Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Early Childhood B.S.

Institute of Child Development
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2020
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 47 to 60
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The undergraduate program in early childhood prepares students to work with young children (birth through age eight) and their families. The curriculum includes a variety of courses that are central to early childhood teaching and child development. The program offers students the flexibility to choose a track that aligns with their career aspirations. The Foundations of Education track prepares students for entry into the master of education (MEd)/initial licensure program in early childhood education. The Individualized Studies track prepares graduates to work in non-licensure educational settings (including daycare centers, private schools, youth community programs, or a variety of non-profit settings), to pursue advanced degrees, or to work in other settings where a strong education in child development is useful.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
Admission into the major is based on the following criteria: GPA of 2.5 is preferred Completion of CPSY 2301 or equivalent with a grade of C- or higher is preferred Those who have not yet completed 2301 will be expected to complete it in their first semester in the program.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
First Year Experience
All incoming CEHD Freshman must complete the First-Year Inquiry course EDHD 1525W.
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· EDHD 1525W - First-Year Inquiry: Multidisciplinary Ways of Knowing [WI] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Child Development Courses
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development (3.0 cr)
CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development (3.0 cr)
Early Childhood Courses
Students must be admitted to the program before taking these courses. Many of the major courses have an experiential component.
CPSY 5241 - Practicum in Early Childhood Education (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5251W - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Early Childhood Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5252 - Facilitating Social and Emotional Learning in Early Childhood Education (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5253 - Facilitating Cognitive and Language Learning in Early Childhood Education (3.0 cr)
CPSY 5254 - Facilitating Creative and Motor Learning in Early Childhood Education (2.0 cr)
EPSY 5625 - Education of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children with Disabilities: Introduction (2.0 cr)
Student Teaching
Student Teaching
CPSY 5281 - Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education (6.0-8.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CPSY 5251W - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Early Childhood Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Foundations of Education
This sub-plan is for early childhood majors who intend to go on to post-baccalaureate early childhood education teacher licensure via the MEd in early childhood education/initial licensure program.
Required Courses
Take 24.5 - 25.5 credit(s) from the following:
Elementary Ed Courses
CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching (3.0 cr)
CI 3212 - Practicum: Elementary Teaching (2.0 cr)
Foundation Courses
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning (1.5 cr)
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society (1.0 cr)
Cognition
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
Math
Students can choose from CI 1806 or any 1000-level 3 credit or higher MATH course with the exception of MATH 1001.
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1xxx
Language and Literacy
Linguistics
CI 3610 - Linguistics for Teachers [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language (4.0 cr)
or LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Literacy
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature [WI] (3.0 cr)
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading (3.0 cr)
CI 5414 - Practicum: Working With Developing Readers (2.0 cr)
Optional coursework for Additional License in Elementary Education
Students who wish to earn a license in Elementary Education need additional pre-requisite courses, but many can overlap with other university requirements. Please work closely with your academic advisors in meeting all M.Ed. pre-reqs, and to select major and liberal education courses that meet multiple requirements.
Individualized Studies
This sub-plan is for students who do not wish to go on to early childhood education teacher licensure via the MEd in early childhood education/initial licensure program.
Students will develop a Supporting Program to complement the major, consisting of at least 15 credits in consultation with the major advisor. Students must submit a program proposal during their first semester in the major to indicate these plans and interests. Recommended areas of study and/or formal minors may include: child psychology, culture and teaching, English as a second language education, second language, family social science, applied psychology in educational and community settings, leadership, business, or public policy.
Supporting program options
These courses will be individually planned with the major advisor, via a program proposal document. Courses may not count in both the required core area and the individualized supporting area. Options below are only suggestions; many more courses are possible, per the proposal.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CPSY 3xxx
· CPSY 4xxx
· SW 2xxx
· SW 3xxx
· FSOS 2xxx
· FSOS 3xxx
· FSOS 4xxx
· EPSY 2xxx
· EPSY 3xxx
· EPSY 5xxx
· YOST 2xxx
· YOST 3xxx
· YOST 4xxx
· OLPD 3xxx
· OLPD 4xxx
· CI 3xxx
· CI 4xxx
· CI 5xxx
· REC 3xxx
· KIN 3xxx
· KIN 4xxx
· ASL 3xxx
· SPAN 3xxx
· SLHS 3xxx
· SLHS 4xxx
· PSY 3xxx
· PSY 4xxx
· JOUR 3xxx
· JOUR 4xxx
· COMM 3xxx
· COMM 4xxx
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4xxx
· PUBH 3xxx
· PA 3xxx
· PA 4xxx
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Early Childhood
· Foundations of Education Track
· Individualized Studies

View checkpoint chart:
· Early Childhood B.S.
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EDHD 1525W - First-Year Inquiry: Multidisciplinary Ways of Knowing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02484 - EDHD1525V/EDHD1525W/PSTL 1525V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Writing intensive multidisciplinary approach to addressing the common question, "How can one person make a difference?" Students read a common book/work collaboratively to produce a final project. Active learning strategies to develop students' skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing.
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. PSY majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 3301.
CPSY 4331 - Social and Personality Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development of social relations and personality; research, methodology, and contrasting theoretical perspectives. Survey of findings on interpersonal relationships, the concept of self, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and acquisition of social roles. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
CPSY 4343 - Cognitive Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the scientific study of cognitive development (children's thinking) from infancy through adolescence. Focus on research and practical applications. Specific topic areas include infant perception and cognition, attention and memory development, language and symbolic thinking, social cognition, executive function. prereq: CPSY 2301 or 3301 or equivalent
CPSY 5241 - Practicum in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course offers a great introduction to the early childhood experience for those interested in working with young children. Helpful first course to explore Early Childhood major (can also count in CPSY BA). Students will review early development and learn how this knowledge is applied in educational and early care settings. Spend time observing early childhood programs through practicum experiences around the city.
CPSY 5251W - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Early Childhood Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the history of early childhood education from Plato to the present, as well as explores various program models and the standards movement, including the Minnesota Early Learning Indicators. The course includes lecture, discussion, videos and vignettes, assignments, and requires students to begin developing a personal teaching philosophy. It is also a writing intensive course which incorporates writing instruction and professional writing expectations throughout all course assignments and activities.
CPSY 5252 - Facilitating Social and Emotional Learning in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores social and emotional development throughout the early childhood (0-8) years. Explore the variety of ways that social interactions and emotional understanding occur in young children with a special emphasis on the role of adults in facilitating these processes. Students will encounter a blend of theory and application as they learn to promote children's mental health, understand special circumstances such as trauma, and respond to challenging behaviors across early learning settings. prereq: CPSY 2301 or equiv or inst consent. For Early Childhood or ECSE students.
CPSY 5253 - Facilitating Cognitive and Language Learning in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of cognitive and language characteristics of children ages 0-8 years and of how teachers can plan curriculum to facilitate children's development in these areas. prereq: CPSY 2301 or equiv or inst consent. For Early Childhood or ECSE students.
CPSY 5254 - Facilitating Creative and Motor Learning in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn how young children develop creativity and motor skills from birth - age 8. Engage in hands-on exploration of creative classroom materials and reflection. Complete action-oriented and applied assignments with small groups of children in early childhood education settings. prereq: CPSY 2301 or equiv or inst consent. For Early Childhood and ECSE students.
EPSY 5625 - Education of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children with Disabilities: Introduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of the issues, problems, and practical applications in designing early intervention services for young children with disabilities and their families.
CPSY 5281 - Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 6.0 -8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Student teaching plus weekly seminar for students pursuing the Early Childhood teaching licensure. Application of theory/research relating to teaching preschool children. Student teach either 5 mornings per week (7:45-12:30) for 8 credits or 3 afternoons per week (11:45-4:30) for 6 credits. In addition, ALL students participate in weekly (Fridays 12:30-2) seminars. Prereq: Early Childhood or ECSE student plus successful completion of CPSY 5241, 5252, 5253, and 5254.
CPSY 5251W - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Early Childhood Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the history of early childhood education from Plato to the present, as well as explores various program models and the standards movement, including the Minnesota Early Learning Indicators. The course includes lecture, discussion, videos and vignettes, assignments, and requires students to begin developing a personal teaching philosophy. It is also a writing intensive course which incorporates writing instruction and professional writing expectations throughout all course assignments and activities.
CI 3211 - Introduction to Elementary Teaching
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classroom management, instructional planning, working with families in elementary classroom. Assigned readings, lectures, classroom activities, assignments. prereq: [Elementary ed or early childhood ed foundations major], concurrent practicum experience
CI 3212 - Practicum: Elementary Teaching
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based practicum. Students apply learning from their University courses to elementary school setting, connecting theory, research, and practice. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 5111, [elementary education foundations or early childhood foundations] major
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or #], basic computer skills
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse educational technology in K-12 classrooms. Effective use of technology. Computer technologies used to stimulate personal productivity/communication and to enhance teaching/learning processes. prereq: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent], basic computer skills
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues of prejudice/discrimination in terms of history, power, social perception. Knowledge/skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, leadership, judgment/decision making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution, teaching in diverse educational settings. prereq: MEd/init lic or CLA music ed or preteaching or instr consent
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, and assessment. Topics: behaviorism, cognitive and social constructivism, human information processing theory, intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability, validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, and portfolios.
EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, assessment. Behaviorism, cognitive/social constructivism, human information processing theory. Intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability/validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, portfolios, demonstrations. Applications to instruction/organization of curricular materials. prereq: MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed or preteaching major or instr consent; psych course recommended
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math modeling, including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, counting/probability. Excel or calculators used to develop equations/graphs from theoretical/real interdisciplinary data. Projects enable students to use models to examine trends, make predictions. prereq: Three yrs high school math or grade of at least C+ in PsTL 0731 or PsTL 0732 or CI 0832 or placement test score or instr consent
CI 3610 - Linguistics for Teachers (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
For pre K-6 pre-service teachers. Introduction to linguistics. Linguistic terminology and how to apply methods of linguistic analysis to English, focusing on educational settings and classroom instruction.
ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to structure of English. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. pragmatics. Language variation/usage.
LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00099
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ability to acquire and use language is a biological trait of the human species. This capacity for language manifests itself as thousands of particular languages spoken around the world in communities large and small. But what is language? What does it mean for a human to ?know? a particular language? How do children acquire this knowledge? How do we use language to communicate? These are some of the important questions addressed by the field of linguistics, the scientific study of the human capacity for language in its physiological, cognitive, historical, and social manifestations. This course introduces some of the essential findings of linguistics: first and foremost, that all varieties of all languages are intricately structured at multiple distinct but related levels. Second, that this intricate structure can be described in terms that are not only precise, but which apply to all human languages. We will work to replicate some of these findings by deploying simple analytical methods on data from a variety of languages. These methods allow us to answer questions about the different structural components of language: phonology (how do speech sounds pattern?), morphology (what are possible words and how are they built?), and syntax (what is the hierarchical structure underlying sequences of words?). In all instances these methods require that we pay attention to basic notions of semantics, from which more complex conceptions of meaning will emerge. Having characterized language as an intricately-structured system of knowledge, we will then possess the tools to ask a number of additional questions about language and cognition. How does such complex knowledge play into the actual task of sentence production or comprehension? What do we know about the neural implementation of this knowledge in human brains? How does child language acquisition proceed, and what makes it so much more robust than language acquisition later in life? Do animals have languages of their own? Can they learn human languages? Finally, we will turn our attention to variation in language patterns observed over the passage of time, across geographical space, and within social systems. How and why do languages change over historical time? What can we know about languages spoken before the invention of writing? What distinctions exist between languages spoken in different places, and how can we tell whether similarities are due to genealogical relationships? How do new languages emerge? How do languages disappear? How does language use vary between individuals from the same place or the same community? How do socioeconomic class, ethnicity, and gender relate to the linguistic behavior of individuals? How does language policy affect educational outcomes? What about social cohesion and conflict? Although we will find that most of these questions lack definitive answers, we will develop an understanding of what it takes to ask them meaningfully and precisely. In particular, we will be able to eliminate false or misleading answers, especially when they fail to take into account the observable and describable properties of the human capacity for language.
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classic/contemporary books for children in all genres, created by authors/illustrators. Research in transactional theory. Cultural authenticity. Reading, discussion, group activities, interactive lectures, projects.
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Reading processes, development of readers. Assessment and tutoring of individual children in reading and other literacy practices. prereq: CI 3610 and concurrent registration with CI 5414
CI 5414 - Practicum: Working With Developing Readers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based practicum. Students apply learning from their University course to working with developing readers. Instructor provides specific assignment. prereq: CI 3610 and concurrent registration with CI 5413 required; elementary education foundations major