Morris campus
 
Morris Campus

History B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 40
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Objectives--The history curriculum is designed to introduce students to the study of the human past in a broad range of contexts across place and time. Emphasizing the role of the student as an active learner, the curriculum encourages individualized learning experiences, including those outside of established coursework, and the development of close working relationships between students and faculty. Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Students are introduced to the study of the human past across a diverse range of contexts. 2. Students learn to think critically through analysis of a variety of primary and secondary source materials. 3. Students learn to communicate their ideas effectively in writing and through oral presentation. 4. Students are exposed to the ethical frameworks within which historians pursue their work, both individually and collectively. 5. Students understand the construction of historical knowledge and gain exposure to a broad range of approaches used by historians.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Students should develop a coherent program of study in consultation with their major advisor. The student and advisor must meet to plan the student's course of study and ensure the major encompasses breadth across regions and time periods. The student's plan must involve at least one course prior to 1750, and at least one course each from three of the following areas: Asia, Europe, Middle East/Africa, Latin America, Native America/Indigenous, and United States. When the student applies for graduation, the advisor reviews the student's course of study to document that the student has successfully demonstrated breadth across regions and time periods in the major. Prior to the end of the second week of the student's last semester before graduation, the student completes an anonymous online assessment of how well the program of study has enhanced the student's: Familiarity with range of historical periods and cultures sufficiently broad to allow meaningful exploration of the human experience in varied times and places; Ability to critically analyze, interpret, and synthesize various types of historical materials; Insight into the construction of historical knowledge as reflective of personal and social contexts; and Ability to initiate and pursue a course of historical inquiry. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S-N, unless offered S-N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
Students must take at least two 3000-level courses prior to enrolling in the Hist 3181(excluding directed studies).
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
HIST 3181 - The Study of History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
HIST 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in History (4.0 cr)
Electives
Students must complete 28 credits choosing at least one course prior to 1750, and at least one course each from three of the following areas: Asia, Europe, Middle East/Africa, Latin America, Native America/Indigenous, and United States. Directed Studies (X993) may be used in any of the areas if content is appropriate and approved by their major adviser.
Take 28 or more credit(s) from the following:
History Prior to 1750
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Geographical Areas
Take 24 or more credit(s) including 3 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Asia
· HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2551 - Modern Japan [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2552 - History of Modern China [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3557 - East Asia Since 1800 [IP] (4.0 cr)
· Europe
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3209 - Modern Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3211 - Modern France [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3212 - The French Revolution [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3213 - Modern Britain [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3214 - History of Childhood [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· Middle East/Africa
· HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Latin America
· HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2608 - History of Cuba: From Colony to Revolutionary State [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective [IP] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· Native American/Indigenous
· NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or NAIS 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2451 - The American West [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· United States
· HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2003 - Public History [HIST] (2.0 cr)
or HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2441 - The United States and the Great War [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 2452 - Minnesota History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 [SS] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3353 - World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1974 [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3455 - American Immigration [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· Division of Social Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· History

View checkpoint chart:
· History B.A.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

Division of Social Sciences

Morris Admissions

Morris Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01803 - Hist 1101/Hist 1102/Hist 1111
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of world history.
HIST 3181 - The Study of History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to historical research methods and 20th-century historiography. How to evaluate and employ primary and secondary sources, to cite evidence, and to develop critical historical arguments in a research project. Exploration of key transformations within the field of history, surveying various schools of thought, and assessing the specific advantages and challenges of the approaches. Topics may include Freudian and Marxist interpretations, the Annales school, quantitative analysis, anthropological and sociological approaches, and gender and postcolonial theory. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Hist 2001] prereq: instr consent
HIST 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced historical thematic analysis and guided research resulting in an original, substantial paper or project. prereq: 3181, instr consent
HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of Africa's incredible human and environmental diversity from the earliest times to European contact. Special attention to how historians of Africa interpret non-written sources to understand the past.
HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia before 1800. Possible sub-themes include the rise of the Confucian world order, the spread of Buddhism, and East Asian interactions with the outside world. Discussion of changing perceptions of gender.
HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of Latin American history.
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of Brazilian history from Portuguese colonization in the early 1500s to its current status as a growing world economic power. Topics include Portuguese colonial rule, independence and the creation of the Brazilian Empire in the nineteenth century, the end of the Brazilian monarchy and the emergence of the oligarchic republic, the rise of the populist state in the mid-twentieth century, military dictatorship during the Cold War, and the return to democracy and Brazil's rise to world-power status. Additional topics include the Amazon and environmental history, indigenous history, Afro-Brazilian history, the U.S.-Brazilian relationship from a historical perspective, Brazilian economic development, how Brazilians are coping with the socioeconomic changes in their society, and how they perceive their role in the world.
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.
HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examination of western European history and historiography between 1350 and 1600 with emphasis on cultural "renaissances" and religious "reformations."
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore issues of race and ethnicity in Latin America from a historical perspective. Covering the colonial and national periods, examine how ideas of race and ethnicity have intersected with political, economic, and socio-cultural developments in the region. Consider the ways in which race, class, and gender have intersected in Latin America.
HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia before 1800. Possible sub-themes include the rise of the Confucian world order, the spread of Buddhism, and East Asian interactions with the outside world. Discussion of changing perceptions of gender.
HIST 2551 - Modern Japan (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The history of Japan from the foundation of the Tokugawa Shogunate until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2552 - History of Modern China (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Study of the history of China from the foundation of the Qing dynasty in the 1600s until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A broad survey of Southeast Asia's civilization and its modern challenges. Emphasizes recent colonialism, nationalism, and postwar development.
HIST 3557 - East Asia Since 1800 (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia [China, Japan, and Korea] since 1800.
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of fairy tales and folklore in European history from the early modern era to the present, with a primary emphasis on tracing changes in the social and cultural use of fairy tales over time. Sources drawn from a diverse corpus of tales and retellings, as well as scholarly interpretations from historians, ethnographers, and folklorists. Explores key developments, such as the transformation of 17th-century French tales written as political allegory into the Grimms' 19th-century reinvention of the fairy tale as a staple of middle-class childhood. Other topics may include the oral tradition and literacy; changing ideas about gender, class, and religion; and themes of violence, nationalism, and sexuality.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3101 - Renaissance and Reformation (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examination of western European history and historiography between 1350 and 1600 with emphasis on cultural "renaissances" and religious "reformations."
HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The intellectual ferment of the Enlightenment has been given the credit and the blame for all things modern--from the concept of human rights and the democracies it has engendered to the subversion of those rights in the totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Exploration of the ideas of the Enlightenment and their political context and attempt to answer the question of how such an important development in human history can be viewed in such contradictory ways.
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examination of German history from the development of German national ideas through unification and consolidation of the modern German state in 1871 and through its re-unification at the end of the 20th century. Examines one of the most fascinating and tumultuous periods in German and European history, why the attempt to understand the German past has occupied so many historians, and why the debates surrounding that attempt have been so contentious. Sources include writings by established historians of Germany, novels, films, and music.
HIST 3211 - Modern France (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of French culture and history from the Revolution (1789) to the present. The ways in which successive governments, from Napoleon's empire through the Fifth Republic, have come to terms with legacies of the Revolution such as national citizenship, individual rights, and the politicization of women.
HIST 3212 - The French Revolution (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the causes, players, drama, complexity, and legacy of the French Revolution. Beginning with the changing social order and new political philosophies of the 18th century, the course follows not only the initial unfolding of revolution, terror, and counter-revolution, but also the rise of Napoleon and revolutionary wars. Later reverberations in the revolutions of 1848, the Commune of 1871, and global influences (such as the Haitian Revolution) also addressed. Throughout these events, the experiences of both prominent figures and ordinary participants (the "crowd") considered.
HIST 3213 - Modern Britain (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of modern Britain and its empire since the 17th century. Topics include the growth of Britain as a world power through imperialism and industrialization, the challenges of shaping a modern polity, and the 20th-century shifts that reduced its global profile.
HIST 3214 - History of Childhood (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of changes in childhood and youth from the early modern era to the present. Geographic emphasis on Europe, although the course also allows for exploration of similar themes in other parts of the world. Considers key developments in both ideas about and experiences of children, such as the emergence of children's rights discourse. Other topics may include schooling, play, labor, family, sexuality, consumption, migration, welfare, imperialism, and war. Readings drawn from social, cultural, and political approaches to the history of childhood, as well as historical documents created by children themselves across contexts.
HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of Africa's incredible human and environmental diversity from the earliest times to European contact. Special attention to how historians of Africa interpret non-written sources to understand the past.
HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Consideration of Africa's past from the colonial era to the present. Special attention to the challenges Africans faced living under Europe's grip as well as their courage to build independent African nations.
HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of South Africa's settler colonial history from European contact to youth resistance against white supremacy. Special attention to examining the history of structural racism in a global perspective.
HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Consideration of apartheid South Africa's roots and the multiracial country's struggle to reconcile its colonial past. Special attention to 20th-century black and non-racial political thought from a global perspective.
HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.
HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination and discussion of pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial African history through the debates and trends in and between Western feminism, U.S. women of color feminism, Third World feminism, LGBT studies, queer theory, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of African queer studies. Also suitable for students interested in understanding past and present issues of gender and sexuality in Africa through the theories and conditions that animate black queer studies and the black queer diaspora. prereq: 1111 or GWSS 1101 or instr consent
HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of Latin American history.
HIST 2608 - History of Cuba: From Colony to Revolutionary State (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A survey of the history of Cuba from Spanish colonization to the present, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include colonization, slavery, imperialism, nationalism, and the Cuban Revolution.
HIST 2609 - History of Brazil: From Sugar to Sugar Cars (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of Brazilian history from Portuguese colonization in the early 1500s to its current status as a growing world economic power. Topics include Portuguese colonial rule, independence and the creation of the Brazilian Empire in the nineteenth century, the end of the Brazilian monarchy and the emergence of the oligarchic republic, the rise of the populist state in the mid-twentieth century, military dictatorship during the Cold War, and the return to democracy and Brazil's rise to world-power status. Additional topics include the Amazon and environmental history, indigenous history, Afro-Brazilian history, the U.S.-Brazilian relationship from a historical perspective, Brazilian economic development, how Brazilians are coping with the socioeconomic changes in their society, and how they perceive their role in the world.
HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of social revolution in 20th-century Latin America. Particular attention paid to social revolution in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua. Populism, democratic attempts at social revolution, and counterrevolution in other parts of Latin America also considered. Key issues include imperialism, capitalism, communism, nationalism, and the Cold War.
HIST 3613 - U.S.-Latin American Relations in Historical Perspective (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from U.S independence to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, social, and cultural relationships between the two.
HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore issues of race and ethnicity in Latin America from a historical perspective. Covering the colonial and national periods, examine how ideas of race and ethnicity have intersected with political, economic, and socio-cultural developments in the region. Consider the ways in which race, class, and gender have intersected in Latin America.
NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02307 - Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for AmIn 1701 or Hist 1701]
NAIS 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02429
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Same as Hist 3403. Examination of indigenous education in the United States from pre-contact to the late 20th century. Topics include indigenous ways of teaching and learning, efforts to assimilate Native peoples through education, the movement toward educational self-determination within Native communities, and contemporary representations of boarding school experiences. Students also gain insight into the history of the Morris Indian School and its contemporary representation at UMM.
ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01990 - Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The experience of the original Americans and their interaction with later immigrants.
HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02307 - Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as NAIS 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for NAIS 1701 or Hist 1701]
HIST 2451 - The American West (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01839 - Hist 3451/Hist 2451
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Overview of the history of the American West up to the 21st century. While many scholars have argued that the "West" was merely a necessary process of national expansion, others argue that it is a very significant region--the most culturally and ecologically diverse region in the country. Discussion of these major historical interpretations of the American West and examination of how people have understood this vast region as a cultural icon of national identity. Work through various definitions of the West and identify how political issues of the environment, international borderlands, and gender and race relations have significantly influenced the United States for many generations. Through lectures, readings, and discussion, examine Western history chronologically while also covering other major themes including federalism, the mythic West, tourism, ranching and agriculture, urban and suburban areas, film, and religion.
HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Exploration of the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the United States and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands.
HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01990 - Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Anth 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02429 - Hist 3403/AmIn 3403
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Same as NAIS 3403. Examination of indigenous education in the United States from pre-contact to the late 20th century. Topics include indigenous ways of teaching and learning, efforts to assimilate Native peoples through education, the movement toward educational self-determination within Native communities, and contemporary representations of boarding school experiences. Students also gain insight into the history of the Morris Indian School and its contemporary representation at UMM.
HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of the history of the United States.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 2003 - Public History (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to the many ways historians conduct research and present historical topics to public audiences. Public historians, who typically come from a traditional academic discipline, utilize their knowledge in such public settings as museums, archives, historic sites, historical societies, and federal agencies. Examine a number of themes ranging from oral histories and historical reenactments to websites and electronic media. Explore what is public history, who practices it, the role of audience, the tension between history and memory, and the ethical concerns that influence public history practice. Gain hands-on experience in facets of public history such as archival management and oral history.
HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History of the United States in the 1960s. Backgrounds to the 1960s; political and cultural issues of the decade; the Kennedy promise, civil rights and other movements, Vietnam war, counterculture, conservative backlash, and legacy.
HIST 2441 - The United States and the Great War (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Presentation of a highly integrated picture of the American experience in World War I. Part of the focus is on the military experience, although approached from the perspective of average sailors and soldiers. More of the emphasis is on the home front and how the war at home encouraged the emergence of a new, more powerful, federal state while simultaneously inviting attacks on civil liberties and ethnic culture. Follow the impact of war through the post-war Red Scare and into the 1920s and explore how it ushered in a new period in American life but one rife with political and cultural contradictions.
HIST 2452 - Minnesota History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the social, cultural, and political history of Minnesota with emphases on American Indian and European-American conflict, immigration and ethnicity, the development of political culture, and the changing nature of regional identity.
HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the history of the United States from the beginning of the Seven Years' War in 1754 to the end of the War of 1812. The origins of the nation and the political, cultural, and social changes that accompanied the birth and early years of the American Republic. Focus on the political and social history of the American Revolution. Other topics include women in revolutionary America, the retrenchment of slavery, indigenous people and early Indian policy, religion and revivalism, the constitutional crisis, and the early presidencies.
HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The themes of race, class, and gender are explored in-depth throughout the semester. Students gain a new awareness about historiography and theories that highlight this growing subfield of American history. Prominent topics covered in lecture and readings include colonization, slavery, suffrage, immigration, sovereignty, labor, ghettoization, art, literature, culture, and the rise of self-determination. Study the intersection of race, class, and gender relations through multiple perspectives of region, ideology, political-economy, and religion.
HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History of the 20th-century U.S. presidency. Brief consideration of the Presidency before 1900, analysis of performance of presidents since 1900 in roles of chief executive, commander-in-chief, chief diplomat, and chief of state during an era of enlarged governmental functions at home and world power abroad.
HIST 3353 - World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, political and military aspects of the war in Europe and Asia, domestic mobilization, the Holocaust and Atomic Bomb, aftermath.
HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Topics, themes, and problems in U.S. history, 1877 to 1920.
HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1974 (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Background of the Civil Rights movement, emergence of the theory and practice of nonviolence, various Civil Rights groups, role of women, legislative and other accomplishments of the movement, its aftermath and influence.
HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origin, context, and significance of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seven former American Presidents were veterans of World War II and over 175,000 books have been published on this subject alone. Arguably this one event has commanded more attention by writers, filmmakers, and academics than any other modern historical event. For decades historians have also debated the significance of World War II. After the conclusion of the war, the worldwide devastation and loss of life had reached apocalyptic proportions and new military technologies, like the atom bomb, forever altered the American experience. Scientists and intellectuals, such as Albert Einstein, emerged as new celebrities. Literally every sector of American society and culture had been transformed by World War II. Investigate these questions and more throughout the semester. It is important to note that this course is not a strict military history of the European and Pacific campaigns. Instead, the purpose of this class is to challenge students to grapple with the historic origins and legacies of the war. prereq: jr or sr or instr consent
HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A broad examination of how humans interacted with their natural world throughout American history. Combined emphasis on cultural ecology (the study of how various cultural groups shaped the American landscape) with political ecology (the role of the nation's political economy in driving environmental change). Possible topics include: the Columbian Exchange, European and American Indian conflict, Thoreau and the creation of an environmental ethic, the slaughter of the bison as an ecological tragedy, urbanization and environmental racism, conservation as a political movement and the development of environmental policy, eco-feminism, American religion and the environment, the politics of global climate change. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Hist 2361]
HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Growth and development of the U.S. presidency during its first century. Emphasis on selected presidencies such as those of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, Abraham Lincoln, and William McKinley.
HIST 3455 - American Immigration (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The role of voluntary migration in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Emphases on settlement, ethnicity, nativism, transnational issues, and immigration law. Possible topics include European immigrants and "whiteness," restriction of immigration from Asia, ethnicity and U.S. foreign and military policy, and the varieties of immigration, legal and undocumented, since 1965.
HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The history of religion in American life from the perspective of ordinary Americans. Religious diversity receives special emphasis. Topics may include New England witchcraft, the First and Second Great Awakenings, American Indian belief systems, nativism and Anti-Catholicism, religion and politics, immigrant religion and new fundamentalist movements.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.