Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Environment and Natural Resources B.S.

Forest Resources
College of Natural Resources
  • Students will no longer be accepted into this program after Spring 2006. Program requirements below are for current students only.
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2013
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 100 to 120
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Environment and natural resources is an interdisciplinary major focusing on the use and management of natural resources and the study of the environment. Students enrolled in this major achieve one or more of the following objectives: ? Learn about the interaction between natural resources and modern society, including the social and environmental roles that natural resources play nationally and internationally. ? Prepare for careers in public and private organizations that plan the use and management of natural resources and protection of the environment. ? Prepare for positions in fields such as environmental education, environmental assessment, resource inventory, natural resource planning, environmental protection, sustainable development, policy analysis, water resources, waste management, and natural resource management. ? Prepare for graduate study. The environment and natural resources curriculum has six areas of concentration from which students choose to complete their degree requirements. Areas of concentration include corporate environmental management; environmental education; geospatial analysis, monitoring, and modeling; planning, policy, and law; resource conservation and environmental management; and water and land management. In addition to the core requirements in each area of concentration, students choose up to 15 credits of ?Additional Professional Courses? in consultation with their faculty advisers. Students then complete a Concentration Contract signed by their faculty adviser listing the additional professional courses on which they have agreed.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Foundation Courses
ESPM 1001 - Freshmen Orientation to Environmental Sciences, Policy, and Management (1.0 cr)
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 1223 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Geospatial Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling
The geospatial analysis, monitoring, and modeling concentration focuses on assessing the extent and character of various natural and environmental resources with techniques such as geographic information systems; remote sensing; and quantitative sampling, analysis, and modeling.
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Professional Courses
ESPM 1201 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
Field Experience
Take one of the following sets of field experience courses.
ENR 3051 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
EEB 4014 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
or PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
or Cloquet Program
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Additional Professional Courses
Course selections must be made in consultation with an adviser, and a contract is required. Courses from this list may be used to fulfill either major courses or additional professional courses, not both.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CSCI 2031 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4014 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ENR 3051 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5228 - Advanced Topics in Assessment and Modeling of Forests (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5562 - GIS Development Practicum (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· MATH 1143 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1107 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
or LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
· Cloquet Program
· FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Corporate Environmental Management
The corporate environmental management specialization provides graduates with the skills to systematically determine the environmental burdens associated with a firm?s products or manufacturing processes and to identify opportunities that generate value from environmental risk reduction, regulatory compliance programs, and other alternatives for improving environmental performance. Coursework includes analytical tools; the business, legal, regulatory, and ethical framework in which firms operate; physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms associated with industrial emissions; techniques used to reduce the environmental impacts of industrial activity; and effective communication.
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
Physics and Chemistry
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Social Sciences
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Management and Systems
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5019 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
Environment, Engineering, and Operations
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials [TS] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3606W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4607 - Industrial Biotechnology and the Environment (3.0 cr)
BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology (3.0 cr)
IE 5522 - Quality Engineering and Reliability (4.0 cr)
Environmental Education
The environmental education concentration focuses on skills and knowledge necessary for working in a variety of communication and education fields associated with natural resources and the environment. Emphasis is on environmental issues at local, regional, and global levels; the human dimensions of environmental education; and best practices for diverse audiences and teaching and learning in informal settings.
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
Environmental Education
CI 5537 - Principles of Environmental Education (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 4195W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation (3.0 cr)
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
or FW 3136 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
ESPM 1201 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
Field Experience
Take one of the following approved field experiences.
ENR 3051 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
or Cloquet Program
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Additional Professional Courses
Course selections must be made in consultation with a faculty adviser and have an adviser signature. Courses from this list may be used to fulfill either required courses or additional professional courses, not both.
Take 9 or more credit(s) including exactly 3 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
or EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3101 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology [TS] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 5601 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FW 3136 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
or LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
or LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CI 5534 - Studies in Science Education (3.0 cr)
or CI 5747 - Global and Environmental Education: Content and Practice (3.0 cr)
or REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education (4.0 cr)
or REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4103 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3041 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 5451W - Intercultural Communication Processes [WI] (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3361 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3001 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3207 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3872W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3383 {Inactive} [ENVT, OH] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Honors
This is an honors sub-plan.
The College of Natural Resources Honors Program is designed to promote and recognize outstanding academic achievement. Honors students explore current topics in natural resources and related sciences and gain experience conducting high quality research, while enjoying advantages such as small honors courses, honors advising, St. Paul campus Scholars Housing, and membership in an honors community. Students have the opportunity to participate in honors at the lower (freshman/sophomore) and upper (junior/senior) division levels.
Current CNR students and transfer students who have completed 1-30 credits of college coursework and have an ACT composite score of 28 or above, or a high school class rank in the 90th percentile or above, or a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or above at the college level are eligible for admission to CNR lower division Honors. To be considered for the upper division Honors Program, students must have completed at least 60 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher.
Honors Focus
Honors (Lower Division)
Lower division honors students must complete at least two honors colloquia and two other honors courses. Students must complete a minimum of one CNR honors colloquium, but students may choose to take both of their honors colloquia through CNR. ENR 1003-Honors Colloquium is the only lower division honors course offered in CNR.
ESPM 1003H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Honors (Upper Division)
BBE 4200H {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 4200H {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
or FR 4200H {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
or FW 4200H {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
BBE 4801H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
BBE 4802H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or ESPM 4801H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
ESPM 4802H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or FR 4801H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
FR 4802H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or FW 4801H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
FW 4802H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
Planning, Policy, and Law
The planning, policy, and law concentration focuses on planning and management activities with emphases on environmental, social, and cultural factors. Application areas encompass watershed, landscape, and site planning, and address issues of development, resource protection, land use, and regulation at local, state, and national levels.
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Planning, Policy, and Law
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
ESPM 1201 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4195W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
Field Experience
Take one of the following approved field experiences.
ENR 3051 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
or Cloquet Program
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Policy, Planning, and Law Tracks
Planning Track
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3001 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3355 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3266 {Inactive} [C/PE] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
APEC 5321 - Regional Economic Analysis (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5371W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5372W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or PA 5004 - Introduction to Planning (3.0 cr)
or PA 5231 - Transit Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5605W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or PA 5203W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5565 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
or LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
or LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Policy and Law Track
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3041 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies (3.0 cr)
· APEC 5711 - Agricultural and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3001 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5480 - Topics in Natural Resources (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ESPM 5482 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5146 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
· PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use (1.5 cr)
· POL 3051 {Inactive} [C/PE, SSCI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4308 {Inactive} (3.0-4.0 cr)
Resource Conservation
The resource conservation and environmental management concentration focuses on the development of a broad understanding of resource conservation and the environment. Emphasis is on understanding the linkages between society and our environment, and the leadership and management skills relevant to environmental management at local, state, and national levels.
Mathematical Thinking
FW 4001 - Biometry (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Physical and Biological Sciences
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Resource Conservation
ESPM 1201 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4195W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
Field Experience
Take one of the following approved field experiences.
ENR 3051 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
or Cloquet Program
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Additional Professional Courses
Course selections must be made in consultation with a faculty adviser and a contract is required.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4014 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3001 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3101 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3207 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5601 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FW 5571 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
· PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use (1.5 cr)
· PA 5212 - Managing Urban Growth and Change (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 3002 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6101 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
Water and Land Management
Sustainable development of land and water resources requires an understanding of the connections between land management and water resources. Land management affects the quantity and quality of water and the long-term productivity of the soil. Water resource use and development affects the use and management of land resources. This area of concentration provides students with the background to understand these connections and the skills to organize and guide land and water resource use in order to manage multiple resources in an environmentally sound manner. Emphasis is on informed decision making, ecological approaches to water resource management, and preventing land degradation.
Students must choose a focus of hydrology, water resources conservation, or water quality.
Biological, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
FW 4001 - Biometry (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Water and Land Management
ESPM 1201 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRS 5101 - Water Policy (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4195W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
Water and Land Management
Hydrology Focus
CEGE 3502 - Fluid Mechanics (4.0 cr)
ESCI 5701 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1281 {Inactive} [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1282 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
PHYS 1202W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Course selections must be made in consultation with a faculty adviser; contract required.
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BBE 5513 - Watershed Engineering (3.0 cr)
· CEGE 4501 - Hydrologic Design (4.0 cr)
· CEGE 4512 - Open Channel Hydraulics (4.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology (4.0 cr)
· SOIL 5232 - Vadose Zone Hydrology (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Water Resources Conservation Focus
Mathematical Thinking
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry and Physics
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment [PHYS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Additional Professional Courses
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils (2.0 cr)
Ecosystem Management
ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
Remote Sensing
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
Soil Sciences
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Water Quality Focus
CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or CEGE 5541 - Environmental Water Chemistry (3.0 cr)
or PUBH 6190 - Environmental Chemistry (3.0 cr)
or Take the following pair of chemistry courses.
CHEM 3101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture (3.0 cr)
CHEM 3111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab (2.0 cr)
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1281 {Inactive} [MATH] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment [PHYS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
Course selections must be made in consultation with a faculty adviser; contract required.
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· EEB 5605 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· EEB 4607 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3021 {Inactive} [ENVT] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· FW 5411 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LAAS 5311 - Soil Chemistry and Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Natural Resources

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· Geospatial Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling
· Corporate Environmental Management
· Environmental Education
· Environment and Natural Resources Honors
· Planning, Policy, and Law
· Resource Conservation
· Water and Land Management

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· Environment and Natural Resources B.S.
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ESPM 1001 - Freshmen Orientation to Environmental Sciences, Policy, and Management
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Academic planning, ESPM careers, liberal education requirements, internships. Building relationships with other students/faculty, student life, information technology, critical computer skills. New freshmen.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3218/FNRM 5218
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3015/ESPM 5015
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3218/FNRM 5218
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 5228 - Advanced Topics in Assessment and Modeling of Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Application of recently developed mathematics, computer science, and statistics methodologies to natural resource functioning, management, and use problems. Specific topics, software, and methodologies vary. prereq: 3218, Math 1272, Stat 5021
FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3462/FNRM 5462
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. Prereq: grad student or instr consent
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theory/methods for estimating vital statistics of fish populations. Using microcomputers/statistical software to describe, analyze, model attributes of fish populations. Case studies from literature of marine/freshwater fisheries management. prereq: [4001 or Stat 5021], Biol 3407, [Math 1142 or Math 1271]
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, policies, regulations in population management. prereq: [FW 4102 or FW 4103], [EEB 3407 or EEB 3408 or EEB 3807]
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 5562 - GIS Development Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: GIS 5571 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Algorithms/data structures for digital cartographic data, topological relationships, surface modeling, and interpolation. Map projections, geometric transformations, numerical generalization, raster/vector processing. Hands-on experience with software packages. prereq: GIS 5571 or instr consent
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability.
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to financial accounting for U.S. organizations. Reading financial statements. prereq: Soph
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3602/ESPM 5602
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues relating to industrial ecology and industry as they are influenced by current standards/regulations at local, state, and national levels. prereq: APEC 1101 or ECON 1101 or 3261W
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3604/ESPM 5604
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A quantitative approach to environmental problems, including the development of mass and energy balances and the application of fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and microbiology. Meets the University of Minnesota's liberal education environment theme through the incorporation of environmental function, problems, and solutions throughout the course. prereq: Chem 1062, Phys 1302, Math 1372 or equivalent
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3605/ESPM 5605
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic principles of recycling and its role in raw materials utilization, energy, and the environment. Recycling processes for commonly recycled materials, products, and their properties and environmental implications of recycling.
ESPM 4607 - Industrial Biotechnology and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4607/ESPM 5607
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biotechnology pertaining to biobased products development, their environmental impact. prereq: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1021
BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4608/BBE 5608
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Use of organisms in remediation of waste and pollution problems related to bio-based product industries. Types, characteristics, identification of useful microorganisms. Applications of microbes to benefit industrial processes of wood and fiber. prereq: [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], CHEM 1011
IE 5522 - Quality Engineering and Reliability
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IE 3522/IE 5522
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Quality engineering/management, economics of quality, statistical process control design of experiments, reliability, maintainability, availability. prereq: [4521 or equiv], [upper div or grad student or CNR]
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
CI 5537 - Principles of Environmental Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Critical review of Environmental Education, its history, theories, curricula, teaching methods, and assessment practices. Development of an exemplary unit plan for teaching environmental studies. prereq: Undergrad in NRES or M.Ed. or grad student in education or instr consent
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4811/ESPM 5811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of interpretation. Nonformal teaching pedagogy. Interpretive talks, walks, and programs. Camp leadership, oral presentation. Newsletter development, Website design. Development of self-guided trail guides, brochures, and exhibits. Planning, evaluation. Interpretive work in private, state, or federal agencies. First-hand experience.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3015/ESPM 5015
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory course in program evaluation; planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; overview of the field of program evaluation.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3601/Hsg 3482
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How sustainable housing practices build community. How community growth has impacted the environment and how natural events impact our communities. Science and technology required to build high performance houses.
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
CI 5534 - Studies in Science Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Improvement of science teaching through the application of research findings. prereq: M.Ed., init lic, or instr consent
CI 5747 - Global and Environmental Education: Content and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prepares educators for leadership responsibilities in the area of global environmental education. Focus on the knowledge and process skills necessary to carry out a leadership role in the curriculum.
REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Rationale for, methods in applying wilderness/adventure education programs in education, recreation, corporate, human service settings. Emphasizes adventure/wilderness program management.
REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods, materials, settings for developing/conducting environmental/outdoor education programs. prereq: REC major or ORE minor or instr consent
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
COMM 5451W - Intercultural Communication Processes (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theory and research on cultural differences in values, norms, behaviors, and perceptions that affect communication across cultures internationally and domestically.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the interaction between human society and the natural environment, focusing on the contemporary and global situation. Takes the perspective of environmental sociology concerning the short-range profit-driven and ideological causes of ecological destruction. Investigates how society is reacting to that increasing destruction prereq: 1001 recommended or a course on the environment, soc majors/minors must register A-F
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 1001/Pol 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is intended to introduce students to the expressed hopes of the American people for their government and to the institutions and processes that have been created and recreated to achieve these hopes. The course is designed to help students understand what liberal education is by engaging in the study of American politics as a fundamentally critical and creative enterprise, and by grappling with the most complex and challenging problems of political life, such as the sources of political equality and inequality, and the tension between individual aspirations and political control. Questions of power and choice, opportunity and discrimination, freedom and restrictions on freedom are fundamental to the historical development of and current controversies within the American political system, and we will attend to all of these. We will explore topics including the ideas underlying the nation?s founding and its constitutional foundations; civil rights and civil liberties; the role of the United States in an increasingly globalized world; the structure and function of American political institutions; and the behavior of American citizens in the political process. In addition, we will learn to think and communicate like political scientists. We will read primary documents, such as the Federalist papers, engage with scholarly arguments about the way the American political system works, and critically evaluate critiques of the American political system that have been offered from a variety of perspectives. By the end of the semester students should have a basic understanding of the structure and function of American government as well as an increased ability to critically reflect on the degree to which our institutions, processes, and citizens live up to the expectations placed on them. Students will be able to identify, define, and solve problems and to locate and critically evaluate information. Students will have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry. This course fulfills the liberal education requirements for the Social Sciences Core.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3015/ESPM 5015
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of tourism industry; economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts of tourism development; influence of government policies and organizations; models and tools needed for successful development; consequences of development activities and ways to involve stakeholders in decisions. prereq: 1101, 1102 or Econ 1101, 1102
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
APEC 5321 - Regional Economic Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Development patterns. Role of resources, transportation, and institutional constraints. Migration, investments in growth and change. Economic information in investment and location decisions. Economic development policies and tools. Economic impact analysis. prereq: 3006 or ECON 3102 or instr consent
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of three principal components of rural landscape (form of land surface, plant life that cloaks it, structures that people have placed upon it). Structures associated with agriculture, including mining, forestry, resort areas, and small towns.
PA 5004 - Introduction to Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History/institutional development of urban planning as profession. Intellectual foundations, planning theory. Roles of urban planners in U.S./international settings. Scope, legitimacy, limitations of planning/planning process. Issues in planning ethics/settings of diverse populations/stakeholders. prereq: Major/minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5231 - Transit Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5213/PA 5231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles/techniques related to implementing transit systems. Historical perspective, characteristics of travel demand, demand management. Evaluating/benchmarking system performance. Transit-oriented development. Analyzing alternative transit modes. System design/finance. Case studies, field projects. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consumer/producer decisions. Theory of supply/demand. Markets, pricing, investment, effect regulation, market failures. prereq: [[1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271]] or instr consent; intended for undergrads in [Ag/Food Bus Mgmt, Appl Econ]
APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3102/ApEc 3006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public sector and market economics. Public goods, externalities, and other allocation issues. Government and stabilization of national economy. Overview of new classical/Keynesian models. Principles of taxation. Individual income tax. Sales, business, and property taxes. prereq: [[1102 or Econ 1102], [3001 or Econ 3101]] or instr consent
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of tourism industry; economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts of tourism development; influence of government policies and organizations; models and tools needed for successful development; consequences of development activities and ways to involve stakeholders in decisions. prereq: 1101, 1102 or Econ 1101, 1102
APEC 5711 - Agricultural and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This is a topics course which changes from year to year. This year we will consider the relationship between famines and armed conflict. The general supposition (conventional wisdom) is that famines are the result of the forces of nature floods, droughts, and earthquakes. In fact, the evidence supports the argument that famines result from the actions of man to do harm to others. We will consider a variety of cases including the Irish Famine of the 19th Century, the hunger after the conclusion of World War II, and the Bengal Famine of 1948. prereq: 3001 or Econ 3101
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 5480 - Topics in Natural Resources
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lectures by visiting scholar or regular staff member. Topics specified in class schedule.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
FW 4001 - Biometry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the basic foundations of statistical methods. In contrast to traditional methods of teaching statistics based on analytical formulas and hand-calculations, we will initially emphasize simulation-based methods (randomization tests, bootstrapping) for analyzing data. Students will learn how to implement common statistical methods (e.g., one and two sample tests, interval estimation techniques, linear regression) in the R programming language, and gain experience analyzing real data from a variety of fields, with particular emphasis on biological examples and applications.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3015/ESPM 5015
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3601/Hsg 3482
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How sustainable housing practices build community. How community growth has impacted the environment and how natural events impact our communities. Science and technology required to build high performance houses.
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4811/ESPM 5811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of interpretation. Nonformal teaching pedagogy. Interpretive talks, walks, and programs. Camp leadership, oral presentation. Newsletter development, Website design. Development of self-guided trail guides, brochures, and exhibits. Planning, evaluation. Interpretive work in private, state, or federal agencies. First-hand experience.
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, policies, regulations in population management. prereq: [FW 4102 or FW 4103], [EEB 3407 or EEB 3408 or EEB 3807]
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability.
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5212 - Managing Urban Growth and Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Theory/practice of planning, promoting, and controlling economic growth/change in urban areas. Economic development tools available to state/local policymakers, historic context of their use in the United States. legal, social, and economic implementation constraints. Interactions among economic, social, and demographic trends. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental and Occupational Health (EOH), the impact of environmental and occupational hazards on individuals and communities, the approaches taken to address EOH issues at the community level,and the challenges that must be overcome to ensure success in dealing with EOH issues. Students will review scientific literature to learn about interventions for environmental health problems, and practice identifying environmental health problems and interventions in their communities. The focus of this course will be on the interaction between humans and the environment and how this interaction affects human health. Online Course.
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
FW 4001 - Biometry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the basic foundations of statistical methods. In contrast to traditional methods of teaching statistics based on analytical formulas and hand-calculations, we will initially emphasize simulation-based methods (randomization tests, bootstrapping) for analyzing data. Students will learn how to implement common statistical methods (e.g., one and two sample tests, interval estimation techniques, linear regression) in the R programming language, and gain experience analyzing real data from a variety of fields, with particular emphasis on biological examples and applications.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3111/ESPM 5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 3015 - Invasive Plants and Animals: Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3015/ESPM 5015
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Overview of invasive plants/animals in North America and around the world. A range of taxa are covered along with their impact and approaches to control. Readings, discussions, and lectures from experts on topics such as invasion theory and real world management.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
WRS 5101 - Water Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5723/WRS 5101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socio-cultural, legal, and economic forces that affect use of water resources by individuals/institutions. Historical trends in water policy, resulting water laws in the United States. Institutional structures whereby water resources are managed at federal, state, and local levels.
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
CEGE 3502 - Fluid Mechanics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fluid statics/dynamics. Kinematics of fluid flow, equations of motion, pressure-velocity relationships, viscous effects, boundary layers. Momentum/energy equations. Lift/drag. Flow in pipes and pipe systems. Hydraulic machinery. Fluid measurements. prereq: [AEM 2012 or AEM 3031], Math 2373, CEGE 3101
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A quantitative approach to environmental problems, including the development of mass and energy balances and the application of fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and microbiology. Meets the University of Minnesota's liberal education environment theme through the incorporation of environmental function, problems, and solutions throughout the course. prereq: Chem 1062, Phys 1302, Math 1372 or equivalent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
BBE 5513 - Watershed Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of engineering principles to managing surface runoff from agricultural, range, and urban watersheds. Design of facilities and selection of land use practices for controlling surface runoff to mitigate problems of flooding and degradation of surface-water quality. prereq: 3023, upper div CSE or grad student
CEGE 4501 - Hydrologic Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hydrologic cycle: precipitation, evaporation, infiltration runoff. Flood routing through rivers and reservoirs. Statistical analysis of hydrologic data and estimation of design flows. Open channel flow, flow through conduits. Detention basin design, hydraulic structure sizing, estimation of risk of flooding. prereq: CEGE 3502
CEGE 4512 - Open Channel Hydraulics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories of flow in open channels, including gradually varied and rapidly varied flows, steady and unsteady flows. Computational methods for unsteady open channel flows, applications to flood routing. Introduction to moveable bed mechanics.
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Origin, development, and continuing evolution of landforms in various environments. Environmental implications. Weathering, slope and shore processes, fluvial erosion and deposition, arid region processes, glacial processes. This course includes lecture and laboratory components, including field trips. Prereqs: MATH 1271 (Calculus I) or equivalent; PHYS 1301 (Physics I: Classical Mechanics) or equivalent. Instructor consent is required to take this course without the prerequisite courses or their equivalents, and it is recommended to take these classes at least concurrently (as co-requisites) with geomorphology. No help will be given on material covered in prerequisite courses.
SOIL 5232 - Vadose Zone Hydrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic soil physical properties/processes governing transport of mass/energy in soils. Emphasizes water/solute transport through unsaturated root/vadose zones, their impact on subsurface hydrology and on water quality. Lectures, hands-on laboratory exercises, discussion of real world problems, problem solving. prereq: [Math 1271 or equiv], [Phys 1042 or equiv]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment (PHYS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles governing physical world in context of energy/environment. Lab. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Learn to write soil profile descriptions in the field. Class requires hands-on experience to determine soil texture, color, and horizon designations in the field. prereq: 2125
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A quantitative approach to environmental problems, including the development of mass and energy balances and the application of fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and microbiology. Meets the University of Minnesota's liberal education environment theme through the incorporation of environmental function, problems, and solutions throughout the course. prereq: Chem 1062, Phys 1302, Math 1372 or equivalent
CEGE 5541 - Environmental Water Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to water chemistry. Physical chemical principles, geochemical processes controlling chemical composition of waters, behavior of contaminants that affect the suitability of water for beneficial uses. prereq: CEGE 3501, Chem 1061, Chem 1062, upper division CSE or grad student or instructor consent
PUBH 6190 - Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview air, water, and soil chemistry. Pertinent environmental problems. Human/ecological multimedia exposures to chemicals in the environment. prereq: One course each in [gen chem, org chem] or instr consent
CHEM 3101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Primarily for chemistry majors. Methods/concepts of measurement by chemical/instrumental analysis, including titrimetry, quantitative spectrophotometric analysis, chromatographic separations, equilibrium/rate methods. prereq: 1062/1066 or equiv
CHEM 3111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Lab for 3101. High precision methods, acidimetry and complexometry, single and multicomponent analysis by spectrophotometry, analysis of mixtures by ion exchange and gas chromatography, enzymatic and rate methods. prereq: 3101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3101
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment (PHYS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles governing physical world in context of energy/environment. Lab. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1301 - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
ESPM 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
LAAS 5311 - Soil Chemistry and Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Structural chemistry, origin/identification of crystalline soil clay minerals. Structure of soil organic matter. Chemical processes in soil: solubility, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, oxidation/reduction, acidity, alkalinity. Solution of problems related to environmental degradation, plant nutrition, and soil genesis. prereq: [[Chem 1022 or equiv], Phys 1102, grad] or instr consent