Research and Conservation of Vertebrate Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Planning/implementation of research/management projects. Collect/analyze data in groups. Group/individual oral/written reports. Keep field journal. prereq: [soph, jr, sr], FW major
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Enhance quality internship experience. Insight about self, world of work, individual learning styles. Communicate skills/learning. prereq: Secured internship, instr consent
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Managed species/systems. Applied aquatic/fish ecology related to fisheries. Role of planning in fisheries management. Application of management tools, assessment of their efficacy.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human dimensions of fish and wildlife concerns. Theory and methods from social sciences to address challenges and issues of managing fish and wildlife resources. Integrating social science information into fish and wildlife decision-making. Guest lecturers.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00362 - ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles, their application to natural resource management problems. Tools to address market failure, project analysis. Economic/financial considerations. Benefit/cost analysis. Valuation/assessment methods for property/market/non-market benefits. Planning/management problems. Managing renewable natural resources. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
GCC 3010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02373
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. prereq:soph,jr,sr
GCC 5010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02373
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. For:so,jr,sr,grad
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ENT 5021 - Insect Biodiversity and Evolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification of families of adult insects. Evolution/classification of insects. Techniques of collecting/curating insects. Principles of phylogeny reconstruction.
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Techniques for studying small mammals. Lectures/field projects emphasize identification, distributions, community interactions, ecophysiology, population ecology. prereq: College-level biology course that includes study of animals or instr consent
EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Biology of breeding birds through use of field techniques at Itasca Biological Station/Laboratories. Daily fieldwork emphasizes identification, behavioral observations, netting/censusing. prereq: One semester college biology or instr consent
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00766 - EEB 5146/FNRM 5146/GCC 5008/P
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theory/methods for estimating vital statistics of fish populations. Using microcomputers/statistical software to describe, analyze, model attributes of fish populations. Case studies from literature of marine/freshwater fisheries management. prereq: [4001 or Stat 5021], Biol 3407, [Math 1142 or Math 1271]
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Managed species/systems. Applied aquatic/fish ecology related to fisheries. Role of planning in fisheries management. Application of management tools, assessment of their efficacy.
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ENT 5021 - Insect Biodiversity and Evolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification of families of adult insects. Evolution/classification of insects. Techniques of collecting/curating insects. Principles of phylogeny reconstruction.
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00766 - EEB 5146/FNRM 5146/GCC 5008/P
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change.
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FW 5604W - Fisheries Ecology and Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Managed species/systems. Applied aquatic/fish ecology related to fisheries. Role of planning in fisheries management. Application of management tools, assessment of their efficacy.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Techniques for studying small mammals. Lectures/field projects emphasize identification, distributions, community interactions, ecophysiology, population ecology. prereq: College-level biology course that includes study of animals or instr consent
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Biology of breeding birds through use of field techniques at Itasca Biological Station/Laboratories. Daily fieldwork emphasizes identification, behavioral observations, netting/censusing. prereq: One semester college biology or instr consent
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human dimensions of fish and wildlife concerns. Theory and methods from social sciences to address challenges and issues of managing fish and wildlife resources. Integrating social science information into fish and wildlife decision-making. Guest lecturers.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
FW 5459 - Stream and River Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structure/dynamics of running waters from ecosystem perspective. Historical perspective, basic hydrology/fluvial geomorphology, terrestrial-aquatic interactions, detrital dynamics, metabolism, drift, trophic relations, biotic/abiotic interactions, ecosystem experiments and natural alterations, stability/succession, ecosystem dynamics in a watershed. prereq: Limnology course or instr consent
FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theory/methods for estimating vital statistics of fish populations. Using microcomputers/statistical software to describe, analyze, model attributes of fish populations. Case studies from literature of marine/freshwater fisheries management. prereq: [4001 or Stat 5021], Biol 3407, [Math 1142 or Math 1271]
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
FW 4107 - Principles of Fisheries Science and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of Fisheries Management is an engaging and dynamic exploration to the principles and practices of fisheries management. The course is designed as a major requirement for Fisheries subplan majors in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology. It is also appropriate as an elective course for other majors and minors in FWCB, ESPM, or related biological disciplines. We cover the basics of fisheries science (habitats, ecology, and population dynamics) and management (e.g., goals, tools, implementation, and assessment) with an emphasis on human intervention and regulation. We first cover management approaches and planning, the development of an information base, and the identification of problems. We then provide a brief overview of applied limnology, fish ecology, and population dynamics, followed by approaches to manage fishery populations and habitats in freshwater and marine systems along with methods to assess management outcomes. Throughout, we demonstrate applications to specific fisheries and habitats. This is primarily a lecture-based course that also integrates field trips, group discussions, and activities. We use exams to measure comprehension, and case studies and assignments to encourage practical application. Prerequisite: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent
FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
HORT 4601 - Aquaponics: Integrated fish and plant food systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced training/experience at intersection of biology, engineering, economics, policy, culture, environment. Emphasis on experiential learning, i.e., system design/maintenance, community engagement. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
VPM 3102 - Aquatic-Sediment Ecological Toxicology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The fate, toxicity and risk assessment will be discussed for aquatic and terrestrial organisms exposed to various toxins. Students will devise strategies for toxicity testing and environmental bioremediation.
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02541
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
ESPM 3131 - Environmental Physics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts and principles of classic and modern physics applied to environmental problems arising from interaction between humans and the natural environment. Forms of pollution (e.g., land, water, air). Transport mechanisms. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Global climate change. Social issues related to environmental problems. prereq: Phys 1101
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq: [2331 or CHEM 2301, [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003]] or instr consent
CHEM 2101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Primarily for chemistry majors. Methods/concepts of measurement by chemical/instrumental analysis, including titrimetry, quantitative spectrophotometric analysis, chromatographic separations, equilibrium/rate methods. prereq: 1022 or equiv
CHEM 2111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Lab for 2101. High precision methods, acidimetry and complexometry, single and multicomponent analysis by spectrophotometry, analysis of mixtures by ion exchange and gas chromatography, enzymatic and rate methods. prereq: 2101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2101
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment (PHYS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles governing physical world in context of energy/environment. Lab. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3111/5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
AFEE 2421 - Professional Communication for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories and practices of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and scientific and technical communication. Lecture, discussion, simulations, small group work.
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Visual communication, audience analysis, organizing presentation, presenting complex material. Emphasizes use of computers.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
FW 3925 - Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human dimensions of fish and wildlife concerns. Theory and methods from social sciences to address challenges and issues of managing fish and wildlife resources. Integrating social science information into fish and wildlife decision-making. Guest lecturers.
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Techniques for studying small mammals. Lectures/field projects emphasize identification, distributions, community interactions, ecophysiology, population ecology. prereq: College-level biology course that includes study of animals or instr consent
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4844 - Field Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Biology of breeding birds through use of field techniques at Itasca Biological Station/Laboratories. Daily fieldwork emphasizes identification, behavioral observations, netting/censusing. prereq: One semester college biology or instr consent
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01229 - ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
ESPM 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment (PHYS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles governing physical world in context of energy/environment. Lab. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq: [2331 or CHEM 2301, [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003]] or instr consent
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/MicB 3303/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent
MICB 3303 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/MicB 3303/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, infectious disease, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to function of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conjugation, aromaticity, chemistry of carbonyls/amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins. Enzyme mechanisms, lipids, nucleic acids. Focuses on biological significance of organic molecules/mechanisms. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena, including optics, atomic structure. Lab. prereq: 1201W
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to the production of beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and other livestock. Fall term class open only to ANSC majors. Spring term class open to all majors.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Foundation for understanding discipline of wildlife management. Preparation for upper division wildlife courses. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012