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Twin Cities Campus

Cell Biology Minor

Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development TCBS
College of Biological Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate minor related to major
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 20
This minor focuses on understanding cells, the basic unit of life from bacteria and archaea to eukaryotes. Training in cell biology involves understanding how cells function: understanding structures, biochemical pathways and metabolism, signaling and development. Organismal responses to the environment, to pharmaceutical agents, to diseases, etc. all are cellular responses that manifest at the organismal level. Training provided by the cell biology minor will benefit students in a wide variety of majors including health sciences, engineering, and agriculture.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
This minor is only for non-CBS students. Students pursuing the Genetics minor are not eligible for the Cell Biology minor.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Minor Requirements
Chemistry
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Biology
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Cell Biology
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GCD 2171 - Stem Cells in Biomedicine and Society [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4171 - Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine (3.0 cr)
· GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Biological Sciences


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· Cell Biology Minor
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CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS honors students
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: Completion of Biol 4003 is preferred, Biol2003/2003H or Biol4003 or grad
GCD 2171 - Stem Cells in Biomedicine and Society (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 2171/GCD 4171
Typically offered: Every Spring
A course that focuses on the general properties of stem cells, their potential uses in biomedicine, and the potential impact of their use on society. The course is suitable for students who have successfully completed at least one general biology course that included coverage of basic genetics and cell biology. Stem cells are one of the rapidly growing topics in biology. Research into stem cells ranges from basic biology to regeneration to clinical applications to ethics. In this course, you will learn the general features of embryonic, artificial, or adult-tissue stem cells: how they contribute to tissue regeneration, how scientists create and manipulate stem cells, what scientists do with them, what the public considers stem cell research and why. Then, you will learn about bone marrow transplantation, an established stem cell-based therapy, and various diseases and potential applications of stem cells to treat/cure the diseases. By the end of this course, you will have deeper insights into stem cells. Recommended prerequisites: BIOL1009 (General Biology), BIOL1951 (Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors) or an equivalent General Biology course that includes basic coverage of genetics and cell biology This course can NOT be used as an elective for some CBS majors, such as the GCD major. Check the Program Requirements for your major to determine if it can be used as an elective.
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: GCD 3033 or BIOL 4004 or instructor consent
GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulatory pathways involved in directing normal development of complex eukaryotic organisms, how disruptions of these pathways can lead to abnormal cell growth/cancer. Causes, detection, treatment, prevention of cancer. prereq: Biol 4003
GCD 4171 - Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 8181/SCB 8181
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contemporary stem cell biology with emphasis on mechanisms/applications. Embryonic, tissue-specific, and induced pluripotent stem cells and potential uses in human disease. prerequisites: BIOL 4003 Genetics; recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 Cell Biology or GCD 4005W This course can be used as an elective for certain CBS majors, such as the GCD major. Check the Program Requirements for your major to determine if it can be used as an elective.
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes. prereq: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W or grad
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease, cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies. Prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 and [Junior or senior]
NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites.
PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4516W/ PMB 5516
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course, we will cover current important research topics in plant cell biology. We will cover many plant-specific topics such as gravitropism, plant cell wall biosynthesis, structure and function, plasmodesmatal connections, signal transduction, tip growth, plant cytokinesis, cell energetics. We will also cover some topics that are important for both plant, fungal, and animal cell biology such as cell polarity, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, and the secretory system. Since we will be using recent literature as the course text, some important and classic cell biology topics will not be covered. In the field of cell biology, new discoveries are often the result of improvements in technology especially in imaging, so we will cover some recent advances in methodology. This is also a writing class with the goal of helping students become familiar and comfortable with writing in a scientific style. There will be writing instruction and there will be some reading assignments on scientific writing. There are no enforced prerequisites. Introductory courses on plants, genetics, and biochemistry are helpful.