Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sexual Health Minor

School of Public Health - Adm
School of Public Health
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
School of Public Health, MMC 819, A395 Mayo Memorial Building, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-626-3500 OR 1-800-774-8636).
  • Program Type: Graduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Length of program in credits (master's): 6
  • Length of program in credits (doctoral): 12
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
The sexual health minor is designed for students who want to specialize in sex, sexuality, reproductive health, and sexual health. By taking public health courses tailored specifically to address sexual health, students are better able to enter the professional world with the confidence and skills needed to handle complex questions and issues related to sexual and reproductive health.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Admission to the sexual health graduate minor is contingent upon prior admission to a master's or doctoral degree-granting program at the University of Minnesota.
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
Required coursework must be completed A-F with a minimum grade of B-. Minimum GPA is 3.00.
Course Requirements
Required Course (2 credits)
All students take the following course, in consultation with the Sexual Health director of graduate studies.
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health (2.0 cr)
Required Coursework (1-3 credits)
Take at least one of the following courses, in consultation with the Sexual Health director of graduate studies:
PUBH 6010 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6605 - Reproductive and Perinatal Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health (2.0 cr)
or Required Coursework Non-SPH Students (2 credits)
Students pursuing a graduate program from outside the School of Public Health must take at least one of the following courses, in consultation with the Sexual Health director of graduate studies:
PUBH 6020 - Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health (2.0 cr)
Electives
Select electives in consultation with the Sexual Health director of graduate studies to meet the masterís 6-credit or the doctoral 12-credit minimum. The minimum grade required for a course taken for an A-F grade is B-.
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
BTHX 8510 - Gender and the Politics of Health (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families (3.0 cr)
GWSS 4406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights (3.0 cr)
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking (2.0 cr)
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Master's
Doctoral
 
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PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate-level class for students preparing for careers in public health research and practice where sex, sexuality, and sexual health are key components. It is a highly applied, highly interactive course focused on developing skills needed in sex research and sexual health practice. The teaching pedagogical approach is a "flipped classroom" where students are expected to learn the content from the assigned audiotaped lectures, movies and readings, and to come to class ready to participate in exercises, discuss case studies, complete assignments and immerse themselves in public health practice and research focused on sex, sexuality, and sexual health. The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare health professionals for a professional career addressing community and population sexual health concerns by deepening their knowledge of and exposure to research practice in the field, increasing comfort familiarity and ability to speak on sexual health topics, and by practicing their skills. The assignments focus on hot topics in sex and sexual health, and are designed to increase knowledge of the field of sexual health, while developing skills in conceptualization, measurement, intervention design, and evaluation. Please note this course addresses the greatest challenges in sexual health facing our world, including such hot topics as the zika virus and HIV prevention, clergy sexual abuse, campus sexual climate, sexual harassment, LGBT health disparities, contraception, abortion, women's rights, teen sex, and unplanned pregnancy.
PUBH 6010 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00354 - PubH 3010/6010
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of public health approaches to AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological/clinical features of HIV infection. Impact of AIDS on certain communities/populations. Behavior change principles as they apply to AIDS interventions. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6605 - Reproductive and Perinatal Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Epidemiology, programs, services, and policies. Social, cultural, psychological, physiologic, environmental, economic, and political factors that affect reproductive health, pregnancy, and childbearing. prereq: Public health student or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6627 - Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, and Controversy
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Issues and controversies affecting K-12 sexuality education. Current research and guidelines for effective, responsible education and curricula selection. Various curricula being used in the United States. Challenges in teaching sensitive issues inherent in sexuality education.
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Programs, services, and policies that affect women's health in the United States. Methodological issues in research. Emphasizes social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors. Measurement/interpretation of factors, how they translate into interventions, programs, and policies.
PUBH 6020 - Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Four major approaches to public health problems: psychosocial, economic, community, policy. Theory, implementation. Small groups practice skills.
PUBH 6250 - Foundations of Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course we will examine values, contexts, principles, and frameworks of public health. We will provide an introduction to public health, consider the history of public health, social/political determinants, impact of health disparities on race, class and gender, moral and legal foundations, public health structures, historical trauma and cultural competence, health and human rights, advocacy and health equity, communication and financing, and the future of public health in the 21st century. Grounded in theory and concepts, we will incorporate core competencies and skills for public health professionals and will focus on developing problem solving and decision-making skills through critical analysis, reflection, case studies, readings, and paper assignments.
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. domestic and foreign policies as they affect Africans and peoples of African descent in the diaspora. Intersections of gender, race, nation, and class. prereq: instr consent
BTHX 8510 - Gender and the Politics of Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Significance of gender to health and health care. Feminist analysis regarding moral/political importance of gender, possibly including contemporary western medicine?s understanding of the body, childbirth, and reproductive technologies; cosmetic surgery; chronic illness; disability; participation in research; gender and classification of disease. Care work, paid/non-paid. Readings from feminist theory, history, social science, bioethics, and moral philosophy. prereq: instr consent
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human ecology/development as frameworks for examining sexuality in close relationships. Diversity of sexual beliefs, attitudes, behaviors within differing social contexts. Using scientific knowledge to promote sexual health among individuals, couples, families through various life stages. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Perspectives on gay, lesbian, bisexuals and transgender (GLBT) in families. Unique contributions of GLBT to understanding diversity among families. Homophobia, mythologies, coming-out, identity, gender, social networks, intimacy, sexuality, children, parenting, aging, AIDS, ethnicity.
GWSS 4406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examine spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
HSEX 6001 - Foundations of Human Sexuality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundations of Human Sexuality covers topics in human sexuality, including biology and sexuality; sexuality across the lifespan, cultures and history; religions, epidemiology and clinical issues; and sexuality and legal/social aspects. Using readings, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the interactions between biological, social, and individual factors in producing variations in human sexuality.
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The age-old debate on the rights of individuals to sexual determination and reproductive autonomy rages on. It grows more contentious as new technology and heated political confrontations alter the playing field. This course, using cases, statutes, and ancient and contemporary critical writings, examines the legal foundations and social implications of regulating contraception, abortion, pregnancy, childbirth, and assisted reproduction. It addresses access, funding, the rights of men, women, minors, fetuses, and government. It also explores ethical considerations and international perspectives.
LAW 6046 - Human Trafficking
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Seminar will examine the breadth and depth of efforts to combat and raise awareness about human trafficking, a form of modern-day slavery in which people are compelled through force, fraud, coercion, or other means to engage in commercial sexual exploitation or forced labor. An optional two-credit externship, Law 6047, is available.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of womenís human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.