Morris campus
 
Morris Campus

Secondary Education

Division of Education
Division of Education
  • Program Type: Other
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 41 to 43
  • This program is 8 terms (4 years) long.
This discipline is in the Division of Education. A separate admissions process must be completed and admission granted before students can enroll in this program. The secondary education program leads to Minnesota licensure as a teacher in specified liberal arts disciplines. Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs)-Coursework in secondary education is designed to meet standards of effective practice required for licensure and provide prospective teachers with opportunities to do the following: • Understand central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of disciplines taught in the middle and secondary school; • Understand adolescent development theory, individual and group motivation, and diversity among learners; • Create instructional opportunities adapted to learners from diverse cultural backgrounds and with exceptionalities; • Use instructional strategies and technologies that reflect personal knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques; • Encourage development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills; • Understand and use formative and summative methods of student assessment; • Collaborate with parents/guardians, families, school colleagues, and the community in an ethical manner. To obtain a teaching license, an individual must have completed a major, a bachelor's degree, and licensure requirements in the area(s) in which licensure is sought. UMM is approved to recommend teaching licensure in the following fields: chemistry (9-12), communication arts and literature (5-12), general science (5-8), instrumental music (K-12), life science (9-12), mathematics (5-12), physics (9-12), social studies (5-12), Spanish (K-12), visual arts (K-12), and vocal music (K-12). Coursework required for licensure, in most cases, is not equivalent to a major. Consult an advisor in the discipline to determine major requirements. Students planning to seek Minnesota teaching licensure at the secondary school level must complete licensure requirements in the discipline(s) of the subject(s) they intend to teach, the secondary teacher education program, and state and federally mandated examinations for new teachers. Students must be in good academic standing, not on probation and not returning from suspension to be admitted. In addition, a minimum GPA of 2.75 is required in licensure area(s) and in education prerequisite courses. A minimum GPA of 2.50 is required overall. The GPA includes all course work. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced. All courses required for teaching licensure in secondary education (discipline, professional education, or other courses) must be completed with a grade of C- or better. Required courses must be taken A-F, unless they are offered S/N only.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 90 credits before admission to the program.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.75 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.75 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.75 transferring from outside the University
For admission to the one-year program which begins each fall, students must apply in the fall of the preceding year. Decisions are made in the spring. Transfer students must be admitted to UMM before admission to the secondary program can be offered. Transfer students should seek academic advising from the secondary education faculty before application to the program. Requirements • Admission to UMM. • Completion of required essential academic skills exams. • A minimum GPA of 2.75 is required in licensure area(s), program requirements, and prerequisite courses and 2.50 overall. No grade below C- will be accepted in these courses. • Completion or near-completion of licensure courses in the content/licensure area(s) and demonstration of adequate progress in each licensure area. • Declared SEED program and licensure. • Approval of the Ed faculty based on an interview, recommendations from content area faculty, prior experiences with young people, and progress towards degree.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Courses Required for Admission
CMR 1042 - Public Speaking and Analysis [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Practicum (1.0 cr)
ED 2121 - Introduction to Education [SS] (4.0 cr)
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
ED 2601 - Development, Learning, and Teaching [SS] (2.0 cr)
or PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3401 - Child Development (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Student Teaching Requirements
Students must successfully complete the following requirements before student teaching.
1. GPA and Grade Requirement
2.75 minimum GPA required in licensure area(s), program requirements, and education prerequisite courses and 2.50 overall. No grade below C- will be accepted.
2. Secondary Education Program Requirements
SEED 4102 - Teaching and Learning Strategies (2.0 cr)
SEED 4103 - Practicum Experience in the Middle and Secondary School (4.0 cr)
SEED 4104 - Equity, Diversity, and Justice in Education [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
SEED 4105 - Reading and Literacy in the Content Areas (2.0 cr)
SEED 4115 - Disciplinary Language and Literacy [HUM] (2.0 cr)
SEED 4121 - Inclusion in the Secondary School (2.0 cr)
3. Area Methods Course(s)
ARTE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Art K-12 (4.0 cr)
or ENGE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Communication Arts and Literature in the Middle and Secondary School (4.0 cr)
or LANE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Foreign Language K-12 (4.0 cr)
or MTHE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary School (4.0 cr)
or MUSE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Music K-12 (4.0 cr)
or SCIE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Science in the Middle and Secondary School (4.0 cr)
or SSCE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Social Science in the Middle and Secondary School (4.0 cr)
4. Tutor-aide and Practicum Experiences
ED 2111-Tutor Aide Practicum and SEED 4103-Practicum Experience in the Middle and Secondary School
5. Essential Academic Skills Examination
Passing scores on required essential academic skills examinations or faculty approved remediation plan.
6. Discipline Recommendation
Approval of SeEd faculty based on recommendations from faculty in the student's discipline.
Additional Licensure Requirements
Students planning to teach at the secondary level must meet licensure requirements of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board, which change as new rules are adopted. Students must complete licensure requirements and apply for licensure within seven years of admission to the program. After seven years, prior education courses are void and must be retaken. Coursework in the licensure area must also meet current requirements; therefore, some content courses may need to be retaken.
Examinations
Passing scores on all state-required basic skills, pedagogy, content, and performance examination.
Student Teaching
SEED 4201 - Directed Student Teaching in the Middle and Secondary School [HDIV] (12.0 cr)
or SEED 4204 - Directed Global Student Teaching at the Middle and Secondary Level [IP] (1.0-16.0 cr)
Professional Development Course
ED 4901 - The Teacher and Professional Development (1.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Chemistry 9-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I [SCI] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 2311 - Organic Chemistry Lab I (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2321 - Introduction to Research I (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2322 - Introduction to Research II (1.0 cr)
CHEM 3101 - Analytical Chemistry [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 3501 - Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2111 - Cell Biology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II [SCI] (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II with a Biological Emphasis [SCI] (4.0 cr)
Communication Arts and Literature 5-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
Study of Shakespeare (ENGL 3159-Shakespeare: Studies in the Bard or ENGL 2059-Introduction to Shakespeare) strongly recommended. ENGL 2059 preferred.
CMR 1101 - Introduction to Theories of Communication, Media, and Rhetoric [HUM] (4.0 cr)
ED 2201 - Perspectives on Young Adult Literature: Schooling, Society, and Culture [HUM] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 1509W - Literary Studies [HUM] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3021 - Grammar and Language [HUM] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3005 - Understanding Writing: Theories and Practices [HUM] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3032 - Creative Nonfiction Writing [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3312 - World Indigenous Literature and Film [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Speaking Experience
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· CMR 2311 - Media History and Society [SS] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 2421 - Business and Professional Communication [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3121 - Rhetorical Criticism and Cinema [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3312 - Media Literacy (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Theater Experience
TH 2211-Oral Interpretation is preferred.
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· TH 2111 - Creative Drama with Children [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· TH 2112 - Drama in the Classroom [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
· TH 2211 - Oral Interpretation [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· TH 2212 - Interpretation for Performance [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
General Science 5-8
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1054 - Introduction to Astronomy [SCI] (4.0 cr)
Principles of Physics
PHYS 1091 - Principles of Physics I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1092 - Principles of Physics II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
or General Physics
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1102 - General Physics II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
Instrumental Music K-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
MUS 1151 - Foundations of Music Theory I: Rhythm and Pitch [M/SR] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1152 - Foundations of Music Theory II: Line [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1153 - Foundations of Musicianship I (1.0 cr)
MUS 1154 - Foundations of Musicianship II (1.0 cr)
MUS 1155 - Foundations in Music History I: Ancient to 1750 [HIST] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1156 - Foundations in Music History II: 1750 to Contemporary [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 2151 - Intermediate Music Theory: Form (2.0 cr)
MUS 2152 - Intermediate Music Theory: Harmony (2.0 cr)
MUS 2301 - Instrumental Techniques--Woodwind (1.0 cr)
MUS 2302 - Instrumental Techniques--Brass (1.0 cr)
MUS 2303 - Instrumental Techniques--Strings (1.0 cr)
MUS 2304 - Vocal Techniques (1.0 cr)
MUS 2305 - Instrumental Techniques--Percussion (1.0 cr)
MUS 2405 - Survey of Instrumental Wind Literature [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 3311 - Conducting Techniques (2.0 cr)
MUS 3321 - Instrumental Conducting and Materials (2.0 cr)
MUS 3351 - Instrumental Arranging [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
MUS 4901 - Senior Project and Portfolio (1.0 cr)
MUS 2404 - The Orchestra and its Literature from the 1700s through Today [FA] (2.0 cr)
or MUS 2406 - Jazz Style and Repertoire [FA] (2.0 cr)
Advanced Music Theory
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MUS 3108 - Intellectual Foundations of Western Music [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3109 - Analysis of Popular Music [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3110 - History of Music Theory: From the Renaissance to the Baroque (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3111 - History of Music Theory: Rameau to Riemann (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3112 - Analysis of Pre-Tonal Music (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3113 - Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (2.0 cr)
Advanced Music History
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MUS 3107 - Music in 20th-Century America [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3114 - Musical Borrowing [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3116 - Music and Identity [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3117 - Music in Film [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3118 - Music and Politics [FA] (2.0 cr)
Concert Attendance
Instrumental licensure students are required to enroll in seven semesters of Concert Attendance.
MUS 100 - Music Performance Lab (0.0 cr)
Symphonic Winds
Instrumental licensure students are required to enroll in seven semesters of Symphonic Winds.
MUS 1300 - UMM Symphonic Winds [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
Piano Proficiency
Music theory courses are taken concurrently with piano lessons or functional keyboard for the Music Major, (Mus 1111, 1112, 2111, 2112) until the piano proficiency test is passed.
Primary Performance Medium- Mus 12xx/Mus 32xx
Individual performance study in wind, string, percussion, or keyboard. Students should consult with music faculty to determine performance study requirements.
Secondary Performance Medium
Secondary performance competence in woodwind, brass, string, percussion, keyboard. Students should consult with music faculty to determine performance study requirements.
Instrument Repair Clinic
Successful completion of the instrument repair clinic.
Life Science 9-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development [SCI] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2111 - Cell Biology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 3121 - Molecular Biology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 3131 - Ecology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 3701 - Biological Communication II (1.0 cr)
BIOL 4312 - Genetics (4.0 cr)
BIOL 4901 - Senior Seminar (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
MATH 1021 - Survey of Calculus [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Mathematics 5-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
MATH 1102 - Calculus II [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
MATH 2101 - Calculus III [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
MATH 2202 - Mathematical Perspectives [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
MATH 2211 - History of Mathematics (4.0 cr)
MATH 3111 - Linear Algebra (4.0 cr)
MATH 3211 - Geometry [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
MATH 3231 - Abstract Algebra I (4.0 cr)
MATH 3411 - Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics (4.0 cr)
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2611 - Mathematical Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Physics 9-12
It is recommended that this license be combined with an additional teaching license (e.g., Mathematics 5-12, General Science 5-8). Due to a dearth of full-time field placements, candidates in this licensure area may need to do their student teaching outside of the Morris area (e.g., Twin Cities, Global Student Teaching, etc.).
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
Also recommended (required for physics major): MATH 2101-Calculus III, MATH 2401-Differential Equations
MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
MATH 1102 - Calculus II [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1102 - General Physics II [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 2101 - Modern Physics [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 2201 - Circuits and Electronic Devices [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 3101 - Classical Mechanics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 3301 - Optics (4.0 cr)
PHYS 3501 - Statistical Physics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 4101 - Electromagnetism (4.0 cr)
PHYS 4201 - Quantum Mechanics (4.0 cr)
Research
Other research experiences (e.g., UROP, internship) can be substituted with discipline approval.
Take exactly 1 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Senior Thesis
· PHYS 4901 - Senior Thesis I (1.0 cr)
PHYS 4902 - Senior Thesis II (1.0 cr)
· Directed Research
· PHYS 1993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
or PHYS 2993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
or PHYS 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
or PHYS 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
Social Studies 5-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
GEOG 2001 - Problems in Geography [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology [SS] (4.0 cr)
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Area of focus:
Students work closely with their advisors to plan a program that satisfies the required competencies in a chosen sub-plan and in the social science disciplines. The sub-plan most often is demonstrated by completing the minor in that discipline.
Anthropology
Required Courses
Introductory Anthropology
ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
Anthropological Methods
ANTH 2001 - How We Study People: Introduction to Methods in Cultural Anthropology [SS] (2.0 cr)
or ANTH 2002 - Learning from the Dead: Introduction to Methods in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology [SS] (2.0 cr)
Anthropological Theory
ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology (2.0 cr)
or ANTH 3002 - Theory in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology (2.0 cr)
Elective Courses
An additional 8 credits (exclusive of those used to complete required courses) in anthropology and sociology; 4 of which must be above 2xxx courses. No more than 4 credits can be from IS 3796.
Lower Division Elective Courses
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1xxx
· SOC 1xxx
· ANTH 2xxx
· SOC 2xxx
Upper Division Elective Courses
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3461 - Archaeology of Eurasia and Africa [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3705 - The Archaeology of Death and Burial (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3751 - Primatology [SCI] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3761 - Human Fossil Record [SCI] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3xxx
· ANTH 4501 - Archaeological Fieldschool [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4xxx
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4xxx
-OR-
Economics
Required Courses
ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory (4.0 cr)
ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory (4.0 cr)
MATH 1101 - Calculus I [M/SR] (5.0 cr)
Elective Courses
No more than 4 cr from each of the following can be applied to the sub-plan: ECON x993, ECON 4501, ECON 4502.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ECON 3005 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics I (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3006 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3009 - Political Economy (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3014 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior I (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3015 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3113 - Money, Banking, and Financial Markets (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3121 - Public Economics I (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3122 - Public Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3131 - Comparative Economic Systems [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3134 - Cooperative Business Model (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3136 - Economics of the Green Power Transition: New Business Models and Regulatory Strategies [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3141 - Economic Growth and Development I [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3142 - Economic Growth and Development II [IP] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3172 - Strategic Firm Interaction and Market Structures (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3173 - Health Care Economics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3211 - History of Economic Thought I [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II [HIST] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 3501 - Introduction to Econometrics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· ECON 3xxx
· ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4102 - Labor Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4111 - Mathematical Economics I (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4112 - Mathematical Economics II (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4121 - International Trade Theory (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4131 - International Finance (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4141 - Empirics of Economic Growth (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4201 - Foundations of Microeconomic Theory (4.0 cr)
· ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4502 - Advanced Research Seminar in Economics and Management (2.0 cr)
· ECON 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· ECON 4xxx
-OR-
History
An additional 16 credits in history of which 12 credits are at 2xxx or above. There should be course work in at least three geographic areas, with at least one of these in a non-Western area. Refer to the history minor for the specific geographic areas.
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1xxx
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2108 - Ancient Greek and Roman History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2132W - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2452 - Minnesota History [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2551 - Modern Japan [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2552 - History of Modern China [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2616 - Environmental History of Latin America [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2xxx
· HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3207 - The Crusades [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3209 - Modern Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3211 - Modern France [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3353 - World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974 [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3455 - American Immigration [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3467 - The Fracturing of America: A History of the United States from Nixon to Trump [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· HIST 3xxx
· HIST 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· HIST 4xxx
-OR-
Political Science
An additional 16 credits; 12 of which must be in courses 2xxx or above. At least 4 credits must be from 3xxx or 4xxx courses.
Elective Courses - 1xxx
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 1101 - Introduction to Political Theory [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1401 - World Politics [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1xxx
Elective Courses - 2xxx
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· POL 2001W - Political Science Research Methods [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing (4.0 cr)
· POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2262 - Power and Politics in American Cities and Communities [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2301 - Anarchy and Utopia [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2302 - Gandhi and the Politics of Resistance [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2354 - Political Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2401 - U.S. Foreign Policy [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2411 - Model United Nations [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2501 - East Asian Society and Politics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2xxx
Elective Courses - 3xxx or above
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· POL 3201 - Legislative Process [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3211 - The American Presidency [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3263 - Political Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3266 - Media in American Politics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3302 - Islamic Political Thought [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3351 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3352 - Modern Political Thought [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3451 - Comparative Foreign Policy (4.0 cr)
· POL 3453 - Russian Politics and Foreign Policy [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· POL 3504 - Latin American Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 3996 - Field Study in Political Science (1.0-16.0 cr)
· POL 3xxx
· POL 4205 - Seminar in American Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 4305 - Seminar in Political Theory (4.0 cr)
· POL 4405 - Seminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations (4.0 cr)
· POL 4xxx
-OR-
Psychology
Required Course
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Required Areas
Students must complete at least one course from four of the five areas. One must be a designated lab course.
Take exactly 4 course(s) including exactly 4 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Learning and Cognition
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 2112 - Psycholinguistics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· Biological and Comparative Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3201 - Comparative Psychology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3216 - Cognitive Neuroscience (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3521 - Health Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology (2.0 cr)
· Personality and Clinical Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3302 - Personality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions (4.0 cr)
· Developmental Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3401 - Child Development (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3403 - Adult Development and Aging [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· Social and Applied Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3513 - Negotiation (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
Additional elective credits to total at least 22 credits in the psychology sub-plan (including required courses). No more than 4 credits of IS 3796 or Psy 4896 may be applied to the sub-plan.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
· IS 3800 - Practicum in Social Sciences (1.0-2.0 cr)
· POL 3263 - Political Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 1026 - Reclaiming Happiness (1.0 cr)
· PSY 2402 - Family Interaction Dynamics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PSY 3611 - History and Philosophy of Psychology [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3800 - Research Practicum (1.0-12.0 cr)
· PSY 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4770 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology I (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4771 - Independent Research in Psychology (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PSY 4772 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology II (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Mental Health (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PSY 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· STAT 3601 - Data Analysis [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3611 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Sociology
Required Courses
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
Elective Courses
No more than 4 credits of the 12 elective credits required for the sub-plan can be from ANTH courses. No more than 4 cr can be from IS 3796. SOC 4991 is strongly recommended.
Take at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2501 - Medical Anthropology-An Overview [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 2xxx
· ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics [SCI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3xxx
· ANTH 4411 - Research in Cultural Anthropology [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4xxx
· IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions (1.0-16.0 cr)
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2xxx
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4991 - Sociology Independent Project Seminar (4.0 cr)
· SOC 4xxx
Spanish K-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
Study abroad is strongly encouraged.
SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I [IP] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II [IP] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 3011 - Conversation, Composition, and Culture [IP] (2.0 cr)
SPAN 3012 - Spanish Grammar in Practice [IP] (2.0 cr)
SPAN 3111 - Readings in Spanish I [HUM] (2.0 cr)
SPAN 3112 - Readings in Spanish II [HUM] (2.0 cr)
SPAN 3211 - Literature and Culture of Latin America [HUM] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 3212 - Literature and Culture of Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
Seminar Electives
Take exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
· SPAN 3651 - Seminar: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's "El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha" [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3681 - Seminar: Romanticism and Revolution in 19th-Century Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3682 - Seminar: Realism and Reform in 19th-Century Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3683 - Seminar: Modernity and Identity in Spain, 1900-1930 [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3684 - Seminar: Hispanic Film [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3690 - Seminar: Mexican Cultural Production [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3691 - Seminar: Native Cultural Production of the Americas [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3692 - Seminar: Nahua Media and Culture [IP] (4.0 cr)
Visual Arts K-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule.
Required Courses
In addition to the required courses and fabric/fiber elective, students must complete three mediums: 16 credits in a first medium, 8 credits in a second medium (different from the first medium), 4 credits in a third medium (different from the first and second mediums).
ARTH 1101 - Interpreting the Visual World: An Introduction to Art History [FA] (4.0 cr)
ARTH 1111 - Ancient to Medieval Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
ARTH 1121 - Renaissance to Modern Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
ARTS 1101 - Studio Essentials: Observational Drawing [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 1102 - Studio Essentials: Experimental Drawing [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 1103 - Studio Essentials: Materials and Design [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 1104 - Studio Essentials: Materials and Space [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 2101 - Drawing From Life [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 2601 - The Artist in Studio and in Society [FA] (2.0 cr)
ARTS 2602 - Digital Fundamentals [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
Fabric and Fiber Elective
Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3002 - Media Studies: Artist's Books [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3006 - Media Studies: Feminist Art: A Studio Perspective [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
First Medium
Take exactly 16 credit(s) including exactly 1 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Printmaking
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3007 - Media Studies: Printmaking [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3200 - Printmaking Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3210 - Printmaking Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Painting
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3013 - Media Studies: Painting [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3300 - Painting Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3310 - Painting Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Sculpture
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3015 - Media Studies: Sculpture [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3400 - Sculpture Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3410 - Sculpture Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Ceramics
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3012 - Media Studies: Ceramics [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3650 - Ceramics Studio [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Drawing
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3017 - Media Studies: Drawing [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3100 - Drawing Studio [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· Photography/Digitial Imaging
Take 0 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3016 - Media Studies: Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3500 - Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
Second Medium
Must be different than first medium.
Take exactly 8 credit(s) including exactly 1 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Printmaking
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3007 - Media Studies: Printmaking [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3200 - Printmaking Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3210 - Printmaking Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Painting
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3013 - Media Studies: Painting [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3300 - Painting Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3310 - Painting Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Sculpture
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3015 - Media Studies: Sculpture [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3400 - Sculpture Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3410 - Sculpture Studio II [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Ceramics
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3012 - Media Studies: Ceramics [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3650 - Ceramics Studio [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· Drawing
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3017 - Media Studies: Drawing [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3100 - Drawing Studio [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· Photography/Digital Imaging
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3016 - Media Studies: Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3500 - Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
Third Medium
Must be different than first and second mediums.
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3002 - Media Studies: Artist's Books [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3006 - Media Studies: Feminist Art: A Studio Perspective [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3007 - Media Studies: Printmaking [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3012 - Media Studies: Ceramics [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3013 - Media Studies: Painting [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3015 - Media Studies: Sculpture [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3016 - Media Studies: Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3100 - Drawing Studio [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3200 - Printmaking Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3300 - Painting Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3400 - Sculpture Studio I [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3500 - Photographic and Digital Processes [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3650 - Ceramics Studio [ART/P] (4.0 cr)
Vocal Music K-12
Some courses in the program sub-plan may require completion of prerequisites. Students should review the prerequisites listed in the catalog or class schedule. Voice study/lessons are required for Vocal Music licensure. Consult with a Music advisor to plan the lessons quantity and sequence.
Vocal Music K-12
MUS 1151 - Foundations of Music Theory I: Rhythm and Pitch [M/SR] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1152 - Foundations of Music Theory II: Line [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1153 - Foundations of Musicianship I (1.0 cr)
MUS 1154 - Foundations of Musicianship II (1.0 cr)
MUS 1155 - Foundations in Music History I: Ancient to 1750 [HIST] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1156 - Foundations in Music History II: 1750 to Contemporary [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 1204 - Individual Performance Study: Voice [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
MUS 1401 - English, Italian, German, and French Diction for Singers [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
MUS 2151 - Intermediate Music Theory: Form (2.0 cr)
MUS 2152 - Intermediate Music Theory: Harmony (2.0 cr)
MUS 2301 - Instrumental Techniques--Woodwind (1.0 cr)
MUS 2302 - Instrumental Techniques--Brass (1.0 cr)
MUS 2303 - Instrumental Techniques--Strings (1.0 cr)
MUS 2304 - Vocal Techniques (1.0 cr)
MUS 2305 - Instrumental Techniques--Percussion (1.0 cr)
MUS 2402 - Art Song Repertoire [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 2403 - Choral Traditions and Literature [FA] (2.0 cr)
MUS 3311 - Conducting Techniques (2.0 cr)
MUS 3331 - Choral Conducting and Materials (2.0 cr)
MUS 3352 - Choral Arranging [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
MUS 4901 - Senior Project and Portfolio (1.0 cr)
Advanced Music Theory
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MUS 3108 - Intellectual Foundations of Western Music [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3109 - Analysis of Popular Music [HUM] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3110 - History of Music Theory: From the Renaissance to the Baroque (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3111 - History of Music Theory: Rameau to Riemann (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3112 - Analysis of Pre-Tonal Music (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3113 - Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (2.0 cr)
Advanced Music History
Take exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MUS 3107 - Music in 20th-Century America [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3114 - Musical Borrowing [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3116 - Music and Identity [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3117 - Music in Film [FA] (2.0 cr)
· MUS 3118 - Music and Politics [FA] (2.0 cr)
Concert Attendance
Vocal licensure students are required to enroll in seven semesters of Concert Attendance.
MUS 100 - Music Performance Lab (0.0 cr)
Choir
Vocal licensure students are required to enroll for seven semesters in Concert Choir and/or University Choir.
MUS 1310 - University Choir [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
or MUS 1320 - Concert Choir [ART/P] (1.0 cr)
Piano Proficiency
Music theory courses are taken concurrently with piano lessons or functional keyboard for the Music Major, (Mus 1111, 1112, 2111, 2112) until the piano proficiency test is passed.
Primary Performance Medium - Voice
Individual performance study in voice (if primary performance medium is not voice, secondary performance medium must be voice) Students should consult with music faculty to determine performance study requirements.
Secondary Performance Medium
Secondary performance competence in another medium if primary performance medium is voice (piano or guitar is strongly recommended). Students should consult with music faculty to determine performance study requirements.
 
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· Division of Education

View sample plan(s):
· Chemistry 9-12
· Comm. Arts & Literature 5-12
· General Science 5-8
· Instrumental Music K-12
· Life Science 9-12
· Mathematics 5-12
· Physics 9-12
· Social Studies 5-12: Anthropology
· Social Studies 5-12: Economics
· Social Studies 5-12: History
· Social Studies 5-12: Political Science
· Social Studies 5-12: Psychology
· Social Studies 5-12: Sociology
· Spanish K-12
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CMR 1042 - Public Speaking and Analysis (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CMR 1042/CMR 1052
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Public address theories, practices, and analysis.
ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students complete 30 hours of preprofessional field experience in the schools. Students enrolled in this course are required to pay for and submit to a Minnesota background check. prereq: coreq 2121
ED 2121 - Introduction to Education (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History, philosophy, and purposes of American education; classroom practices and effective teaching; instructional technology; and certification requirements in education. prereq: coreq 2111
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081]
ED 2601 - Development, Learning, and Teaching (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introductory exploration of perspectives on child and adolescent development including cognitive, social/emotional, personal, physical, and language development and theories of learning, with a strong focus on the implications for effective teaching in the P-12 classroom. This course is a prerequisite for admission to the Elementary and Secondary Education programs.
PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3401 - Child Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to middle childhood. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
SEED 4102 - Teaching and Learning Strategies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Provides greater depth in previously taught concepts and skills, including teaching and learning strategies for middle and secondary classrooms, planning for lesson and unit instruction and assessment, learning theory, use of technology in the classroom, discipline, and classroom management. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program; coreq 4103, 4104, 4105, methods
SEED 4103 - Practicum Experience in the Middle and Secondary School
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field experience in the middle and secondary school. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program; coreq 4102, 4104, 4105, methods
SEED 4104 - Equity, Diversity, and Justice in Education (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of educational inequity centered on race, ethnicity, social class, gender, and sexuality; teaching practices to combat such inequity; and teachers? roles in educational policy work around equity and justice in schools. Topics include; race, gender, sexual orientation, culture, and class; effects of inequity on schooling; preventing and responding to prejudice and discrimination; culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy; intercultural communication; and teachers? roles in effecting change within educational institutions. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program; coreq 4102, 4103, 4105, methods
SEED 4105 - Reading and Literacy in the Content Areas
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of how teachers in the various academic disciplines can support reading and literacy in their classrooms and use reading and literacy to enhance learning in the disciplines. Topics include theory and instructional strategies in the areas of reading comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary development. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program; coreq 4102, 4103, 4104, methods
SEED 4115 - Disciplinary Language and Literacy (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of how conventions of academic language, thought, and literacy vary among academic disciplines. Topics include strategies to support close reading of academic text, strategies to support academic literacy development among a diverse array of learners, and subject-specific theories, strategies, and projects. prereq: 4105
SEED 4121 - Inclusion in the Secondary School
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ED 4121/SEED 4121
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategies and techniques for developing inclusive learning environments in secondary schools. Discussion of the differences in strategies in accommodations and modifications. Emphasizes adaptations for students with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities. Introduction to various methods of identifying students with disabilities and follow-up interventions. prereq: admission to the secondary education program
ARTE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Art K-12
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching art in K-12. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103, SeEd 4104, SeEd 4105
ENGE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Communication Arts and Literature in the Middle and Secondary School
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching communication arts and literature in the middle and secondary school. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
LANE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Foreign Language K-12
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching foreign language in K-12. prereq: admission to the SeEd or ElEd teacher education program; coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103, SeEd 4104, SeEd 4105 or prereq ElEd 3202, ElEd 3212
MTHE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary School
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching mathematics in the middle and secondary school. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
MUSE 4123 - Methods of Teaching Music K-12
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching music in K-12. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103, SeEd 4104, SeEd 4105
SCIE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Science in the Middle and Secondary School
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching science in the middle and secondary school. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
SSCE 4121 - Methods of Teaching Social Science in the Middle and Secondary School
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Objectives, curricula, special methods, materials, and evaluation appropriate for teaching social science in the middle and secondary school. prereq: admission to the secondary teacher education program or elementary education program, coreq SeEd 4102, SeEd 4103 or prereq ELED 3202, ELED 3212
SEED 4201 - Directed Student Teaching in the Middle and Secondary School (HDIV)
Credits: 12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students teach for a period of at least 12 weeks, demonstrating application of approaches to teaching and learning in the middle and secondary grades under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor. [Note: special fee required] prereq: 4102, 4103, 4104, 4105, methods, CMR 1042, passing scores on basic skills exams or instr consent
SEED 4204 - Directed Global Student Teaching at the Middle and Secondary Level (IP)
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students complete Global Student Teaching demonstrating application of approaches to teaching and learning in the middle and secondary grades under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor. [Note: special fee required] prereq: 4102, 4103, 4104, 4105, methods, CMR 1042, passing scores on basic skills exams or instr consent
ED 4901 - The Teacher and Professional Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone experience. Professional development issues and philosophy of education are included as topics of study. prereq: ElEd or SeEd 4201 or 4204 or instr consent
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Scientific method, measurements, nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, thermochemistry, chemical periodicity, introduction to chemical bonding, and properties of common elements and ions. Development of scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. Laboratory exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: Math 1010 or placement beyond Math 1010 using ACT/placement exam score
CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Chem 1101. Chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, acid-base chemistry, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, quantum theory, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Lab exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: 1101
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules; nomenclature and functional groups; stereochemistry; mechanisms of substitution and elimination pathways; physical organic chemistry; introduction to synthetic strategy; fundamentals of spectroscopic techniques. prereq: 1102
CHEM 2311 - Organic Chemistry Lab I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: coreq 2301 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of lab techniques in organic chemistry; experimental problem-solving. (3 hrs lab) prereq: coreq 2301 or instr consent
CHEM 2321 - Introduction to Research I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary approach to experiment design and analysis of data. Synthesis of organic, organometallic, and/or inorganic compounds, with emphasis on purification and characterization using advanced techniques and instrumental methods. Instruction in use of the scientific literature and scientific communication. Begin research project with faculty mentor. (6 hrs lab) prereq: 2311, coreq 2302 or 2304 or instr consent
CHEM 2322 - Introduction to Research II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continue research with faculty mentor. Experiment design and analysis of data. Instruction in the use of the scientific literature and oral and written scientific communication.(6 hrs lab) Prereq-2321, coreq 2302 or 2304
CHEM 3101 - Analytical Chemistry (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The application of chemical equilibria to chemical analysis with emphasis on the fundamental quantitative aspects of analytical chemistry. Acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and complexometric titrations, introduction to electrochemical and spectrophotometric analyses and separations. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab) prereq: 1102
CHEM 3501 - Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The gas state. Classical thermodynamics. Phase, chemical and heterogeneous equilibria. Chemical kinetics. Kinetic theory of gases. prereq: 1102, Phys 1101, Math 1102 or instr consent
BIOL 2111 - Cell Biology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell structure and function. Includes topics pertaining to the chemistry, physiology, structure, and reproduction of plant and animal cells. (three 65-min lect and one 120-min lab) prereq: C- or better in 1111, Chem 1102 or instr consent
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Vectors, kinematics, laws of motion, circular motion, work-energy theorem, conservation principles, rotational motion, gravitation, simple harmonic oscillations, wave phenomena, fluid mechanics, thermal properties of matter, kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics. (4 hrs lect and rec, 2 hrs lab) prereq: Math 1101 or instr consent
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of topics from Chem 2301; spectroscopy; chemistry of polyenes, aromatic systems, and amines; enol and enolate chemistry; free-radical chemistry; retrosynthetic analysis; special topics. prereq: C or better in 2301, coreq 2321 or instr consent for chem majors
CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II with a Biological Emphasis (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Continuation of topics from Chem 2301, with an emphasis on compounds and reactions of biological interest. Topics include spectroscopy, structure and reactivity of aromatic compounds, phosphoryl and acyl group transfer, nucleophilic carbonyl addition, reactions involving enolate and enamine intermediates, coenzyme chemistry, electrophilic addition, beta elimination, oxidation and reduction of organic compounds, and reactions involving free radical intermediates. prereq: C or better in 2301, Biol 2111 or instr consent
CMR 1101 - Introduction to Theories of Communication, Media, and Rhetoric (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A survey of the field of study. Students learn the history, theories, and contexts of communication study that prepare them for upper-division courses.
ED 2201 - Perspectives on Young Adult Literature: Schooling, Society, and Culture (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Exposure to multiple genres of young adult literature and brief introduction to various types of response to literature. Special emphasis on multicultural literature, the role of literature in forming moral and cultural values, using literature in the grade 5-12 classroom, and reader response theory and pedagogy. Students read, respond to, select, and evaluate young adult literature.
ENGL 1509W - Literary Studies (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the tools and methods of literary analysis, including the vocabulary of criticism, the techniques of close reading, and the conventions of literary argumentation. Primarily for English majors and minors. A prerequisite to advanced courses in English.
ENGL 3021 - Grammar and Language (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of the English language. Historical development and current structure. Includes language variation and change, social history of language, phonology, syntax, semantics, development of English grammar, prescriptive versus descriptive grammar, and contemporary theories of grammar.
ENGL 3005 - Understanding Writing: Theories and Practices (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to composition theory: generating, composing, revising, and responding to writing; conventions across disciplines; strategies for teaching and tutoring writing. Weekly short assignments; three formal papers, written and revised in stages; oral presentation of research. Required for first-semester Writing Room staff. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv, soph standing, instr consent, coreq IS 3720 for students working in the Writing Room
ENGL 3032 - Creative Nonfiction Writing (ART/P)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
For experienced writers. Focus on understanding and practicing the rhetorical and stylistic choices available to writers of creative nonfiction, especially decisions about structure, pacing, language, style, tone, detail, description, and narrative voice. prereq: 2121 or instr consent
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of literatures by African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, U.S. Latino/a, and other under-represented peoples. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3312 - World Indigenous Literature and Film (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Comparative study of indigenous literature and film from North America, New Zealand, and Australia with particular emphasis given to issues of political and cultural sovereignty, cultural appropriation, self-representation, and colonial nostalgia. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212, or instr consent, or NAIS major
CMR 2311 - Media History and Society (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the historical and on-going development of the relationship of media, culture, and the public. Traces and explores the developments of various communication technologies, their impacts and consequences, and their relationships to notions of "the public."
CMR 2421 - Business and Professional Communication (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Developing proficiency in communication skills in business and professional contexts. Preparing, selecting, organizing, designing, and delivering messages in business situations. Analyzing meeting/group facilitation, interviewing, and professional presentations. prereq: 1042, 1062 or instr consent
CMR 3121 - Rhetorical Criticism and Cinema (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Investigation and analysis of film. Learn how films make meaning with their audiences. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
CMR 3312 - Media Literacy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examining ways people decode media images and messages. Topics include principles of literacy, media content/industries, media and identity, and media effects. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of intercultural communication from an interpersonal and group perspective. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
TH 2111 - Creative Drama with Children (ART/P)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of classroom skills in the use of dramatic techniques to teach a broad range of subjects to children. Exercises, presentations, and experiential learning techniques are modeled and practiced in class. prereq: 1101 or theatre or elem ed major or instr consent
TH 2112 - Drama in the Classroom (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of classroom skills in the use of dramatic techniques to teach a broad range of subjects to children. Exercises, presentations, and experiential learning techniques are modeled and practiced in this 2-credit half-semester class.
TH 2211 - Oral Interpretation (ART/P)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
offered alternate yrs
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces the study of literature through text analysis and performance. Focus is on the student's discovery of the aesthetic, communicative, and performative elements of a variety of personal narratives, prose, and poetry.
TH 2212 - Interpretation for Performance (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Th 2211/Th 2212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduces students to the study of performance through voice, body movement, and emotions by using their interpretations of literary texts (prose, poetry, drama, music) as well as a memorized program on a theme. [Note: no credit for students who received credit for Th 2211]
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of evolutionary trends using historical and contemporary evidence. Principles of classification and phylogenetic reconstruction. Includes laboratory survey of the major groups of organisms. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab) prereq: C- or better in 1111 or instr consent
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Scientific method, measurements, nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, thermochemistry, chemical periodicity, introduction to chemical bonding, and properties of common elements and ions. Development of scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. Laboratory exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: Math 1010 or placement beyond Math 1010 using ACT/placement exam score
CHEM 1102 - General Chemistry II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Chem 1101. Chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, acid-base chemistry, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, quantum theory, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Lab exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: 1101
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the materials that make up the Earth and the structures, surface features, and geologic processes involved in its origin and development. Lab work includes study of the major constituents of the Earth's crust, including the important rocks and minerals; study of surface and geologic features using aerial photographs, topographic maps, and satellite imagery. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab)
PHYS 1054 - Introduction to Astronomy (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Course covers the fundamentals of sky observation, including fall constellations and historical development; orbits, gravitation, and seasons; radiation, spectra, and astronomical instrumentation; objects in the solar system; including planets, asteroids, comets, and more; the sun as a star in the Milky Way. Nighttime viewing sessions are required. (4 hrs lect)
PHYS 1091 - Principles of Physics I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to physics without the use of calculus. Vectors, kinematics. Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, torque, fluids, thermal physics, laws of thermodynamics, oscillations and waves. (4 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab) prereq: high school higher algebra and trigonometry
PHYS 1092 - Principles of Physics II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Coulomb's law, electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, electric current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetism, induction, reflection and refraction of light, mirrors and lenses, interference and diffraction, optical instruments, radioactivity (4 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab) prereq: 1091
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Vectors, kinematics, laws of motion, circular motion, work-energy theorem, conservation principles, rotational motion, gravitation, simple harmonic oscillations, wave phenomena, fluid mechanics, thermal properties of matter, kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics. (4 hrs lect and rec, 2 hrs lab) prereq: Math 1101 or instr consent
PHYS 1102 - General Physics II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Coulomb's law, electric field, Gauss's law, electric potential, capacitance, dielectrics, current, resistance, circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, Faraday's law, AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, nature of light, reflection, refraction, optical instruments, interference, diffraction. (4 hrs lect and rec, 2 hrs lab) prereq: 1101, Math 1102 or instr consent
MUS 1151 - Foundations of Music Theory I: Rhythm and Pitch (M/SR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Notation; rhythm reading and identification; scales, modes, keys, and basic chords; simple, compound, and complex meters. prereq: coreq 1153, 1155, concurrent enrollment in piano classes/lessons until piano proficiency is passed for maj/min
MUS 1152 - Foundations of Music Theory II: Line (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of melody and line; one-, two-, and four-part writing and counterpoint; phrase structure; interaction of line with harmony; analysis and identification. prereq: 1151, coreq 1154, 1156, concurrent enrollment in piano classes/lessons until piano proficiency is passed for maj/min
MUS 1153 - Foundations of Musicianship I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to sight-singing, rhythmic and pitch dictation and transcription, and aural error detection. prereq: coreq 1151, 1155
MUS 1154 - Foundations of Musicianship II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sight-singing of melodies; melodic dictation and transcription; aural error detection. prereq: 1153, coreq 1152, 1156, concurrent enrollment in piano classes/lessons until piano proficiency is passed for maj/min
MUS 1155 - Foundations in Music History I: Ancient to 1750 (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A chronological survey of Western musical development from the earliest notated examples to the end of the Baroque period. Emphasis is placed on specific works and composers as examples of larger musical and cultural trends. This is the first of two courses intended to provide a historical framework for further musical study. prererq: coreq 1151, 1153
MUS 1156 - Foundations in Music History II: 1750 to Contemporary (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A chronological survey of Western musical development from the Classical period through the current day. Emphasis is placed on specific works and composers as examples of larger musical and cultural trends. This is the second of two courses intended to provide a historical framework for further musical study. prereq: 1155, coreq 1152, 1154
MUS 2151 - Intermediate Music Theory: Form
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Periodicity; analysis and score study of pieces in binary, rounded binary, ternary, variation, sonata, rondo, and sonata-rondo forms. prereq: 1152, music major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2152 - Intermediate Music Theory: Harmony
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Further exploration of triads, seventh chords, and harmonic function; secondary-function chords; modal mixture; modulation; Neapolitan and augmented-6th chords; upper extensions; altered dominants and chromatic mediants. prereq: 1152, music major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2301 - Instrumental Techniques--Woodwind
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Practical study to develop elementary skills as well as a basic teaching knowledge and understanding of performance challenges of the woodwind instruments. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2302 - Instrumental Techniques--Brass
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Practical study to develop elementary skills as well as a basic teaching knowledge and understanding of performance challenges of the brass instruments. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2303 - Instrumental Techniques--Strings
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical study to develop elementary skills as well as a basic teaching knowledge and understanding of performance challenges of the string instruments. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2304 - Vocal Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Practical study to develop elementary skills as well as a basic teaching knowledge and understanding of performance challenges of the voice. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2305 - Instrumental Techniques--Percussion
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical study to develop elementary skills as well as a basic teaching knowledge and understanding of performance challenges of the percussion instruments. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 2405 - Survey of Instrumental Wind Literature (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A survey of standard and educational wind ensemble and wind chamber music literature from all historical periods and styles. Students develop a comprehensive knowledge of the composers and literature discussed in the course through detailed listening, score study, discussion, and evaluation.
MUS 3311 - Conducting Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of basic ensemble conducting skills. prereq: major or minor or instr consent
MUS 3321 - Instrumental Conducting and Materials
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Specialization of instrumental conducting and a survey of ensemble materials for various levels of ability and maturity. prereq: 3311, major or minor or instr consent
MUS 3351 - Instrumental Arranging (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mus 3351/Mus 3352/Mus 3353
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theoretical study of orchestral and band instruments and special problems of scoring and arranging for small and large instrumental ensembles. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 4901 - Senior Project and Portfolio
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Culminating activity that allows a graduating student to demonstrate competence as a musician. Projects may take the form of a solo recital, lecture-recital, research paper, chamber music recital, or other major study. Project should be determined in the student's junior year and approved by the music faculty. Majors taking Mus 3200 through 3223 normally satisfy this requirement with a senior recital. prereq: major, piano proficiency, instr consent
MUS 2404 - The Orchestra and its Literature from the 1700s through Today (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A study of the orchestra as a cultural institution. Examine important and influential repertoire, with an emphasis on the symphony, as well as examples of ensembles to understand the role of the orchestra in Western culture.
MUS 2406 - Jazz Style and Repertoire (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course addresses the stylistic component of jazz performance through study and analysis of seminal recordings throughout all eras of jazz history.
MUS 3108 - Intellectual Foundations of Western Music (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Exploration of source readings and analytical projects showing the intellectual foundations of Western music from antiquity through the Middle Ages. prereq: 2151, 2152 or instr consent
MUS 3109 - Analysis of Popular Music (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Development of analytical techniques to examine popular music from Tin Pan Alley to the present. prereq: 2151, 2152 or instr consent
MUS 3110 - History of Music Theory: From the Renaissance to the Baroque
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Study of source documents and analytical projects covering the history of Western music theory from the 15th century to approximately 1750. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3111 - History of Music Theory: Rameau to Riemann
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Study of source documents and analytical projects covering the history of Western music theory from 1750 to 1900. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3112 - Analysis of Pre-Tonal Music
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structure of Western music written between 900 and 1600 CE; topics covered may include polyphony, modality, cadences, isorhythm, and formal considerations. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3113 - Analysis of Post-Tonal Music
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structure of music since 1900 CE; topics covered may include free atonality, twelve-tone music, serialism, minimalism, neo-Classicism, neo-Romanticism, the New Complexity, post-modernism and collage-based works, and popular influences. prereq: 2151, 2152
MUS 3107 - Music in 20th-Century America (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A study of select American musical styles in the 20th century. Art, traditional, and popular musical styles are considered, as well as how these styles intersect. Examples are discussed in terms of musical elements as well as cultural and social contexts. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords, instr consent
MUS 3114 - Musical Borrowing (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examination of multiple ways that musical traditions or works borrow from each other through techniques such as arrangement, transcription, quotation, adaptation, sampling, etc. Consider how changing the context for these musical references can change intention and meaning for the artist/listener. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores both representation of and discourse on gender and sexuality through music. Course content includes examples from both cultivated and vernacular traditions. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
MUS 3116 - Music and Identity (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Explore how music is used in various contexts to shape and express elements of identity. Consider expressions of cultural, racial, social, and other modes of identity. prererq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
MUS 3117 - Music in Film (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examines how music is used in film. Consider how music is used in narrative and representative ways, as well as how the role of music in film has changed over time. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
MUS 3118 - Music and Politics (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Examines how music is used in political contexts, and how artists express political ideas through music, both reflecting and shaping contemporary ideas. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
MUS 100 - Music Performance Lab
Credits: 0.0 [max 0.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
To be taken by all music majors and minors; students will participate in music events as performers, support staff, and listeners. prereq: major or minor
MUS 1300 - UMM Symphonic Winds (ART/P)
Credits: 1.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A select ensemble of wind, brass, percussion, double bass, and piano instrumentation which performs traditional and contemporary literature of the highest quality. A program fee is attached to this course in fall semester only to cover the expenses of the annual off-campus weekend retreat. [Note: special fee required for fall semester]
BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development (SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to scientific methods and the history of biology, with an emphasis on mechanisms of inheritance, development, and descent with modification. Overview of pre-Darwinian scientific thought; the theory of evolution; a qualitative introduction to genetics and molecular biology; and a summary of developmental biology. (two 75-min lect) prereq: biol major/minor or chem major or any health sciences preprofessional program or ElEd or SeEd major with middle school science specialties or instr consent
BIOL 2101 - Evolution of Biodiversity (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of evolutionary trends using historical and contemporary evidence. Principles of classification and phylogenetic reconstruction. Includes laboratory survey of the major groups of organisms. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab) prereq: C- or better in 1111 or instr consent
BIOL 2111 - Cell Biology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell structure and function. Includes topics pertaining to the chemistry, physiology, structure, and reproduction of plant and animal cells. (three 65-min lect and one 120-min lab) prereq: C- or better in 1111, Chem 1102 or instr consent
BIOL 3121 - Molecular Biology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and mechanisms of DNA function, protein synthesis, and gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Genetic engineering and evolution at the molecular level. (two 65-min lect, 180-min lab, additional lab time arranged) prereq: C- or better in 2111, Chem 2301 or instr consent
BIOL 3131 - Ecology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic principles and models of population biology, community structure and function, and ecosystem dynamics. Lab exercises emphasize field work, techniques for characterizing local plant and animal communities, and experimental investigation of topics such as competition and behavioral ecology. (two 65-min lect, one 180-min lab and field study; weekend field trip required) prereq: C- or better in Biol 2101 or EnSt 2101, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
BIOL 3701 - Biological Communication II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing, editing, and revising an extensive review paper on a biological topic under the mentorship of a faculty member. Multiple drafts and revisions are expected. prereq: 3700, instr consent
BIOL 4312 - Genetics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/Biol 4312
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles and mechanics of inheritance and variation, including cytological, organismal, and population genetics; mechanisms of evolution; and the genetic problems of humans. (two 65-min lect, 180-min lab) prereq: 2111 or instr consent
BIOL 4901 - Senior Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Seminar series on selected biological topics. Includes preparation and presentation of a seminar based on original research and/or scientific literature. Enroll in fall, continues all year. prereq: 3701, sr or instr consent; required of all sr biology majors; full-year course begins fall sem
CHEM 1101 - General Chemistry I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Scientific method, measurements, nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, thermochemistry, chemical periodicity, introduction to chemical bonding, and properties of common elements and ions. Development of scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. Laboratory exercises concomitant with these topics. (three 65-min lect, 180 min lab) prereq: Math 1010 or placement beyond Math 1010 using ACT/placement exam score
MATH 1021 - Survey of Calculus (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1012 or placement; credit will not be granted for Math 1021 if a grade of C- or higher has previously been received for Math 1101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Short course for students in social sciences, biological sciences, and other areas requiring a minimal amount of calculus. Topics include basic concepts of functions, derivatives and integrals, exponential and logarithmic functions, maxima and minima, partial derivatives; applications. prereq: 1012 or placement; credit will not be granted for Math 1021 if a grade of C- or higher has previously been received for Math 1101
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
MATH 1102 - Calculus II (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Techniques of integration. Further applications involving mathematical modeling and solution of simple differential equations. Taylor's Theorem. Limits of sequences. Use and theory of convergence of power series. Students use a computer algebra system. prereq: 1101
MATH 2101 - Calculus III (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multivariable and vector calculus. Three-dimensional analytic geometry; partial differentiation; multiple integration; gradient, divergence, and curl; line and surface integrals; divergence theorem; Green and Stokes theorems; applications. prereq: 1102 or instr consent
MATH 2202 - Mathematical Perspectives (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to the methodology and subject matter of modern mathematics. Logic, sets, functions, relations, cardinality, and induction. Introductory number theory. Roots of complex polynomials. Other selected topics. prereq: 1101
MATH 2211 - History of Mathematics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101 or higher or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical development of various areas in mathematics and important figures in mathematics from ancient to modern times. prereq: 1101 or higher or instr consent
MATH 3111 - Linear Algebra
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Math majors are highly encouraged to take this course in their second year. Matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner-product spaces, characteristic values and polynomials, eigenspaces, minimal polynomials, diagonalization of matrices, related topics; applications. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Math 2111] prereq: 1102 or instr consent
MATH 3211 - Geometry (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1102 or higher or #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Synthetic approach to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Selected topics from affine, hyperbolic, spherical, projective geometries. Possible comparisons of analytic and synthetic approaches. May include other related topics or use of computer software for geometry. prereq: 1102 or higher or instr consent
MATH 3231 - Abstract Algebra I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Systematic study of groups and rings, making use of linear algebra. Groups as codifying symmetry throughout mathematics and its applications. The Euclidean algorithm and its consequences, both for integers and polynomials. Other selected topics and applications. prereq: 3111, 2202 or instr consent
MATH 3411 - Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1102 or higher or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Propositional logic; equivalence relations; recurrence equations; structures and properties of undirected and directed graphs; applications of the aforementioned topics. prereq: 1102 or higher or instr consent
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
STAT 2611 - Mathematical Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to probability theory. Principles of data reduction; sufficiency principle. Point estimation; methods of finding and evaluating estimators. Hypothesis testing; methods of finding and evaluating tests. Interval estimation; methods of finding and evaluating interval estimators. Linear regression and ANOVA. prereq: Math 1101
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
MATH 1102 - Calculus II (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Techniques of integration. Further applications involving mathematical modeling and solution of simple differential equations. Taylor's Theorem. Limits of sequences. Use and theory of convergence of power series. Students use a computer algebra system. prereq: 1101
PHYS 1101 - General Physics I (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Vectors, kinematics, laws of motion, circular motion, work-energy theorem, conservation principles, rotational motion, gravitation, simple harmonic oscillations, wave phenomena, fluid mechanics, thermal properties of matter, kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics. (4 hrs lect and rec, 2 hrs lab) prereq: Math 1101 or instr consent
PHYS 1102 - General Physics II (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Coulomb's law, electric field, Gauss's law, electric potential, capacitance, dielectrics, current, resistance, circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, Faraday's law, AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, nature of light, reflection, refraction, optical instruments, interference, diffraction. (4 hrs lect and rec, 2 hrs lab) prereq: 1101, Math 1102 or instr consent
PHYS 2101 - Modern Physics (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Special relativity, quantum nature of matter and radiation, Bohr-Sommerfeld atom, atomic spectra, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, hydrogen atom, electron spin, Pauli principle, and periodic table. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab) prereq: 1102, Math 2401 or instr consent
PHYS 2201 - Circuits and Electronic Devices (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A hands-on practical course in electronics. Analog electronics including AC and DC circuit analysis, passive circuit elements, pn junctions, transistors, and op-amp circuits. Digital electronics including combinational logic, sequential logic, and modern digital electronic devices. (3 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab) prereq: 1102 or instr consent
PHYS 3101 - Classical Mechanics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Kinematics and dynamics of a particle, oscillations, central-force motion, systems of particles, rigid-body rotations, gravitation, non-inertial coordinate systems, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, dynamics of rigid bodies. (4 hrs lect) prereq: 2101, Math 2101 or instr consent
PHYS 3301 - Optics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Light as a wave phenomenon, electromagnetic nature of light, Huygens' principle, interference, diffraction--Fraunhofer and Fresnel, polarization, dispersion, absorption and scattering. (2-65 min lect, one 180-min lab) [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Phys 2401] prereq: 1102
PHYS 3501 - Statistical Physics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Probability distributions, statistical ensembles, statistical thermodynamics, ideal gases, quantum statistics, kinetic theory of transport phenomena. (4 hrs lect) prereq: 2101
PHYS 4101 - Electromagnetism
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Vector calculus, electrostatics, Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics, magnetostatics, magnetic properties of matter, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, electrodynamics, electromagnetic waves. (4 hrs lect) prereq: 2101, Math 2101 or instr consent
PHYS 4201 - Quantum Mechanics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Uncertainty principle, Schroedinger equation, commutation relations, momentum space wave functions, Dirac notation, applications to problems in one dimension and the hydrogen atom, angular momentum. (4 hrs lect) prereq: 2101, Math 2101
PHYS 4901 - Senior Thesis I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone experience in physics. Students work with recent journal articles in physics, practice technical writing, and identify a thesis topic. prereq: sr
PHYS 4902 - Senior Thesis II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students develop and present their senior theses orally and in writing. prereq: 4901
PHYS 1993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PHYS 2993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PHYS 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PHYS 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic economic problems, concepts, and theoretical models. U.S. economic institutions and the economic organization of society. The role of markets in the production and distribution of societal resources. Measurement of economic performance; national income, inflation, and unemployment; competing macroeconomic theories and stabilization policies. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
GEOG 2001 - Problems in Geography (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic concepts and questions in the field of geography. The terminology and approaches of geographical inquiry and analysis, with emphasis on the spatial patterns and arrangements of human interaction with the landscape and the production of geographical knowledge.
HIST 1111 - Introduction to World History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1101/Hist 1102/Hist 1111
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of world history.
HIST 1301 - Introduction to U.S. History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of the history of the United States.
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the science of mind and behavior. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, biological bases for behavior, life span development, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive and social processes, personality, psychopathology, and applications of psychology.
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of sociology, the exploration of societies, and how societies operate. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, guides analytical thinking, and develops writing skills. By actively thinking about issues facing societies today, students learn to examine life situations and the influence of societies and groups on people's lives, careers, hopes, fears, and personalities. Emphasis on how society is stratified: how organizations and institutions influence the way people think, talk, feel, and act and how different groups (e.g., racial and ethnic) and divisions (e.g., gender and social class) within society have different access to power and privilege. People live their lives in relation to social and physical environments; sociologists study these environments and their effects on people's experiences and behavior.
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies.
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2001 - How We Study People: Introduction to Methods in Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of methods in cultural anthropology. prereq: any 1xxx Anth or Soc course
ANTH 2002 - Learning from the Dead: Introduction to Methods in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of archaeological methods (lithic and ceramic analysis, zooarchaeology, paleoethnobotany, geoarchaeology, etc.), as well as biological anthropology methods (genetics, paleoanthropology, bioarchaeology, etc.). Introduction to data interpretation and site formation processes. Includes lecture and hands-on work with archaeological and biological anthropology materials. prereq: any 1xxx Anth course
ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the historical development of cultural anthropological theory, influences that shaped historical and contemporary theories in cultural anthropology, and major debates regarding their interpretation. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Anth 4901] prereq: 1111
ANTH 3002 - Theory in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Development of theoretical foundation for archaeology and biological anthropology, particularly evolutionary theory, ecological theory, and middle-range theory. Influences that shaped historical and contemporary theory in archaeology and biological anthropology. prereq: 1103
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines food access, production, and consumption from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis on varying uses of and relationships to food including issues of sustainability, industrial food production systems, food as harmful or medicinal, religious meanings of food, social class, food marketing, gender, and nationalism. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or Psy 1051 or instr consent
ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3251/Anth 3206
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Exploration of human ecology with an emphasis on human health and demographics, the relationship between socio-environmental factors and human health/demographics, and the evolution of human adaptations. prereq: any Anth 1xxx course
ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America.
ANTH 3461 - Archaeology of Eurasia and Africa (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The archaeology of Europe, Asia, and Africa, from 30,000 years ago up to the development of state-level societies on all three continents. Focus is on prehistory and non-Classical societies.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies.
ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A survey of gender and sexuality in contemporary Latin America. Course readings attend to the ways gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religion. Topics include women's activism, public health, LGBTQ activism, tourism, and globalized labor.
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 1201 or Biol 2102
ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods. prereq: 1201 or Biol 1111
ANTH 3705 - The Archaeology of Death and Burial
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The study of human remains in archaeological sites, with particular attention to the analysis of mortuary behavior and reconstruction of demographic processes from buried populations. Covers theory, methodology, results, and ethics in the subfield of bioarchaeology. prereq: 1103
ANTH 3751 - Primatology (SCI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A survey of non-human primates (monkeys, apes, and prosimians), with a focus on their physical and behavioral adaptations. Also covers basic methods in primatology, the evolution of primate taxonomic groups, and modern conservation status.
ANTH 3761 - Human Fossil Record (SCI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In-depth exploration of the human evolution through the fossil record, from the last common ancestor with chimpanzees (around 6 million years ago) up to the extinction of the last pre-modern human (sub)species. prereq: 1201
ANTH 4501 - Archaeological Fieldschool (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Experience in archaeological fieldwork, including excavation, survey, artifact processing, and living under field conditions. prereq: instr consent
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3401/Soc 3402/Soc 3403
Prerequisites: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of major developments in sociological theory, with attention to both classical and contemporary variants. Emphasis on sociological ideas in relation to the principal intellectual currents of European society, American society, and non-Western thought. prereq: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
ECON 3201 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical approach to decision making by individual economic units in the output and input markets, under perfect and imperfect market conditions. Externalities and role of government. prereq: 1111, Math 1101 or instr consent
ECON 3202 - Macroeconomic Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The theory of national income determination; inflation, unemployment, and economic growth in alternative models of the national economy. prereq: 1112, Math 1101 or instr consent
MATH 1101 - Calculus I (M/SR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Limits and continuity; the concepts, properties, and some techniques of differentiation, antidifferentiation, and definite integration and their connection by the Fundamental Theorem. Partial differentiation. Some applications. Students learn the basics of a computer algebra system. prereq: 1012, 1013 or placement
ECON 3005 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to economic experiments as controlled tests of microeconomic and game-theoretic behavioral predictions. In-class economic experiments, elements of non-cooperative game theory, results of market and social preference experiments, and empirical applications. prereq: 1111, 1112, Math 1101, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601; or instr consent
ECON 3006 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced concepts and applications in experimental and behavioral economics. prereq: 3005 or instr consent
ECON 3007 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics I (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of the causes and consequences of environmental pollution. Emphasis on the role of market failures as the root cause of pollution, and on regulatory approaches to solve those problems. Case studies of incentive regulation (emissions taxes & tradeable discharge permits) in practice, in the U.S. and beyond. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3008 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics II (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The economic analysis of sustainability, focusing on market designs to discourage over-exploitation of both renewable and exhaustible natural resources. Topics include markets for water, fisheries, and energy. prereq: 3007 or instr consent
ECON 3009 - Political Economy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3009/Econ 3003/Econ 3004
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The historical evolution, methodological relevance, and basic structure of the modern capitalist economy, including the dynamics of capital accumulation, economic crisis, transformation and regulating mechanism of contemporary capitalism, and hegemonic tendency of economy over polity and other aspects of life in contemporary society. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3014 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The analytic approach to strategic interaction. Strategic interaction takes place among people when the payoffs to each person depend on the choices of all the others, and each person knows this fact in choosing their behavior. Development of the basic concepts of the theory of strategic interaction, including the definition of a strategy, extensive form and strategic form representations of the same game, and the solution concepts of Nash equilibrium and rollback equilibrium. A selection of applications of economic interest are covered, such as market entry deterrence and social dilemma games. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for IS 3206H] prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3015 - Game Theory: The Theory of Strategic Behavior II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Extensions to the basic analytic theory of strategic interaction that widen its applicability, including topics such as repeated games, asymmetric information, and refinements to basic solution concepts. A selection of applications of economic interest, such as screening, signaling, and brinkmanship. prereq: 3014 or instr consent
ECON 3113 - Money, Banking, and Financial Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature and function of money; role of commercial banks and other financial institutions; structure and function of Federal Reserve system; monetary policies for stabilization and growth; and a survey and synthesis of major theories on the value of money. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent, Engl 1601 (or instr consent for students with college writing experience)
ECON 3121 - Public Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of the economics of public expenditures. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3122 - Public Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of the economics of taxation. prereq: 3121 or instr consent
ECON 3131 - Comparative Economic Systems (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparison of the theory and functioning of the major economic systems of the world. Examples of the use of different system attributes in important sectors of particular economies. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3134 - Cooperative Business Model
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3134/Mgmt 3134
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as Mgmt 3134. In the northern plains of the United States, cooperative businesses, including consumer, producer, and worker cooperatives, have made significant contributions to economic growth and development. Identify the unique economic, legal, and organizational characteristics of these firms and their role in the economy. Special attention is given to the potential role of cooperative business organizations in community development. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3136 - Economics of the Green Power Transition: New Business Models and Regulatory Strategies (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines "Utility 2.0" business models and new regulatory approaches that aim to encourage rapid de-carbonization of the electricity system. prereq: 1111
ECON 3141 - Economic Growth and Development I (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues of growth and development that are fundamental to low and middle-income countries. The concept and indicators of growth and development, comparative development status of countries, and the primary determinants of growth. Poverty, inequality, and the role of program evaluation in the formulation of evidence-based development policies. prereq: 1111, 1112 or instr consent
ECON 3142 - Economic Growth and Development II (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues internal to developing countries, such as agriculture, human capital, institutions (governmental, civic, and private), geography, culture. Issues external to developing countries, such as globalization. foreign trade, international migration, and climate change. The effects of these issues on poverty, inequality, and economic growth. prereq: 3141 or instr consent
ECON 3172 - Strategic Firm Interaction and Market Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Firms must interact strategically in all market settings except perfect competition and pure monopoly. The course begins with imperfect markets for simple commodities and a consideration of substitutes and complements. More advanced models are then presented which develop topics such as quality differentiation, entry deterrence, collusion, mergers along the supply chain, various types of price discrimination, and natural monopoly. Emphasis is on the relative efficiency of different market structures, with some consideration of options for government regulation. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3173 - Health Care Economics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ECON 3173/MGMT 3703
Typically offered: Every Spring
Utilizes economic theory and statistical tools to analyze the allocation of health care resources with respect to the demand and supply of health care. Explores the institutional details and market structures of the health care industry through the lens of economic analysis, providing a context for managerial decision-making. In particular, the behavior of patients in the utilization of health care, and the roles of hospitals, physicians, and health insurance in the production, distribution, and the utilization of health care resources are examined. Finally, the role of market imperfections and government regulatory intervention are discussed. prereq: 1111 or instr consent
ECON 3211 - History of Economic Thought I (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The origin and development of economic thought from Mercantilism through the classical school. Among others, Adam Smith and Karl Marx are featured. Nature of economics as a social science through the study of its historical development. prereq: 1111, 1112
ECON 3212 - History of Economic Thought II (HIST)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The development of economic thought from Marx and the end of the classical school, through the development of more modern approaches. In addition to the demise of classical thought, a selection from the thinkers who contributed to the foundations of modern microeconomics and/or macroeconomics is covered. Nature of economics as a social science, through the study of its historical development. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
ECON 3501 - Introduction to Econometrics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Statistical techniques and statistical problems applicable to economics and management, focusing on ordinary least-squares regression, classical inference, and detections of and adjustments for violations of the classical assumptions. The course also briefly explores some advanced econometric topics in model specification, estimation, and prediction that include pooled and panel data models, instrumental variable estimation, two-stage least squares estimation, limited dependent variables and logistic regression. prereq: 3201 or 3202, Engl 1601 (or instr consent for students with college writing experience), Stat 1601 or Stat 2601
ECON 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Wage and employment determination. Distribution of earnings and earnings inequality by race and sex. Labor supply applications. prereq: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or instr consent
ECON 4102 - Labor Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Functioning and performance of the labor market. Heterodox explanations of labor market behavior. Labor demand applications. prereq: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or instr consent
ECON 4111 - Mathematical Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ECON 4201/ECON 4111
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Application of mathematical methods to economic analysis. Mathematical formulations and solution of optimizing models pertaining to households and firms and of adjustments to disturbances. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Econ 4201] prereq: 3201, 3202 or instr consent
ECON 4112 - Mathematical Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics include linear modeling, input-output analysis and linear programming, efficiency and exchange, comparative static analysis, and dynamic microeconomic and macroeconomic models. prereq: 4111 or instr consent
ECON 4121 - International Trade Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of why trade occurs, pattern of trade and international factor movement. Effect of trade and trade policy on the economy. Current topics in trade theory. prereq: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or instr consent
ECON 4131 - International Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Foreign exchange markets; theories of exchange rate determination; fixed vs. flexible rate systems; theories of balance of payments adjustments; international quantity of money theory; international reserves; international monetary system (past, present, and future); internal and external balance, international economic policy coordination, international debt problem; effect of international sector on domestic growth and stability. prereq: 3202 or instr consent
ECON 4141 - Empirics of Economic Growth
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Presentation of the recent developments in economic growth with an emphasis on empirical research. The course asks, "Why are some countries so rich and some countries so poor?" Students first explore the proximate causes of economic growth such as physical capital, human capital, and productivity, and then address the role played by fundamental causes such as institutions, geography, and deep history. prereq: 3501
ECON 4201 - Foundations of Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ECON 4201/ECON 4111
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Consumer theory, production theory, and general equilibrium. Issues addressed include: the choice approach versus the preference approach; the perils of common highly regular utility functions; the demand aggregation problem and solutions; the foundations of individual consumer welfare theory and social welfare criteria; multiple output production; and general equilibrium theory as a method for overcoming many of the issues encountered earlier in the course. This course does use a substantial amount of multivariable differential calculus. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Econ 4111] prereq: 3201
ECON 4501 - Senior Research Seminar in Economics and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Guided research sessions familiarize students with literature in the field. Students devote their time to identify a research question and prepare a literature review and research plan. Students are required to write a short literature review paper and make a formal presentation of their literature review and their research plan to their peers. Required presentations may occur outside the regular class schedule. prereq: Engl 1601 for all students (or instr consent for students with previous college writing experience), 3501 for econ majors or sr status for mgmt majors or instr consent
ECON 4502 - Advanced Research Seminar in Economics and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Guided sessions familiarize students with advanced research tools in the field. Students extend their research from Econ 4501 in the form of a deeper literature review, an empirical analysis, or a specific case study (management majors only). Students are required to submit a final paper and make a formal presentation of their research to their peers. Required presentations may occur outside the regular class schedule. prereq: 4501, instr consent
ECON 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1112 - Introduction to African History to 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of Africa's incredible human and environmental diversity from the earliest times to European contact. Special attention to how historians of Africa interpret non-written sources to understand the past.
HIST 1113 - Introduction to African History since 1880 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Consideration of Africa's past from the colonial era to the present. Special attention to the challenges Africans faced living under Europe's grip as well as their courage to build independent African nations.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 1501 - Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1800. (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia before 1800. Possible sub-themes include the rise of the Confucian world order, the spread of Buddhism, and East Asian interactions with the outside world. Discussion of changing perceptions of gender.
HIST 1601 - Latin American History: A Basic Introduction (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods, themes, and problems in the study of Latin American history.
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2108 - Ancient Greek and Roman History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Provides a broad survey of the political, social, and cultural history of ancient Greece and Rome from the archaic period (c. 700 BCE) to the rise of Islam (c. 600 CE).
HIST 2132W - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of fairy tales and folklore in European history from the early modern era to the present, with a primary emphasis on tracing changes in the social and cultural use of fairy tales over time. Sources drawn from a diverse corpus of tales and retellings, as well as scholarly interpretations from historians, ethnographers, and folklorists. Explores key developments, such as the transformation of 17th-century French tales written as political allegory into the Grimms' 19th-century reinvention of the fairy tale as a staple of middle-class childhood. Other topics may include the oral tradition and literacy; changing ideas about gender, class, and religion; and themes of violence, nationalism, and sexuality.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The experience of the original Americans and their interaction with later immigrants.
HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as NAIS 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for NAIS 1701 or Hist 1701]
HIST 2352 - The U.S. 1960s (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History of the United States in the 1960s. Backgrounds to the 1960s; political and cultural issues of the decade; the Kennedy promise, civil rights and other movements, Vietnam war, counterculture, conservative backlash, and legacy.
HIST 2452 - Minnesota History (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the social, cultural, and political history of Minnesota with emphases on American Indian and European-American conflict, immigration and ethnicity, the development of political culture, and the changing nature of regional identity.
HIST 2551 - Modern Japan (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The history of Japan from the foundation of the Tokugawa Shogunate until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2552 - History of Modern China (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Study of the history of China from the foundation of the Qing dynasty in the 1600s until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.
HIST 2557 - History of Southeast Asia (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A broad survey of Southeast Asia's civilization and its modern challenges. Emphasizes recent colonialism, nationalism, and postwar development.
HIST 2616 - Environmental History of Latin America (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
A broad examination of human interaction with the natural environment in Latin America and how these interactions have shaped the region's social, cultural, political, and economic history. The course also considers historical and contemporary environmental challenges and people's responses to them. The course covers colonial, modern, and contemporary Latin America. Possible topics include: the Columbian Exchange, the Amazon, agriculture, economic development, cultural attitudes toward the environment, sustainability, conservation and environmentalism, ecotourism, indigenous rights, and urbanization.
HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3161 - The Enlightenment (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The intellectual ferment of the Enlightenment has been given the credit and the blame for all things modern--from the concept of human rights and the democracies it has engendered to the subversion of those rights in the totalitarian regimes of the 20th century. Exploration of the ideas of the Enlightenment and their political context and attempt to answer the question of how such an important development in human history can be viewed in such contradictory ways.
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3207 - The Crusades (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th century and early modern period, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of German history from the development of German national ideas through unification and consolidation of the modern German state in 1871 and through its re-unification at the end of the 20th century. Examines one of the most fascinating and tumultuous periods in German and European history, why the attempt to understand the German past has occupied so many historians, and why the debates surrounding that attempt have been so contentious. Sources include writings by established historians of Germany, novels, films, and music.
HIST 3211 - Modern France (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of French culture and history from the Revolution (1789) to the present. The ways in which successive governments, from Napoleon's empire through the Fifth Republic, have come to terms with legacies of the Revolution such as national citizenship, individual rights, and the politicization of women.
HIST 3303 - Creation of the American Republic (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the history of the United States from the beginning of the Seven Years' War in 1754 to the end of the War of 1812. The origins of the nation and the political, cultural, and social changes that accompanied the birth and early years of the American Republic. Focus on the political and social history of the American Revolution. Other topics include women in revolutionary America, the retrenchment of slavery, indigenous people and early Indian policy, religion and revivalism, the constitutional crisis, and the early presidencies.
HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The themes of race, class, and gender are explored in-depth throughout the semester. Students gain a new awareness about historiography and theories that highlight this growing subfield of American history. Prominent topics covered in lecture and readings include colonization, slavery, suffrage, immigration, sovereignty, labor, ghettoization, art, literature, culture, and the rise of self-determination. Study the intersection of race, class, and gender relations through multiple perspectives of region, ideology, political-economy, and religion.
HIST 3351 - The U.S. Presidency Since 1900 (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History of the 20th-century U.S. presidency. Brief consideration of the Presidency before 1900, analysis of performance of presidents since 1900 in roles of chief executive, commander-in-chief, chief diplomat, and chief of state during an era of enlarged governmental functions at home and world power abroad.
HIST 3353 - World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, political and military aspects of the war in Europe and Asia, domestic mobilization, the Holocaust and Atomic Bomb, aftermath.
HIST 3355 - United States in Transition, 1877-1920 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics, themes, and problems in U.S. history, 1877 to 1920.
HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974 (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Background of the Civil Rights movement, emergence of the theory and practice of nonviolence, various Civil Rights groups, role of women, legislative and other accomplishments of the movement, its aftermath and influence.
HIST 3358 - Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origin, context, and significance of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Exploration of the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the United States and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands.
HIST 3360 - American Experience in World War II (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seven former American Presidents were veterans of World War II and over 175,000 books have been published on this subject alone. Arguably this one event has commanded more attention by writers, filmmakers, and academics than any other modern historical event. For decades historians have also debated the significance of World War II. After the conclusion of the war, the worldwide devastation and loss of life had reached apocalyptic proportions and new military technologies, like the atom bomb, forever altered the American experience. Scientists and intellectuals, such as Albert Einstein, emerged as new celebrities. Literally every sector of American society and culture had been transformed by World War II. Investigate these questions and more throughout the semester. It is important to note that this course is not a strict military history of the European and Pacific campaigns. Instead, the purpose of this class is to challenge students to grapple with the historic origins and legacies of the war. prereq: jr or sr or instr consent
HIST 3361 - An Environmental and Geographic History of the United States (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A broad examination of how humans interacted with their natural world throughout American history. Combined emphasis on cultural ecology (the study of how various cultural groups shaped the American landscape) with political ecology (the role of the nation's political economy in driving environmental change). Possible topics include: the Columbian Exchange, European and American Indian conflict, Thoreau and the creation of an environmental ethic, the slaughter of the bison as an ecological tragedy, urbanization and environmental racism, conservation as a political movement and the development of environmental policy, eco-feminism, American religion and the environment, the politics of global climate change. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Hist 2361]
HIST 3453 - The American Presidency, 1789-1900 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Growth and development of the U.S. presidency during its first century. Emphasis on selected presidencies such as those of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, Abraham Lincoln, and William McKinley.
HIST 3455 - American Immigration (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The role of voluntary migration in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Emphases on settlement, ethnicity, nativism, transnational issues, and immigration law. Possible topics include European immigrants and "whiteness," restriction of immigration from Asia, ethnicity and U.S. foreign and military policy, and the varieties of immigration, legal and undocumented, since 1965.
HIST 3456 - History of Religion in America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The history of religion in American life from the perspective of ordinary Americans. Religious diversity receives special emphasis. Topics may include New England witchcraft, the First and Second Great Awakenings, American Indian belief systems, nativism and Anti-Catholicism, religion and politics, immigrant religion and new fundamentalist movements.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.
HIST 3467 - The Fracturing of America: A History of the United States from Nixon to Trump (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine American history from the Vietnam War to the election of Donald J. Trump. Although it will paint a broad picture of American history and engage a wide variety of issues--ranging from foreign policy and the American role in the world to technological and cultural change--the course's primary focus will be on social change and how it played out in American electoral politics. More precisely, the class centers on America coming apart on the wide array of interrelated historical forces whose aggregation beginning with the presidency of Richard Nixon posed severe challenges to American social arrangements. Thus, the 2016 election of Donald Trump is seen less as a singular political event and more as the product of long-term historical trends. The goal then is to challenge those popular narratives that privilege the significance of certain events, the personality of the candidates and the interworkings of their campaigns and offer a more complicated history based on a deeper understanding of America's recent past.
HIST 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
HIST 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
POL 1101 - Introduction to Political Theory (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to key political concepts, questions, and ideologies through the writings of major political thinkers and examination of contemporary debates about political life.
POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Law is a significant part of modern-day society and culture, especially in the United States. Examine the adversarial system of law and the various actors and institutions that influence and shape it in this country. In particular, look at where legal authority comes from and its limits in modern society. Explore the ways in which law acts to restrict and empower individuals and groups in society. This introductory level course is intended as a survey of the concept of public law both for students interested in taking upper-level courses dealing with legal and constitutional questions and for students simply interested in a greater understanding of why and how law matters in 21st-century society. It is taught using lectures mixed with some in-class activities and simulations.
POL 1401 - World Politics (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to international relations, covering the basic concepts, theories, and trends. The major issue fields include historical international systems, war and peace, foreign policy, diplomacy, national interests, international conflict and cooperation, international law, and international organizations.
POL 2001W - Political Science Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students conceive and develop research questions and hypotheses; collect and critically review published research on their topic; analyze empirical evidence using statistical software; and write clearly, forcefully, and logically about their research. Examination of the philosophy and critiques of social-science methods. prereq: any 1xxx-level UMM Pol course, major or minor or instr consent
POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 2202/HMSV 2202
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Same as HMSV 2202. Law enforcement is a critical function in the United States that operates on the local, state, and national level. This course examines processes, actors, and institutions involved in criminal justice, from the investigation of criminal activity through the arrest and incarceration of individuals. With a focus on modern controversies such as use of force and systemic racism, the course provides students with a critical foundation for understanding the criminal justice system in the context of the United States. prereq: 1202
POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2221/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course examining the common law system as broadly practiced in the United States, including types of legal recourse, the structures of state and federal judicial systems, how judges are selected, and the various influences on their decisions.
POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2222/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course specifically looking at the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. politics with an emphasis on its historical development, how it interacts with the other federal branches, and the decision-making process of the justices on the Court.
POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2234/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Using a case study approach, this half-semester course examines a variety of social movements from across U.S. history. Addresses questions such as why social movements arise, how they succeed or fail, and how the American political system adapts to their influence.
POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2235/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A half-semester course focusing on the growth and importance of interest groups in U.S. politics by looking at different types of interest groups, the tactics they use to try to influence the political system, how successful they are at doing so, and whether this system works for the public good.
POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of the ways American democracy functions in the states. Analysis of principles, organizations, procedures, and functions of state government in the United States, with particular emphasis on comparing state politics and policy outcomes. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3261] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 2262 - Power and Politics in American Cities and Communities (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2262/Pol 3261
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the nature of political power and institutions in urban, suburban, and rural communities, along with cultural and economic forces. Analyzes political and policy trends in metropolitan regions and rural areas. Includes relevant experiential or service projects in surrounding communities.
POL 2301 - Anarchy and Utopia (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
An analytical survey of anarchist thought and utopian ideals that are used to challenge modern political and social systems. The course draws from scholarly work as well as fiction, films, and mixed media sources.
POL 2302 - Gandhi and the Politics of Resistance (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2302/Pol 4302
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
A study of Gandhi's theory and practice of satyagraha and swaraj as forms of nonviolent political resistance and human realization. Places Gandhi within the historical and theoretical context of Indian political thought and colonialism and examines the influence of Gandhi's politics of resistance on international political theory.
POL 2354 - Political Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the political leadership and decision making. Ethical frameworks drawn from theoretical readings are applied to a range of historical and contemporary case studies, including an extended role-playing simulation.[Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3354]
POL 2401 - U.S. Foreign Policy (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
American diplomatic history. Institutions and processes of American foreign policy. Major factors to be considered and levels of analysis that allow for the examination and dissection of foreign policy decisions. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3401]
POL 2411 - Model United Nations (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Students examine the nature and functions of the United Nations and hone their negotiating skills through a series of mock UN conferences. The issue areas to be covered include peace and security, social justice, economic well-being, nuclear proliferation, environment, and human rights.
POL 2461 - Diplomatic Negotiation (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Discusses negotiation strategies and tactics and examines negotiation skills through a series of simulated negotiations and mock conferences. Diplomacy, negotiation styles, negotiation simulations, and mock conferences. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3461]
POL 2501 - East Asian Society and Politics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Examination of governments, political and leadership changes, and economic developments in China, Japan, and Korea. Modernization, democratization, political pluralism, revolution, authoritarianism, and civil-military relations. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3501]
POL 3201 - Legislative Process (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The internal organization of Congress and state legislatures, with emphasis on how rules and organizational changes affect the policy process. Topics include the evolution of the modern Congress and state legislatures, the committee system, the role of party leadership, and competing theories of congressional organization and behavior. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3211 - The American Presidency (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traces the development of the American presidency over time. Major theories of presidential behavior and success are examined, as well as the literature on presidential popularity and executive/congressional relations. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 3231/Pol 3233
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions primarily dealing with the Bill of Rights and including topics such as freedom of religion, speech and the press, rights of the accused, and struggles over the right to privacy and how to guarantee civil rights protections. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions dealing with separation of powers, checks and balances, and issues of federalism. Specific topics include the importance of due process, the Contract Clause, the power to tax and spend, the Commerce Clause, and the struggle to define national and state powers. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the American system of choosing new political leaders and the reasons behind political engagement and making specific voting choices. Attention is paid to the demographics of who does and does not participate, what happened in recent elections, and how American voting behavior has changed and is changing. There is a significant focus on the mid-term or presidential elections which occur during the semester the course is offered, including the creation and implementation of a poll of voters. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4251] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the intersection of political science and psychology research, particularly on topics such as personality, emotions, and cognition. Explores the various roles of individuals and groups in political decision-making, emphasizing the connections between how we think and learn and how we structure society and make political choices. prereq: 1201; Psy 1051 or instr consent recommended
POL 3266 - Media in American Politics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the relationships between mass media, government, and public in American democracy. Focus on the role of informed citizenry in theories of U.S. democracy, role of media in informing the U.S. citizenry, and the methods by which this occurs or fails to. Specific attention is given to the ways media influences public opinion, the effects of media, such as framing, agenda setting, and priming, and relationship of media, public opinion, and elites in politics. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4266] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3272 - Making Environmental Public Policy (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Exploration of the domestic and international politics of environmental and energy policy making. Focus on theoretical frameworks for policy making and political behaviors surrounding development of environmental and energy policies. Includes the applications of political dynamics and principles to specific areas of environmental and energy policy. Emphasis also given to politics of policy implementation. prereq: 1101 or 1201 or 1401
POL 3302 - Islamic Political Thought (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 3302/Pol 4302
Prerequisites: 1101 or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of classical and contemporary perspectives on Islam and politics that draws from a diverse range of Muslim and non-Muslim political thinkers and scholars. Particular attention given to the global discourse on Islam and democracy. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the politics of sex, gender, and sexuality through study of contemporary critical analyses within political theory. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3351 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A survey of Western social and political thought from 5th century BCE through the 15th century. Includes two extended role-playing simulations on the Athenian Assembly at the time of the trial of Socrates and the Roman Republic at the time of Julius Caesar's assassination. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3352 - Modern Political Thought (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A survey of Western social and political thought from the 16th through the 19th centuries. Includes an extended role-playing simulation on the Reformation Parliament?s debates on secular rule and separation from the Church during the reign of King Henry VIII. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3355 - Environmental Political Theory (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
An examination of political understandings of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Topics include international perspectives on the natural environment, technological optimism and survivalism, the tragedy of the commons, environmental direct action movements, the environmental justice movement, and theories of green democracy and citizenship.
POL 3411 - International Law (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
An introduction to public international law, examining basic concepts, theories, and legal cases in international law. Includes the nature of international law, recognition, succession, the rights and duties of international persons, the individual and international law, territorial questions, and laws of war. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3451 - Comparative Foreign Policy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Comparative examination of foreign policies of the United States, China, and Russia. Topics include Sino-American relations, Sino-Russia relations, China's rise, Russia's resurgence, global war on terrorism, and nuclear proliferation. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4451] prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3453 - Russian Politics and Foreign Policy (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Domestic and foreign policies of Russia and the former Soviet Union from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present. Nature of the Soviet empire, Russian Federalism, democratic and market reforms, and Russian foreign relations. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3504 - Latin American Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
A comparative examination of central issues in and components of Latin American political life, with a particular focus on economic development, political development of democratic regimes, political violence and human rights, and the region's role in the world. Countries analyzed may include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico, Peru, and Cuba. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3996 - Field Study in Political Science
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field study of governmental organization; internship with legislature, a state or local administrative office, lobbying group, or other position involving direct experience with government, governmental officials, or political organizations and environment. [Note: max of 4 cr may be applied to the major or minor]
POL 4205 - Seminar in American Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4205/Pol 4905
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1201, 2001 or instr consent
POL 4305 - Seminar in Political Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4305/Pol 4905
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1101, 2001 or instr consent
POL 4405 - Seminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4405/Pol 4905
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course includes class meetings based on scholarly readings, student-led critical discussion, as well as time devoted to independent research leading to a substantive research paper. prereq: 1401, 2001 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 2112 - Psycholinguistics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the crossroads of psychology and linguistics. Topics include: introduction to linguistics, language production and comprehension at various levels, dialogue, language development, reading, and language abnormalities. Specific methods are discussed throughout. prereq: 1051
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3111 - Sensation and Perception
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Empirical study of sensory processes and perceptual organization with emphasis on vision and audition. Anatomy and physiology of sense organs, psychophysics, signal detection theory, attention, speech perception, and perceptual-motor coordination. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 3201 - Comparative Psychology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparison of the causations of human and non-human animal behavior from both an evolutionary and biological point of view. The contributions of evolutionary selection pressures, genetics, environment, learning, and culture on the expression of behavior in a wide variety of species, through topics such as adaptation, fitness, altruism, social behavior, parental care, reproductive behavior, mating systems, and aggression. Focus on explaining modern human behavior as informed by non-human behavior. Includes lab component. prereq: [1051, 2001] or Biol 2111
PSY 3211 - Biological Psychology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Brain organization and function; an emphasis on an understanding of the neural processes that underlie human and nonhuman behavior. Incorporates information from psychology, neuroscience, endocrinology, physiology, chemistry, neurology, and zoology to investigate the physiological bases of behavior. Topics include sensory processes, drugs and addiction, biological rhythms, sexual differentiation, reproduction, methods in neuroscience, neuropsychological disorders, and clinical assessment. Lab projects focus on neuro-anatomical organization and function of the brain. prereq: [1051, 2001] or Biol 1101 or Biol 1111
PSY 3216 - Cognitive Neuroscience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Cognitive neuroscience introduces theory and data about how brain activity recorded with non-invasive recording techniques is linked to perceptual, motor, and cognitive function. The main paradigms for structural and functional imaging, as well as localization of function and connectivity, will be discussed. prereq: 1051
PSY 3521 - Health Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Health implications of interactions among behavioral, environmental, and physiological states. Physiological bases of behavior and health; stress and coping; behavioral antecedents of disease; psychoneuro-immunology; disease prevention and health promotion. [Note: includes lab component] prereq: 1051, 2001
PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biological and behavioral aspects of drug use, abuse, and addiction. Includes focus on therapeutic drugs used to treat psychiatric conditions as well as drugs of abuse. prereq: C- or better in 2581
PSY 3302 - Personality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of personality constructs and theories. Conscious vs. nonconscious processes; emotion and motivation; nature and measurement of personal traits; their dimensional structure, stability, development, and heritability. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
PSY 4301 - Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Evaluation of psychological assessments and interventions from different perspectives. Topic examples: structured and unstructured assessments; career counseling and assessment; motivational interviewing; family and couples therapy; interpersonal therapy; group therapy; and solution-focused therapy. prereq: 3313 or 3314 or 4101
PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3401 - Child Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to middle childhood. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3403 - Adult Development and Aging (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introductory exploration of the health, individual, social, and cultural factors associated with adult development (e.g., young adulthood, middle age, and older adulthood). Provides an overview of current concepts, gerontological theories, and current methodology in the study of adult development and aging. Students become familiar with the physical aging process, society's perceptions of aging, aging family relationships, and end of life preparation and planning. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3503 - Consumer Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3503/Mgmt 3503
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Same as Mgmt 3503. Psychological basis for understanding consumers. Some of the topics include consumer behavior, consumer cognitive processes, and consumer judgments and decisions. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601 or instr consent
PSY 3513 - Negotiation
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 3513/Psy 3513
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as Mgmt 3513. Examines the theoretical and applied aspects of negotiation. Topics include negotiation theory, strategy, skills and tactics, communication processes, global negotiation, and ethics. Use of negotiation simulations. prereq: 3501 or Mgmt 3221 or Psy/Mgmt 3701
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Mgmt 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
IS 3800 - Practicum in Social Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Supervised experience of selected learning activities such as discussion group leader, lab assistant, research assistant, or other teaching-related activities. [Note: no more than 4 credits may be applied to the bachelor of arts degree] prereq: approved practicum form
POL 3263 - Political Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201; Psy 1051 or # recommended
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the intersection of political science and psychology research, particularly on topics such as personality, emotions, and cognition. Explores the various roles of individuals and groups in political decision-making, emphasizing the connections between how we think and learn and how we structure society and make political choices. prereq: 1201; Psy 1051 or instr consent recommended
PSY 1026 - Reclaiming Happiness
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to maintain wellbeing through practices in positive psychology, including cultivating optimism and positive emotions, rewiring negative bias, identifying personal strengths, optimism, gratitude, engagement, meaning and purpose, and positive relationships in support of personal wellbeing and success. [Note: only one credit may be applied to the Psy major or minor]
PSY 2402 - Family Interaction Dynamics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Families are known for their complexity. Focus is on the development of families, their interactive relationships, and the influence of external factors (e.g., stress) and individual decisions. Includes a general examination of various theories, contemporary research, and practical applications of family life development. Analyze research related to family interaction processes across the family life span with an emphasis on relationship dynamics and cultural differences.
PSY 2993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PSY 3611 - History and Philosophy of Psychology (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Historical roots and comparative features of major theoretical systems in psychology, including scientific methodology, research interests, and techniques. Movements within psychology that are discussed include: structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, Gestaltism, psychoanalytic, and existential movements and their modern syntheses, as well as other topics of interest to students. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3800 - Research Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research activity carried out under the supervision of a psychology faculty member.
PSY 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts of professional ethics in human services professions; ethically relevant legal mandates and constraints on professional practice; practical problems in the application of ethical principles. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for IS 4101] prereq: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
PSY 4770 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This class provides students with an opportunity to conduct their own research. Students work independently or in groups. Students review an area of psychology, generate a hypothesis, design a study and obtain IRB approval. prereq: 2001, instr consent; no credit for 4770 until 4772 is completed
PSY 4771 - Independent Research in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Prerequisites: 2001, #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Supervised independent research by a student in any area of psychology. A research proposal may be required by a faculty member prior to approval to enroll in the course. The student is required to write an APA style research paper or give a public presentation. prereq: 2001, instr consent
PSY 4772 - Empirical Investigations in Psychology II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Based on previous work in 4770, students collect and analyze data, submit and present their research to the Undergraduate Research Symposium or other instructor approved venue, and write an APA style research paper. prereq: 4770, instr consent
PSY 4896 - Field Experiences in Mental Health
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individually arranged, supervised observation of and assistance with activities of licensed mental health providers (e.g., Licensed Psychologists, Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists) in schools, clinics, hospitals, and other field settings [Note: only 4 cr may be applied to the BA or the Psy major or minor] prereq: normally requires 4101, 4102, other courses appropriate to field experience.
PSY 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
STAT 3601 - Data Analysis (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature and objectives of statistical data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory data analysis techniques. Some types of statistical procedures; formulation of models, examination of the adequacy of the models. Some special models; simple regression, correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: 1601 or 2601 or 2611 or instr consent
STAT 3611 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of categorical data. Loglinear models for two- and higher-dimensional contingency tables. Logistic regression models. Aspects of multivariate analysis, random vectors, sample geometry and random sampling, multivariate normal distribution, inferences about the mean vector, MANOVA. Analysis of covariance structures: principal components, factor analysis. Classification and grouping techniques: discrimination and classification, clustering, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: 1601 or 2601 or 2611 or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3403 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3401/Soc 3402/Soc 3403
Prerequisites: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of major developments in sociological theory, with attention to both classical and contemporary variants. Emphasis on sociological ideas in relation to the principal intellectual currents of European society, American society, and non-Western thought. prereq: 1101; 4 addtl cr in Soc recommended
ANTH 1103 - People of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies.
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues.
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
ANTH 2501 - Medical Anthropology-An Overview (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of cultural understandings of health, illness, and healing. Using cross-cultural examples and an anthropological perspective, issues such as medicalization, authoritative knowledge, and global inequalities are examined. Examples and case studies may include such diverse topics as childbirth, nutrition, mental health, disease prevention, and the role of medical institutions. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101
ANTH 3001 - Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Examines the historical development of cultural anthropological theory, influences that shaped historical and contemporary theories in cultural anthropology, and major debates regarding their interpretation. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Anth 4901] prereq: 1111
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines food access, production, and consumption from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis on varying uses of and relationships to food including issues of sustainability, industrial food production systems, food as harmful or medicinal, religious meanings of food, social class, food marketing, gender, and nationalism. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or Psy 1051 or instr consent
ANTH 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies.
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 1201 or Biol 2102
ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics (SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods. prereq: 1201 or Biol 1111
ANTH 4411 - Research in Cultural Anthropology (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration and evaluation of methods used in cultural anthropology; qualitative methods; research ethics; and design of qualitative research project. prereq: 1111, 2001
IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
Credits: 1.0 -16.0 [max 32.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of food and society. Examines the complexities of food, health, and power relations as well as the intersections of food with race, class, gender, and sexuality. Explores patterns of consumption and embodiment. Applies a sociological lens to food in relation to globalization, systems of inequality, and social change. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 4991 - Sociology Independent Project Seminar
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4901/4902/Soc 4991
Typically offered: Every Spring
A capstone seminar to guide sociology majors in the completion of an independent study project, including selection and definition of a research project, designing and planning its execution, developing a literature review and bibliography, applying relevant theoretical perspectives to research materials, and organizing and writing a research paper. prereq: 3103, 3403
SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasizes the continued development of oral expression, vocabulary building, spelling, grammar, reading, and composition through the use of authentic materials such as short films and news features, cultural readings, literary selections, and contemporary music that strengthen students' proficiency in Spanish and their understanding of Hispanic cultures. prereq: 1002 or 1003 or placement or instr consent
SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of the sequence beginning with 2001. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
SPAN 3011 - Conversation, Composition, and Culture (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Practice in effective oral and written communication in Spanish for advanced students, with an emphasis on the diversity of contemporary Hispanic cultures and a review of basic grammatical concepts. prereq: 2002, concurrent enrollment in 3111 or instr consent
SPAN 3012 - Spanish Grammar in Practice (IP)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A review of advanced Spanish grammar, with emphasis on areas of concern and challenge for the non-native speaker, and on strengthening academic writing skills in Spanish. prereq: 3011, concurrent enrollment in 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3111 - Readings in Spanish I (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to representative works of contemporary Hispanic literature from diverse genres and cultural contexts, with emphasis on strategies for comprehension and interpretation. prereq: concurrent enrollment in 3011 or instr consent
SPAN 3112 - Readings in Spanish II (HUM)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Further examination of representative works of Hispanic literature from diverse genres, time periods, and cultural contexts, with emphasis on literary concepts and terminology, analysis, research and writing practices, and interpretation. prereq: 3111, concurrent enrollment in 3012 or instr consent
SPAN 3211 - Literature and Culture of Latin America (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 3012, 3112, or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of important exemplary works of Latin American literary and cultural production through major historical periods. Texts are examined in light of multiple contexts, such as artistic, political, historical, and philosophical. prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3212 - Literature and Culture of Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 3012, 3112, or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of important exemplary works of Spanish (peninsular) literary and cultural production through major historical periods. Texts are examined in light of multiple contexts, such as artistic, political, historical, and philosophical. prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3651 - Seminar: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's "El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha" (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's novel "El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha" in light of its socio-historical context. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The theme of sex, love, and marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature through prose, poetry, and theatre of the Golden Age (XVI-XVII centuries) Spain. Consideration of the gender relations and gender politics reflected in the works and the socio-historical context in which these works were produced. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3681 - Seminar: Romanticism and Revolution in 19th-Century Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of representative texts (prose and poetry) from the first half of the 19th century in Spain, with emphasis on the expression of the Romantic vision within the particular political context of the period, marked by tensions between liberal reform and traditional conservatism. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3682 - Seminar: Realism and Reform in 19th-Century Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of representative texts (novels, stories, and essays) from the second half of the 19th century in Spain, with emphasis on the rise of realism as an exploration of the socio-political reality of the era and the need for reform. The focus is on general trends in Western cultures (e.g., industrialization, positivism, secularization). prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3683 - Seminar: Modernity and Identity in Spain, 1900-1930 (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of representative texts (prose and poetry) from the early decades of the 20th century in Spain with particular emphasis on their responses to changes brought by modernity: advancing technology, modern psychology, political experimentation, spiritual exploration, and artistic innovation. prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3684 - Seminar: Hispanic Film (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 3012, 3112 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
View, study, and discuss relevant Hispanic films from Spain, Latin America, and the U.S.A. Consider films' cinematic techniques and their specific socio-cultural and socio-political contexts. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of the major texts surrounding Cuban slavery from the 1812 Aponte slave rebellion to independence from Spain in 1898. How did 19th-century writers depict Cuban slave society? What was the relationship between literature, abolition, and independence? prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of 20th- and 21st-century Latin American historical novels and the colonial and 19th-century texts on which they are based. How and why is the past mobilized to meet the needs of the present? How do historical events continue to haunt the present day? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An overview of the literature and culture of peoples of African descent in Spanish America from the colonial period to present day. How have Afro-Hispanics been marginalized from national projects in Spanish America? To what extent and under what circumstances has the group been included? How have Afro-Hispanic writers responded to larger culture? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An examination of 19th-century Spanish literature with primary emphasis on gender representation and construction. Readings include both canonical and lesser known works, by both male and female writers, that reflect an ongoing dialogue regarding traditional and shifting notions of gender identity and relations in Spain at the time. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3690 - Seminar: Mexican Cultural Production (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
An overview of the literature and culture of Anahuac (Mexico) from the colonial period to present day. With a focus on migration and diaspora, a key objective is to explore the dynamic cultural exchanges across this region. How are migration and diaspora represented? How do these representations deepen our understanding of Mexico and movements on a global scale? prereq: 3012, 3112
SPAN 3691 - Seminar: Native Cultural Production of the Americas (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A study of contemporary Native artistic production across Abya Yala (North and South America) in various media such as film, literature, radio, and paintings and its historical origins. One of the main objectives is to deepen students' understanding of the complexity and diversity of Native communities within urban and rural spaces, including those communities within the USA. What innovative aesthetic practices and perspectives do these texts contribute? What strategies can be gleaned from this cultural production for challenging discriminatory practices? prereq: 3012, 3112
SPAN 3692 - Seminar: Nahua Media and Culture (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
An introduction to media and culture in Nahuatl, more popularly known as the language of the Mexica or Aztecs. Gives an overview of cultural production from the pre-colonial era to the present, with an emphasis on bilingual Nahuatl-Spanish film, music, radio, and literature. What strategies can be gleaned from Nahua artists’ perspectives that would be of value to struggles for social and political rights across the globe? What do they teach us about persecution of minority languages and cultural practices? prereq: 3012, 3112
ARTH 1101 - Interpreting the Visual World: An Introduction to Art History (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
We live in a visual culture - yet to what extent do we look deeply at, or think critically about, the art that surrounds us? This course introduces students to the field of art history and develops their abilities to more carefully observe, analyze, interpret, and appreciate works of art of the past and present.
ARTH 1111 - Ancient to Medieval Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of the major works of art of western Europe from its origins in the Paleolithic period through to the full development of the Gothic era. Includes the monuments of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome as well as those of the Early Christian and Romanesque periods. Also includes some treatment of non-Western traditions in this era.
ARTH 1121 - Renaissance to Modern Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of the major works of art of western Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present.
ARTS 1101 - Studio Essentials: Observational Drawing (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Preparation for advanced work in studio art. Basic exercises of drawing, use and exploration of materials and methods in line and form development, problems of spatial representation. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: coreq 1103, one 1xxx ArtH course recommended during the same year
ARTS 1102 - Studio Essentials: Experimental Drawing (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Preparation for advanced work in studio art. Continued development of drawing, use and exploration of materials and methods in line and form development, problems of spatial representation. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: 1101, coreq 1104; one 1xxx ArtH course recommended during the same year
ARTS 1103 - Studio Essentials: Materials and Design (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Preparation for advanced work in studio art. Elements of two-dimensional design and color theory, introduction to painting and printmaking. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: coreq 1101; one 1xxx ArtH course recommended during the same year
ARTS 1104 - Studio Essentials: Materials and Space (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Preparation for advanced work in studio art. Elements of three-dimensional design, introduction to sculpture. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: 1103, coreq 1102; one 1xxx ArtH course recommended during the same year
ARTS 2101 - Drawing From Life (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Via the study of human anatomy, the course increases and improves students' knowledge and skill in drawing as a traditional art form and as a preparation for work in other media. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 2601 - The Artist in Studio and in Society (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTS 1105/ARTS 2601
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Preparation for advanced reasoning, writing, and communication skills in studio art. Theories, philosophy, history of visual arts, contemporary trends in art, selected readings. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: 1102, 1104, major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 2602 - Digital Fundamentals (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ARTS 1106/ARTS 2602
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Preparation for advanced work in studio art. Basics of using digital technologies to create independent works, support other studio media or professional practices. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: 1102, 1104, major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 3002 - Media Studies: Artist's Books (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Personal expression through artist's books. Designed for students who have a working knowledge of the basic principles and skills of art such as drawing, 2D and 3D design, composition, and color theory. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 3006 - Media Studies: Feminist Art: A Studio Perspective (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The impact of the women's movement of the 1970s on contemporary art. Exploration of the notion of "women's work" as a studio practice; the materials, methods, and issues that define feminist work. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Focus on the possibilities of fabric as the primary medium in art making. Topics include surface manipulation via hand and mechanical processes and using fabric to construct independent forms. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 3007 - Media Studies: Printmaking (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of and practice in various contemporary methods of printmaking: application of drawing skills, color, composition, and personal expression to alternative printmaking techniques. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ARTS 3200 - Printmaking Studio I (ART/P)
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of and practice in various methods of printmaking: application of drawing skills, color, composition, and personal expression to printmaking techniques. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent for non-major jrs and srs
ARTS 3210 - Printmaking Studio II (ART/P)
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of and practice in various methods of printmaking: application of drawing skills, color, composition, and personal expression to printmaking techniques. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent for non-major jrs and srs
ARTS 3013 - Media Studies: Painting (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of and practice in various contemporary methods in painting: application of drawing skills, color, composition, and personal expression to alternative painting techniques. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ART