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Duluth Campus

Environment, Sustainability & Geography B.A.

Geography & Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2020
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 45 to 46
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The purpose of this degree is to prepare students to create sustainable communities for present and future generations. This program provides students with the tools to understand the physical and social systems of the earth to become informed change makers locally and globally. Sustainability challenges are all around us: from climate change, to vulnerabilities in the industrial food system, to the way we design cities. One of the fundamental hurdles in a transition toward sustainability is bridging the ecological and social sciences with decision-making. The program trains students to analyze the interwoven nature of social and ecological systems, and translate that knowledge into policies to enact change. Meaningful engagement with the world outside the classroom prepares students to comprehend and address these challenges. To this end, the program provides students with theoretical and hands-on instruction in ecological and social processes, mentoring, as well as opportunities for professional and real-world experiences through internships and applied research. There are three tracks students may choose from: 1) Environment and Sustainability, 2) Geography, 3) Urban and Regional Studies.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
The Board of Regents, on recommendation of the faculty, grants degrees from the University of Minnesota. Requirements for an undergraduate degree from University of Minnesota Duluth include the following:
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits.
  4. At least 30 semester credits must be earned through UMD, and 15 of the last 30 degree credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. Students must complete at least half of their courses at the 3xxx-level and higher at UMD. Study-abroad credits earned through courses taught by UM faculty and at institutions with which UMD has international exchange programs may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. For certificate programs, at least 3 upper-division credits that satisfy requirements for the certificate must be taken through UMD. If the program does not require upper division credits students must take at least one course from the certificate program from UMD.
  8. The minimum cumulative UM GPA required for graduation will be 2.00 and will include only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UM GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major and minor. No academic unit may impose higher grade point standards to graduate.
  9. Diploma, transcripts, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
1) A second field of study (either a minor, another major or dual degree). 2) Study abroad is encouraged for all students and the department makes every effort to facilitate such experiences.
First Term Requirement (1 cr)
Transfer students with 24 or more credits and current UMD students who change colleges to CLA are exempt from this requirement. New first-year students with 24 or more PSEO credits may request to be waived from this requirement.
UST 1000 - Learning in Community (1.0-2.0 cr)
Core Requirements (9 cr)
ES 2005 - Environment and Sustainability [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
Sustainability (4 cr)
GEOG 1414 - The Physical Geography [LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
or GEOL 1110 - Geology and Earth Systems [LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Requirements (4 cr)
ES 4090 - Internship Preparation & Career Development (1.0 cr)
ES 4612 - Field Techniques and Research Design (3.0 cr)
Advanced Writing Requirement (3 cr)
WRIT 31xx - Adv Writing (3 cr)
Electives (9 cr)
To fulfill this requirement students take at least 3 courses. Students have two options to complete this requirement: 1) Select 3 courses across the listed Course Lists. One course may be at the 2xxx level. 2) Students may propose 3 courses. NOTE: The first option is the system default. Courses listed in the tracks are not listed here as options, but may be applied with permission from an ESG adviser.
Course List (2xxx level)
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ES 2095 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be assigned) (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ES 2100 - Western Lake Superior Sustainable Food Systems (4.0 cr)
· ES 2803 - Issues in Global Ecology [LE CAT] (3.0 cr)
· Course List (3xxx-4xxx level)
Take 2 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· ES 3200 - Environmental and Ecological Justice (3.0 cr)
· ES 3300 - Anthropocene Stories: Geology, Human Histories and Possible Futures (3.0 cr)
· ES 3500 - Ecological Economics (3.0 cr)
· ES 4612 - Field Techniques and Research Design (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3605 - The Irish Landscape in Science and Literature - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3370 - Geographies of Development (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411 - Human Environment Interactions (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3422 - Natural Hazards (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3481 - The Ecology of Cities (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3712 - Geography of Latin America (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3800 - Community Empowerment in South Asia - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3995 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned) (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4401 - Climate Science (3.0 cr)
· Optional Experience
Take 0 - 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ES 4091 - Independent Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· ES 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Environment and Sustainability (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ES 4999 - Honors Project in Environment and Sustainability (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3991 - Independent Study in Geography (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Geography (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4999 - Honors Project Geography (3.0 cr)
· URS 3991 - Independent Study in Urban and Regional Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· URS 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Urban & Regional Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· URS 4999 - Honors Project in Urban and Regional Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
or Propose Electives
If students elect to propose courses, they must consult with an ESG adviser. No more than 1 course at the 2xxx level. Proposal form found here: z.umn.edu/umdclaprograms
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Environment and Sustainability
This track emphasizes the ecological and societal dimensions of sustainability, specifically, the food-energy-water nexus. Students develop the skills to create solutions that meet material human needs while preserving natural resources and ecosystems.
Environment and Sustainability Core (7 cr)
ES 3100 - Sustainable Food Systems (4.0 cr)
GEOG 3461 - Geography of Global Resources (3.0 cr)
Physical Systems (3 cr)
GEOG 3401 - Weather and Climate (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4446 - Water Processes and Management (3.0 cr)
Internship (3 cr)
ES 4097 - Internship (3.0 cr)
Capstone (3 cr)
ES 4005 - Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
Geography
This track emphasizes a holistic and spatial approach to both human and physical systems. Students explore how humans transform the earth, with an emphasis on three broad streams of geographic thought: human-environment interaction, human systems, and physical systems.
Human-environment Interaction (3 cr)
GEOG 2306 - Environmental Conservation [LE CAT] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3411 - Human Environment Interactions (3.0 cr)
Human Systems (3 cr)
GEOG 2313 - Economic Geography [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3334 - Urban Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4393 - Political Geography (3.0 cr)
Physical Systems (3 cr)
GEOG 3401 - Weather and Climate (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4446 - Water Processes and Management (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 4451 - The Geography of Soils (4.0 cr)
Internship (3 cr)
GEOG 3997 - Internship (3.0 cr)
Capstone (3 cr)
GEOG 4803 - Geographic Thought (3.0 cr)
Urban and Regional Studies
This track emphasizes the social and cultural dimensions of urbanization, addressing how our increasingly urban world can organize in just and cohesive societies.
Urban and Regional Studies Core (9 cr)
ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 3334 - Urban Geography (3.0 cr)
GEOG 3335 - Urban Planning (3.0 cr)
Internship (3 cr)
URS 3097 - Internship (3.0 cr)
Capstone (3 cr)
URS 4001 - Cities and Citizenship (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Enviro., Sustainability & Geog Sample Plan
· Environment and Sustainability
· Study Abroad (one term - Environment and Sustainability track)
· Geography
· Urban and Regional Studies

View checkpoint chart:
· Environment, Sustainability & Geography B.A.
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UST 1000 - Learning in Community
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02403
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
ES 2005 - Environment and Sustainability (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02630 - ES 1001/ES 2005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will cover human impacts on their natural environments (resource depletion and pollution) and the complex notion of Sustainable Development. Students will analyze resource depletion (i.e., fossil fuels, forests, fisheries, water and soil) and pollution (i.e., climate change, ocean acidification, and oceanic garbage patches and dead zones) trends over the past century to better understand our growing impacts on the natural environment. Students will also analyze a wide variety of solutions (i.e., local food systems, renewable energy systems and water systems) from the emerging field of Sustainable Development aimed at mitigating these alarming resources depletion and pollution trends. Finally, students will be introduced to policy considerations regarding the implementation of these solutions and new economic approaches to help transition from economic growth to Sustainable Development.
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World (SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture, and politics by examining human geography in the context of global regions. This course introduces core concepts in human geography such as space, place, and scale, and globalization, and applies those concepts to understand the diversity of our globalizing world. Topics from the impact of climate change, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and ethnic and national identities are explored.
GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World (LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02628 - GIS 2552/GEOG 2552
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course starts with the definition of what a map is and considers maps as tools for communication. Students are led to explore the effects of scale, projection, cartographic symbolization and generalization on the mapping process and resulting digital databases. Students are introduced to spatial data models, types of spatial data and representation, and study alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS and Remote Sensing. The course includes hands-on map activities; map reading/interpretation, map use, and map production where students will use their laptops to create online web mapping services.
GEOG 1414 - The Physical Geography (LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The environment is highly dynamic and is continually modified by human and environmental processes. This course examines these processes to better understand how the Earth's landscapes were formed and how they are currently being transformed. Specifically, students will understand the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment including Earth-sun relations, water resources, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils.
GEOL 1110 - Geology and Earth Systems (LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Earth systems science is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the processes operating within and the interactions between the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. In this course we investigate the changing nature of the Earth; its composition, architecture, and antiquity; the internal and external processes that shape it through time; cycles of energy and matter; the development of life and impact of human activity; and both local environmental issues and global change.
ES 4090 - Internship Preparation & Career Development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various employers and members of environmental/social organizations from Duluth and northern Minnesota will speak to describe how their organization supports a transition towards sustainability in the region. Students will work together under the guidance of their instructor to assess, reflect, and prepare for graduation and the job market. prereq: ESG major
ES 4612 - Field Techniques and Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02629 - ES 4612/GEOG 4612
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to qualitative research methods in environmental sustainability, and is designed to equip students to plan, analyze, and present original research. Students will follow the complete research design process, including funding and grant proposals internal review board applications, and how to use these leverage employment and graduate school applications. Specifically, students will learn to collect data through interviews, focus groups, textual analysis, and participant observation; how to analyze data through these techniques; and how to prepare sound scientific arguments based on these analyses. Based on the collection of data throughout the semester students will produce original research that will be presented to the public. no grad credit
ES 2095 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be assigned)
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Special topics in Environment and Sustainability
ES 2100 - Western Lake Superior Sustainable Food Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This course covers issues in sustainable agriculture including relationships between food, environmental quality, human health and nutrition, social justice and economic imperatives. It is designed for student interested in hands-on, interdisciplinary field work, and community engaged learning. The course brings a systems-thinking approach to sustainable farming methods and healthy, equitable food systems. This course maximizes time: outside on the University's Land Lab (Sustainable Agriculture Project Farm), in the greenhouses, fields, orchard, forests and greenhouse. The training is rounded out with field trips, service learning, reading, assignments, and team projects.
ES 2803 - Issues in Global Ecology (LE CAT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
An examination of our most pressing global environmental problems and their most promising solutions.
ES 3200 - Environmental and Ecological Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Integrated study of justice issues as it relates to both the distribution of pollution and related negative impacts of contemporary society and of the natural world and non-human life. Emphasis on identifying how fairness is imagined, debated, determined via structure and/or legislated.
ES 3300 - Anthropocene Stories: Geology, Human Histories and Possible Futures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of Anthropocene discourse and social ecological reality from scientific, social science and humanities point of view. Explore this rupture in geological history that collective and cumulative human activity has created, contemporary social and political movements that has arisen to meet the challenges this unprecedented reality, and possible futures that it may bring. Focus on comparing the assumptions and implications of these frameworks.
ES 3500 - Ecological Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examine the basic principles and assumptions of Micro and Macro Economics, and their relevance in our modern global economic system. Examine the environmental/social consequences of deviations from these assumptions, and alternative economic models/analyses and policies consistent with sustainable development. prereq: [ES major or minor or URS major] and [Econ 1022 or Econ 1023] or instructor consent
ES 4612 - Field Techniques and Research Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02629 - ES 4612/GEOG 4612
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to qualitative research methods in environmental sustainability, and is designed to equip students to plan, analyze, and present original research. Students will follow the complete research design process, including funding and grant proposals internal review board applications, and how to use these leverage employment and graduate school applications. Specifically, students will learn to collect data through interviews, focus groups, textual analysis, and participant observation; how to analyze data through these techniques; and how to prepare sound scientific arguments based on these analyses. Based on the collection of data throughout the semester students will produce original research that will be presented to the public. no grad credit
ESCI 3605 - The Irish Landscape in Science and Literature - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02781
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study abroad in Ireland. This course focuses on the natural, cultural, and literary history of Ireland, with a particular emphasis on the intersection of science and the humanities. The last Ice Age left its marks on the Irish landscape, and, human communities over millennia have left their imprints as well. The stages of human settlement over time have adapted to postglacial climate change and associated changes of flora and fauna. The evolving landscape and coastlines and the archaeological record of human history from the paleolithic period to modern times make the Irish landscape a fascinating field stie. Moreover, the Irish literary tradition from the ancient oral cultural to the beginning of literacy in the early Middle Ages has a long, rich, often locally-based heritage of nature writing. The assigned literature wll connect postglacial history and climate change to the natural systems and environments and to the history of human adaptation over time. Students will visit important geographic and cultural sites and learn how cultural evolution remains a powerful presence in modern Ireland. pre-req: WRIT 1120 or equivalent, GEOL 1110 or GEOL 1610 or GEOG 1414, instructor consent
GEOG 3370 - Geographies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This class examines the global geography of wealth and poverty, i.e., why some places are very rich while others are very poor. The impacts of colonialism, the Cold War, globalization, overpopulation, and ecological and climate change are explained, and the prospects for a more just future are considered. prereq: Minimum 30 credits
GEOG 3411 - Human Environment Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the interactions between humans and their physical environments. Topics covered include the physical components of the natural environment, human population growth and movement, natural resource use, and human impact upon vegetation, soil, water, landforms and climate. pre-req: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 3422 - Natural Hazards
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geography of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and droughts; human-physical environment interrelationships under extreme geophysical conditions; causes, characteristics, and consequences of natural hazards; human adjustment to natural hazards. Prereq: 1414 or Geol 1110, or minimum 30 credits or instructor consent.
GEOG 3481 - The Ecology of Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
By 2050, over three-quarters of the world's population will live in urban environments. To accommodate this transition, it is critical that we understand the relationship between nature and people within cities. This course will introduce the theoretical, practical, and policy-related aspects of urban systems, and the challenges and solutions to developing sustainable cities. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 3712 - Geography of Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Considers the social, physical and political landscapes of Latin America and the Caribbean before, during and after the European invasion and colonial times. Examines contemporary dynamics in the region from a political ecology perspective. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 3800 - Community Empowerment in South Asia - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02244 - FORS 3800/COMM 3800/GEOG 3800
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This course will take students to Bangalore, India where they will learn about the history and culture of India and examine processes of social change. Bangalore has grown tremendously in recent years as the city has become the center of India's high-tech economy. However, the benefits of this growth have not been equally distributed: slums that house millions of the city's poorest residents are located alongside gleaming new office towers and shopping malls. In this course, students will examine the causes of these disparities and learn how disenfranchised groups such as women, lower caste members, tribal communities, and religious minorities are advocating for their social and economic rights. Students will be challenged to think about how realities in India mirror realities in the United States today, and how they too can become agents of change in their communities. prereq: minimum 3.0 GPA, 30 credits, & instructor consent; also visit the UMD Study Abroad office
GEOG 3995 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in geography of current and special interest to students that are not offered in regular department curriculum. Topics may involve specialties of staff or visiting faculty.
GEOG 4401 - Climate Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course examines the complex relationship between the atmosphere, oceans, and the biosphere over space and time, and how they relate to Earth's climate. Specifically, this course will study the basic forces that drive Earth's climate systems, how climate differs between the equator and the poles and between oceans and continents, and how these difference results in variations in Earth's climate. In addition, we will explore the global balance and distribution of energy and the transfer of that energy throughout the atmosphere, the role of land and ocean surfaces in climate forcing, how global atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns are related, and examine long-term climate forcing (ENSO, NAO, MJO, etc.) Lastly, we will understand how these processes have varied in the past, and how current variations are leading to fundamental changes to our climate system. pre-req: GEOG 3401
ES 4091 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed readings and projects for students who wish to do independent advanced study or work on topics not normally covered in other courses. prereq: 60 credits, instructor consent; no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for ES 4001
ES 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Environment and Sustainability
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical experience in teaching beginning courses in the department. Students serve as intern teachers assisting the instructor in administration of the course. pre-req: instructor consent, no grad credit
ES 4999 - Honors Project in Environment and Sustainability
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced individual project in any area of Environment and Sustainability demonstrating sound theoretical and research foundations and resulting in a written report or other expression of scholarly production. pre-req: instructor consent; no grad credit
GEOG 3991 - Independent Study in Geography
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For students interested in doing advanced work in selected fields of geography. prereq: instructor consent
GEOG 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Geography
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical experience in teaching beginning courses in the department. Students serve as intern teachers assisting the instructor in administration of the course. pre-req: instructor consent, no grad credit
GEOG 4999 - Honors Project Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced individual project in any area of Geography, GIScience, Urban and Regional Studies, or Environment and Sustainability demonstrating sound theoretical and research foundations and resulting in a written report. prereq: minimum 90 credits, approval by department honors program director; no grad credit
URS 3991 - Independent Study in Urban and Regional Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For students interested in doing advanced work in urban and regional studies. prereq: instructor consent
URS 4910 - Teaching Assistantship in Urban & Regional Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical experience in teaching beginning courses in the department. Students serve as intern teachers assisting the instructor in administration of the course. pre-req: instructor consent, no grad credit
URS 4999 - Honors Project in Urban and Regional Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced individual project in any area of Urban and Regional Studies demonstrating sound theoretical and research foundations and resulting in a written report or other expression of scholarly production. pre-req: instructor consent, no grad credit
ES 3100 - Sustainable Food Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical and contemporary food systems within sustainability framework. Understands food within social, political, economic and environmental contexts. Looks at sustainable production, consumption and processing issues. Lab time is spent at the UMD Land Lab and include experiential learning opportunities within the Duluth community.
GEOG 3461 - Geography of Global Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial distribution and uses of global natural resources addressed through models of resource management, focusing on energy, non-fuel minerals, population, food, and technology. Theoretical approach and political perspective applied to trade, international economic development, and environmental issues. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 3401 - Weather and Climate
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Weather and climate are critical to both Earth systems and human societies, yet they are frequently misunderstood. The goal of this course is to develop a scientific understanding of atmospheric processes and how they are responsible for weather events and climatic patterns. Atmospheric composition, structure, and motion are studied, along with precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclonic storms, and the the distribution and classification of climates. prereq: 1414 or GEOL 1110 or 1130 or instructor consent
GEOG 4446 - Water Processes and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to the surface water processes and water resources management, including precipitation, runoff generation, channel processes, spatial and temporal variations in water distribution, aspects of water quantity and quality, and watershed management problems. Prereq: Geog 1414 or Geol 1110 or Graduate students or Instructor consent.
ES 4097 - Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Experience in the field of environment and sustainability with direct supervision in public agencies or relevant private firms. prereq: instructor consent; no grad credit
ES 4005 - Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the creation and implementation of environmental policy in the United States. Major environmental policies and laws at the federal and state level. Particular attention will be paid to air and water pollution, climate change, and natural resource use. pre-req: minimum 60 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 2306 - Environmental Conservation (LE CAT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In order to adapt to and mitigate environmental challenges that are predicted to occur in the future, we must have a clear understanding of the physical, economic, societal, and political contexts that brought us to the present. This course examines the complexity of coupled social-ecological systems and the role that humans have played in changing the face of the Earth.
GEOG 3411 - Human Environment Interactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the interactions between humans and their physical environments. Topics covered include the physical components of the natural environment, human population growth and movement, natural resource use, and human impact upon vegetation, soil, water, landforms and climate. pre-req: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 2313 - Economic Geography (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary geographic pattern analysis of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Development of geographic theories and models that attempt to explain spatial variations of economic activities such as agriculture, manufacturing, and trades and services.
GEOG 3334 - Urban Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As the world becomes more urbanized there seems to be less distinction between global problems and urban problems. Analysis of the relationship between urbanization and other aspects of our modern world such as economic globalization, increased levels of international migration, and warfare. Examine how global dilemmas can be seen in the national and international issues. Pay particular attention to the everyday struggles that occur in the households and neighborhoods of cities as people attempt to care for themselves and their families in this rapidly changing world. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 4393 - Political Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the geography of social power from international geopolitics, to protest politics in public space, to theories of hetero-normativity and patriarchy. The central focus of this course is the spatial organization of politics, i.e., how people organize themselves into groups, and how those groups police themselves and vie with each other in various places and at multiple scales. prereq: Minimum 60 credits including or instructor consent
GEOG 3401 - Weather and Climate
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Weather and climate are critical to both Earth systems and human societies, yet they are frequently misunderstood. The goal of this course is to develop a scientific understanding of atmospheric processes and how they are responsible for weather events and climatic patterns. Atmospheric composition, structure, and motion are studied, along with precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclonic storms, and the the distribution and classification of climates. prereq: 1414 or GEOL 1110 or 1130 or instructor consent
GEOG 4446 - Water Processes and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to the surface water processes and water resources management, including precipitation, runoff generation, channel processes, spatial and temporal variations in water distribution, aspects of water quantity and quality, and watershed management problems. Prereq: Geog 1414 or Geol 1110 or Graduate students or Instructor consent.
GEOG 4451 - The Geography of Soils
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course gives students a fundamental understanding of the soil as a living resource. The course covers basic soil science and the critical need for sustainable soil management in the context of current agricultural and climate change. The course includes outdoor field excursions, hands-on soil study both in the field and in the lab. Course includes a weekend field trip. prereq: 1414 or Geol 1110 or grad student or instructor consent
GEOG 3997 - Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Experience in the field of geography with direct supervision in public agencies or relevant private firms. prereq: 60 credits completed and instructor consent
GEOG 4803 - Geographic Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development and significance of geographic concepts and thought. History and intellectual roots of contemporary geography, geographers, and geographic institutions. prereq: 60 credits or grad student or instructor consent
ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The city as a work of art and center of culture. A study of artistic representations combined with references to primary texts. Use of case studies of particular urban centers to explore the rise of the city and the history of urban planning around the globe.
GEOG 3334 - Urban Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As the world becomes more urbanized there seems to be less distinction between global problems and urban problems. Analysis of the relationship between urbanization and other aspects of our modern world such as economic globalization, increased levels of international migration, and warfare. Examine how global dilemmas can be seen in the national and international issues. Pay particular attention to the everyday struggles that occur in the households and neighborhoods of cities as people attempt to care for themselves and their families in this rapidly changing world. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent
GEOG 3335 - Urban Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban planning explores the purpose, practice, and theories of modern community planning for the promotion of social and economic well-being. The causes of urban problems, and the tools planners can use to solve them will be investigated. Special focus will be paid to citizen participation and how the voices of community members can be heard in the planning process. prereq: Minimum 30 credits
URS 3097 - Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Practical experience in some field of urban and regional studies work, under direction of a faculty adviser and a work-site adviser. prereq: instructor consent
URS 4001 - Cities and Citizenship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course explores the relationship between urbanization and democracy by examining how urban policy is created in cities around the world. The course examines the questions given the increasing pace of urban growth and the growing multiculturalism in cities around the word, how are cities responding, and how are community voices being included in the decision making process? Particular attention will be paid to infrastructure, transportation, participatory democracy, sustainability and urban resiliency, urban activism, tensions between the urban, national, and global scales, multiculturalism, and modernization. no grad credit