Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

American Indian and Indigenous Studies Minor

American Indian Studies
College of Liberal Arts
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of American Indian Studies, 19 Scott Hall, 72 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis MN 55455, phone 612-624-1338
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 6
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
Grounded by a strong commitment to the worlds, histories, representations, and political struggles of Indigenous peoples locally and globally, the intellectual project of American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) uses interdisciplinary methods of critical inquiry as a means through which doctoral students engage research and scholarship in their major fields of study. An AIIS minor is composed of graduate course work with core and affiliated Indigenous studies faculty in the Department of American Indian Studies and other departments. The AIIS graduate minor strengthens students' work in their major field of study, as they will learn how to best integrate American Indian and Indigenous Studies into their existing work as well as how to complement their research to include indigenous methodologies.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Special Application Requirements:
Students interested in the minor are strongly encouraged to confer with their major field advisor and director of graduate studies, and the AIIS director of graduate studies regarding feasibility and requirements.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
Minor field coursework offered on both the A-F and S/N grading basis must be taken A-F. The cumulative GPA for minor field coursework is 3.00.
Required Core Course (3 credits)
Select one of the following core courses in consultation with the AIIS director of graduate studies.
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory (3.0 cr)
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
Electives (3-9 credits)
Masterís students select 3 credits and doctoral students select 9 credits from the following, in consultation with the AIIS director of graduate studies, to complete minimum credit requirements. Courses from the Required Core course list not applied to that requirement can be used as electives. Topics coursework must be preapproved by the AIIS director of graduate studies and must be taken for 3 credits. If chosen, AMIN 4994 or AMIN 4996 must be taken for 3 credits.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
AMIN 4511 - Indigenous Political Economies (3.0 cr)
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 4532 - Vine Deloria, Jr.: A Renaissance Indigenous Figure (3.0 cr)
AMIN 4990 - Topics in American Indian Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMIN 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-12.0 cr)
AMIN 4996 - Field Study (1.0-12.0 cr)
AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin: The Ojibwe Language (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5202 - Indigenous Peoples and Issues Before the United States Supreme Court (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology (3.0 cr)
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods (3.0 cr)
ESCI 4602 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (3.0 cr)
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History (1.0-4.0 cr)
AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
HIST 5891 - American Indian and Indigenous Studies Workshop (1.5 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Doctoral
Masters
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

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· Amer Indian and Indig Studies Sample Plan
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AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the "critical turn" in American Indian and Native or Indigenous Studies as evident in the emergence of three overlapping threads or intellectual/political genealogies: critiques of Indigeneity (the claims and conditions of nativeness to specific places), Indigenous Feminist (which foregrounds the salience of gender in indigenous critiques of power structures), and Indigenous Queer, sometimes labeled "Two-Spirit" (which foregrounds sexuality). What are the analytical, political and cultural backgrounds and what are their purchases for theory, critique, and practice? For interrogating academic and non-academic (including Indigenous) forms of inquiry and knowledge production and being in the world?
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century. prereq: 1001
AMIN 4511 - Indigenous Political Economies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Sources, nature, consequences of social/economic development/change in Indian communities. Precontact Indian communities. Effect of European contact. Social movements into 20th century, including phenomenon of urban Indian communities. prereq: 1001
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 4525W/Pol 4525W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
AMIN 4532 - Vine Deloria, Jr.: A Renaissance Indigenous Figure
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth consideration of indigenous scholar and activist Vine Deloria Jr.'s intellectual works, and impacts on fields such as law, religion and theology, history, natural and social science, literary criticism, education, anthropology, paleontology, and political science. Students read, discuss, produce research on an aspect of Deloria's work.
AMIN 4990 - Topics in American Indian Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMIN 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individually arranged research with faculty to meet student needs and interests. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
AMIN 4996 - Field Study
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Opportunities for experiential learning in a variety of American Indian community settings. Consult department faculty at least one term before enrolling. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin: The Ojibwe Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3107/5107
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Analysis of Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe language) structure in the context of an endangered Algonquian language. Examine writing systems, phonological (sound) features, morphology (word parts), and grammatical structures as documented historically and presently. The aim of the course is to provide students with an overview of the structure of Anishinaabemowin and introduce them to primary sources readings. Unlike language courses students may be familiar with from other departments, this course will not require memorization of extensive amounts of vocabulary ? our focus will be on understanding the structure of the language and acquiring an appreciation of the relevant linguistic issues and language revitalization issues.
AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3141/5141
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Planning for maintenance/revitalization of North American indigenous languages. Condition/status of languages. Documentation, cultivation, literacy, education. prereq: 3103 or 3123 or instr consent
AMIN 5202 - Indigenous Peoples and Issues Before the United States Supreme Court
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar explores the role and the practice of the US Supreme Court as a policy-making institution when dealing with indigenous nations and their citizens. Analysis of theoretical, behavioral, political, and institutional perspectives. Student work includes reading and textual analysis, leading discussions, analytical research paper.
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3409/AmIn 5409
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Various topics in American Indian studies, depending upon instructor/semester.
AMIN 8910 - Topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This is a topics shell
AMST 8920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8510 - Topics in Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar examines particular aspects of archaeological methods and/or theory. Topics vary according to student and faculty interests.
CI 8645 - Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course is a hands-on look at activist research methods situated in the context of Indigenous Language Revitalization. That is, what happens when a community problem is the organizing force in research? Students will be expected to both engage in language learning, research, designing a research project, and connecting this to critical thinking as applied to culture, language and indigenous language revitalization.
ESCI 4602 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interpretation of origin of sedimentary rocks through application of basic physical/chemical principles. Modern depositional environments, petrographic microscopy, basin dynamics, stratigraphy. prereq: [2301] or instr consent
HIST 5910 - Topics in U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected topics in U.S. history not covered in regular courses. Taught as staffing permits. prereq: Grad or advanced undergrad student with instr consent
AMIN 5602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3601/Anth 5601/AmIn 3602/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
HIST 5891 - American Indian and Indigenous Studies Workshop
Credits: 1.5 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5891/Hist 5891
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Workshop brings graduate and advanced undergraduate students and faculty together to read and provide intensive feedback (written and oral) on their works in progress. As an interdisciplinary field, AIIS students stand to benefit from ongoing and engaged conversations about that work that will deepen and enhance their professionalization in the field. The readings for the workshop are submissions from the membership of the workshop (which will include participants who are not formally enrolled in the workshop). We read and consider two submissions per week (sometimes more if the submissions are shorter) that are pre-circulated to all participants via the workshop?s listserv. Readings under consideration include research papers, dissertation chapters, article manuscripts, research proposals, conference papers, and other submissions that will benefit from intensive engagement with the members and will deepen the knowledge of all of the participants. Students will gain experience with the research, writing, and revision process as well as scholarly conversations about original research and writing. The overarching aim of the workshop is to develop research, writing, revision, and scholarly discussion skills as well as community-building in American Indian and Indigenous Studies and professionalization in an increasingly interdisciplinary and global field of study