Morris campus
 
Morris Campus

French B.A.

Division of Humanities - Adm
Division of Humanities
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 34 to 42
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
French is an important language of diplomacy, commerce, and health care and is used in research across the globe and in many disciplines, such as music, art, linguistics, history, law, political science, anthropology, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and philosophy. The French discipline gives students the language and analytical skills necessary to engage intellectually with these interconnected fields in French and to appreciate the cultures of France and Francophone countries throughout the world. Program Student Learning Outcomes The French curriculum is designed to ensure that: 1. Students will be able to interpret with accuracy detailed information and narratives in French in the past, present, and future. 2. Students will be able to express themselves, in speaking and in writing, in the past, present, and future about topics of general, academic, and professional interest. 3. Students will be able to interpret cultural artifacts, texts, and films with accuracy, demonstrating knowledge of the French and Francophone cultures that produced them. 4. Studentsí work will reflect an awareness of their own cultural biases and articulate the inherent complexities, worldviews, and values of other cultures. 5. Students will be prepared for a future in graduate school or in the professional world. CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN FRENCH The certificate program in French responds to the growing demand for individuals who can communicate successfully in a global environment and is intended for students whose other academic commitments prevent them from completing either a major or minor in French. To earn a certificate, a student must: a) complete a minimum of 16 credits in French at UMN Morris at the 2xxx and/or 3xxx level. At least half of the credits for the certificate must be taken through UMN Morris. Students are encouraged to study abroad. No courses in English may count toward the French certificate program. Students who complete a major or minor in French are not eligible for the certificate program. A student who has met the above requirements may request a reference letter from the UMN Morris French faculty certifying completion of the certificate program as well as language competence based on guidelines published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Beginning French
Beginning French I or equivalent previous language experience required to take Fren 1002.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
French majors must complete a significant amount of coursework at Morris and are also strongly encouraged to study abroad. Students will be best-served by seeking guidance from a UMN Morris French professor in order for transfer credit, including study abroad, to be applied to the French major. Credits completed under the European Credit Transfer System will be converted to United States credits according to internationally recognized standards (i.e. 1 ECTS credit = .5 U.S. credit). Credit for prior experiences in French: Students majoring in French complete different numbers of credits, depending on where they enter the program: Students who enter the major at the 1002 level must complete a minimum of 42 credits for the major. Students who place into FREN 2001 must complete a minimum of 38 credits for the major. Students who place into FREN 30xx must complete a minimum of 34 credits for the major. Up to eight credits taught in English in the French Discipline or in another discipline with relevant content may count towards the French major. The French Discipline strongly encourages French majors to complete one year of study in an additional world language. No grades below C- may count toward the French major. In addition to French 4902, students may elect to take up to 8 credits towards the major on an S/N grading basis. A minimum GPA of 2.000 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
The final capstone presentation (Fren 4902) must be given in French
FREN 1002 - Beginning French II [WL] (4.0 cr)
FREN 2001 - Intermediate French I [IP] (4.0 cr)
FREN 2002W - Intermediate French II [IP] (4.0 cr)
FREN 3011 - Introduction to French and Francophone Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
FREN 4902 - French Capstone Project (2.0 cr)
HUM 1305 - Career Preparation in World Languages (2.0 cr)
Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)
These courses fall within the period that encompasses the Middle Ages through French classicism. Students gain familiarity with the history, cultures, languages, and literatures of France from the ninth century through the seventeenth century.
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FREN 3002 - MEMS: Civilization and Composition: Tools for Studying the Medieval and Early Modern Periods [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· FREN 3402 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Pre-Enlightenment Culture in France (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3406 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Emotional Extremes in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3407 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: The "East" and its Marvels (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3408 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Quests, Quails, and Custards--Food in Life and Literature (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3411 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Medieval and Renaissance Bodies (4.0 cr)
Modern Studies (MOS)
These courses cover a wide range of historical, literary, and cultural moments and movements that have marked France's development since the dawn of the French Enlightenment.
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France [SS] (2.0 cr)
· FREN 3003 - Modern Studies: Civilization and Composition: France Since the Enlightenment [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· FREN 3108 - Community Translation and Interpretation for French Speakers (1.0 cr)
· FREN 3501 - Modern Studies: The Old Regime and New Ideas: The French Enlightenment (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3502 - Modern Studies: Revolution, Romanticism, Modernity (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3503 - Modern Studies: Avant-Garde, Existentialism, Experimentation (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3507 - Modern Studies: French for Sustainability [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
Francophone Studies (FRS)
These courses examine the literature, film, history and cultures of French-speaking populations living in Africa, North America, the Caribbean, South America, Europe, and Asia.
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema [IP] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3004 - Francophone Studies: Civilization and Composition: Colonialism and Francophone Worlds [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· FREN 3605 - Francophone Studies: Maghrebian Cinema (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3606 - Francophone Studies: Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3607 - Francophone Studies: Sex and Gender in Francophone Literature and Film (4.0 cr)
Advanced Lauguage Studies (ALS)
These courses analyze the structure and usage of the French language in detail and on an advanced level.
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FREN 3112 - Advanced Language Studies: Introduction to French Phonetics (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3113 - Advanced Language Studies: Introduction to Translation (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3114 - Advanced Language Studies: Advanced French Grammar (2.0-4.0 cr)
· HUM 3108 - Community Interpreting [E/CR] (3.0 cr)
Electives - Outside of the French Discipline
Students must complete additional elective credits to reach 42 credits in the French major if beginning at 1002, or 38 credits if beginning at 2001, or 34 credits if beginning at 3011. Electives can be chosen from the cluster courses above (exclusive of those used to meet the required courses) or the following.
The French discipline recommends that students take as many of their major courses as possible in the French language in order to build and maintain their skills. However, a maximum of 4 elective credits may also be chosen from the following list of affinity and partial content courses. The discipline will also consider petitions to include courses not listed and will consider petitions to include up to 4 more elective credits outside of the discipline to count toward the major.
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2001 - How We Study People: Introduction to Methods in Cultural Anthropology [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3461 - Archaeology of Eurasia and Africa [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3465 - Archaeology and Native Peoples [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 1111 - Ancient to Medieval Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 1121 - Renaissance to Modern Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 2107 - Global Modernisms: Modern Art in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Beyond [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3113 - Early Islamic Art and Culture [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3132 - Castles and Cathedrals [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3201 - Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3211 - Modern European Art from Impressionism to Surrealism [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3281 - Women and Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3291 - Facing the Past: Portraiture and Social History [FA] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3433 - Communication, Power, and Identity [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3434 - Communication, Nature, and Belonging [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4131 - International Finance (2.0 cr)
· ENGL 1509W - Literary Studies [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2033 - The Bible and Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3211 - Modern France [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3212 - The French Revolution [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HUM 4102 - Linguistics for Students of Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· LANE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Foreign Language K-12 (4.0 cr)
· MUS 1155 - Foundations in Music History I: Ancient to 1750 [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 1156 - Foundations in Music History II: 1750 to Contemporary [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 1401 - English, Italian, German, and French Diction for Singers [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
· MUS 2403 - Choral Traditions and Literature [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 2404 - The Orchestra and its Literature from the 1700s through Today [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3108 - Intellectual Foundations of Western Music [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3111 - History of Music Theory: Rameau to Riemann (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3112 - Analysis of Pre-Tonal Music (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3305 - West African Styles in African American Music [FA] (2.0 cr)
· NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4002 - Existentialism [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4121 - Philosophy of Language [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1401 - World Politics [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2411 - Model United Nations [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· TH 3101 - World Theatre: History and Literature I [FA] (4.0 cr)
· TH 3102 - World Theatre: History and Literature II [FA] (4.0 cr)
 
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FREN 1002 - Beginning French II (WL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the skills developed in French 1001 to move students towards fluency and a greater ability to interact with diverse French and Francophone peoples across the globe and here in the United States. prereq: C- or better in 1001 or placement or instr consent
FREN 2001 - Intermediate French I (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course moves students towards the expression of abstract thought in French. By studying more complicated linguistic and cultural structures, students gain the skill to discuss hypothetical and theoretical ideas, which is a key component of real conversations with French speakers. Fren 2001 similarly expands students? ability to read more complex texts and to express their own ideas in writing. prereq: 1002 or placement or instr consent
FREN 2002W - Intermediate French II (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course prepares students to launch into studying French and Francophone literature and cultures, and to put their linguistic skills to practice by studying abroad in a French-speaking country. In preparation for those opportunities, students continue to work on grammar and vocabulary while writing creative stories and reading and discussing children?s books, youth literature, and other texts appropriate to this level. prereq: 2001 or placement or instr consent
FREN 3011 - Introduction to French and Francophone Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A survey of literature from France and from across the Francophone world. Study poetry, novels, theater, and film, and develop reading skills and methods of analysis. prereq: 2002 or instr consent
FREN 4902 - French Capstone Project
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students work in consultation with the course instructor in one of two tracks: they either develop a project they began in another French elective course or they develop a project related to another major. For either track, students undertake a significant research project (in terms of both length and depth) and present their findings in a formal presentation in French. prereq: a minimum of 16 credits completed in 3xxx electives, instr consent
HUM 1305 - Career Preparation in World Languages
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Students advance their understanding of the liberal arts, bilingual skills, and a global and interconnected labor market by developing a professional profile and associated materials in the target language and English including a curriculum vitae (CV), resume, and cover letters. Ideally completed in the junior year to allow ample time for career exploration. Can be repeated once but only one credit may count towards French major or minor.
FREN 3002 - MEMS: Civilization and Composition: Tools for Studying the Medieval and Early Modern Periods (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study Paris as the center of society, culture, religion, and literature from 1100-1300, while also refining the ability to write academic papers and engaging in academic discussions in French. Read primary texts about religion, mythology, and Classical epics that form the foundation of much of medieval French literature. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: 2002 or instr consent
FREN 3402 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Pre-Enlightenment Culture in France
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the history of French culture in the Middle Ages and into the Early Modern Period; it examines the geography, language, and institutions of medieval and early modern France through literature. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3406 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Emotional Extremes in Medieval and Early Modern Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories from cultural and religious studies, anthropology, history, psychology, and sociology combine to approach emotional expression in society and in literature. Readings: Durkheim, Freud, Laplanche, Bataille, Chretien's Lancelot, Partonopeus, Le Roman de Troie, troubadour lyric, Aucassin et Nicolette, Legenda Aurea, Saint Augustine, Ovid's Metamorphoses. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011
FREN 3407 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: The "East" and its Marvels
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Medieval French course introducing cultural and literary aspects of the Middle Ages through marvelous figures and manifestations of the medieval French interpretation of the "East," including attention to exotic forms of clothing and food in romance, crusades, bestiaries, and fabliaux. Students read medieval interpretations of adventure stories such as the Iliad and Aeneid. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011
FREN 3408 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Quests, Quails, and Custards--Food in Life and Literature
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Spices, game, and chocolate trace the real and imagined movement of European people in the Middle Ages and Early Modern period in literary and historical sources. Make authentic recipes and read authors, including Marco Polo, from many genres of literature. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3411 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Medieval and Renaissance Bodies
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through literature, students learn about the diversity of the understandings of the body in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. By studying fictional, religious, and historical portrayals of habits and customs alongside medical treatises, students analyze different conceptions of the body through a variety of primary and secondary sources. prereq or coreq: 3011 or instr consent
FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Beginning with Vesalius, this course examines how the notions of body and mind have been shaped and reshaped in tandem with the rise of the sciences in France, with emphasis on evolving conceptions of ability and disabilities. Taught in English. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement in the French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3003 - Modern Studies: Civilization and Composition: France Since the Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of French culture from the Enlightenment period up to contemporary society. Study the development of the French nation while also refining the ability to write academic papers and to participate in academic discussions in French. Meets the Modern Studies (MOS) requirement for the French major. prereq: 2002 or instr consent
FREN 3108 - Community Translation and Interpretation for French Speakers
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course pairs with Hum 3108: Community Interpreting and represents the opportunity to continue to build bilingual skills in French and English for the purpose of supporting access to community resources and essential services for French-speaking populations. prereq: (or coreq) 3011, Hum 3108
FREN 3501 - Modern Studies: The Old Regime and New Ideas: The French Enlightenment
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explores the absolutism of Louis XIV and the rise of modern secular thinking in the French literature and philosophy of the Enlightenment, with particular attention given to shifting notions of freedom, agency, and one's place within society and relationship to others. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement for the French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3502 - Modern Studies: Revolution, Romanticism, Modernity
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the emergence of Romanticism, Modernity, Realism, and Naturalism in a historical context shaped by the successive revolutions of 1789, 1815, 1830, 1848, and 1870; industrialization; the rise of a middle class; advances in technology and medicine; and the centrality of images and the popular press in daily life in France. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3503 - Modern Studies: Avant-Garde, Existentialism, Experimentation
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From la belle epoque through two world wars and the civil unrest of 1968; from France's efforts to come to terms with its colonial past to its role within the European Union, from Proust to Pennac, this course examines French history, culture and literary movements of the past century to the present day. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3507 - Modern Studies: French for Sustainability (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
France's engagement with sustainable development with regard to biodiversity, food systems, renewable energy, and air and water quality, especially as these intersect with social and economic disparities. The course draws upon UMM's unique institutional strengths and prepares students with the tools and skills they need in order to work in the sustainability sector in a global, bilingual setting. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of cinema in French-speaking West Africa. Students learn to read African films, to recognize and analyze political themes in the films, and to become sensitive to issues facing many African nations in the postcolonial world. All films have English subtitles. Taught in English. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement for the French major. [Note: does not count toward the Fren minor]
FREN 3004 - Francophone Studies: Civilization and Composition: Colonialism and Francophone Worlds (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of the history of French colonialism and of the development of la Francophonie as an association of French-speaking countries outside of France. An introductory exploration into the cultures, literatures, and current events of multiple francophone countries and regions throughout the world. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: 2002 or instr consent
FREN 3605 - Francophone Studies: Maghrebian Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of Algerian, Tunisian, and Moroccan history and culture as presented through the art of cinema. Examination of films produced in the francophone Maghreb thematically, focusing on topics such as colonialism, gender, Islam, childhood, and immigration. An important goal is to learn to analyze and discuss film academically. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3606 - Francophone Studies: Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of cinema in French-speaking West Africa. Students learn to read African films, to recognize and analyze political themes in the films, and to become sensitive to issues facing many African nations in the postcolonial world. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3607 - Francophone Studies: Sex and Gender in Francophone Literature and Film
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The study of the representation of women, men, and queer identities in Francophone literature and film. Discussion of models of femininity and masculinity, and LGBTQAA+ identities and how the dual system of sexuality and gender is problematic. Examination of various models of Feminist and Queer Theory from Africa and the Caribbean and how they may differ from American or French models. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3112 - Advanced Language Studies: Introduction to French Phonetics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Training in French pronunciation through general and French phonetics. Students learn the International Phonetic Alphabet and study the correct articulate of French vowels and consonants, as well as other important parts of speech such as liaison, enchainement, and intonation. Meets Advanced Language Studies (ALS) requirement in French major. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Fren 2011] prereq: 2002 (or concurrent enrollment in 2002) or instr consent
FREN 3113 - Advanced Language Studies: Introduction to Translation
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The art of translation applied to everyday discourse, literary texts, and a number of professional fields: journalism, international business, and political, social, and natural sciences with a particular emphasis on specialized vocabularies and advanced grammar and syntax. Meets Advanced Language Studies (ALS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3114 - Advanced Language Studies: Advanced French Grammar
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Refinement of grammar. Students gain a deeper understanding of the functionality of the French language through a study of French grammar and through applied and historical linguistics. Meets Advanced Language Studies (ALS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
HUM 3108 - Community Interpreting (E/CR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Intended for students with advanced skills in a language other than English, trains participants to serve as Community Interpreters, supporting people with emerging English language skills in gaining access to essential services, such as educational, medical, and social services resources. This course meets international standards for training community interpreters. prereq: advanced proficiency in a language other than English
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
ANTH 2001 - How We Study People: Introduction to Methods in Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of methods in cultural anthropology. prereq: any 1xxx Anth or Soc course
ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by cultural anthropologists to study and understand educational processes. Exploration of approaches to diverse educational settings, including both formal and informal contexts. The seminar-style format of the course emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to connect the readings and course topics to their own lives and experiences.
ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the historical development of cultural anthropological theory, influences that shaped historical and contemporary theories in cultural anthropology, and major debates regarding their interpretation. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Anth 4901] prereq: 1111
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines food access, production, and consumption from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis on varying uses of and relationships to food including issues of sustainability, industrial food production systems, food as harmful or medicinal, religious meanings of food, social class, food marketing, gender, and nationalism. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or Psy 1051 or instr consent
ANTH 3461 - Archaeology of Eurasia and Africa (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The archaeology of Europe, Asia, and Africa, from 30,000 years ago up to the development of state-level societies on all three continents. Focus is on prehistory and non-Classical societies.
ANTH 3465 - Archaeology and Native Peoples (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Consideration of examples of archaeological investigations which take Native peoples and cultures as their objective focus; the foundations of a scientific epistemology and philosophy underwriting that focus; the reaction and resistance of Native communities to this kind of archaeology and the epistemological differences informing their positions; and examples of how archaeology might integrate both Native and scientific epistemological stances for a more ethically equitable approach to the past. The goal is to introduce students to scholarly and literary resources that bring opposing viewpoints into conversation with one another.
ARTH 1111 - Ancient to Medieval Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of the major works of art of western Europe from its origins in the Paleolithic period through to the full development of the Gothic era. Includes the monuments of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome as well as those of the Early Christian and Romanesque periods. Also includes some treatment of non-Western traditions in this era.
ARTH 1121 - Renaissance to Modern Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of the major works of art of western Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present.
ARTH 2107 - Global Modernisms: Modern Art in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Beyond (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An exploration of key examples of modern art in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and elsewhere. Examination of modern art in a global context, the intersection of modern art with imperialism and colonialism, and cross-cultural artistic exchanges. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or sophomore status or instr consent
ARTH 3113 - Early Islamic Art and Culture (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
An investigation of Islamic art and architecture in both the secular and religious realm. Examination of these works in the context of the cultures and historical periods that produced them. Begins with the birth of Islamic art and continues up until the Ayyubid dynasty (14th century). prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3132 - Castles and Cathedrals (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
An investigation of the two major forms of architectural construction in the Middle Ages. Exploration of the development of the cathedral and castle as architectural forms and examination of the circumstances surrounding their evolution through the medieval period. Examples are drawn from continental Europe, the British Isles, and the Levant. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or instr consent
ARTH 3201 - Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of major movements from Neoclassicism through Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism, considering these in their theoretical, historical, social, and artistic contexts. The course also highlights issues of class, imperialism/colonialism, and gender. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3211 - Modern European Art from Impressionism to Surrealism (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of major modern movements including Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, Dada, Constructivism and Surrealism, considering these in their theoretical, historical, social, and artistic contexts. Particular attention is given to modern art's relationship to popular culture and to issues of gender and race. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3281 - Women and Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A historical survey of women's roles as creators and patrons of the visual arts in Western European and American societies, from antiquity to the present. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ARTH 3291 - Facing the Past: Portraiture and Social History (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This seminar examines functions and formats of portraits created primarily in Western Europe between 1400-1800, in order to gain greater insight as to how various social identities (such as that of husband and wife, child, friend, and freak of nature) were visually constructed and verbally interpreted. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of intercultural communication from an interpersonal and group perspective. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
CMR 3433 - Communication, Power, and Identity (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Exploration of the relationship between communication, culture, and social identities. The focus is negotiation of meaning and social identity in face-to-face interaction and intercultural contexts. Surveyed are theories and texts within intercultural communication, environmental communication, ethnic and racial identity, power in discourse. prereq: 1101
CMR 3434 - Communication, Nature, and Belonging (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore how various cross cultural means of communication are active in and about our worlds and allow for better insights about communication, environment, people, and the ways they are related. Overview research that links communication and the ways knowledge and understanding of our environment are situated in local historical contexts. prereq: 1101
ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The development of economic thought from Marx and the end of the classical school, through the development of more modern approaches. In addition to the demise of classical thought, a selection from the thinkers who contributed to the foundations of modern microeconomics and/or macroeconomics is covered. Nature of economics as a social science, through the study of its historical development. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
ECON 4131 - International Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Foreign exchange markets; theories of exchange rate determination; fixed vs. flexible rate systems; theories of balance of payments adjustments; international quantity of money theory; international reserves; international monetary system (past, present, and future); internal and external balance, international economic policy coordination, international debt problem; effect of international sector on domestic growth and stability. prereq: 3202 or instr consent
ENGL 1509W - Literary Studies (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the tools and methods of literary analysis, including the vocabulary of criticism, the techniques of close reading, and the conventions of literary argumentation. Primarily for English majors and minors. A prerequisite to advanced courses in English.
ENGL 2033 - The Bible and Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the role of the English Bible in the western literary tradition. Readings include key Biblical narratives, as well as English and American literary texts that are either deeply influenced by these stories or attempt to re-write them. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the major schools of literary theory and cultural analysis; particular attention to the ways in which the dialogue and debate between these approaches define the discipline of literary criticism. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Engl 3414/GWSS 3414
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as GWSS 3414. Engages students in a critical examination of several influential works participating in the elaboration of feminist theories. Readings and discussions focus on a series of themes and issues--gender, sexuality, race, class, language, bodies, etc.--and how these issues bear upon society. prereq: [1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212] or [GWSS 1101]
GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides a historical overview and introduction to fundamental concepts, frameworks, and bodies of theory related to gender, sexuality, feminism, and other related topics across disciplines. It emphasizes critical analysis of foundational theoretical works and applications of theories to current activism, problems, and scholarship. prereq: 1101 or instructor consent
HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of Africa's incredible human and environmental diversity from the earliest times to European contact. Special attention to how historians of Africa interpret non-written sources to understand the past.
HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Consideration of Africa's past from the colonial era to the present. Special attention to the challenges Africans faced living under Europe's grip as well as their courage to build independent African nations.
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination and discussion of pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial African history through the debates and trends in and between Western feminism, U.S. women of color feminism, Third World feminism, LGBT studies, queer theory, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of African queer studies. Also suitable for students interested in understanding past and present issues of gender and sexuality in Africa through the theories and conditions that animate black queer studies and the black queer diaspora. prereq: 1111 or 1112 or 1113 or Anth 1111 or GWSS 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The intellectual ferment of the Enlightenment has been given the credit and the blame for all things modern--from the concept of human rights and the democracies it has engendered to the subversion of those rights in the totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Exploration of the ideas of the Enlightenment and their political context and attempt to answer the question of how such an important development in human history can be viewed in such contradictory ways.
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
HIST 3211 - Modern France (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of French culture and history from the Revolution (1789) to the present. The ways in which successive governments, from Napoleon's empire through the Fifth Republic, have come to terms with legacies of the Revolution such as national citizenship, individual rights, and the politicization of women.
HIST 3212 - The French Revolution (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the causes, players, drama, complexity, and legacy of the French Revolution. Beginning with the changing social order and new political philosophies of the 18th century, the course follows not only the initial unfolding of revolution, terror, and counter-revolution, but also the rise of Napoleon and revolutionary wars. Later reverberations in the revolutions of 1848, the Commune of 1871, and global influences (such as the Haitian Revolution) also addressed. Throughout these events, the experiences of both prominent figures and ordinary participants (the "crowd") considered.
HUM 4102 - Linguistics for Students of Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: jr or sr status
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Course offers an introduction to language-based approaches to literature. Directed at literature majors (in any language) to enhance close reading through the linguistic analysis of literary language. Topics will include syntax, phonetics, metaphor, speech act theory, sociolinguistics (non-standard dialects), and metrics/prosody. prereq: jr or sr status
LANE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Foreign Language K-12
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching foreign language in K-12. prereq: admission to the SeEd or ElEd teacher education program; coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103, SeEd 4104, SeEd 4105 or prereq ElEd 3202, ElEd 3212
MUS 1155 - Foundations in Music History I: Ancient to 1750 (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A chronological survey of Western musical development from the earliest notated examples to the end of the Baroque period. Emphasis is placed on specific works and composers as examples of larger musical and cultural trends. This is the first of two courses intended to provide a historical framework for further musical study. prererq: coreq 1151, 1153
MUS 1156 - Foundations in Music History II: 1750 to Contemporary (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A chronological survey of Western musical development from the Classical period through the current day. Emphasis is placed on specific works and composers as examples of larger musical and cultural trends. This is the second of two courses intended to provide a historical framework for further musical study. prereq: 1155, coreq 1152, 1154
MUS 1401 - English, Italian, German, and French Diction for Singers (ART/P)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Learning sounds and symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet, rules for correct English, Italian, German, and French lyric diction. Transcribing English, Italian, German, and French song/area texts. Performing pieces in each of these languages in class for critique.
MUS 2403 - Choral Traditions and Literature (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An exploration of choral singing and repertoire from various global cultures, including the western European tradition. Students develop an understanding of the evolution of the choral art form and its parallels with society, culture, politics, and religion.
MUS 2404 - The Orchestra and its Literature from the 1700s through Today (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A study of the orchestra as a cultural institution. Examine important and influential repertoire, with an emphasis on the symphony, as well as examples of ensembles to understand the role of the orchestra in Western culture.
MUS 3108 - Intellectual Foundations of Western Music (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Exploration of source readings and analytical projects showing the intellectual foundations of Western music from antiquity through the Middle Ages. prereq: 2151, 2152 or instr consent
MUS 3111 - History of Music Theory: Rameau to Riemann
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Study of source documents and analytical projects covering the history of Western music theory from 1750 to 1900. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3112 - Analysis of Pre-Tonal Music
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structure of Western music written between 900 and 1600 CE; topics covered may include polyphony, modality, cadences, isorhythm, and formal considerations. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3305 - West African Styles in African American Music (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
An examination of the West African precursors to jazz and other African-American musical styles in the United States, considering both important elements of West African musics and how those elements are found in early African-American styles. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for AmIn 1701 or Hist 1701]
PHIL 4002 - Existentialism (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of some prominent thinkers often classified as "existentialists": Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus. Topics include what human freedom is, what makes a life authentic (or inauthentic), what role passion and choice should play in acquiring our beliefs and values, and what difference (if any) God's existence or non-existence makes on the significance of our lives. prereq: any 1xxx or 2xxx or instr consent
PHIL 4121 - Philosophy of Language (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Traditional and contemporary discussions of philosophical problems such as the nature of language, its relationships to the world, to human thought, and to truth; the nature of logical reasoning; metalogical problems. Readings from philosophers such as Frege, Russell, Quine, Putnam, Goodman, Wittgenstein, and Kripke. prereq: 1102 or instr consent
POL 1401 - World Politics (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to international relations, covering the basic concepts, theories, and trends. The major issue fields include historical international systems, war and peace, foreign policy, diplomacy, national interests, international conflict and cooperation, international law, and international organizations.
POL 2411 - Model United Nations (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Students examine the nature and functions of the United Nations and hone their negotiating skills through a series of mock UN conferences. The issue areas to be covered include peace and security, social justice, economic well-being, nuclear proliferation, environment, and human rights.
POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Discusses negotiation strategies and tactics and examines negotiation skills through a series of simulated negotiations and mock conferences. Diplomacy, negotiation styles, negotiation simulations, and mock conferences. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3461]
POL 3411 - International Law (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
An introduction to public international law, examining basic concepts, theories, and legal cases in international law. Includes the nature of international law, recognition, succession, the rights and duties of international persons, the individual and international law, territorial questions, and laws of war. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
TH 3101 - World Theatre: History and Literature I (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theatrical practice and dramatic literature from origins through late 17th century, tracing the roots leading to, and influences on, early modern European theatre practice and dramatic literature, as well as examining select Asian, African, and/or pre-Columbian American theatrical practice.
TH 3102 - World Theatre: History and Literature II (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theatrical practice and dramatic literature from the late 17th century to the present, examining select Asian, African, and/or Western Hemisphere theatrical practice, as well as tracing the roots leading to, and influences on, current world theatre practice and dramatic literature.