Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Population Studies Minor

Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15 to 18
Population studies encompasses the study of the size, structure, and distribution of populations and spatial or temporal changes in them in response to birth, migration, aging, and death. Changes in the size and composition of populations, as well as in the underlying components of population change (i.e., mortality, fertility, and migration), strongly influence and are influenced by natural and human systems in ways that are increasingly consequential. Population studies equips students with the ability to connect to demography in ways that promote understanding, preparedness, leadership, and service in a period of rapid social change. This program draws from a rich set of resources at the University of Minnesota with a possible experience with the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) – via internships, employment, or course offerings. Coursework focuses on the intersections of population studies with ecology, economics, education, environmental science, epidemiology, geography, history, political science, public health, public policy, sociology, and statistics. Faculty interests in the comparative study of demography and institutions in various countries add an international emphasis to these areas of study. All population studies courses emphasize the skills of social inquiry necessary for analyzing patterns of social relationships. For those students who pursue completion of an advanced minor elective, the minor will also equip and credential undergraduates with highly marketable skills for employment in a range of business, government, and non-profit organizations. The population studies minor would help to qualify students and signal qualifications to employers for jobs such as: data science and data management; research analysts in government and non-profit organizations focused on social services, urban planning, elder services, environmental stewardship, and resource management, family planning, health, transportation, and education; market analysts and consultants employing market forecasting based on demographic projections; and actuaries.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3511 - World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
Electives
Electives must be taken from at least two different departments (excluding Advanced Population Studies Elective Options). Students who are interested in graduate programs related to population studies should take an advanced population studies elective option.
Take 4 or more course(s) totaling 12 - 15 credit(s) from the following:
Geography, Environment & Society
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· History
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3415 - Migrations in Modern Global History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3797 - History of Population [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Public Affairs
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
· Public Health
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease (2.0 cr)
· Sociology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3507 - Immigration to the United States: Beyond Walls [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4511 - Sociology of Youth: Transition to Adulthood (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Advanced Population Studies Elective Options
Students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher, and with instructor and advisor consent, may request permission for a 3-credit 8xxx-level population studies course to count as the Advanced Population Studies Elective. Credit for population studies related internships may be counted toward the minor with approval from the advisor.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
Population Studies Research Practicum
Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on experience with population studies research by working with a researcher or on a research team at the MPC. Students in the course will meet weekly with the instructor to discuss their research experiences and develop a final research product, and students will attend the weekly MPC Seminar Series. Note: Students may petition the instructor to use a relevant non-MPC internship placement to fulfill the hands-on learning component of the course.
· SOC 4881 - Population Studies Research Practicum (3.0 cr)
· Coursework Options
· GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts


View checkpoint chart:
· Population Studies Minor
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Liberal Arts

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
SOC 3511 - World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
HIST 3011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02029 - Hist 3011/Hist 5011
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basics of quantitative historical data collection, measurement, analysis.
HIST 3415 - Migrations in Modern Global History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Today¿s debates about immigration in historical/comparative perspective. Major migrations into, within, and out of Americas over 500 years. Lives/identities of U.S. immigrants compared with foreigners living/working in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Words/voices of migrants.
HIST 3797 - History of Population (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02643 - Hist 3797/Hist 5797
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of births, deaths, migration, population size, and population characteristics. Evidence from Europe, the United States, and Latin America with comparative material from Africa and Asia. Methods of historical population analysis and research of historical population data.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02021
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How diseases are distributed among us. Epidemiology terminology, methods, critical thinking, and analysis. Intended for students interested in a health science career or in a career that may need to evaluate epidemiologic evidence such as health journalism or public policy or litigation. prereq: Undergrad statistics course is recommended
SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02540 - Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3507 - Immigration to the United States: Beyond Walls (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Immigration is one of the most politically and emotionally charged issues in the United States today. It is also poorly understood. Assumptions, myths, and misinformation about US immigration and immigrants are routinely and increasingly manifested in acrimonious political debates, news stories and sound bites, and our daily conversations and interactions with one another in the very communities in which we live and work. At the same time, US immigration and immigrants have been, are, and will continue to be an essential and vibrant part of our lived and shared experiences as individuals and communities, Minnesotans and Americans, and global citizens.
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4511 - Sociology of Youth: Transition to Adulthood
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine how recent societal trends have influenced the process of becoming an adult, including demographic change and inequality, shifts in the labor force, technological advances, school-work linkages and change in other major institutions, such as in higher education and criminal justice. These societal trends affect young people differently, depending on their social locations—their gender, race/ethnicity, and social class. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02028 - GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02028 - GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: soph, jr, or sr
SOC 4881 - Population Studies Research Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on experience with population studies research by (1) working under the mentorship of an individual researcher or a research team at the Minnesota Population Center (MPC) and (2) attending and reflecting in writing on MPC's weekly research seminar. In addition, students in the course will meet weekly with the instructor to discuss their research experiences and to develop and present a final research poster.
GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course, you will develop practical social science data analysis skills for use in the non-profit or corporate workplace or in a graduate program of research. You will assess the measurement of important social concepts, like race, health, or education, in large social surveys, and the strengths and weaknesses of those different measurement techniques. You will conduct data analysis on large datasets (see, e.g., www.ipums.org) using a statistical software program, such as STATA. You will develop a substantive, empirical final project (poster and paper) based on your analysis. prereq: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent