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Twin Cities Campus

Public Interest Design Minor

DESIGN Intrdiscp Assoc Dean
College of Design
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2018
  • Required credits in this minor: 18
  • No
This minor explores the emerging field of public interest design. Public interest design refers to human-centered and participatory design practices that address ecological, economic, cultural, and social issues in design and design-related fields. This minor provides an integrated education in design where students enhance their learning by making connections between traditional design courses and important social, economic, and environmental issues.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
A maximum of two courses taken for a major may be used toward the public interest design minor. Up to a maximum of two study abroad or transfer courses may be used toward the minor and must be approved by the minor advisor.
Foundation Courses
ARCH 3756 - Public Interest Design: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
Core selectives
Students taking more than two of these courses can use the additional credits towards their elective requirement.
Take exactly 2 course(s) from the following:
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· LA 1601 - Design and Equity [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· LA 3601 - Design and Equity [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar (3.0 cr)
· HSG 3462 - Housing and Community Development (3.0 cr)
· DES 3131 - User Experience in Design (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Deepen Understanding of Design Practice
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· DES 3131 - User Experience in Design (4.0 cr)
· DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar (3.0 cr)
· HSG 3462 - Housing and Community Development (3.0 cr)
· HSG 4461 - Housing Development and Management (4.0 cr)
· HSG 4465 - Housing in a Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
· HSG 4467W - Housing and the Social Environment [WI] (4.0 cr)
· LA 1001 - Sustainability by Design [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· LA 1601 - Design and Equity [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· LA 3003 - Climate Change Adaptation (3.0 cr)
· LA 3601 - Design and Equity [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· RM 1201 - Fashion, Ethics, and Consumption [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4561 - Architecture and Ecology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Broaden Understanding of Public Interest Design's Contexts
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3871 - A Suburban World (3.0 cr)
· Develop Knowledge and Skills for PID Practice and Leadership
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 1401 - Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4012 - Strategic Decision Making and Problem Solving (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism (3.0 cr)
· HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Design

View sample plan(s):
· Public Interest Design Sample Plan

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· Public Interest Design Minor
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ARCH 3756 - Public Interest Design: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02515
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
As the allied fields of design evolve in response to an increasing number of global challenges - inequity, social and political turmoil, disruptive climate-change, accelerating population growth - the question of how designers will address the needs of the most vulnerable among us is fundamental. Public Interest Design (PID), an emerging area of specialization within the design professions, specifically considers the concerns of the vast majority of the world?s inhabitants who are historically under-resourced and ill-equipped to respond to the ?Grand Challenges? facing humankind. With this mind, this introductory survey course has two aims: First, to critically examine the range of environmental, economic, social, and ethical issues that underpins work with under-resourced domestic and international communities ? including how these concerns can be collectively addressed to become more resilient; and second, to investigate organizational models that seek to broaden the traditional scope of the allied design fields as disciplines and professions by advocating a humanitarian basis for practice.
LA 1601 - Design and Equity (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02010
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Investigate world from new perspectives. Spaces of everyday life that reflect/shape values. Meets with LA 3601.
LA 3601 - Design and Equity (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02010 - LA 1601/LA 3601
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Investigate world from new perspectives. Spaces of everyday life that reflect/shape values. Meets with LA 1601.
DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01645
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The street as part of network of urban systems/fragments: sidewalks, private interiors, curbs, terraces, boulevards, parking lots, bus stops, public institutions, urban architectures, utility lines, storm/sewer systems, groundwater, satellite communication systems, gardens, and lighting. Readings in urban studies, geography, design, economics and art history. Students review case studies, envision possible transformations of streets/street life.
HSG 3462 - Housing and Community Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Meaning/significance of neighborhood/community, residential neighborhood change, impact of housing on neighborhood conditions. Gentrification, displacement, racial segregation, suburbanization, community-based revitalization.
DES 3131 - User Experience in Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theories/principles of human interaction with designed objects. Focuses on affect/emotional quality of designs. Objects, interfaces, environments. Digitally mediated experiences.
ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02090
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designed environment as cultural medium/product of sociocultural process/expression of values, ideas, behavioral patterns. Design/construction as complex political process. prereq: Soph or above
DES 3131 - User Experience in Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theories/principles of human interaction with designed objects. Focuses on affect/emotional quality of designs. Objects, interfaces, environments. Digitally mediated experiences.
DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01645
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The street as part of network of urban systems/fragments: sidewalks, private interiors, curbs, terraces, boulevards, parking lots, bus stops, public institutions, urban architectures, utility lines, storm/sewer systems, groundwater, satellite communication systems, gardens, and lighting. Readings in urban studies, geography, design, economics and art history. Students review case studies, envision possible transformations of streets/street life.
HSG 3462 - Housing and Community Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Meaning/significance of neighborhood/community, residential neighborhood change, impact of housing on neighborhood conditions. Gentrification, displacement, racial segregation, suburbanization, community-based revitalization.
HSG 4461 - Housing Development and Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Housing development process/financing. Management of multifamily housing. Emphasizes housing for low-income families/specific populations (e.g., older residents).
HSG 4465 - Housing in a Global Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Demographic changes, economic connections, and public policies for housing around the world. Sustainable development, rural-to-urban migration, land distribution, economic globalization, and civil conflict and war.
HSG 4467W - Housing and the Social Environment (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01739
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Housing choices in context of social environment. Emphasizes special needs of elderly, disabled, minorities, large families, female-headed households, and low-income households. Students conduct a post-occupancy evaluation of housing.
LA 1001 - Sustainability by Design (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How the Twin Cities region (as example of many metropolitan areas) can adapt to climate change, depleted energy resources, and other environmental impacts. How cities and places are designed, how places influence sustainable lifestyles. How to adapt the Twin Cities/other cities to a changing world.
LA 1601 - Design and Equity (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02010
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Investigate world from new perspectives. Spaces of everyday life that reflect/shape values. Meets with LA 3601.
LA 3003 - Climate Change Adaptation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01857 - LA 3003/LA 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will study nations, regions, cities, and communities that have adapted or are undergoing adaptation to climate change. The course will examine different approaches in planning, policy, economics, infrastructure, and building design that increase the adaptive capacity of human settlements. These approaches will vary in scale from the construction of new neighborhoods to the implementation of storm water gardens. The course will emphasize multi-functional strategies which couple climate change adaptation with other urban improvements. Learning Objectives: To understand role of climate adaptation in the reconfiguration of human settlements. To apply design thinking to the issue of climate adaptation in the context of an urban society.To apply knowledge to challenge-based coursework on managing climate risk, decreasing climate vulnerability, and building resilience to climate change.
LA 3601 - Design and Equity (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02010 - LA 1601/LA 3601
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Investigate world from new perspectives. Spaces of everyday life that reflect/shape values. Meets with LA 1601.
RM 1201 - Fashion, Ethics, and Consumption (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Apparel business. Overview of steps in the process of creating, merchandising, selling, and consuming apparel. Various ethical positions reflected in manufacturer, retailer, and consumer decision making are considered.
ARCH 4561 - Architecture and Ecology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01107 - Arch 4501/Arch 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to theories/practices of ecological approaches to architectural design. Ecological context, implications/opportunities of architecture. Historical/theoretical framework for ecological design thinking. Issues studied at various scales: site/community, building, component.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02640 - Urbs 1001W/Urbs 3001W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
URBS 3871 - A Suburban World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Suburbs as sites of urgent battles over resources, planning practices, land use, and economic development. How suburban life shapes values, political ideals, and worldviews of its populations.
PA 1401 - Public Affairs: Community Organizing Skills for Public Action (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Public affairs work, roles of citizens in democratic way of life. Community organizing skills, their importance for public affairs. Negotiations among diverse audiences, understanding different interests, mapping power relationships. Relevant public affairs and governance theory.
CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.
ABUS 4012 - Strategic Decision Making and Problem Solving
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Frameworks/processes for decision-making. Analyzing causes, effects of problems, and solutions in organizations. Creativity, team building. Case studies, final real-world project, online presentation. prereq: 45 cr
FNRM 3101 - Park and Protected Area Tourism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00410 - FNRM 3101/FNRM 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Tourism is a significant industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Park and protected area attractions are among the most visited but also the most vulnerable attractions. This course is designed to familiarize you with the basic concept of park and protected area tourism, including cultural and ecotourism, and then develop your expertise to plan and evaluate sustainable tourism development and operations. Accordingly, you will complete assignments that apply the knowledge gained to planning and evaluation activities. This course is offered partially on-line. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the class you will be able to: 1.Differentiate and appreciate the complexities involved with defining and developing nature, eco, heritage, geo-, park and protected, cultural and "sustainable tourism." 2.Identify specific social, economic, and environmental impacts associated with park and protected area tourism, how to measure them, and methods to minimize the negative and maximize the positive impacts. 3.Analyze domestic and international case studies of park and protected area tourism. 4.Critically evaluate park and protected area tourism services and effective management and planning. 5. Create elements of a business plan for park and protected area tourism operations that emphasize sustainability.
HORT 3131 - Student Organic Farm Planning, Growing, and Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organic fruit and vegetable production has been one of the fastest growing segments of the US economy for almost two decades, stimulating an overwhelming number of biological and ecological innovations to produce food using organic approaches. This course aims to increase student?s knowledge of ecological concepts as applied to managing organic systems, with an emphasis on soil nutrient cycles and plant-soil-microbe interactions that serve as the cornerstone of organic systems. Students in this course will learn tools needed to manage an organic diversified vegetable operation. The course consists of two components: a classroom session two times each week for 50 minutes, and a laboratory session that meets before class on Tuesdays for two hours. The classroom session is designed to help students think about concepts and principles that are useful in planning and managing production strategies on organic farms. We spend a significant amount of our time reviewing soil nutrient cycling and its critical importance for organic farms, including how to effectively use soil and organic nutrient inputs such as cover crops, manure and fertilizers, to provide vegetable crops with the nutrients they need to grow. We also learn about successful marketing strategies for organic produce. Finally, near the end of the semester we will discuss pest management, including both weeds and disease/insect pests, and compare different tillage options available to organic producers. What we learn is then applied to planning next year?s season of the UMN student organic farm. Throughout, we will use case studies, guest speakers, games, and active learning discussion approaches to move these classroom sessions "beyond the lecture" and allow students to engage with the material in a meaningful way. The lab is designed to allow a space to put into action some of the concepts students learn in lecture, including soil organic matter analysis, microgreen propagation, calculation of organic fertilizer rates, and operation of driven and walk-behind tractors.
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02359 - ABUS 4571/ABUS 4571W/HSM 4571
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofits and health care entities will continue to be challenged by limited resources and increased needs in communities they serve. This reality also results in an increased need for these groups to find additional financial support. This course will provide an understanding of ways to find, research, and write proposals for grants offered by government and private entities. As a writing intensive course, it will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to the field because the only way for a nonprofit to be awarded a grant is by submitting a written proposal. The strength of the proposal has a significant impact on the money that an organization will receive. Students will become familiar with various sections of the proposal by drafting, editing, and seeking feedback, and by revising a needs assessment, goal statement, budget justification, and statement of organizational purpose. By learning how to write well in the field, students will increase their chances of being employed by a nonprofit and securing funding for their organization.
LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00296 - Lead 1961W/OLPD 1301W/OLPD 130
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine personal views of leadership, differences between personal/positional leadership, leadership ethics/values, personal leadership strengths/skills.