Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Civic Engagement M.P.S.

CCAPS Graduate Programs Instruction
College of Continuing and Professional Studies
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
College of Continuing and Professional Studies Information Center, 20 Ruttan Hall, 1994 Buford Avenue, St. Paul, MN, 55108 (612-624-4000)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits: 30
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Professional Studies
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The M.P.S. in Civic Engagement meets the unique needs of working adult students looking to enhance their knowledge and credentials as “T-shaped” professionals. The T-shaped professional has a combination of broad applied managerial skills complemented by disciplinary knowledge in a focused area. Students in this major will benefit from exposure to the qualitative human-centered and quantitative data-focused applied professional skills that have become integral to workplace success. They will be well-positioned to take on challenges in the ever-changing global workforce. Graduates of this degree program will: -Analyze and implement applied business practices and graduate level inquiry within interdisciplinary civic engagement frameworks -Develop managerial and advanced communications skills -Enhance critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills to develop collaborative solutions for professional goals -Synthesize and apply the larger ethical framework of the profession to the communities served -Amalgamate their disciplinary expertise with their individual passion for a specific cause within the larger scope of civic engagement This unique Master’s degree features a 3 credit introductory course, 12 credits of required Applied and Professional Studies (APS courses), 12 credits of elective coursework from disciplines in the Humanities and/or Social Sciences, and a required 3 credit capstone course that synthesizes applied professional literacy with disciplinary knowledge.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution - Transcripts - Personal statement - Two letters of recommendation from academic or professional referees - Updated resume or CV
Special Application Requirements:
International students interested in the M.P.S. in Civic Engagement should contact the International Student and Scholar Service (www.isss.umn.edu) for information on visa status and academic requirements.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 84
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 563
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
    • Reading Score: 6.5
    • Writing Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 84
  • MN Batt
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, MN Batt).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 30 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project: The final course APS 6002 serves as the capstone course for students in the M.P.S. in Civic Engagement. This course will synthesize the disciplinary and applied business coursework taken by students during their graduate career and will facilitate completion of an individualized, applied capstone project based on their community engagement career focus. This culminating experience, taken in the final year of the program, will provide students with an opportunity to engage in creative problem solving to address pressing real-world needs.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
Students must earn a grade of B- or better (or S) in all courses.
Required Courses (18 credits)
Courses required of all students in the M.P.S. in Civic Engagement
APS 6001 - Critical Approaches to Civic Engagement (3.0 cr)
APS 6311 - Strategies toward Authentic Leadership (3.0 cr)
APS 6312 - Finance for Non-financial Managers (3.0 cr)
APS 6313 - Harnessing Big Data (3.0 cr)
APS 6314 - Leading Projects and Teams (3.0 cr)
APS 6002 - Civic Engagement Capstone (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Civic Life and Social Justice
This sub-plan is limited to students completing the program under Plan C.
Students who specialize in Civic Life and Social Justice have a passion for improving the world around them, serving the community, and enacting social justice. Whether they are activists hoping to bring business or people management skills to their organizations, or they work in nonprofits or non-governmental organizations, this track offers exposure to contemporary civic and social issues.
In addition to the 18 credits of required core courses, students in the Civic Life and Social Justice specialization track must complete 12 credits from the following list OR other 5xxx level and above courses with prior program approval.
Civic Life and Social Justice (12 credits)
Selected 5xxx and above courses may be taken with prior program approval.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GCC 5001 - Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health (3.0 cr)
· PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 8300 - Seminar in American Minority Literature (3.0 cr)
· COMM 5231 - Media Outlaws (3.0 cr)
· ACL 5211 - Trends and Impacts in Arts and Cultural Leadership and Management (3.0 cr)
· HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
Perspectives in Global Citizenship
This sub-plan is limited to students completing the program under Plan C.
Students who specialize in Perspectives in Global Citizenship seek a broad knowledge of what it means to be a global citizen, and the inherent opportunities and tensions that arise from living in a global society. Students may seek jobs in healthcare and health disparity nonprofits, non-governmental organizations focused on climate change, wealth inequalities, maternal and child health, or diversity and equity issues.
In addition to the 18 credits of required core courses, students in the Perspectives in Global Citizenship specialization track must complete 12 credits from the following list (max 6 credits GCC courses) OR other 5xxx level and above courses with prior program approval.
Perspectives in Global Citizenship - (12 credits)
Only 6 credits of GCC courses may be used. Selected courses level 5xxx and above may be taken with prior program approval.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BTHX 5710 - Ethical Issues in Global Health (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5241 - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5001 - Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5005 - Global Venture Design: What Impact Will You Make? [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5007 - Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5015 - Bioinspired Approaches to Sustainability: Greening Technologies and Lives [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
· PA 5161 - Human-Centered Service Redesign (3.0 cr)
· PA 5422 - Diversity and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy (3.0 cr)
Election Administration
This 12 credit online certificate offered through the Humphrey School of Public Affairs can serve as a focus area within the MPS degree for individuals involved in election administration at the local, state, or national level. Students in this focus area could earn two academic credentials - the MPS in Civic Engagement and the Election Administration Certificate.
In addition to the 18 credits of required core courses, students in the Election Administration specialization track must complete 12 credits from the following 2 categories. Take 10 credits of listed required courses and a minimum of 2 credits of listed electives.
Election Administration - Required Courses - (10 credits)
PA 5971 - Survey of Election Administration (3.0 cr)
PA 5972 - Elections and the Law (3.0 cr)
PA 5973 - Strategic Management of Election Administration (2.0 cr)
PA 5974 - Election Administration Capstone Project (2.0 cr)
Election Administration - Electives - (2 credits)
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PA 5975 - Election Design (2.0 cr)
· PA 5976 - Voter Participation (1.0 cr)
· PA 5982 - Data Analysis for Election Administration (2.0 cr)
Self Designed Track
This sub-plan is limited to students completing the program under Plan C.
Students interested in a disciplinary area outside the three defined tracks work with an academic adviser and select a set of elective courses to explore their specific area of interest. The student must justify the coherence of the courses selected within this track, and approval by the Director of Graduate Studies will be required.
In addition to the 18 credits of required core courses, students in the Self Designed specialization track must work with an advisor to select 12 credits of elective coursework.
 
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APS 6001 - Critical Approaches to Civic Engagement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course serves as the introductory course for students in the Master of Professional Studies in Civic Engagement. Students in the course will be introduced to graduate level inquiry, and will augment critical thinking skills that frame applied professional and disciplinary practice. Students will grapple with real-world problems and topical content, engaging with relevant scholarship, readings, and disciplinary methodologies. In doing so, they will gain proficiency in critical thinking, community processes and cultural competency in collaboration with their peers. Students will also develop skills to be change agent leaders. This course offers students unique opportunities to engage in cross-disciplinary partnerships and creative problem-solving simulating real-world situations.
APS 6311 - Strategies toward Authentic Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will gain proficiency in various leadership modalities within a self-reflective framework. Students will learn to build their own authentic leadership capabilities, as well as assess those of fellow leaders across individual, group, and organization levels. Assignments will examine temperament and decision making, goal setting, change making and coping with pressure, growing your strengths and professional authenticity, and corporate and organizational social responsibility.
APS 6312 - Finance for Non-financial Managers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores organizational finance from the lens of a non-financial manager, helping students gain an applied understanding of financial and accounting concepts and the role finance plays in the economic viability of a business. Students will learn to construct financial statements and use these tools to strategically determine the overall business financial health. Students will forecast possibilities for future growth in relation to costs associated with operational expenses and the cost of capital. Students will review basic economic frameworks and complete case studies focusing on the connection of global economic influences to company and industry financial indicators. Specific topics include financial analysis; planning, forecasting, and budgeting; cash flow, and strategic financing.
APS 6313 - Harnessing Big Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students will analyze the structure and reliability of big data sets and how big data can be applied to decision making in organizations. Students will learn to use numerical, statistical and geometric models to organize data, make predictions, form valid arguments, and support conclusions. Students will also be introduced to the growing field of Business Intelligence and Data Analytics. Topics include data mining, text mining, business intelligence architecture, data reporting systems, dashboards, and data visualization tools such as Tableau and Power BI.
APS 6314 - Leading Projects and Teams
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides students the background and skills needed to enhance teamwork, make informed business decisions, or resolve productivity issues effectively. This course will focus on the principles techniques, and tools used to plan, control, monitor, and review projects to meet organizational monetary and time constraints. Through case studies and practical application, students will practice project management skills along with setting team priorities, performance objectives, and the team decision making process.
APS 6002 - Civic Engagement Capstone
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course serves as the capstone course for students in the master of professional studies in civic engagement. This course will synthesize the disciplinary and applied business coursework taken by students during their graduate career and will facilitate completion of an individualized, applied capstone project based on their community engagement career focus. This culminating experience, taken in the final year of the program, will provide students with an opportunity to engage in creative problem solving to address pressing real-world needs.
GCC 5001 - Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02310
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In this course, we will seek solutions to the challenge of achieving global food security and sustainability. Together, we will work to answer the question, "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" The course begins with lectures and skills workshops, followed by a series of interactive panels with guest experts. We will also prepare group projects that are focused on finding innovative solutions to this grand challenge. We will learn about the fundamental changes occurring in the global food system, the environment, and our civilization as a whole. We will explore how to approach inherently interdisciplinary problems, how to identify solutions that are truly sustainable in the long term, and how science and technology can inform decision-making. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
SOC 8551 - Life Course Inequality & Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Seminar examines the changing life course in its social and historical context, including theoretical principles, methodologies, and policy implications. Focus on key societal institutions that offer unequal opportunities and constraints, depending on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Unequal access to age-graded social roles and resources shape the course of development, and in doing so, they have profound impacts on health. We will consider how inequality in the family, education, work, the military, and in the health care & criminal justice systems influence health behaviors and outcomes at different ages and life stages. prereq: grad student or instr consent
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Policy analysis/other applied social sciences as tools for measuring/detecting discrimination in market/nonmarket contexts. Application of modern tools of labor econometrics/race relations research to specific problems of market/nonmarket discrimination.
ENGL 8300 - Seminar in American Minority Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sample topics: Harlem Renaissance, ethnic autobiographies, Black Arts movement. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
COMM 5231 - Media Outlaws
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
People working outside of mainstream media institutions who find creative/provocative ways to use media as space for cultural, political, or economic critique/resistance.
ACL 5211 - Trends and Impacts in Arts and Cultural Leadership and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Through discussion and analysis, research and peer presentation projects, this seminar will investigate and question the theoretical nuances from which nonprofit arts and cultural organizations are built and the practical influences that affect them daily. Leadership in the cultural sector is evolving rapidly; textbook strategies are being re- evaluated and organizations are re-inventing themselves in creative ways in response to current social and economic conditions. Emphasis is placed on current events, immediate and long- term trends and research into what is happening now. Topics include the role of arts and cultural organizations within the community; past, current and future concepts in organizational structures; and the application of traditional and integrated relationship-based strategies.
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
BTHX 5710 - Ethical Issues in Global Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course examines ethical issues related to global health. Topics may include religion, morality, public policy, and the connection between health and human rights. Open to juniors, seniors, graduate and professional students.
CSPH 5118 - Whole Person, Whole Community: The Reciprocity of Wellbeing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship between individual and community health and wellbeing, as well as the many factors/forces which influence that relationship. Drawing upon recent studies in the area of reciprocal/symbiotic effects between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing, this course will include the following core topics: definitions of community and related dimensions of wellbeing, importance of Individual/Community reciprocity (Social Justice, Equity, Safety, and Trust), historical trauma and healing, and individual action and personal empowerment in community transformation. Utilizing elements of the Center for Spirituality & Healing's Wellbeing model and modes of contemplative practice, this course will ultimately assist learners through phases of individual reflection and mindfulness for the purpose of creating more open and reciprocal relationships with entities they describe as their communities. An extension of recent studies in the area of the reciprocal (or rippling) effect between individual wellbeing and community wellbeing this course will guide individuals in identifying the various communities in which they live or participate, the roles they "play" within those communities and why/ how this knowledge can help prepare them for action and leadership. Main themes of the course will include: - Mindfulness, Reflection and Healing: Historical Trauma and Marginalization. - Roles and Reciprocity: Justice, Equity, Security and Trust between individuals and their communities. - Transformation: Individual Action/Leadership as Bridge between Personal and Community Wellbeing.
ESPM 5241 - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes at play in management of environment and how disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies and institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GCC 5001 - Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02310
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In this course, we will seek solutions to the challenge of achieving global food security and sustainability. Together, we will work to answer the question, "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" The course begins with lectures and skills workshops, followed by a series of interactive panels with guest experts. We will also prepare group projects that are focused on finding innovative solutions to this grand challenge. We will learn about the fundamental changes occurring in the global food system, the environment, and our civilization as a whole. We will explore how to approach inherently interdisciplinary problems, how to identify solutions that are truly sustainable in the long term, and how science and technology can inform decision-making. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5005 - Global Venture Design: What Impact Will You Make? (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02315
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Addressing many of the world's most pressing environmental and social challenges requires not only an idea, but a plan to establish a scalable solution. In this project-based course, multidisciplinary teams design venture solutions to global grand challenges related to environment, health and development. For example, teams may address a challenge related to water supply, energy availability, food/agriculture production, waste management, or public health. This fall, teams will identify a specific challenge in Puerto Rico, India and Greater Minnesota; design a product or service; and create a financially viable and impactful business solution. Professionals and experts based here and in their various locations will mentor each team. By the end of the class students will have a well-designed venture plan and will be well-prepared to compete in the Acara Challenge for fellowship funds to pilot their ventures if desired. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
GCC 5007 - Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02320
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen--vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00766
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01002
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This interdisciplinary course will examine obstacles to energy transitions at different scales. It will explore the role of energy in society, the physics of energy, how energy systems were created and how they function, and how the markets, policies, and regulatory frameworks for energy systems in the US developed. The course will closely examine the Realpolitik of energy and the technical, legal, regulatory, and policy underpinnings of renewable energy in the US and Minnesota. Students will learn the drivers that can lead global systems to change despite powerful constraints and how local and institutional action enables broader reform. Students will put their learning into action by developing proposals for addressing a particular challenge: What would it take to get the University of Minnesota to invest significantly in solar energy? This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5015 - Bioinspired Approaches to Sustainability: Greening Technologies and Lives (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02264
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
How can we build a sustainable society? From designing cities and technologies that use green energy, to health care and agriculture that can sustain billions, the sustainability challenges that face us today are immense. The field of biomimicry seeks solutions to such problems by looking to the diverse ways in which organisms have adapted to varied and sometimes extreme environments. With over 1.3 million described species (and likely over 8 million in existence), chances are a species out there has evolved some solution to a particular problem. But how do we go about figuring out which species this might be? And which trait holds the adaptation in which we are interested? What might be some limitations associated with copying this adaptation ? how might we build on it instead? This course teaches bioinspired approaches to sustainability solutions. Throughout the course, students work in teams of complementary expertise to identify a sustainability problem, research a relevant biological system, and build a prototype bio-inspired solution to their focal problem. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by an agronomist (Porter) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02373
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. For: so, jr, sr, grad
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
PA 5161 - Human-Centered Service Redesign
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course helps to frame the significance of human-centered redesign to improve service provision and outcomes. It explores how public, nonprofit, and philanthropic structures create unique operational realities and cultures that must be navigated to lead change across institutional boundaries. It also systematically investigates contributors to disparities in the human services system ? particularly race. The use of frameworks such as human-centered design, human services value curve, and an equity lens will help us on this exploration. Course learning materials take students through a design process to highlight strategies for systems change and improvement grounded in outcomes. Design processes are iterative and involve understanding and engaging the people and context in problem solving. Through project-based learning approach, students will understand the various constraints that need to be navigated in design: feasibility, viability, and desirability. Students gain experience using design to help appreciate these constraints and develop strategies for overcoming them.
PA 5422 - Diversity and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Economics of diversity. Business/public administration cases for workplace diversity. Value of cultural competency in public/nonprofit organizations. Current policy debates on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and disability. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
PA 5971 - Survey of Election Administration
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of building blocks of election administration, from voter registration to recounts.
PA 5972 - Elections and the Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and basic structure of the American legal system. Experience with basic tools and skills for using the law to understand and analyze issues facing election administrators across the nation. Use of election-related and non-election related materials to prepare election administrators for interacting with counsel, legislators and the courts in carrying out their responsibilities.
PA 5973 - Strategic Management of Election Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic management for election administrators in the political environment. Election official tools and challenges. The role of the lawmaking process in budgeting and organizational planning.
PA 5974 - Election Administration Capstone Project
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report of an election administration issue or problem in jurisdiction of student's choice. Research best practices and possible solutions. Final paper or presentation with findings.
PA 5975 - Election Design
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Election administration design principles, including ballot and polling place design and poll worker training materials. Application of principles of field.
PA 5976 - Voter Participation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Voter participation issues and challenges including historical survey of voter participation in US and methods to increase voter turnout.
PA 5982 - Data Analysis for Election Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evidence-based election administration. Collection and analysis of quantitative data to solve problems and identify opportunities for improvement. Emphasis on pre-election forecasting for planning purposes and post-election auditing of election results.