Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management B.S.

College of Food, Agri & Natural Resource Sciences
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2014
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 71 to 92
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The environmental sciences, policy and management (ESPM) major is designed to address the needs posed by the complexity of environmental and renewable resource issues that are faced on a state, national, and global level. This interdisciplinary, environmental major prepares graduates to solve environmental problems from an integrated knowledge base. The mission of the ESPM major is to * improve the basis for environmental decision-making by integrating physical, biological, and social sciences with policy analysis and management; * educate the next generation of environmental professionals and leaders; * foster innovative approaches for the education of environmental professionals; * facilitate science/social science/policy linkages within and beyond the University. Students complete a set of common "integrated core" courses that focus on integrated problem solving using environmental sciences, policy, ethics, management models, and communication theory. Students also incorporate classroom and fieldwork.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All students complete Required Courses below and choose one of the following ESPM tracks: conservation and resource management (CRM); corporate environmental management (CEM); environmental education and communication (EEC); policy, planning, law and society (PPLS); and environmental science (ES). Students are strongly encouraged to have an international experience before graduation. Courses completed during an international experience (study, work, volunteer, research) can meet program requirements, liberal education requirements, and/or electives. Discussion with an adviser prior to commencing an international experience is required to plan how courses meet requirements in the ESPM major. All major requirements must be taken A-F (unless only offered S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C-.
Communication Skills
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment [WI] (3.0 cr)
Biological Sciences
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Integrated ESPM Core
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM (1.0 cr)
ESPM 1001 - Freshmen Orientation to Environmental Sciences, Policy, and Management (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 1002 - Transfer Orientation Seminar (1.0 cr)
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
ESPM 4021W or ESPM 4041W fulfills this requirement.
Interdisciplinary Learning
ESPM 1011, ESPM 2021, ESPM 3575, ESPM 4021W, or ESPM 4041W fulfills this requirement.
Upper-division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper-division Writing Intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3606W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies [WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Corporate Environmental Management
The CEM track provides graduates with the fundamental skills to systematically determine the environmental burdens associated with a firm's products or manufacturing processes and to identify opportunities that generate value from environmental risk reduction, regulatory compliance programs, and other alternatives for improving environmental performance. The CEM track prepares students for positions in growing environmental, health, and safety organizations housed within private enterprises, consultancies, and governmental institutions, as well as for graduate study in business, public policy, environmental sciences, and industrial ecology.
Student experiences within this track focus on analytical tools; the business, legal, regulatory, and ethical framework in which industrial firms operate; physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms associated with industrial emissions; techniques used to reduce the environmental impacts of industrial activity; and effective communication.
Social Sciences
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Prerequisite CEM Courses
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CEM Track Required Courses
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3606W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
or ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
or Appropriate study abroad
or FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Track Contract Courses
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3656 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4607 - Industrial Biotechnology and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4609 {Inactive} [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· AFEE 3361 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 3023 - Ecological Engineering Principles (3.0 cr)
· BBE 3033 - Material and Energy Balances in Biological Systems (3.0 cr)
· SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4535 - Assessment and Diagnosis of Impaired Waters (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4744 - Engineering Principles for Biological Scientists (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5121 - Applied Experimental Design (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
Conservation and Resource Management
Students in the CRM track are involved in what Thoreau suggested was "environmental wisdom," or the ability to make effective decisions about the environment by synthesizing natural and human created facts and information. Students integrate this understanding with diverse economic and social insight to make effective decisions for the environment and society. This track prepares students for technical support, operational, and managerial positions in diverse aspects of resource conservation and management with local, state, and federal agencies and the private sector. This track also prepares students for graduate study in a wide range of areas.
Students solve problems in field settings and communicate their understanding, synthesis, and decision-making to diverse audiences. They gain experience in the actual implementation of decisions. Students may also develop special skills through electives (e.g., geographic information systems, geospatial analysis).
Social Sciences
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
CRM Core Courses
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3101 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
Internship
Requires approval and supervision by faculty adviser from track.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
CRM Contract Courses
Courses taken to meet other requirements cannot be double counted here, nor can courses count for multiple groups. Course selections from contract area must be made through a faculty adviser. A contract is required.
Take 32 or more credit(s) including 4 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Conservation and Management
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3101 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3656 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4609 {Inactive} [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4535 - Assessment and Diagnosis of Impaired Waters (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 2 - 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
· Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
Environmental Education & Communication
Students in the EEC track gain a solid base of knowledge in the environmental sciences, environmental ethics, and the social context of environmental issues, and they develop a practical set of skills for teaching effectively in informal settings and for communicating clearly in written, oral, and electronic forms. This track prepares students to work at government agencies, nature centers, parks, non-governmental organizations, and similar institutions, and is appropriate for students who wish to gain a broad understanding of environmental issues and the choices humans can make to mitigate unwanted impacts of human behavior on the environment.
Students may specialize in a content area through a minor, study abroad experience in ESPM topics, and/or a student designed content area. Students are encouraged to make choices that strengthen their expertise in an area and/or provide comparative understanding from another culture or discipline. Courses listed in the track but not taken are good possibilities for use in a content area, as are courses listed below. ESPM students should see their adviser for a list of minors.
Mathematical Thinking
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 3012 Statistical Methods. Take only if your CLE mathematical thinking requirement is satisfied by another course.
Physical Science
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Social Sciences
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Education and Communication
ESPM 2401 - Environmental Education/Interpretation (3.0 cr)
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 5250 - Environmental Communication (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation (3.0 cr)
or CI 5537 - Principles of Environmental Education (3.0 cr)
or CI 5747 - Global and Environmental Education: Content and Practice (3.0 cr)
or REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education (4.0 cr)
or REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
Human Dimensions
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Natural Sciences
Ecology
BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
or FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)
Physical Environment
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
or EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment [PHYS, ENV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
Organismal Biology
Take 3 or more course(s) including 2 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Plant
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· Animal
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· ENT 1005 - Insect Biology with Lab [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
Complex Human and Natural Systems
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or EEB 5146 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 5146 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
or LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Field Experience
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
or FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Environmental Science
The ES track focuses on the application and integration of basic and applied sciences to solve complex environmental problems. Students can earn professional licenses and certification in several areas and will be qualified to work as soil scientists, hydrologists, water quality and wetland ecology scientists, environmental remediation scientists, climatologists, and atmospheric scientists. Graduates find jobs with environmental regulatory agencies, private consulting firms, and nonprofit organizations. This track provides a diverse basic and applied science background that also prepares students for scientific research through advanced graduate studies.
Students in this track use an understanding of biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics to develop a broad knowledge base in soil, hydrologic, atmospheric, and biological sciences. Students study the interaction between science and the functioning of urban, forested, and agricultural lands, as well as hydrologic, atmospheric, soil, and wetland resources.
Social Sciences
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Additional Basic Science and Math Courses
ESPM 3131 - Environmental Physics (3.0 cr)
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Applied Sciences and Technology Courses
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
Take 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3521 - Soil Judging (1.0 cr)
· SOIL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
ES Contract Courses
Students must develop a contract with their faculty adviser to create an area of specialization. All track electives must be upper division. Depending on the selected courses, students have the opportunity to become certified or licensed as a professional soil scientist, hydrologist, wetland delineator, erosion control specialist, or site evaluator for individual sewage treatment system. Below are sample courses that could be taken to complete a contract; it is not a comprehensive list.
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3656 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· LAAS 5515 - Soil Formation: Earth Surface Processes and Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 3521 - Soil Judging (1.0 cr)
· SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils (2.0 cr)
· SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5605 - Limnology Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· FW 5604W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6190 - Environmental Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· WRS 5101 - Water Policy (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 5402 - Biometeorology (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems (3.0 cr)
· PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3963 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5146 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FW 3565 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3425 - Atmospheric Pollution: From Smog to Climate Change (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5402 - Biometeorology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5423 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5565 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 21 credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5601 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5241 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6103 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6104 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6105 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6171 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6175 - Environmental Measurements Laboratory (2.0 cr)
Policy, Planning, Law and Society
The PPLS track focuses on developing understanding and problem-solving skills germane to the interaction between human and natural systems. Students will be well prepared for policy development and analysis, strategy development, and decision-making in a range of positions and institutional settings. Example positions include those as a policy analyst, community planner, social researcher, or lawyer in public agencies, with legislative bodies, consulting firms, and conservation organizations. This track also prepares students for graduate study in policy, planning, and law programs.
Students study concepts, issues, and problem solving approaches that address the policy, legal, economic, political, planning and sociological aspects of environment and natural resource management. This study includes ethics and conflict management. The track further emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach for examining problems, such as sustainable land use planning, resource conservation and management, law, and environmental protection at a range of political levels and spatial scales and developing effective and innovative solutions. Students develop skill in integrating knowledge from the physical, biological, and social sciences to develop policy and planning alternatives and appropriate strategies to provide real solutions to complex problems.
Physical Science
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
PPLS Core and Contract Courses
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior [CIV, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Policy and Planning
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 4256 - Natural Resource Law and the Management of Public Lands and Waters (3.0 cr)
Choice of ESPM 3251 (Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development) or an equivalent study abroad course.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
or Appropriate Study Abroad
Field Session Options
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0 cr)
or Cloquet Field Session
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants (1.0 cr)
with FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology (2.0 cr)
with FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources (1.0 cr)
Methods
Choose one course from the following.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis (3.0 cr)
or POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis (3.0 cr)
Take exactly one course from the following:
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Ecology and Management
Choose 3 credits from the following.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3656 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
or FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
Choose 6-8 credits from the following.
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 5146 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 1125 {Inactive} [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
PPLS Contract Courses
Students must specialize in a content area to strengthen their expertise, through a minor, appropriate study abroad experience, and/or a student designed area. Courses listed in the track but not taken are good choices for use in a content area, as are courses listed below. PPLS students should see their adviser for a list of appropriate minors. Submit a contract for 12 credits of 3XXX or above credits, completed through prior consultation with your faculty adviser.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3xxx
· AGRO 3xxx
· APEC 3xxx
· BBE 3xxx
· COMM 3xxx
· ECON 3xxx
· ENT 3xxx
· FR 3xxx
· FW 3xxx
· GEOG 3xxx
· GLOS 3xxx
· MGMT 3xxx
· POL 3xxx
· RRM 3xxx
· SOIL 3xxx
· WRIT 3xxx
· WRS 3xxx
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View future requirement(s):
· Spring 2021
· Fall 2020
· Spring 2019
· Fall 2018
· Fall 2017
· Spring 2017
· Fall 2016
· Fall 2015
· Spring 2015

View sample plan(s):
· Environmental Sci,Policy&Mgmt Sample Plan
· Corporate Environmental Management
· Conservation and Resource Management
· Environmental Education and Communication
· Environmental Science
· Policy, Planning, Law and Society

View checkpoint chart:
· Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management B.S.
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COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 1101/Comm 1101H/PSTL 1461
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 2021 - Environmental Sciences: Integrated Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Environmental issues facing the world today are increasingly complex. Challenges such as global climate change, air and water quality impairments, land use change for forest and agricultural production, and species conservation require an ability to conceptualize problems broadly so that solutions are crafted in a manner that addresses a multitude of perspectives and considerations. This course will use an interdisciplinary case-study approach to expose students to the most important environmental problems facing society today as well as innovative solutions. The case studies include investigations of ecosystem services, invasive species and pollution remediation, with world experts on these topics leading the discussions. Throughout, a focus on interdisciplinary analysis, including linkages to environmental grand challenges will be emphasized. An interactive approach will be utilized as well, in which students work in groups and engage in class discussions as ways to internalize and conceptualize information. prereq: 1011, ESPM major
ESPM 3000 - Seminar on Current Issues for ESPM
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Environmental issues students will have to address in their future careers. Small group discussion, in-depth/focused intellectual debate. Topics depend on faculty selection or student interest. prereq: Jr
ESPM 1001 - Freshmen Orientation to Environmental Sciences, Policy, and Management
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Academic planning, ESPM careers, liberal education requirements, internships. Building relationships with other students/faculty, student life, information technology, critical computer skills. New freshmen.
ESPM 1002 - Transfer Orientation Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This required course provides orientation and guidance in planning for students transferring into the environmental sciences, policy and management (ESPM) major. We will use course activities to enhance your success and sense of community at the University and within the ESPM major while we explore the major, maximizing your time at the University, and preparing you for an environmentally-focused career.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SSM 4504W/SSM 5504
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of new-product development and product management, their application to biobased products. prereq: Jr or Sr or instr consent
COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of and factors influencing intercultural communication. Development of effective intercultural communication skills. prereq: Planning an intercultural experience
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3451W/Soc 3451V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course presents a survey of fundamental theories and philosophies of communication. Students will become acquainted with several theories of language and linguistic meaning and with principles of non-verbal and relational communication, and will engage in reflection on differences between older and newer media or ?modes? of discourse (speaking vs. writing; conventional print vs. digital text, etc.). In addition to introducing theories and concepts, the course seeks to develop competencies in evaluating and applying them in the analysis of communication in various contexts including face-to-face conversations, ongoing interpersonal relationships, and digitally-mediated interactions.
WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to explore major issues and perspectives in rhetorical criticism, including foundational concepts from the history of rhetorical theory, elements of rhetorical studies, and methods of rhetorical analysis. Rhetoric is an art form with a diverse theoretical landscape, meaning that there is no singular, stable definition of the term; rather, rhetoric is a practice that has been used as an organizing principle for a variety of communicative acts ? written, spoken, and enacted. As such, the study of rhetorical theory and criticism begins with the understanding that human beings use language and symbols to shape our many worldviews. The skills obtained in this class will help you to understand the nature and function of the persuasive strategies that structure our everyday lives and arguments. As a writing-intensive course, you will also learn how to construct a piece of rhetorical criticism that draws upon a toolbox of ideas and methods to successfully articulate a rhetorical argument.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Acct 2050/ApEc 1251/Dbln 2051
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to financial accounting for U.S. organizations. Reading financial statements. prereq: Soph
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is about the foundational principles of management, encompassing disciplinary and topical boundaries. We will look at these principles from the perspective of how they guide action, specifically: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. By the end of the course, students will know the basics of how to set up organizations to be effective and innovative, and not just efficient. During the course, you will engage with the material in the course and understand how management frameworks can be used to choose the right internal structures and processes that can best react to your particular industry context and general business environment.
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A quantitative approach to environmental problems, including the development of mass and energy balances and the application of fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and microbiology. Meets the University of Minnesota's liberal education environment theme through the incorporation of environmental function, problems, and solutions throughout the course. prereq: Chem 1062, Phys 1302, Math 1372 or equivalent
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3602/ESPM 5602
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues relating to industrial ecology and industry as they are influenced by current standards/regulations at local, state, and national levels. prereq: APEC 1101 or ECON 1101 or 3261W
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3604/ESPM 5604
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3111/ESPM 5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3605/ESPM 5605
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic principles of recycling and its role in raw materials utilization, energy, and the environment. Recycling processes for commonly recycled materials, products, and their properties and environmental implications of recycling.
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of contaminant transport in percolate solution and in overland flow. Hydrologic cycle, percolation/runoff processes, contaminant transport, leachate sampling methods, remediation technologies, scale effects on runoff water quality, tillage technologies, control of sediment/chemical losses. Discussions mostly descriptive, but involve some computations.
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
ESPM 4607 - Industrial Biotechnology and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4607/ESPM 5607
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biotechnology pertaining to biobased products development, their environmental impact. prereq: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1021
BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4608/BBE 5608
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Use of organisms in remediation of waste and pollution problems related to bio-based product industries. Types, characteristics, identification of useful microorganisms. Applications of microbes to benefit industrial processes of wood and fiber. prereq: [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], CHEM 1011
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
There is a growing sense of national and global urgency regarding carbon and climate change with particular emphasis on our energy system. Unfortunately, the answers are not simple. In this course, students explore our wide range of traditional and renewable energy sources and how these options impact our environment and society. Students are also exposed to the complex and compelling ethical issues raised by global, national, and local changes in how we produce and use energy. This course informs and engages students to be thoughtful, rather than passive consumers of energy. Students gain the knowledge necessary to be articulate in career, community, and personal arenas regarding renewable energy resources. In addition, students develop the ability to evaluate and respond to present and future technological changes that impact their energy use in the workplace, at home, and in the community. This course was designed and offered as an online course since 2011. For more details on the course please look at the syllabus and some comments from previous students by going to bbe2201.cfans.umn.edu
BBE 3023 - Ecological Engineering Principles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical, thermal, texture, strength, moisture properties of soil. Saturated/unsaturated moisture movement. Quantitative descriptions of mass/energy flux/storage in ecosystems. Distribution of vegetation in landscapes. Engineering/management impacts on soil-water-plant systems. prereq: BIOL 1009, [3012 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3012] or instr consent
BBE 3033 - Material and Energy Balances in Biological Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [CHEM 1062 or equiv], [CHEM 1066, or equiv], [MATH 1372 or equiv], [PHYS 1302W or equiv]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic principles of materials and energy balances, their applications in biological systems. prereq: [CHEM 1062 or equiv], [CHEM 1066, or equiv], [MATH 1372 or equiv], [PHYS 1302W or equiv]
SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SSM 4504W/SSM 5504
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of new-product development and product management, their application to biobased products. prereq: Jr or Sr or instr consent
BBE 4535 - Assessment and Diagnosis of Impaired Waters
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4535/BBE 5533/BBE 5535
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Assessing impaired waters and developing TMDL for conventional pollutants. Preparing/communicating legal, social, and policy aspects. TMDL analysis of real-world impaired waters problem. Field trip to impaired waters site. prereq: BBE 3012 and Upper division in CSE or CFANS or CBS student or instr consent
BBE 4744 - Engineering Principles for Biological Scientists
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4744/FScN 4331
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Material/energy balances applied to processing systems. Principles of fluid flow, thermodynamics, heat, mass transfer applied to food and bioprocess unit operations such as pumping, heat exchange, refrigeration/freezing, drying, evaporation, and separation. prereq: [Math 1142 or Math 1271], Phys 1101; intended for non engineering students
ENT 5121 - Applied Experimental Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 5121/Ent 5121
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Principles of sampling methodologies, experimental design, and statistical analyses. Methods/procedures in generating scientific hypotheses. Organizing, initiating, conducting, and analyzing scientific experiments using experimental designs and statistical procedures. Offered with AGRO 5121. prereq: Stat 5021 or equiv or instr consent
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores how written texts help shape understandings of the land in the U.S. Students read and analyze historical texts that have contributed to colonialist understandings of nature and the land. Students will study how the rhetorical strategies of such texts helped to form exploitive relations with the land and enact violence against indigenous peoples. Historical and current texts written by native peoples provide a counter-narrative to the myth of progress. Emphasis in the course is placed on analyzing texts with an eye toward setting the ground for conversations aimed at achieving sustainability and justice. Students will also study how written texts are composed within material contexts that contribute to their understanding.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3575/ESPM 5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3602/ESPM 5602
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues relating to industrial ecology and industry as they are influenced by current standards/regulations at local, state, and national levels. prereq: APEC 1101 or ECON 1101 or 3261W
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of contaminant transport in percolate solution and in overland flow. Hydrologic cycle, percolation/runoff processes, contaminant transport, leachate sampling methods, remediation technologies, scale effects on runoff water quality, tillage technologies, control of sediment/chemical losses. Discussions mostly descriptive, but involve some computations.
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
BBE 4608 - Environmental and Industrial Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4608/BBE 5608
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Use of organisms in remediation of waste and pollution problems related to bio-based product industries. Types, characteristics, identification of useful microorganisms. Applications of microbes to benefit industrial processes of wood and fiber. prereq: [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], CHEM 1011
SSM 4504W - Sustainable Products Systems Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SSM 4504W/SSM 5504
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of new-product development and product management, their application to biobased products. prereq: Jr or Sr or instr consent
BBE 4535 - Assessment and Diagnosis of Impaired Waters
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4535/BBE 5533/BBE 5535
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Assessing impaired waters and developing TMDL for conventional pollutants. Preparing/communicating legal, social, and policy aspects. TMDL analysis of real-world impaired waters problem. Field trip to impaired waters site. prereq: BBE 3012 and Upper division in CSE or CFANS or CBS student or instr consent
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effects differing classes of pollutants have on insects that are aquatic. Insect life-cycle dynamics, trophic guilds, community structure. Hypotheses to explain community structure in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, lakes, reservoirs. Organic pollution, eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, runoff/siltation, acidification, thermal pollution. Changes in aquatic insect community structure. Designing/maintaining biological monitoring networks. prereq: [[3005 or Biol 3407 or FW 2001], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course covers the ecological basis for management of wildlife, including biological and sociological factors that influence management. Goals include: understanding the ecological mechanisms influencing the distribution and abundance of wildlife, learning the ecological and historical foundations of wildlife management and the ecological and social ramifications of management actions, thinking critically and logically about current wildlife issues, honing writing skills, and developing technical skills in key areas. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores how written texts help shape understandings of the land in the U.S. Students read and analyze historical texts that have contributed to colonialist understandings of nature and the land. Students will study how the rhetorical strategies of such texts helped to form exploitive relations with the land and enact violence against indigenous peoples. Historical and current texts written by native peoples provide a counter-narrative to the myth of progress. Emphasis in the course is placed on analyzing texts with an eye toward setting the ground for conversations aimed at achieving sustainability and justice. Students will also study how written texts are composed within material contexts that contribute to their understanding.
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3218/FNRM 5218
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3462/FNRM 5462
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. Prereq: grad student or instr consent
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3111/ESPM 5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
SOIL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out a directed study on selected topics or problems under the direction of a faculty member; eg, literature review. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment. Students enrolling in a directed study will be required to use the University-wide on-line directed study contract process in order to enroll. Prereq: Department consent, instructor consent, no more than 6 credits of directed research counts towards CFANS major requirements
SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Learn to write soil profile descriptions in the field. Class requires hands-on experience to determine soil texture, color, and horizon designations in the field. prereq: 2125
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
ESPM 3602 - Regulations and Corporate Environmental Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3602/ESPM 5602
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/issues relating to industrial ecology and industry as they are influenced by current standards/regulations at local, state, and national levels. prereq: APEC 1101 or ECON 1101 or 3261W
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3604/ESPM 5604
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity.
ESPM 4242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4242/ESPM 5242
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Methods, formal/informal, for analyzing environmental/natural resource policies. How to critically evaluate policies, using economic/non-economic decision-making criteria. Application of policy analysis to environmental/natural resource problems. Recognizing politically-charged environment in which decisions over use, management, and protection of resources often occur. Prereqs: ESPM 3241W or ESPM 3271 and ESPM 3261, undergrads with jr or sr standing.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
ESPM 2401 - Environmental Education/Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundational view of environmental education/interpretation, its history, theories, and methodologies. Practical skills for teaching in the outdoors. Educational content, state/national standards, effective pedagogy for informal learning environments.
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Planning/strategy for communication campaigns related to food/agriculture. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation.
COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of and factors influencing intercultural communication. Development of effective intercultural communication skills. prereq: Planning an intercultural experience
COMM 5250 - Environmental Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 4250/Comm 5250
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical, cultural, material contexts within which environmental communication takes place. Understand environmental communication as well as develop communication strategies that lead to more sustainable social practices, institutions, systems.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course presents a survey of fundamental theories and philosophies of communication. Students will become acquainted with several theories of language and linguistic meaning and with principles of non-verbal and relational communication, and will engage in reflection on differences between older and newer media or ?modes? of discourse (speaking vs. writing; conventional print vs. digital text, etc.). In addition to introducing theories and concepts, the course seeks to develop competencies in evaluating and applying them in the analysis of communication in various contexts including face-to-face conversations, ongoing interpersonal relationships, and digitally-mediated interactions.
WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to explore major issues and perspectives in rhetorical criticism, including foundational concepts from the history of rhetorical theory, elements of rhetorical studies, and methods of rhetorical analysis. Rhetoric is an art form with a diverse theoretical landscape, meaning that there is no singular, stable definition of the term; rather, rhetoric is a practice that has been used as an organizing principle for a variety of communicative acts ? written, spoken, and enacted. As such, the study of rhetorical theory and criticism begins with the understanding that human beings use language and symbols to shape our many worldviews. The skills obtained in this class will help you to understand the nature and function of the persuasive strategies that structure our everyday lives and arguments. As a writing-intensive course, you will also learn how to construct a piece of rhetorical criticism that draws upon a toolbox of ideas and methods to successfully articulate a rhetorical argument.
ESPM 4811 - Environmental Interpretation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4811/ESPM 5811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of interpretation. Nonformal teaching pedagogy. Interpretive talks, walks, and programs. Camp leadership, oral presentation. Newsletter development, Website design. Development of self-guided trail guides, brochures, and exhibits. Planning, evaluation. Interpretive work in private, state, or federal agencies. First-hand experience.
CI 5537 - Principles of Environmental Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Critical review of Environmental Education, its history, theories, curricula, teaching methods, and assessment practices. Development of an exemplary unit plan for teaching environmental studies. prereq: Undergrad in NRES or M.Ed. or grad student in education or instr consent
CI 5747 - Global and Environmental Education: Content and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prepares educators for leadership responsibilities in the area of global environmental education. Focus on the knowledge and process skills necessary to carry out a leadership role in the curriculum.
REC 4301 - Wilderness and Adventure Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Rationale for, methods in applying wilderness/adventure education programs in education, recreation, corporate, human service settings. Emphasizes adventure/wilderness program management.
REC 4311 - Programming Outdoor & Env Ed
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods, materials, settings for developing/conducting environmental/outdoor education programs. prereq: REC major or ORE minor or instr consent
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory course in program evaluation; planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; overview of the field of program evaluation.
OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to program evaluation. Planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; evaluation strategies; overview of the field of program evaluation.
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3451W/Soc 3451V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores how written texts help shape understandings of the land in the U.S. Students read and analyze historical texts that have contributed to colonialist understandings of nature and the land. Students will study how the rhetorical strategies of such texts helped to form exploitive relations with the land and enact violence against indigenous peoples. Historical and current texts written by native peoples provide a counter-narrative to the myth of progress. Emphasis in the course is placed on analyzing texts with an eye toward setting the ground for conversations aimed at achieving sustainability and justice. Students will also study how written texts are composed within material contexts that contribute to their understanding.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FW 2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
There is a growing sense of national and global urgency regarding carbon and climate change with particular emphasis on our energy system. Unfortunately, the answers are not simple. In this course, students explore our wide range of traditional and renewable energy sources and how these options impact our environment and society. Students are also exposed to the complex and compelling ethical issues raised by global, national, and local changes in how we produce and use energy. This course informs and engages students to be thoughtful, rather than passive consumers of energy. Students gain the knowledge necessary to be articulate in career, community, and personal arenas regarding renewable energy resources. In addition, students develop the ability to evaluate and respond to present and future technological changes that impact their energy use in the workplace, at home, and in the community. This course was designed and offered as an online course since 2011. For more details on the course please look at the syllabus and some comments from previous students by going to bbe2201.cfans.umn.edu
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
PHYS 1001W - Energy and the Environment (PHYS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles governing physical world in context of energy/environment. Lab. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
FNRM 1101 - Dendrology: Identifying Forest Trees and Shrubs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Identification nomenclature, classification, and distribution of common/important forest trees/shrubs. Use of keys. Field/lab methods of identification.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ENT 1005 - Insect Biology with Lab (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ent 1004/Ent 1005
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Insects represent one of the most abundant and diverse life forms on Earth, and their environmental importance is displayed across both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Beyond environmental importance, insects shape human society through their impact on our health, the pollination of our food crops, and damage to our commodities and homes. Insect Biology is an introductory entomology course on the biology and ecology of insects, their classification, and their interactions with the environment and human society. This course will provide background on insect diversity and physiology while providing insight into how scientists examine the roles of insects in medicine, agriculture, advances in genetics, and ecology. These topics will provide fundamental biological knowledge needed to make informed decisions about insect-related topics in a global society.
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4501/FNRM 5501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management concepts for green infrastructure of cities, towns, and communities. Urban forest as a social/biological resource. Emphasizes management of urban forest ecosystem to maximize benefits to people. Tree selection, risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, landscape planning, values, perceptions. How urban forestry can be a tool to improve community infrastructure.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
ESPM 3131 - Environmental Physics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts and principles of classic and modern physics applied to environmental problems arising from interaction between humans and the natural environment. Forms of pollution (e.g., land, water, air). Transport mechanisms. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Global climate change. Social issues related to environmental problems. prereq: Phys 1101
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3111/ESPM 5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
SOIL 3521 - Soil Judging
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
A field-based course which requires students to apply fundamental knowledge obtained from Basic Soil Science and Field Study of Soils to the description of soils in the field. This course includes an inter-collegiate Soil Judging contest that takes during the course of the class. prereq: An introductory soils course and field studies course.
SOIL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out a directed study on selected topics or problems under the direction of a faculty member; eg, literature review. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment. Students enrolling in a directed study will be required to use the University-wide on-line directed study contract process in order to enroll. Prereq: Department consent, instructor consent, no more than 6 credits of directed research counts towards CFANS major requirements
SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Learn to write soil profile descriptions in the field. Class requires hands-on experience to determine soil texture, color, and horizon designations in the field. prereq: 2125
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
LAAS 5515 - Soil Formation: Earth Surface Processes and Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic soil morphology, soil profile descriptions. Pedogenic processes, models of soil development. Soil geomorphology, hydrology, hillslope processes. Digital spatial analysis. Soil classification. Soil surveys, land use. Soil geography. prereq: 2125 or instr consent
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
SOIL 3521 - Soil Judging
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
A field-based course which requires students to apply fundamental knowledge obtained from Basic Soil Science and Field Study of Soils to the description of soils in the field. This course includes an inter-collegiate Soil Judging contest that takes during the course of the class. prereq: An introductory soils course and field studies course.
SOIL 4511 - Field Study of Soils
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Learn to write soil profile descriptions in the field. Class requires hands-on experience to determine soil texture, color, and horizon designations in the field. prereq: 2125
SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Formation and characteristics of modern glaciers; erosional and depositional features of Pleistocene glaciers; history of quaternary environmental changes in glaciated and nonglaciated areas. Field trips and labs. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores how written texts help shape understandings of the land in the U.S. Students read and analyze historical texts that have contributed to colonialist understandings of nature and the land. Students will study how the rhetorical strategies of such texts helped to form exploitive relations with the land and enact violence against indigenous peoples. Historical and current texts written by native peoples provide a counter-narrative to the myth of progress. Emphasis in the course is placed on analyzing texts with an eye toward setting the ground for conversations aimed at achieving sustainability and justice. Students will also study how written texts are composed within material contexts that contribute to their understanding.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of contaminant transport in percolate solution and in overland flow. Hydrologic cycle, percolation/runoff processes, contaminant transport, leachate sampling methods, remediation technologies, scale effects on runoff water quality, tillage technologies, control of sediment/chemical losses. Discussions mostly descriptive, but involve some computations.
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5605 - Limnology Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field/lab methods to obtain information on environmental conditions in aquatic environments and measure abundance of aquatic organisms, especially plankton. Field/lab instruments, sampling devices, microscopy, water chemistry, data analysis. prereq: 3603 or instr consent
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
PUBH 6190 - Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview air, water, and soil chemistry. Pertinent environmental problems. Human/ecological multimedia exposures to chemicals in the environment. prereq: One course each in [gen chem, org chem] or instr consent
WRS 5101 - Water Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5723/WRS 5101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socio-cultural, legal, and economic forces that affect use of water resources by individuals/institutions. Historical trends in water policy, resulting water laws in the United States. Institutional structures whereby water resources are managed at federal, state, and local levels.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
ESPM 5402 - Biometeorology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course examines the interactions between the atmosphere and the Earth’s surface. We will discuss the principles of the surface energy and radiation balance, air motion in the atmospheric boundary layer, land surface parameterization for climate models, boundary layer budgets, and field research methods. The course aims to achieve exemplary learning through hands-on activities and examining recent field studies conducted in natural and managed ecosystems. prereq: MATH 1271, PHYS 1201, STAT 3011, [instr consent]
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 4505 - Biology, Ecology, and Management of Invasive Plants
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Ecology/biology of invasive plant species (weeds). Principles of invasive plant management in agricultural/horticultural, urban, wetland, aquatic, and other non-cropland landscape systems, utilizing biological, cultural, and chemical means. Management strategies to design systems that optimize invasive plant management in terms of economic, environmental, and social impacts. prereq: 4005, [Bio 3002 or equiv], Soil 2125, [Agro 2501 or Hort 1011]
AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/Ent 5321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological approach to problems in agricultural systems. Formal methodologies of systems inquiry are developed/applied. prereq: [3xxx or above] course in [Agro or AnSc or Ent or Hort or PlPa or Soil] or instr consent
PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores a range of plant physiological processes, including how plants make and use food; acquire and use minerals; transport water and nutrients; and regulate growth and development in response to hormones and environmental cues, such as light quality. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
FNRM 3204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3204/FNRM 5204
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems, characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Ecology course
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 5071/Hort 5071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Each ecosystem restoration is the product of a myriad of decisions made in response to existing site conditions (biotic and abiotic), anticipated effects from the surrounding landscape, predictions about future events, logistical realities, and, of course, desired conditions. During this course, you will learn about the ecological and social factors that affect ecosystem recovery and how people intervene to reverse ecosystem degradation. The course includes examples from ecosystems around the world, with emphasis on those found in the Midwestern US. Field trips. PREREQUISITES: This course presumes previous courses in basic ecology and plant science.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability.
PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products. prereq: 3301
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
HIST 3417W - Food in History (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
ESPM 3425 - Atmospheric Pollution: From Smog to Climate Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Processes governing chemical makeup of Earth's atmosphere. Implications for air pollution, climate, human welfare. Evolution of atmosphere. Atmospheric structure/transport. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, mercury. Greenhouse effect. Aerosols. Stratospheric ozone loss. prereq: [CHEM 1061, PHYS 1101W, MATH 1142 or 1271] or equiv or instr consent
ESPM 5402 - Biometeorology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course examines the interactions between the atmosphere and the Earth’s surface. We will discuss the principles of the surface energy and radiation balance, air motion in the atmospheric boundary layer, land surface parameterization for climate models, boundary layer budgets, and field research methods. The course aims to achieve exemplary learning through hands-on activities and examining recent field studies conducted in natural and managed ecosystems. prereq: MATH 1271, PHYS 1201, STAT 3011, [instr consent]
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 4216 - Contaminant Hydrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of contaminant transport in percolate solution and in overland flow. Hydrologic cycle, percolation/runoff processes, contaminant transport, leachate sampling methods, remediation technologies, scale effects on runoff water quality, tillage technologies, control of sediment/chemical losses. Discussions mostly descriptive, but involve some computations.
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
ESPM 4601 - Environmental Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course uses the principles of chemistry, microbiology, physics, and toxicology to understand the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants and the pollution of soils, surface waters, groundwater, and sediments. The course is structured around a semester-long risk assessment project that provides a framework for integrating concepts of pollution, contaminant movement, contaminant degradation, human health risk, ecological risk, risk mitigation, environmental remediation processes, and interactions among them. The history of federal regulations concerning environmental contamination is presented in the context of the major episodes of environmental pollution that motivated legislative action. prereq: SOIL 2125, CHEM 1061 and 1062 or equiv, or permission
CEGE 3501 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A quantitative approach to environmental problems, including the development of mass and energy balances and the application of fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and microbiology. Meets the University of Minnesota's liberal education environment theme through the incorporation of environmental function, problems, and solutions throughout the course. prereq: Chem 1062, Phys 1302, Math 1372 or equivalent
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
FNRM 3218 - Measuring and Modeling Forests
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3218/FNRM 5218
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling design, survey techniques to assess resource conditions. Applying metrics/sampling methods to forest vegetation. Calculating tree/stand volume. Modeling approaches. Case studies of modeling to project future growth. Landscape processes, characterization, modeling. prereq: [ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011], MATH 1151
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
FNRM 5462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3462/FNRM 5462
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. Prereq: grad student or instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues related to providing adequate levels of clean air/water. Local water quantity/quality, air quality in developed/developing world, global air/water quality, policies meant to protect these resources.
PUBH 6175 - Environmental Measurements Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Measuring exposures to potentially hazardous agents in air or water. Sampling the agent. Preparing sample for analysis. Conducting analysis. Interpreting results. prereq: EH or instr consent
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3261/ESPM 5261
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Microeconomic principles and their application to natural resource management problems. Economic and policy tools to address market failures. Discussion of regulatory and market-based instruments. Discounting and compounding concepts. Methods for conducting financial and economic analyses of natural resource management projects. Decision criteria when conducting benefit/cost analysis of natural resource projects. Methods for valuing non-market natural resource goods and services. Economics of managing renewable natural resources such as forests and fisheries. Land economics. Payments for environmental services. Planning and management problems. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or equivalent.
ESPM 3271 - Environmental Policy, Law, and Human Behavior (CIV, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
What is necessary to achieve sustainable societies. What influences societal deliberation/decisions about environmental issues. How our behaviors affect natural systems. Key theoretical concepts of environmental social psychology and political science. How people respond to policies, using theoretical concepts from social psychology about attitudes, values, and social norms; applying these ideas to specific environmental problems and ethical debates.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
ESPM 4242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4242/ESPM 5242
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Methods, formal/informal, for analyzing environmental/natural resource policies. How to critically evaluate policies, using economic/non-economic decision-making criteria. Application of policy analysis to environmental/natural resource problems. Recognizing politically-charged environment in which decisions over use, management, and protection of resources often occur. Prereqs: ESPM 3241W or ESPM 3271 and ESPM 3261, undergrads with jr or sr standing.
ESPM 4256 - Natural Resource Law and the Management of Public Lands and Waters
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4256/ESPM 5256
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course is intended to provide non-law students with an understanding of the role of the judiciary in the management of public lands and public waters. The course will examine Constitutional provisions affecting the management of public resources, the concept of property rights, major principles of water law, the role of the legal system in environmental review, the scope of legal authority granted to administrative agencies, and limitations of private property rights to protect public lands and public waters. The class will introduce students to the concepts of legal reasoning including case synthesis and analysis. The class will be taught using a combination of lecture, guest lectures, written exercises and class participation. Recommended prereq: 3241W or instructor consent
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students create oral/written report based on paid or volunteered work or field experience. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, completed internship contract
FNRM 2101 - Identifying Forest Plants
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field identification of common northwoods trees, shrubs, and nonwoody vascular plants. Emphasizes concept of plant communities, soil site relationships, and wildlife values. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
FNRM 2102 - Northern Forests Field Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field examination of natural history of northern/boreal forests with respect to soils, ecological characteristics of trees, community-environment relationships, stand development, succession, and regeneration ecology. Taught at the Cloquet Forestry Center. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
FNRM 2104 - Measuring Forest Resources
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Introduction to land survey, tree/forest stand measurement (mensuration), and forest sampling techniques. Taught at Cloquet Forestry Center.
ESPM 3211 - Survey, Measurement, and Modeling for Environmental Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3211/ESPM 5211
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey, measurement, modeling concepts/methods for study of natural resources/environmental issues. Emphasizes survey design for data collection, estimation. Analysis for issues encompassing land, water, air, vegetation, animal, soil, human/social variables. prereq: [MATH 1031 or MATH 1051], [3012 or FW 4001 or STAT 3011 or SOC 3811], computer competency
POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
POL 3085 teaches students how to study politics scientifically and introduces them to how to use quantitative analysis to answer political questions. The first part of the class covers how to formulate a theory (a possible answer to a question), specify testable hypotheses (what you would see if the theory is correct or incorrect), and set up a research design to test those hypotheses. In the second part of the class, we cover quantitative data analysis, beginning from preliminary statistical analysis to multivariate linear regression. There is no mathematical or statistical background required for this course. By the end of the class, students should be able to ask and answer political questions using quantitative data and fluently evaluate statistical analyses of political phenomena in the media and many academic articles.
PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent
FNRM 5259 - Visitor Behavior Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Recreation, leisure, and tourism are significant parts of the world, national, and state economies. Understanding visitor behavior is important and has significant implications for organizations, agencies, and businesses related to parks, tourism destinations, and museums. In this class, you will learn to apply both social science theory and methods to understand consumers, with an emphasis on visitors to parks and protected areas. You will immediately apply your learning of survey development, interviewing, observation and content analysis to real-word situations in class projects. This is an online course.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3131/FNRM 5131/FR 3131/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3575/ESPM 5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3411/FNRM 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3604/ESPM 5604
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
BBE 2201 - Renewable Energy and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
There is a growing sense of national and global urgency regarding carbon and climate change with particular emphasis on our energy system. Unfortunately, the answers are not simple. In this course, students explore our wide range of traditional and renewable energy sources and how these options impact our environment and society. Students are also exposed to the complex and compelling ethical issues raised by global, national, and local changes in how we produce and use energy. This course informs and engages students to be thoughtful, rather than passive consumers of energy. Students gain the knowledge necessary to be articulate in career, community, and personal arenas regarding renewable energy resources. In addition, students develop the ability to evaluate and respond to present and future technological changes that impact their energy use in the workplace, at home, and in the community. This course was designed and offered as an online course since 2011. For more details on the course please look at the syllabus and some comments from previous students by going to bbe2201.cfans.umn.edu
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv