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Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 40
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
This is an interdisciplinary program housed in the Division of Social Sciences. The program is administered by the Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies (GWSS) coordinator who is a faculty member of any of the four divisions. Gender and sexuality are urgent contemporary issues that impact the culture, politics, and economics of American and international societies. Because such issues affect nearly every professional field and avenue of inquiry, GWSS students engage critically with theoretical and practical models from across the disciplines. Objectives and Program Learning Outcomes: (1) Students will be able to apply concepts from the study of gender and sexuality across a diverse range of contexts. (2) Students will be able to apply a broad range of interdisciplinary theories and perspectives to current events. (3) Through diverse methodologies and critical paradigms, students will be able to analyze the impact of gender and sexuality in their own lives and in the world around them.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Students interested in the major should meet with their advisor before the beginning of their junior year. Students develop a coherent program of study in consultation with their advisor. In developing an elective plan, students are also strongly encouraged to consult with faculty who teach within the GWSS program. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S/N, unless offered S/N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
GWSS 1101 - Introduction to Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
GWSS 4901 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Capstone (1.0 cr)
Elective Requirements
Students must fill the remaining 33 credits with courses from the following lists. These courses must come from at least three different disciplines. A course not listed below may be applied to the elective requirement with the consent of the instructor and GWSS coordinator. With the approval of the GWSS coordinator, up to 8 credits can be supplied by internship experiences.
Primarily Gender, Women, and Sexuality Content
The following courses are strongly recommended: Engl 2031. Gender in Literature and Culture. Phil 2141. Analytic Feminism. Psy 3261. Human Sexuality. Soc 3121. Sociology of Gender and Sexuality.
Take 25 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3281 - Women and Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3064 - Queer Literatures [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3155 - 20th-Century British Fiction (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4039 - Research Seminar: Feminist and Queer Storytelling [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3607 - Francophone Studies: Sex and Gender in Francophone Literature and Film (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 2101 - American Masculinities: The Making of Guys, Dudes, Bros, and Men [SS] (2.0 cr)
· GWSS 2102 - Masculinities in the Margins: Intersectional and Marginalized Masculinities [SS] (2.0 cr)
· GWSS 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
· HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music [FA] (2.0 cr)
· PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain [HUM] (4.0 cr)
Partial Gender, Women, and Sexuality Content
Take at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2121 - Topics in Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2501 - Medical Anthropology-An Overview [SS] (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology [ENVT] (2.0 cr)
· ARTS 2001 - Unruly Bodies: The Artist's Body [ART/P] (2.0 cr)
· ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form [ART/P] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· ED 2221 - Diversity and Identity in Literature and Film [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2411 - Representations of American Indians in Popular and Academic Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3063 - Environmental Justice Literatures [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3153 - Gothic Literature (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3154 - 19th-Century British Fiction (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3165 - Seventeenth-Century Revolutions (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3168 - Victorian Literature and Culture (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4027 - Research Seminar: Dickens and Criticism (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4031 - Research Seminar: Renaissance Romance (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4034 - Research Seminar: The Adventure Novel in American and British Literature (4.0 cr)
· FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France [SS] (2.0 cr)
· FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema [IP] (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3402 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Pre-Enlightenment Culture in France (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3406 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Emotional Extremes in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3407 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: The "East" and its Marvels (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3408 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Quests, Quails, and Custards--Food in Life and Literature (2.0-4.0 cr)
· FREN 3411 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Medieval and Renaissance Bodies (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3603 - Francophone Studies: Witches, Wilderness, and Words in African Folktales (4.0 cr)
· FREN 3605 - Francophone Studies: Maghrebian Cinema (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2151 - Modern Europe [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3209 - Modern Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3212 - The French Revolution [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3214 - History of Childhood [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2402 - Family Interaction Dynamics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2001 - Unruly Bodies: The Societal Body [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture [IP] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3690 - Seminar: Mexican Cultural Production [HUM] (4.0 cr)
 
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GWSS 1101 - Introduction to Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to the concepts and impacts of gender and sexuality in everyday life. Various feminist, queer, and other gender-oriented theories are introduced as students explore how definitions of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality have been created, maintained, negotiated, and resisted.
GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides a historical overview and introduction to fundamental concepts, frameworks, and bodies of theory related to gender, sexuality, feminism, and other related topics across disciplines. It emphasizes critical analysis of foundational theoretical works and applications of theories to current activism, problems, and scholarship. prereq: 1101 or instructor consent
GWSS 4901 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Capstone
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course requires a theoretical analysis paper, in which students analyze and reflect on their academic coursework and own intellectual autobiography. Students are expected to consider and apply feminist, queer, and/or other gender-oriented theoretical approaches in this final paper. This course also requires a portfolio and a presentation and panel discussion. Students can work with any faculty teaching GWSS courses. prereq: 2404, completion of 32 cr towards the GWSS major
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A survey of gender and sexuality in contemporary Latin America. Course readings attend to the ways gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religion. Topics include women's activism, public health, LGBTQ activism, tourism, and globalized labor.
ARTH 3281 - Women and Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A historical survey of women's roles as creators and patrons of the visual arts in Western European and American societies, from antiquity to the present. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literary and cultural representations of gender. Emphasis on the intersections between power and the social relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3064 - Queer Literatures (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will focus on some key moments in queer storytelling since the advent of gay liberation: working-class and women-of-color feminisms; literatures of HIV/AIDS; trans liberation; and disability justice, among others. We will encounter poems, essays, novels, theory, and/or plays, and also music, visual art, and films by a diverse range of queer writers and artists. prereq: 1509, two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3155 - 20th-Century British Fiction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major novelists from the Modernist period and after, focusing on the historical context of the new challenges to literary tradition. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
If African Americans struggled to achieve equality and recognition in the racist United States, the situation was even more difficult for African American women, who had to contend with the sexism in both the white and black communities. This course examines the writings of prominent African American women. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or instr consent
ENGL 4039 - Research Seminar: Feminist and Queer Storytelling (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class will focus on key moments in LGBTQ+ storytelling since the advent of gay liberation: working-class and women-of-color feminisms; literatures of HIV/AIDS; 90s feminisms; trans liberation; and disability justice. We will encounter poems, essays, novels, theory, plays, films, and more by a diverse range of writers and artists. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
FREN 3607 - Francophone Studies: Sex and Gender in Francophone Literature and Film
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The study of the representation of women, men, and queer identities in Francophone literature and film. Discussion of models of femininity and masculinity, and LGBTQAA+ identities and how the dual system of sexuality and gender is problematic. Examination of various models of Feminist and Queer Theory from Africa and the Caribbean and how they may differ from American or French models. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
GWSS 2101 - American Masculinities: The Making of Guys, Dudes, Bros, and Men (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What makes a man? What does it mean to be "masculine"? How is manhood defined, represented, and enforced in American popular culture? How do race and ethnicity intersect with American manhood? This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore these and other questions about gender, masculinity, and society. We situate definitions of manhood historically, examine representations of masculinity in literature and film, and critically reflect on social and cultural messages of American masculinity.
GWSS 2102 - Masculinities in the Margins: Intersectional and Marginalized Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Is "masculinity" the same throughout America? the world? Which men "count" and why? Are there new versions of masculinity in the making? How do race, class, ethnicity, and nationality intersect with manhood? How have these ideas changed over time? This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore these and other questions about gender, masculinity, and society. We situate definitions of manhood historically; explore concepts of intersectionality and hegemonic, subordinated, and marginalized masculinity; and critically reflect on social and cultural messages about these concepts.
GWSS 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination and discussion of pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial African history through the debates and trends in and between Western feminism, U.S. women of color feminism, Third World feminism, LGBT studies, queer theory, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of African queer studies. Also suitable for students interested in understanding past and present issues of gender and sexuality in Africa through the theories and conditions that animate black queer studies and the black queer diaspora. prereq: 1111 or 1112 or 1113 or Anth 1111 or GWSS 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The themes of race, class, and gender are explored in-depth throughout the semester. Students gain a new awareness about historiography and theories that highlight this growing subfield of American history. Prominent topics covered in lecture and readings include colonization, slavery, suffrage, immigration, sovereignty, labor, ghettoization, art, literature, culture, and the rise of self-determination. Study the intersection of race, class, and gender relations through multiple perspectives of region, ideology, political-economy, and religion.
MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores both representation of and discourse on gender and sexuality through music. Course content includes examples from both cultivated and vernacular traditions. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A critical examination, from a variety of perspectives, of major philosophical positions of prominent feminist writers and movements. Possible topics include the nature and ethics of sexism, patriarchy, gender and gender differences, transgenderism, standpoint theory, hate speech, and relationship and parenting ethics.
PHIL 2162 - Ethics of Love and Sex (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates about the ethics of love and sex. Topics include: competing accounts of erotic love, hookup culture, sexual consent and fraud, racial preferences, prostitution, polygamy and polyamory, BDSM and sexual dignity, sex robots, and sex ultimatums.
POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the politics of sex, gender, and sexuality through study of contemporary critical analyses within political theory. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of aspects of human sexuality, including intimacy and communication; male and female anatomy, physiology, and response; development of sexual differentiation, gender identity, gender role, and gender orientation; varieties of sexual expression; pregnancy and child birth; contraception and disease prevention; sexual coercion and abuse; sexual dysfunctions and their treatment. prereq: 1051
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SPAN 3654 - Seminar: Sex, Love, and Marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The theme of sex, love, and marriage in Golden Age Spanish Literature through prose, poetry, and theatre of the Golden Age (XVI-XVII centuries) Spain. Consideration of the gender relations and gender politics reflected in the works and the socio-historical context in which these works were produced. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
SPAN 3688 - Seminar: Literature and Gender in Nineteenth-Century Spain (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An examination of 19th-century Spanish literature with primary emphasis on gender representation and construction. Readings include both canonical and lesser known works, by both male and female writers, that reflect an ongoing dialogue regarding traditional and shifting notions of gender identity and relations in Spain at the time. prereq: 3012, 3112 or instr consent
ANTH 2121 - Topics in Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey of ethnography (a key genre of anthropology writing) including classical and contemporary works. Consider issues about how research is conducted, how it is represented in writing, and ethics and consider the variety of ways in which anthropologists approach their work. Some locations, topics, and approaches may be determined by student interests.
ANTH 2501 - Medical Anthropology-An Overview (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of cultural understandings of health, illness, and healing. Using cross-cultural examples and an anthropological perspective, issues such as medicalization, authoritative knowledge, and global inequalities are examined. Examples and case studies may include such diverse topics as childbirth, nutrition, mental health, disease prevention, and the role of medical institutions. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101
ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines food access, production, and consumption from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis on varying uses of and relationships to food including issues of sustainability, industrial food production systems, food as harmful or medicinal, religious meanings of food, social class, food marketing, gender, and nationalism. prereq: 1111 or Soc 1101 or Psy 1051 or instr consent
ANTH 3251 - Health and Human Ecology (ENVT)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3251/Anth 3206
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Exploration of human ecology with an emphasis on human health and demographics, the relationship between socio-environmental factors and human health/demographics, and the evolution of human adaptations. prereq: any Anth 1xxx course
ARTS 2001 - Unruly Bodies: The Artist's Body (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Exploring aspects of The Body in Art, via use as subject, working material, and conceptual questions regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, beauty, non-conformity, class, and other contemporary issues. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: coreq Soc 2001
ARTS 3014 - Media Studies: Fabric as Form (ART/P)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Focus on the possibilities of fabric as the primary medium in art making. Topics include surface manipulation via hand and mechanical processes and using fabric to construct independent forms. [Note: materials fee required] prereq: major or minor or instr consent
ECON 4101 - Labor Economics I (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Wage and employment determination. Distribution of earnings and earnings inequality by race and sex. Labor supply applications. prereq: 3201 or Mgmt 3123 or instr consent
ED 2221 - Diversity and Identity in Literature and Film (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A survey of key concepts in diversity research (including power, prejudice, social justice, institutionalized discrimination, tolerance) as well as identity representation in literary and film texts. Additionally, students analyze power relationships and how they impact and are impacted by such institutions as schooling and the media.
ENGL 2411 - Representations of American Indians in Popular and Academic Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of representations of American Indians in American popular and academic culture including literature, films, and sports. Particular attention given to how Indian identity, history, and cultures are represented in pop culture by non-Indians and, more recently, Indians themselves. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3063 - Environmental Justice Literatures (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Environmental justice is the struggle for equity and fairness in the distribution of environmental risks and benefits. This class examines the literature of this struggle. In the process of reading fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, films, visual art, and other types of texts, students learn to bring social, political, and ethical questions of environmental studies to representations of humans in their relationships to nature. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3153 - Gothic Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The cultural origins of gothic literature in tension with the neoclassical values of 18th-century Britain and its persistent influence over the next two centuries (including its relationship to modern horror fiction and film). Emphasis on the ways gothic tales encode cultural anxieties about gender, class, and power. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3154 - 19th-Century British Fiction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The rise of the novel to respectability and prominence in Britain from the Romantics to the Victorians. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3165 - Seventeenth-Century Revolutions
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An in-depth study of how 17th-century British literature represents and responds to the numerous revolutionary changes of the time, including political, religious, sexual, cultural, and genre-based upheavals. Writers to be considered may include Philip Sidney, John Donne, Mary Wroth, George Herbert, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, and John Milton. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3168 - Victorian Literature and Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studies an array of 19th-century literary forms, including fiction, poetry, drama, and prose, in their social and political contexts. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of literatures by African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, U.S. Latino/a, and other under-represented peoples. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of American Indian literature written in English. Particular attention given to language, identity, land, and sovereignty. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3411 - Critical Approaches to Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An introduction to the major schools of literary theory and cultural analysis; particular attention to the ways in which the dialogue and debate between these approaches define the discipline of literary criticism. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
During the 1920s, there was a major aesthetic outpouring in the African American community. Listen to jazz, examine African American artwork, and read poetry, short stories, novels and essays from Harlem Renaissance writers. prereq: 1509 (or 2501), two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
ENGL 4027 - Research Seminar: Dickens and Criticism
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Multiple novels by Dickens in their historical context with sustained attention to recent critical analysis of his work. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
ENGL 4031 - Research Seminar: Renaissance Romance
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: two from 31xx-35xx, #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An intensive study of the ever-controversial and paradoxical romance genre of 16th- and 17th-century England. Texts include Sir Philip Sidney's "Arcadia," Lady Mary Wroth's "Urania," Robert Greene's "Menaphon," and William Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale," among others. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
ENGL 4034 - Research Seminar: The Adventure Novel in American and British Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: two from 31xx-35xx, #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Survey of adventure fiction in the Anglo-American tradition from Walter Scott through the mid 20th century, paying particular attention to themes that shaped this tradition, including imperialism and revisions of masculine identity. prereq: two from 31xx-35xx, instr consent
FREN 1031 - Modern Studies: The Modern Body in France (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Beginning with Vesalius, this course examines how the notions of body and mind have been shaped and reshaped in tandem with the rise of the sciences in France, with emphasis on evolving conceptions of ability and disabilities. Taught in English. Meets Modern Studies (MOS) requirement in the French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 1311 - Sub-Saharan Francophone Cinema (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of cinema in French-speaking West Africa. Students learn to read African films, to recognize and analyze political themes in the films, and to become sensitive to issues facing many African nations in the postcolonial world. All films have English subtitles. Taught in English. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement for the French major. [Note: does not count toward the Fren minor]
FREN 3402 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Pre-Enlightenment Culture in France
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course traces the history of French culture in the Middle Ages and into the Early Modern Period; it examines the geography, language, and institutions of medieval and early modern France through literature. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3406 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Emotional Extremes in Medieval and Early Modern Literature
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories from cultural and religious studies, anthropology, history, psychology, and sociology combine to approach emotional expression in society and in literature. Readings: Durkheim, Freud, Laplanche, Bataille, Chretien's Lancelot, Partonopeus, Le Roman de Troie, troubadour lyric, Aucassin et Nicolette, Legenda Aurea, Saint Augustine, Ovid's Metamorphoses. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011
FREN 3407 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: The "East" and its Marvels
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Medieval French course introducing cultural and literary aspects of the Middle Ages through marvelous figures and manifestations of the medieval French interpretation of the "East," including attention to exotic forms of clothing and food in romance, crusades, bestiaries, and fabliaux. Students read medieval interpretations of adventure stories such as the Iliad and Aeneid. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011
FREN 3408 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Quests, Quails, and Custards--Food in Life and Literature
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Spices, game, and chocolate trace the real and imagined movement of European people in the Middle Ages and Early Modern period in literary and historical sources. Make authentic recipes and read authors, including Marco Polo, from many genres of literature. Meets Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3411 - Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Medieval and Renaissance Bodies
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through literature, students learn about the diversity of the understandings of the body in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. By studying fictional, religious, and historical portrayals of habits and customs alongside medical treatises, students analyze different conceptions of the body through a variety of primary and secondary sources. prereq or coreq: 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3603 - Francophone Studies: Witches, Wilderness, and Words in African Folktales
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of the oral tale in African cultures and how these texts encapsulate cultural knowledge of identity, community, and spirituality. Examination of the supernatural and ancestral spiritual worlds, with a special emphasis on the magical power of words and their ability to create, transform, and destroy. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
FREN 3605 - Francophone Studies: Maghrebian Cinema
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of Algerian, Tunisian, and Moroccan history and culture as presented through the art of cinema. Examination of films produced in the francophone Maghreb thematically, focusing on topics such as colonialism, gender, Islam, childhood, and immigration. An important goal is to learn to analyze and discuss film academically. Meets Francophone Studies (FRS) requirement in French major. prereq: (or coreq) 3011 or instr consent
HIST 2103 - Medieval Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical developments in Europe from about 500 to 1500.
HIST 2132 - History of Fairy Tales and Folklore in Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of fairy tales and folklore in European history from the early modern era to the present, with a primary emphasis on tracing changes in the social and cultural use of fairy tales over time. Sources drawn from a diverse corpus of tales and retellings, as well as scholarly interpretations from historians, ethnographers, and folklorists. Explores key developments, such as the transformation of 17th-century French tales written as political allegory into the Grimms' 19th-century reinvention of the fairy tale as a staple of middle-class childhood. Other topics may include the oral tradition and literacy; changing ideas about gender, class, and religion; and themes of violence, nationalism, and sexuality.
HIST 2151 - Modern Europe (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
History of modern Europe emphasizing political, economic, social, and intellectual developments since 1789.
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3209 - Modern Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of German history from the development of German national ideas through unification and consolidation of the modern German state in 1871 and through its re-unification at the end of the 20th century. Examines one of the most fascinating and tumultuous periods in German and European history, why the attempt to understand the German past has occupied so many historians, and why the debates surrounding that attempt have been so contentious. Sources include writings by established historians of Germany, novels, films, and music.
HIST 3212 - The French Revolution (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the causes, players, drama, complexity, and legacy of the French Revolution. Beginning with the changing social order and new political philosophies of the 18th century, the course follows not only the initial unfolding of revolution, terror, and counter-revolution, but also the rise of Napoleon and revolutionary wars. Later reverberations in the revolutions of 1848, the Commune of 1871, and global influences (such as the Haitian Revolution) also addressed. Throughout these events, the experiences of both prominent figures and ordinary participants (the "crowd") considered.
HIST 3214 - History of Childhood (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of changes in childhood and youth from the early modern era to the present. Geographic emphasis on Europe, although the course also allows for exploration of similar themes in other parts of the world. Considers key developments in both ideas about and experiences of children, such as the emergence of children's rights discourse. Other topics may include schooling, play, labor, family, sexuality, consumption, migration, welfare, imperialism, and war. Readings drawn from social, cultural, and political approaches to the history of childhood, as well as historical documents created by children themselves across contexts.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.
PHIL 2112 - Professional Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A critical examination of moral issues that arise in a person's professional life. Possible topics include affirmative action, autonomy in the workplace, ethical issues in advertising, corporate responsibility, coercive wage offers, distributive justice, and sexual harassment. Issues concerning race, gender, and women are included in selected modules.
PSY 2402 - Family Interaction Dynamics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Families are known for their complexity. Focus is on the development of families, their interactive relationships, and the influence of external factors (e.g., stress) and individual decisions. Includes a general examination of various theories, contemporary research, and practical applications of family life development. Analyze research related to family interaction processes across the family life span with an emphasis on relationship dynamics and cultural differences.
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2001 - Unruly Bodies: The Societal Body (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Exploring aspects of The Body as a social construct, via theories and research pertaining to themes of race, class, gender, sexuality, disability, beauty, non-conformity, and other contemporary issues. prereq: coreq ArtS 2001
SOC 2201 - Sociology of Food (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of food and society. Examines the complexities of food, health, and power relations as well as the intersections of food with race, class, gender, and sexuality. Explores patterns of consumption and embodiment. Applies a sociological lens to food in relation to globalization, systems of inequality, and social change. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SPAN 3685 - Seminar: Slavery and Abolition in Cuban Literature and Culture (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of the major texts surrounding Cuban slavery from the 1812 Aponte slave rebellion to independence from Spain in 1898. How did 19th-century writers depict Cuban slave society? What was the relationship between literature, abolition, and independence? prereq: 3012, 3112, or instr consent
SPAN 3686 - Seminar: Writing History in Spanish American Literature (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A study of 20th- and 21st-century Latin American historical novels and the colonial and 19th-century texts on which they are based. How and why is the past mobilized to meet the needs of the present? How do historical events continue to haunt the present day? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
SPAN 3687 - Seminar: Afro-Hispanic Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An overview of the literature and culture of peoples of African descent in Spanish America from the colonial period to present day. How have Afro-Hispanics been marginalized from national projects in Spanish America? To what extent and under what circumstances has the group been included? How have Afro-Hispanic writers responded to larger culture? prereq: 3011, 3012, or instr consent
SPAN 3690 - Seminar: Mexican Cultural Production (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
An overview of the literature and culture of Anahuac (Mexico) from the colonial period to present day. With a focus on migration and diaspora, a key objective is to explore the dynamic cultural exchanges across this region. How are migration and diaspora represented? How do these representations deepen our understanding of Mexico and movements on a global scale? prereq: 3012, 3112