Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Recreation Administration B.S.

Kinesiology, School of
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 62
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The undergraduate program in recreation administration prepares students to assume leadership, supervisory, or beginning administrative responsibilities, and design and deliver recreation programs to diverse populations in a variety of settings. In addition to the general education requirements, core professional courses give students a firm foundation in the recreation field. Students further define their career interests by selecting focus electives that allow them to combine recreation with other disciplines such as health and wellness, social work, youth studies, sports management, outdoor education and tourism. The program features a 9-credit internship experience, which allows students to integrate theory and practical applications in the field. Students select an organization that will provide an experiential learning opportunity in their specific area of interest. Graduates may find employment in such locations as nonprofits (YMCA, Campfire, Boy Scouts of America, etc.), parks at the municipal, state, or national level, commercial recreation, outdoor education and natural resources, outdoor recreation and tourism, as well as corporate wellness, campus and military recreation and event management
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 30 credits before admission to the program.
Students must complete at least 30 credits of the University's requirements and have earned a minimum overall GPA of 2.00, with preference given to applicants with a higher average.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Requirements include a minimum 2.00 GPA.
Foundation Courses
For additional college requirements, consult with an SPS program advisor.
PE
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming (1.0 cr)
· PE 1012 - Beginning Running (1.0 cr)
· PE 1014 - Conditioning (1.0 cr)
· PE 1015 - Weight Training (1.0 cr)
· PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise (1.0 cr)
· PE 1029 - Handball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1032 - Badminton (1.0 cr)
· PE 1033 - Foil Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1034 - Judo (1.0 cr)
· PE 1035 - Karate (1.0 cr)
· PE 1036 - Racquetball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1037 - Squash Racquets (1.0 cr)
· PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis (1.0 cr)
· PE 1044 - Self-Defense (1.0 cr)
· PE 1045 - Rock Climbing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do (1.0 cr)
· PE 1048 - Bowling (1.0 cr)
· PE 1053 - Ice Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1055 - Golf (1.0 cr)
· PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1058 - Snowboarding (1.0 cr)
· PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics (1.0 cr)
· PE 1067 - Basketball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket (1.0 cr)
· PE 1072 - Soccer (1.0 cr)
· PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1076 - Flag Football (1.0 cr)
· PE 1078 - Ultimate Disc (1.0 cr)
· PE 1079 - Rugby (Non-contact) (1.0 cr)
· PE 1107 - Intermediate Swimming (1.0 cr)
· PE 1135 - Intermediate Karate (1.0 cr)
· PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash (1.0 cr)
· PE 1146 - Intermediate Tae Kwan Do (1.0 cr)
· PE 1154 - Figure Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1174 - Intermediate Volleyball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving (1.0 cr)
· PE 1262 - Marathon Training (3.0 cr)
· PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education (1.0-3.0 cr)
Public Speaking
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument [WI] (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Sociology or Psychology
Students should take one or more of the following courses:
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Required Core Courses
Students are required to take 9 credits of REC 3796.
REC 1501 - Orientation to Leisure and Recreation (3.0 cr)
REC 3281 - Research and Evaluation in Recreation Administration (4.0 cr)
REC 3541W - Recreation Programming [WI] (3.0 cr)
REC 3551 - Recreation Administration and Finance (4.0 cr)
REC 3601W - Leisure and Human Development [WI] (3.0 cr)
REC 3796 - Senior Internship in Recreation Administration (3.0-9.0 cr)
REC 4271 - Community Leisure Services for Persons with Disabilities (3.0 cr)
SMGT 3861 - Sport and Recreation Law (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· REC 3541W - Recreation Programming [WI] (3.0 cr)
· REC 3601W - Leisure and Human Development [WI] (3.0 cr)
Electives (20 credits)
Students must take 20 elective credits. Students should consult with their department academic advisor on course choices that best fit with their academic and professional goals. The following are some possible electives in each focus area. This list is not exhaustive and students may consult with their faculty advisor for approval on courses not listed.
Electives
Take 20 or more credit(s) from the following:
· REC 1600 - Topics in Recreation Administration (1.0-4.0 cr)
· REC 2151 - Outdoor and Camp Leadership (3.0 cr)
· REC 3321 - Outdoor Recreation 3-Season Skills (3.0 cr)
· REC 3322 - Outdoor Recreation Winter Skills (3.0 cr)
· REC 3993 - Directed Study in Recreation Administration (1.0-9.0 cr)
· REC 4161 - Recreation Land Policy (3.0 cr)
· REC 4191 - Adventure Recreation, Tourism, and Eco-Tourism (3.0 cr)
· REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education (4.0 cr)
· REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed (3.0 cr)
· REC 4900 - Special Topics: Contemporary Issues in Leisure Services (1.0-12.0 cr)
· KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 4214 - Health Promotion (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management (2.0 cr)
· SMGT 3111 - Sports Facility and Event Management (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3601 - Ethics and Values in Sport (2.0 cr)
· SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing (3.0 cr)
· SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising (3.0 cr)
· ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4311 - Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4313W - Disabilities and Development [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4334W - Children, Youth in Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 3101 - Creating Ecosystems of Well-Being (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5121 - Whole Systems Healing: Health and the Environment (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5523 - Applications in Therapeutic Horticulture (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5642 - Nature Heals: An Introduction to Nature-Based Therapeutics (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5643 - Horse as Teacher: Intro to Nature-Based Therapeutics Equine-Assisted Activities & Therapies (EAAT) (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4104 - Family Psychology (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4154 - Families and Aging (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
· OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development (3.0 cr)
· YOST 1001 - Seeing Youth, Thinking Youth: Media, Popular Media, and Scholarship (3.0 cr)
· YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· YOST 2241 - Experiential Learning (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3234 - Youth Agencies, Organizations, and Youth Service Systems (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Rec Admin B.S. Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Recreation Administration B.S.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Education and Human Development

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic aquatic safety, fundamentals of swimming and hydrodynamics. Principles of hydrodynamics and stroke mechanics; five basic strokes; basic rescue techniques with use of pool equipment; hydrotherapy for disabilities and other conditions, opportunities for competitive activities, lifetime enjoyment of aquatics.
PE 1012 - Beginning Running
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of running. Completing a 5K race. Benefits of running. Appropriate apparel/equipment. Principles of running. Injury prevention. Road racing rules. Nutrition, hydration.
PE 1014 - Conditioning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of personal fitness. Principles of fitness; health and motor skill components of fitness; principles of training/conditioning programs; nutrition; weight control; common fitness injuries; motivation and consistency in fitness programs; stress management.
PE 1015 - Weight Training
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to weight training. Basic aspects of weight training including exercise selection and technique, charting workouts, program design, nutritional considerations, and safety.
PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Good posture techniques, individual exercises, fitness concepts, and mental techniques. Specific overall sound body and mind techniques to include flexibility exercises, cardiovascular fitness, resistance training, nutrition management, weight control, stress management, and self-thought.
PE 1029 - Handball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hand and eye coordination, footwork in practice and game conditions, and skills and strategies of service and rally for the court sport handball (four-wall version). Novice to intermediate levels of play accommodated.
PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic sabre techniques, movement, an overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1032 - Badminton
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals including etiquette, terminology, game rules for singles and doubles, footwork, shot selection, and strategy.
PE 1033 - Foil Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fending fundamentals, including basic foil techniques, movement, a general overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1034 - Judo
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills for throwing, falling, grappling (matwork), choking, arm and neck techniques; contest judo from Jiu-Jitsu; fundamental rules and scoring of contests. Videotapes used for technique instruction and contest appreciation.
PE 1035 - Karate
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Traditional Japanese Shotokan Karate. Students learn to punch, block, strike, & kick with a focus on proper form, posture, & body mechanics. Students also learn a Kata (choreographed form), techniques with partners, & practical self-defense. Non-contact - no pads, hitting, or throwing.
PE 1036 - Racquetball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of racquetball, including equipment; safety and etiquette; terminology; game rules of singles, doubles, and cutthroat; grips; basic strategies; serves and shots.
PE 1037 - Squash Racquets
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Entry-level technique, basic equipment, international dimension courts, and fitness.
PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental strokes, including forehands, backhands, volleys, lobs, overheads, and serves; introduction to doubles play; terminology, rules, and etiquette.
PE 1044 - Self-Defense
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical, psychological, and de-escalation skills for acting in crisis situations. Distance, body language, and tone of voice are addressed. Physical skills include striking, kicking, shifting, blocking, releasing techniques, floor defenses, and applications to armed attackers and multiple attackers.
PE 1045 - Rock Climbing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Safety, knots, equipment, techniques, and anchor systems used in climbing. Course includes all necessary equipment. Held at St. Paul Gym climbing wall. prereq: Good general health, no [neck or back] problems
PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Tae Kwon Do. Principles of martial arts, body mechanics of Tae Kwon Do, practical self-defense.
PE 1048 - Bowling
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals, including stance, approach and delivery, scoring, bowling terminology, and etiquette.
PE 1053 - Ice Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic turns, basic stops, balance techniques, and various other skills from both the forward and backward positions. Equipment, safety issues, ice skating terminology.
PE 1055 - Golf
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proper grip, stance, ball address, swing, club selection, psychological management, rules, and etiquette. Basic instruction in analyzing, assisting with, and coaching golf.
PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine skiing. How to stop, turn, and use lifts. Safety, etiquette, and purchase of equipment. Class held at Highland Hills ski area in Bloomington.
PE 1058 - Snowboarding
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine snowboarding. Uses American Teaching System. Classes are split into nine skill levels, beginning through advanced. Held at Hyland Ski and Snowboard School in Bloomington. prereq: Good general health, injury free
PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Rolls, handstands, cartwheels, extensions, handsprings, tucks (flips). Spotting techniques. Skills on bars, vault, and beam.
PE 1067 - Basketball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental skills and rules of basketball, with emphasis on basic court movement and different offensive and defensive strategies.
PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Cricket. Laws of Cricket, bowling/batting techniques, competitive/recreational Cricket opportunities.
PE 1072 - Soccer
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of soccer including sporting behavior both on and off the field, game rules, soccer terminology, participation and competition drills, fundamental soccer skills, practical instruction in strategy.
PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills, team play, rules, officiating, and strategy.
PE 1076 - Flag Football
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to flag football, techniques, field positions, rules/regulations. Students will participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, kicking, and catching.
PE 1078 - Ultimate Disc
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to ultimate disc, techniques, field positions, rules, regulations. Students participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, and catching.
PE 1079 - Rugby (Non-contact)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Appropriate techniques and field positions. Safe play using appropriate rules and laws. Vigorous exercise activities, including running, passing, catching, evasion, and other physical activity associated with rugby.
PE 1107 - Intermediate Swimming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intermediate swimming skills. Fundamentals of swimming and hydrodynamics. prereq: 1007 or equiv, proficient ability to swim 100 meters or instr consent
PE 1135 - Intermediate Karate
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of Japanese traditional Shotokan Karate taught through Ippon Kumite (one step sparring), San Kumite (three step sparring), and Heian Shodan Kata/Nidan Kata (forms). Testing for orange belt is optional. prereq: 1035 or equiv or instr consent
PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Stroke mechanics, shot placement, changing pace. Court movement/positioning. Fitness requirements, joint/muscle stresses. Weight training for squash. On-court etiquette. prereq: 1037 or instr consent
PE 1146 - Intermediate Tae Kwan Do
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Continuation of 1046. Focuses on Olympic-style intermediate skills/techniques. Self-defense techniques for men/women. prereq: 1046, previous Tae Kwon Do experience (World Tae Kwon Do Federation sanctioned), basic white Tae Kwon Do uniform
PE 1154 - Figure Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Terminology, rules. Basic moves, jumps, spins. On-/off-ice assignments. prereq: 1053 or equiv or instr consent
PE 1174 - Intermediate Volleyball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Volleyball systems of play. Incorporating offensive/defensive formations. Team play, transition, coaching, officiating. prereq: [1074 or equiv], instr consent
PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diving equipment, physics, physiology, decompression, emergencies, recreational dive planning, oceans, currents and aquatic life, snorkeling/SCUBA equipment usage, buoyancy control, entries, emergencies. prereq: Ability to swim 400 yds comfortably or instr consent
PE 1262 - Marathon Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Physical challenge achieved through physiological/psychological adaptation. Goal setting that fosters adaptation in many facets of life. Marathon history. prereq: No pre-existing medical condition that would prevent finishing a marathon, instr consent
PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Activities or related opportunities not normally available through regular course offerings.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
COMM 1101H - Honors: Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670 - Comm 1101H, PSTL 1461, GC 1461
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation. prereq: Honors
COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategies for analyzing, evaluating, generating arguments. Problems in listening/responding to argument.
OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02467
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course prepares students to present information and hone their messages based on audience need in a variety of business, leadership, and workplace contexts. Students interested in majoring in Business and Marketing Education (BME), Human Resource Development (HRD), and other majors can take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in training and development, as well as business and industry to convey vital and timely messages.
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02467
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course prepares students to present information and adjust their messages based on audience need in a variety of future work contexts. Students interested in majoring in Family Social Science, Education, Youth Studies, and Kinesiology will take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in counseling, community-based organizations, education, and health sciences to convey important, and often sensitive, material to specific audiences.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/1011V/1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00518 - PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
PSY 1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00518 - PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology. prereq: Honors
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The course introduces students to applied psychology as a discipline and reviews fundamental principles of psychology through the lenses of applied and professional areas that are the foci of CEHD majors. Specifically, through the lenses of education, we review principles of learning, memory, development, intelligence, and interventions; through the lenses of health and wellness, we review personality, biological, social, and cognitive bases of normal and abnormal behavior, as well as treatments; and, through the lenses of business and organizations, we review principles of motivation, sensation perception, and social behavior. Thus, these psychological principles are considered theoretically, empirically, and through examples for application, with lab discussions and projects emphasizing education, business, health and wellness. The course serves as a foundation for future coursework in education, health sciences, and psychology, and is consistent with the APA’s public education effort to demonstrate how the science and application of psychology benefits society and improves lives.
REC 1501 - Orientation to Leisure and Recreation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Opportunities to explore field of recreation/role it plays in society/human development. Visit recreation facilities representing public, quasi-public, for-profit agencies. Overview of recreation field/foundation for continuing on to more advanced recreation courses.
REC 3281 - Research and Evaluation in Recreation Administration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social research/evaluation methodology. Survey of present status of recreation/park research, evaluation. prereq: Rec major or instr consent
REC 3541W - Recreation Programming (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods, skills, materials needed for planning, developing, implementing, evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations in various settings. prereq: REC major or instr consent
REC 3551 - Recreation Administration and Finance
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of financing/managing leisure service agencies in public/private sector. prereq: rec major
REC 3601W - Leisure and Human Development (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore issues associated with roles of leisure throughout life span. Principles/procedures for designing programs, services, facilities relative to individual values, attitudes, identity, culture, age, gender. prereq: REC major or instr consent
REC 3796 - Senior Internship in Recreation Administration
Credits: 3.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
On-the-job supervised practical experience under specialist in a field directly related to student's academic program. prereq: Rec major, completion of most core courses, sr, instr consent
REC 4271 - Community Leisure Services for Persons with Disabilities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: REC major or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploration/application of concepts/techniques of normalization. Least restrictive environment strategies to leisure service delivery in inclusive community settings for range of individuals with disabilities. prereq: REC major or instr consent
SMGT 3861 - Sport and Recreation Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to acquaint the students to the US legal system, structure, process and terminology. The course provides an introduction of the legal aspects of contract law, tort law, statutory law, negligence, and constitutional law. A student upon completion of the course will understand basic legal aspects of sport and physical activity and will be able to provide managerial analysis and decision making based upon a legal aspects of sport knowledge, therefore providing a competitive advantage of the organization of which are involved. The course instruction relies heavily on court case studies and the legal implications in a sport setting. prereq: SMGT major or REC major or SMGT minor or Health and Wellness Promotion minor and 60 credits completed or in progress.
REC 3541W - Recreation Programming (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods, skills, materials needed for planning, developing, implementing, evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations in various settings. prereq: REC major or instr consent
REC 3601W - Leisure and Human Development (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore issues associated with roles of leisure throughout life span. Principles/procedures for designing programs, services, facilities relative to individual values, attitudes, identity, culture, age, gender. prereq: REC major or instr consent
REC 1600 - Topics in Recreation Administration
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to the understanding of the Recreation Industry which may include historical perspectives and philosophical foundations as well as contemporary issues and challenges.
REC 2151 - Outdoor and Camp Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical/theoretical study of leading/educating diverse groups in outdoor settings. Outdoor leadership skills, styles/methods, how these translate to general leadership methods in other settings/careers. How leadership styles impacts learning processes.
REC 3321 - Outdoor Recreation 3-Season Skills
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to essential outdoor technical skills as they relate to outdoor leadership and programming. Focus on teaching students to lead/instruct in outdoor classroom. prereq: Student will not receive credit if they have previously taken REC 4900/5900 - Special Topics with this topic title
REC 3322 - Outdoor Recreation Winter Skills
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to essential winter technical skills as they relate to outdoor leadership/programming. Focus on teaching students to lead/instruct in outdoor classroom. prereq: Student will not receive credit if they have previously taken REC 4900/5900 - Special Topics with this topic title
REC 3993 - Directed Study in Recreation Administration
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Work with faculty or grad students on research or scholarly or creative activities. Students usually assist with faculty scholarship or carry out projects under faculty supervision. Topic leads to new learning or discovery or contributes to student?s academic program. prereq: Rec major, instr consent
REC 4161 - Recreation Land Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical development of recreational land policy in United States. Related contemporary issues in policy, management, interpretation, research.
REC 4191 - Adventure Recreation, Tourism, and Eco-Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Development of adventure recreation programs, including emphasis on tourism industry.
REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Rationale for, methods in applying wilderness/adventure education programs in education, recreation, corporate, human service settings. Emphasizes adventure/wilderness program management.
REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods, materials, settings for developing/conducting environmental/outdoor education programs. prereq: REC major or ORE minor or instr consent
REC 4900 - Special Topics: Contemporary Issues in Leisure Services
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Contemporary issues emphasizing administrative and supervisory functions for recreation and allied professionals; individual offerings, to be determined by faculty, focus on special issues and professional groups.
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of health/wellness. Physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, and financial health. Influence of societal changes on general health/wellness of diverse populations.
KIN 4214 - Health Promotion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Behavioral and environmental theories of health promotion. How to develop and evaluate programs. Smoking cessation, asthma management programs. Students develop a health promotion program for their class project.
SMGT 1701 - Introduction to Sport Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope/motive of the study of sport from sociological, psychological, historical, economic, and scientific perspective. Issues in sport.
SMGT 3111 - Sports Facility and Event Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of managing a sport facility and the events which take place within these facilities. Some of the topics discussed include operations, scheduling, marketing, ticketing, finance, sponsorship, risk, security, and event management. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and present viewpoints as it relates to the management of sport facilities and event management. In addition, students will have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained through lecture and in class exercises by viewing a sports event and critiquing various facility management functions during the event, and by developing a sports event management plan. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3143 - Organization and Management of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the various aspects of organization, management, and administration within the sport industry. Students will have the opportunity to hear, learn, and share viewpoints as they relate to sport management through lectures, discussions on current events, and case study analysis. prereq: SMGT major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent, and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3421 - Business of Sport
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the business activity of the sports industry. Topics include sports and its business ecosystem, basic economic principles, revenue management, ticketing, sponsorships and other revenue sources, and expenditure management. prereq: SMGT or KIN or REC major or SMGT minor or CEHD IDP or instructor consent and 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3601 - Ethics and Values in Sport
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In sport management we have many opportunities to ask questions regarding acts and decisions as right or wrong. What does it mean to act in a way that characterizes good behavior? How do we develop morally? What are our personal values and moral orientations? Does sport perpetuate violence in society? What is moral and ethical conduct in sport management? What is meant by the term social responsibility? Do professional sport team owners have a responsibility to the community? How do we make decisions that are good, right and authentic? These questions and other ethical issues in sport will be explored from historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives. The process of critical reading, thinking, writing, and discussion will be emphasized. Thoughtful reflection and respectful dialogue are encouraged. Critical thinking is a learned process and two activities are central to this process: 1) identifying and challenging assumptions and 2) exploring and imagining alternatives (Brookfield, 1987). prereq: SMGT major and 60 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3631 - Sport Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an overview of sport marketing management in sport organizations. The most basic objectives of the course provide you with a broad introduction to sport marketing concepts, the role of sport marketing in society, and the various factors that influence marketing decision making. Like other introductory survey courses, you will be exposed to and expected to learn the "language? of the industry (i.e., terms, concepts, and frameworks) used by practicing marketing professionals. However, it is also expected that by the end of the course you will have a solid understanding of the major decision areas under marketing, the basic interrelationships of those decision areas, and an appreciation of how to apply key frameworks and tools in analysis of customers, competition, and marketing strengths and weaknesses. With this combination, the course should help you develop insight about creative selection of target markets and blending decisions related to product, price, promotion, place, and PR (i.e., the marketing mix) to meet the needs of a target market. It is important that sport management students understand the vital role of marketing within the sport industry. Marketing may take several forms in sport businesses. Students must be able to differentiate between use of marketing to sell sport products and/or services (marketing of sport) from the use of sport and sport personality marketing to sell general or sport-related products or services (marketing through sport). These objectives can only be achieved through a joint effort. I will work to stimulate your interest and learning in these areas, but you will be expected to display initiative and a program of self-study. In that sense, a complementary objective of the course is to provide you with an environment that will encourage and reward your own intellectual effort, while simultaneously maintaining rigorous standards that identify those who are motivated to pursue excellence in their own educational preparation for a sport business career. prereq: SMGT Major or SMGT Minor, or instructor consent AND 45 credits completed or in progress.
SMGT 3632 - Sport Sales and Fund-raising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Foundation of revenue production in sport management. Necessary skills related to revenue production and sales processes as they apply to the business of sport. prereq: Sport Management major or instr consent
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to financial accounting for U.S. organizations. Reading financial statements. prereq: Soph
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the science of child behavior; review of theory and research. Psychology majors should take 3301, not 2301.
CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Overview of development in the teenage years/second decade of life. Interactions of adolescents with family, school, and society. prereq: PSY 1001 or equivalent
CPSY 4311 - Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study abnormal psychology and atypical development in children and adolescents. Focus on behavioral and emotional problems, disorders and diagnoses, psychopathology contrasted to normal development. Understand symptoms, causes, course, and prevention of common disorders, excluding physical and sensory handicaps. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4313W - Disabilities and Development (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Surveys all areas of exceptionality. Mental, hearing, vision, physical, speech, language handicaps. Learning disabilities. Autism. Emotional/behavior disorders. Giftedness. prereq: Psy 1001
CPSY 4334W - Children, Youth in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Child development principles relative to social policy decision making. Issues in applying theories, findings to problems (e.g., media influences, mainstreaming, day care, child abuse, effects of peers). prereq: 2301
CSPH 3101 - Creating Ecosystems of Well-Being
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Information, practices, and tools that enable individuals and communities to build capacity for well-being. Factors and ecosystems that contribute to health, happiness, and well-being. Students develop a personal plan for health and well-being and one for a community.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
CSPH 5121 - Whole Systems Healing: Health and the Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected interfaces between human health and the environment. Using complexity theory as a theoretical framework, students use phenomenological methodologies to analyze and describe the interrelated dynamics of human and natural systems. Case studies. Develop strategies to optimize the healthy functioning of human/environmental systems. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
CSPH 5523 - Applications in Therapeutic Horticulture
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
How to develop comprehensive program plans in therapeutic horticulture. Evidence-based principles, facilitation techniques. Documentation, assessment, program development techniques, evaluation. Leadership training, program plan components, book reviews, readings, comprehensive exam.
CSPH 5642 - Nature Heals: An Introduction to Nature-Based Therapeutics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will cover the basic theories and approaches of Nature-Based Therapeutics including restorative environments, therapeutic horticulture, animal assisted interactions, therapeutic landscapes, forest bathing, green care farming, facilitated green exercise, wilderness therapy and ecopsychology. The course includes: 1) historic and theoretical perspectives 2) research into specific techniques 3) application of techniques to specific population and setting
CSPH 5643 - Horse as Teacher: Intro to Nature-Based Therapeutics Equine-Assisted Activities & Therapies (EAAT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: jr or sr or grad or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) and to the range of therapeutic and learning opportunities found within equine interactions. Five domains of practice in EAAT are covered and include physical, social, cognitive, psychological and spiritual contexts. The course presents historical and theoretical concepts which helped develop various types of EAATs, and how the growth of EAAT nationally and internationally has continued to mold the profession. Students will learn to describe safety guidelines, best practices as they are currently known, and precautions and contraindications in EAAT sessions. During a three-day face-to-face class, students will engage in hands-on learning with horses and apply course concepts and topics during this intensive. Students will evaluate peer-reviewed literature in EAAT research to identify the strengths and weaknesses of such published material. Students will synthesize reading, lecture and experiential learning to develop an EAAT plan for an assigned target group population. prereq: jr or sr or grad or instr consent
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00379 - ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human development in a family context. Life-course and human development theories. Individual/family development, mate selection, birth, life cycle. Physical, cognitive, language, social, social, and personality development. Historical, social, and cultural factors. How theory/research are applied to everyday lives.
FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00529 - FSoS 3102/FSOS 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Family systems/theories applied to dynamics/processes relevant to family life. Diversity issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability. Divorce, single parenthood, remarriage. Family strengths/problems. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00758 - FSoS 3104/FSOS 4102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Perspectives on family dynamics of various racial/ethnic populations in the United States/other countries in context of national/international economic, political, and social processes. prereq: at least Soph or instr consent
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human ecology/development as frameworks for examining sexuality in close relationships. Diversity of sexual beliefs, attitudes, behaviors within differing social contexts. Using scientific knowledge to promote sexual health among individuals, couples, families through various life stages. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4104 - Family Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Processes in families of origin, families of choice, and other close relationships, within diverse social contexts. Evaluating current research on family dynamics within/across generations.
FSOS 4154 - Families and Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Aging families from diverse socioeconomic/cultural groups as complex multigenerational systems interacting within ever-changing social structures.
LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00296 - Lead 1961W/OLPD 1301W/OLPD 130
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine personal views of leadership, differences between personal/positional leadership, leadership ethics/values, personal leadership strengths/skills.
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00297 - Lead 3961//OLPD 3302W/PA 3961
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects/characteristics of organizations, their members. Why people/groups feel/behave as they do. Processes/methods that improve behavior/attitudes/effectiveness of members. Member/manager skills. Guest speakers, group presentations, films.
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02347
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human resource development theories, principles, concepts, and practices.
OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes to carry out theoretically sound training/development practices, within the context of systemic relationship with host organization or system.
OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization development theories, principles, concepts, and practices. How development is used to direct change in an organization.
YOST 1001 - Seeing Youth, Thinking Youth: Media, Popular Media, and Scholarship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of life-experience, news and popular media to explore everyday realities of being a young person, as it varies by age social class, race/ethnicity, geography, time period, sexual orientation, and capacity.
YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What it is like to be a young person in a city, in the United States and worldwide. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
YOST 2241 - Experiential Learning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History/theory of experiential learning, its application in youthwork. Observation, reflection, program design, and evaluation skills grounded in experiential learning theory. 15 hours of field observation required. prereq: [1001, 2001] or instr consent
YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01134 - YoSt 3032/YoSt 5032
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of theory/research about children/adolescents. How findings can be used. How theories facilitate understanding of behavior. prereq: 1001 or 2001 or 2002W or 2101, [any Psych or CPsy course]
YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical/contemporary approaches to youthwork, diverse settings in which it is done, importance of worker's life experience in crafting ethical, effective practice. At least 15 hours of field experience. prereq: One gen psy course, one gen soc course
YOST 3234 - Youth Agencies, Organizations, and Youth Service Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01137
Typically offered: Every Spring
Communities/governmental responses to young people as potential problems through agencies, programs, and other organizational forms. Purpose, structure, and activities of such forms. How the forms are/are not integrated into youth service systems. prereq: [Two soc/anth courses, work experience in youth [agency or org]] or instr consent