Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

American Indian Public Health and Wellness Minor

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, Room A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 or 1-800-774-8636)
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 6
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
This minor is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with federally recognized Tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health and wellness services, and the implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. Students from all races, cultures, and experiences are welcome to declare the Minor. While the focus is on American Indians, there are advantages to learning accurate history, other populations' prevention health models, innovative humility and health in all services, and the importance of using a holistic approach of health and wellness for all populations.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
  • partially online (between 50% to 80% of instruction is online)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Students must be enrolled in a University master's or doctoral degree-granting program. Consult with the program advisor, then contact the American Indian Public Health and Wellness director of graduate studies regarding requirements.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
Required courses must be taken A-F, and a minimum grade of B- must be earned. The overall minimum GPA for coursework applied to the minor is 3.0.
Required Coursework (6 credits)
Take the following courses:
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Masters
Doctoral
Electives (6 credits)
Select elective credits, in consultation with the advisor and the American Indian Public Health and Wellness director of graduate studies, to complete the 12-credit minimum.
AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin: The Ojibwe Language (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5202 - Indigenous Peoples and Issues Before the United States Supreme Court (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5212 - Peacebuilding Through Mindfulness: Transformative Dialogue in the Global Community (3.0 cr)
DAKO 5126 - Advanced Dakota Language I (3.0 cr)
DAKO 5129 - Advanced Dakota Language II (3.0 cr)
LAW 6236 - Indian Law (3.0 cr)
OJIB 5106 - Advanced Ojibwe Language I (3.0 cr)
OJIB 5109 - Advanced Ojibwe Language II (3.0 cr)
OJIB 5202 - Ojibwe Mastery I (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6244 - American Indian Health & Wellness Equity (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6245 - American Indian Environmental Health Tribal Case Studies (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6246 - General History of American Indians Post Colonization and Review of Historical Trauma (2.0 cr)
 
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PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their respective tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulations, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants, and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local governments, county and state health departments. This course provides a general basis for understanding American Indian public health and wellness. Central to this area of study, is an appreciation to understand the unique governmental relationship based on how the federal government relates to tribal nations as distinct sovereign political entities, not as a racial classification. The trust responsibility is a government to government relationship as established in the U.S. Constitution. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 574 federally recognized tribes, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations, and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. This is a required course for those seeking a certificate or minor. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health services and implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. While this course focuses on American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration, there are many parallels that can be made by students related to other governance structures from around the world. The lessons can help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors.
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities. The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional?s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services. The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin: The Ojibwe Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3107/5107
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Analysis of Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe language) structure in the context of an endangered Algonquian language. Examine writing systems, phonological (sound) features, morphology (word parts), and grammatical structures as documented historically and presently. The aim of the course is to provide students with an overview of the structure of Anishinaabemowin and introduce them to primary sources readings. Unlike language courses students may be familiar with from other departments, this course will not require memorization of extensive amounts of vocabulary ? our focus will be on understanding the structure of the language and acquiring an appreciation of the relevant linguistic issues and language revitalization issues.
AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3141/5141
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Planning for maintenance/revitalization of North American indigenous languages. Condition/status of languages. Documentation, cultivation, literacy, education. prereq: 3103 or 3123 or instr consent
AMIN 5202 - Indigenous Peoples and Issues Before the United States Supreme Court
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar explores the role and the practice of the US Supreme Court as a policy-making institution when dealing with indigenous nations and their citizens. Analysis of theoretical, behavioral, political, and institutional perspectives. Student work includes reading and textual analysis, leading discussions, analytical research paper.
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics shell
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course is a hands-on look at activist research methods situated in the context of Indigenous Language Revitalization. That is, what happens when a community problem is the organizing force in research? Students will be expected to both engage in language learning, research, designing a research project, and connecting this to critical thinking as applied to culture, language and indigenous language revitalization.
CSPH 5212 - Peacebuilding Through Mindfulness: Transformative Dialogue in the Global Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the core principles and practices of peacebuilding through restorative dialogue, using a mindfulness-based approach, in the context of multiple interpersonal, community, national, and international settings. prereq: Jr or Sr or Grad, or instructor consent.
DAKO 5126 - Advanced Dakota Language I
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on immersion method.
DAKO 5129 - Advanced Dakota Language II
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Focuses on immersion method.
LAW 6236 - Indian Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the evolution of Indian law from colonization onward as impacted by treaties, executive orders, congressional enactments, and the development of federal common law. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of one of the more particularized areas of the law, and acquire the necessary tools to become able practitioners within the field. The course will also focus upon the unique historical experience of the Midwest tribal nations.
OJIB 5106 - Advanced Ojibwe Language I
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on immersion method.
OJIB 5109 - Advanced Ojibwe Language II
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Focuses on immersion method.
OJIB 5202 - Ojibwe Mastery I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of the first three years of the Ojibwe language courses at the University is to introduce students to the most common Ojibwe grammatical and conjugational systems, and to help develop their fluency through immersion. In this course and in the subsequent course in the winter semester, students will work towards Ojibwe language mastery by learning less frequent, but crucial aspects of the Ojibwe language and further working towards a more sophisticated level of talking.
PUBH 6244 - American Indian Health & Wellness Equity
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
American Indian health-related problems and the lack of adequate health care and services has resulted in a disproportionate burden of disease and social suffering on the population. History indicates that time and again health inequities are directly and indirectly associated with colonization, social support, hope, general resilient coping abilities, traditional cultural and spiritual practices, ethnic pride/enculturation, community mastery, and political inequities. It is also important to understand how American Indians ?survived? to this day. Resilience is a major factor in understanding health and wellness equity. It is also important to understand the unique differences between each of the 574 tribal governances, cultural traditions, respect for elders, community reciprocity, historical trauma, kinship, food security, healing, economy, social dependence and extended family of each of the 574 federally recognized tribes and American Indian Communities. While this course focuses on American Indian public health and wellness equity, there are many parallels that will be discussed as this history relates to other oppressed populations. These historical lessons help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, by learning accurate American Indian heath and wellness equity issues, and other experiences of ?tribal-like? populations from around the World that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors. From the earliest days of colonization, the diseases brought from the ?Old World? proved far more lethal than any weapon in the European arsenal. Infectious diseases, including measles, smallpox, and plague, among others, annihilated entire communities lost forever from history. The toll taken by infectious disease, when combined with the effects of war, the expulsion of virtually all American Indians from their ancestral lands, and the destruction of traditional American Indian ways of life, effectively destroyed the historical governance structures previously employed by American Indians. As a consequence, American Indians became dependent on the federal government for the provision of health services as noted in the U.S. Constitution. American Indians are dying of preventable diseases including: diabetes, alcoholism, tuberculosis, suicide, unintentional injuries, and other health conditions at shocking rates above the general U.S. population. This course will discuss the differences of health disparities and health assets from the Northern Plains Tribes to other regional areas and other populations. The course will offer examples about communication plans, hopelessness behaviors, public perceptions, resilience, and social marketing in Indian Country. Constructs learned from this course can be advantageous for students to adapt to other unique populations around the world. Learning how American Indian?s resiliences and assets have allowed this population to exist today are valid examples that can be utilized (with adaptations) for non-American Indian populations.
PUBH 6245 - American Indian Environmental Health Tribal Case Studies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Unique legal, political, and cultural dynamics surround environmental health in federally recognized American Indian Tribal communities. From the earliest days of colonization, the diseases brought from other populations proved far more lethal than any arsenal. Infectious diseases, including measles, smallpox, and plague, among others, annihilated entire communities lost forever from history. The toll taken by infectious disease, when combined with the effects of war, and the expulsion of virtually all American Indians from their ancestral lands, destroyed knowledge about traditional healing plants and natural resources. This lost knowledge has a direct impact on using historical practices that was based on practicing environmental protection as a means of survival. While this course focuses on American Indian environmental case studies and resulting inequities, there are many parallels that will be discussed as this history relates to other oppressed populations. These historical lessons help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, by learning accurate American Indian environmental issues, and other experiences of ?tribal-like? populations from around the World to be utilized in individual professional endeavors. American Indian tribes are sovereign governments, with inherent and Constitutional powers of self-governance over their citizens and their territories. Historically, tribes had utilized a governance structure to advance and maintain natural resources, traditional diets, life styles, food sources, spiritually that respects earthly harmony, and preservation of resources for future generations. Case studies will be used that utilize current best or promising practices that have served as model programs to address diabetes, smoking, cancer, integration of traditional healing, health policy, community engagement, private sector partnerships, and tribal self-determination in health and wellness systems. This course will offer an examination of historical environmental health case studies and the resulting inequities to justify methods for learning and gaining confidence in working with tribal communities, establishing collaborations to improve awareness of social and cultural contexts, honoring traditional customs, and respecting traditional spiritually practices. The focus of the course will be promotion/development of policies that include tribal participation that advances positive tribal public and environmental health. This course is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the accurate environmental history and historical trauma as it relates to understanding health inequities and the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. Constructs learned from this course can be advantageous for students to adapt to other unique populations around the world. Learning the promotion and or development of policies that include community participation are critical to understanding readiness to foster public and environmental health for all populations.
PUBH 6246 - General History of American Indians Post Colonization and Review of Historical Trauma
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulation, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants, and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local, county, and state health departments. The history of American Indians pre and post colonization will be discussed as it relates to the health and wellness of present day American Indians. There are significant Indigenous knowledge lessons that will be shared from American Indians who lived and continue to live upon their land (including forced relocation to non-traditional land) to help understand the relationship to the land culture and its other inhabitants today. While this course focuses on American Indian history, there are many parallels that will be discussed as this history relates to other oppressed populations. These historical lessons help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, by learning accurate American Indian history, and other experiences of ?tribal-like? populations from around the World to be utilized in individual professional endeavors. American Indian tribes have had a unique history with the United States that is mixed with conflict, warfare, lack of cooperation, and lack of collaboration. This history has resulted in a complex unique web of federal Indian policy, treaties, and inter- governmental relationships. Services provided to American Indians persons have been guaranteed through treaties, executive orders, and other legal bases. The US Constitution established the current ?government to government? status federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations have with the federal government. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 574 federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities by reviewing historical implications of forced acculturation, warfare, and severely underfunded health services, that has lead to health inequities. Students will examine the health status of American Indian tribes and American Indian communities, that have/are suffering needless loss of life related to preventable and treatable illness as a matter of social justice and civil rights. The hostile environment against American Indians and resulting historical trauma from the federal government will be discussed, e.g. the United State voted against the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People in 2007. The United States subsequently reversed to approve in 2010. This course is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the accurate history and historical trauma as it relates to understanding health inequities and the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. Constructs learned from this course can be advantageous for students to adapt to other unique populations around the world.