Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Landscape Design and Planning B.E.D.

Landscape Architecture
College of Design
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 77 to 83
  • Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design
Landscape design and planning focuses on the creation of livable communities that sustain ecological function, fulfill human aspirations for community development, public health, and safety, and are artistically evocative and meaningful. Core courses in design and planning introduce students to the history, theory, and practice of landscape design and planning at various geographic scales and in diverse settings. Students create integrative, collaborative, and beautiful designs for regions, communities, and sites to conserve ecosystems services and water and air resources, protect biodiversity, and to reduce dependence on fossil fuels.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.80 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.80 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.80 transferring from outside the University
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Design
LA 1201 - Learning from the Landscape [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
LA 1401 - The Designed Environment [AH] (3.0 cr)
LA 3001 - Understanding and Creating Landscape Space (3.0 cr)
LA 3002 - Informants of Creating Landscape Space (3.0 cr)
LA 3003 - Case Studies in Sustainable Landscape Planning and Design (3.0 cr)
LA 4001 - Sustainable Landscape Design and Planning Practices (3.0 cr)
LA 4002 - Implementation of Sustainable Landscape Design and Planning Practices (3.0 cr)
LA 4096 - Internship in Landscape Design and Planning (1.0 cr)
LA 4755 - Infrastructure, Natural Systems, and Space of Inhabited Landscapes [TS] (3.0 cr)
Design Communication
LA 1301 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture Drawing [AH] (3.0 cr)
LA 2301 - Advanced Representation for Environmental Design (3.0 cr)
LA 2302 - Computer-Aided Representation for Environmental Design (3.0 cr)
Ecosystem Pattern and Process Core
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice (3.0 cr)
LA 3571 - Landscape Construction: Site Systems and Engineering (3.0 cr)
Social and Cultural Systems Core
LA 3413 - Introduction to Landscape Architectural History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Accelerated Program
This sub-plan is optional and does not fulfill the sub-plan requirement for this program.
The accelerated status option admits a limited number of students annually and allows qualified undergraduates to complete the B.E.D. and M.L.A. in six years rather than seven years. Applicants for the accelerated status must complete the first three years of the B.E.D. degree requirements before their senior year. Students must complete the first year of the professional degree program in their undergraduate senior year. These courses carry upper division credit and satisfy senior year B.E.D. requirements.
Accelerated status is granted on a competitive basis and does not admit any student to the graduate professional program. Separate requirements, such as letters of recommendation, a letter of interest, and other application documents, must be submitted in January of the year that students are seeking admission to the graduate program. B.E.D. graduates who have completed the accelerated status option and applied to the M.L.A. professional degree program will receive advanced standing in the M.L.A. program upon acceptance by the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Graduate School.
Landscape Design
The design track prepares students for a career in the design of sustainable landscapes at the residential and small-scale commercial level.
The landscape design track also requires students to take courses in biological science, plant materials, landscape management, and small business management.
Landscape Design--Ecosystem Pattern and Process
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants (4.0 cr)
HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology [WI] (4.0 cr)
HORT 4061W - Turfgrass Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Landscape Design--Social and Cultural Systems
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
Landscape Planning
The landscape planning track prepares students for work planning sustainable landscape at the urban and regional scale.
The landscape planning track requires additional courses in urban geography, urban and regional planning, natural resource planning and management, as well as biological and physical sciences. Students in this track should select GEOG 1502 to complete the mathematical thinking requirement.
Landscape Planning--Ecosystem Pattern and Process
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
LA 3004 - Regional Environmental Landscape Planning (4.0 cr)
LA 3514 - Making the Mississippi [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· BBE 3023 - Ecological Engineering Principles (3.0 cr)
· BBE 5513 - Watershed Engineering (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3409 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· CEGE 3501 - Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3004 - Water and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4631W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· LA 5574 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· PBIO 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· LAAS 5515 - Soil Formation: Earth Surface Processes and Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Landscape Planning--Social and Cultural Systems
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
Take one course from the following
ARCH 4445W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 4671 - Historic Preservation (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 4701W - Introduction to Urban Form and Theory [WI] (3.0 cr)
or DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments (4.0 cr)
or LA 4755 - Infrastructure, Natural Systems, and Space of Inhabited Landscapes [TS] (3.0 cr)
or PA 4200 - Urban and Regional Planning (3.0 cr)
or PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use (1.5 cr)
or PA 5211 - Land Use Planning (3.0 cr)
or PA 5221 - Private Sector Development (3.0 cr)
or PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
or PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes (3.0 cr)
or FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
or URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
or URBS 3301W - American Cities As Settings for Cultural Diversity [WI] (3.0 cr)
or URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements, in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies, or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP adviser and their departmental faculty adviser.
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Design

View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2016
· Fall 2014
· Spring 2014
· Fall 2013

View sample plan(s):
· Accelerated--see your adviser
· Landscape Design Track
· Landscape Planning Track

View checkpoint chart:
· Landscape Design and Planning B.E.D.
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LA 1201 - Learning from the Landscape (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical elements shaping the world. Shapes, forms, and order of towns, cities, and countryside. How design, planning, and natural systems, taken together, shape physical surroundings. Lectures, discussions, field trips.
LA 1401 - The Designed Environment (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of relationships between place and space, and realms of the ideal and real, public and private. Survey of how the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design have explored those issues.
LA 3001 - Understanding and Creating Landscape Space
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to spatial design issues at all scales. prereq: Landscape design and planning [major or minor] or instr consent
LA 3002 - Informants of Creating Landscape Space
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development of the design program, Site analysis of landscape space. Design exercises show how design program and site analysis inform creation of landscape space in developing schematic designs at varying geographic scales and in different geographic settings. Lectures, readings, discussions. prereq: 3001, Arch 3401, 3501
LA 3003 - Case Studies in Sustainable Landscape Planning and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01857 - LA 3003/LA 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sustainable landscape design/planning practices. Integrative potential between practices and changes in global biodiversity, quality of air/water resources, development/consumption of resources, and climate. Practice-/metrics-based selection, deployment, and management of sustainable design.
LA 4001 - Sustainable Landscape Design and Planning Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01724
Typically offered: Every Fall
Changes in global biodiversity. Quality of air/water resources. Development/consumption of energy resources. Climate change. Design for sustainable practices to create evocative/meaningful landscapes. prereq: 1301, [2301 or ARCH 3301], 3001, 3002
LA 4002 - Implementation of Sustainable Landscape Design and Planning Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1301, 2301, 2302, 3001, 3002, 3003, 4001
Typically offered: Every Spring
Capstone experience. Service-learning project. Groups of students develop sustainable landscape designs/plans that address project implementation.
LA 4096 - Internship in Landscape Design and Planning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised professional experience in environmental design firms or government agencies. Students perform professional services and relate these experiences to their education in environmental design. prereq: 1301, 2301, 2302, 3001, 3002, 3003
LA 4755 - Infrastructure, Natural Systems, and Space of Inhabited Landscapes (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01745 - LA 4755/5755
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Seminar, cross-disciplinary. Urban infrastructural solutions to mitigate/reverse anthropogenic impacts on Earth. Design of sustainable urban infrastructure systems. Policy options, technologies. Criteria, design methods. prereq: Jr or sr
LA 1301 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture Drawing (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00557 - Arch 1301/LA 1301/5301
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Development of basic skills in perceiving/representing material environment. Sketching/drawing conventions of visual phenomena/forms.
LA 2301 - Advanced Representation for Environmental Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Perceiving/representing material environment. Multiple media approaches in environmental design representation. Analytic diagramming as means of developing design ideas. Interface between hand rendered and digital representation. prereq: 1301
LA 2302 - Computer-Aided Representation for Environmental Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of computer-aided design (CAD) technologies in developing, representing, and communicating environmental design ideas. Adobe Creative Suite?, Autodesk AutoCAD?, DynaSCAPE? ESRI ArcMap?, etc. Integration of images generated from various computer and hand-rendered technologies. prereq: 1301, 2301
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01229 - ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
HORT 1001 - Plant Propagation (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
LA 3204 - Holistic Landscape Ecology and Bioregional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bioregional practice, how it responds to landscape ecology of great bioregions. Scientific/cultural basis for bioregional design and landscape sustainability. prereq: [[EEB 3001 or ESPM 3108], sr BED major] or equiv
LA 3571 - Landscape Construction: Site Systems and Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory applications of landform systems for design. Landform typology, representation methods, manipulation techniques, use of land survey data, earthwork construction issues. Spatial accommodation of vehicles in landscape architecture, including road design. prereq: BED major or BED minor or instr consent
LA 3413 - Introduction to Landscape Architectural History (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of landscape architecture's roots by examining the creation of landscapes over time. Influences of ecological and environmental issues as well as political, economic, and social contexts on the cultural construction of landscape ideas and meaning and creation of landscape architectural works.
ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02090
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designed environment as cultural medium/product of sociocultural process/expression of values, ideas, behavioral patterns. Design/construction as complex political process. prereq: Soph or above
HORT 1015 - Woody and Herbaceous Plants
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to identify plants around the world. A few hundred of the most important cultivated plants for northern climates, their distinguishing features, common uses, cultural specificities, and notable cultivars.
HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to physiological basis for effects of environment on plant growth/development. How to produce optimal plant growth. Experimental technique, data analysis, scientific writing. Lecture, readings, lab.
HORT 4061W - Turfgrass Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology of turfgrasses, ecology of landscape systems. Installation, management, and culture of turfgrass communities and landscape plant systems. Sod production, industrial grounds, lawn care, park/recreation areas, athletic field/business management. Case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Prerequisites: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, Internet access; high school physics recommended; CHEM 1015 is a 3-credit, lecture-only course, with the lectures delivered online via Moodle, and exams taken in person on campus. Internet access is required. Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lectures online, exams on campus. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02347
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 3131/5131
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
LA 3004 - Regional Environmental Landscape Planning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02271 - LA 3004/LA 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
An exploration of critical regional landscape parameters affecting the growth and development of metropolitan areas. Students assess these parameters and prepare a multifunctional land use plan for a defined locale. prereq: prereq FR 3131 or Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in FR 3131 or GEOG 3561 or Concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in GEOG 3561, or equivalent
LA 3514 - Making the Mississippi (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01687
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Environmental parameters affecting growth/development of metropolitan areas. Students assess these parameters and prepare a multi-functional land use plan for a defined locale.
BBE 3023 - Ecological Engineering Principles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical, thermal, texture, strength, moisture properties of soil. Saturated/unsaturated moisture movement. Quantitative descriptions of mass/energy flux/storage in ecosystems. Distribution of vegetation in landscapes. Engineering/management impacts on soil-water-plant systems. prereq: BIOL 1009, [3012 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3012] or instr consent
BBE 5513 - Watershed Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of engineering principles to managing surface runoff from agricultural, range, and urban watersheds. Design of facilities and selection of land use practices for controlling surface runoff to mitigate problems of flooding and degradation of surface-water quality. prereq: 3023, upper div CSE
CEGE 3501 - Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Chem 1022, Phys 1302
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to environmental engineering. Quantitative approach to environmental problems. Scientific background for understanding roles of engineers and scientists. prereq: Chem 1022, Phys 1302
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
ESPM 3111 - Hydrology and Water Quality Field Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3111/5111
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Integrates water quality, surface/groundwater hydrology. Case studies, hands-on field data collection, calculations of hydrological/water quality parameters. Meteorological data, snow hydrology, stream gauging, well monitoring, automatic water samplers. Designing water quality sampling program. Geomorphology, interception, infiltration.
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342 - FNRM 3114/FNRM 5114
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems. prereq: [[BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009], [[CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021], MATH 1151] or instr consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 3004 - Water and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
For non-science majors. Study of (1) the role of humans as agents influencing the composition (quality) of water resources through domestic, agricultural, industrial, and other land-use practices; (2) the role of water in various ecosystem services which may be at odds with the anthropocentric view of water as a resource; (3) how population increase and climate change, coupled with human actions, is affecting the quality and quantity of available water, leading to lack of access to clean water and decent sanitation, and to severe water shortages (e.g., for irrigation) in some areas, especially in developing nations and politically unstable regions; and (4) how the availability of water shapes a society’s view of water as a resource and its view of the non-human demands for water (which is not uniform across the globe).
ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Geologic aspects of energy/material resources. Resource size/life-times. Environmental consequences of resource use. Issues of international/public ethics associated with resource production, distribution, and use.
ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Origin, development, and continuing evolution of landforms in various environments. Environmental implications. Weathering, slope and shore processes, fluvial erosion and deposition, arid region processes, glacial processes. This course includes lecture and laboratory components, including field trips. prereq: ESCI 2201, 2203 and 3202; MATH 1272; and PHYS 1301; or instructor consent.
ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Formation and characteristics of modern glaciers; erosional and depositional features of Pleistocene glaciers; history of quaternary environmental changes in glaciated and nonglaciated areas. Field trips and labs. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
PBIO 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
LAAS 5515 - Soil Formation: Earth Surface Processes and Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic soil morphology, soil profile descriptions. Pedogenic processes, models of soil development. Soil geomorphology, hydrology, hillslope processes. Digital spatial analysis. Soil classification. Soil surveys, land use. Soil geography. prereq: 2125 or instr consent
SOIL 5555 - Wetland Soils
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00673 - ES 5555/Soil 5555
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation of mineral/organic soils in wet environments. Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions, field techniques of identifying hydric soils for wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits, preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab, field hydric soil delineation project. prereq: SOIL 1125 or 2125 or equiv or instr consent; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in SOIL 4511 recommended
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
ARCH 4671 - Historic Preservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01364
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophy, theory, origins of historic preservation. Historic archaeology, research, descriptive analysis, documentation. Government's role, standards/guidelines, building codes, neighborhood preservation, advocacy. Using primary/secondary resources. Controversial aspects. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ARCH 4701W - Introduction to Urban Form and Theory (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Urban form, related issues of design/theory/culture. Thematic history of cities. Lectures, discussions, assignments. prereq: [3411, 3412] or instr consent
DES 3331 - Street Life Urban Design Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01645
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The street as part of network of urban systems/fragments: sidewalks, private interiors, curbs, terraces, boulevards, parking lots, bus stops, public institutions, urban architectures, utility lines, storm/sewer systems, groundwater, satellite communication systems, gardens, and lighting. Readings in urban studies, geography, design, economics and art history. Students review case studies, envision possible transformations of streets/street life.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
FNRM 4501 - Urban Forest Management: Managing Greenspaces for People
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FR 4501/5501
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management concepts for green infrastructure of cities, towns, and communities. Urban forest as a social/biological resource. Emphasizes management of urban forest ecosystem to maximize benefits to people. Tree selection, risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, landscape planning, values, perceptions. How urban forestry can be a tool to improve community infrastructure.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973W/3973W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social/physical characteristics of Twin Cities. Their place in U.S. urban network.
GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of three principal components of rural landscape (form of land surface, plant life that cloaks it, structures that people have placed upon it). Structures associated with agriculture, including mining, forestry, resort areas, and small towns.
LA 4755 - Infrastructure, Natural Systems, and Space of Inhabited Landscapes (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01745 - LA 4755/5755
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Seminar, cross-disciplinary. Urban infrastructural solutions to mitigate/reverse anthropogenic impacts on Earth. Design of sustainable urban infrastructure systems. Policy options, technologies. Criteria, design methods. prereq: Jr or sr
PA 4200 - Urban and Regional Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of urban/regional land-use planning. Introduction to planning theory and its applications. Political-economic context of urban/regional planning.
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5211 - Land Use Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical/spatial basis for land use planning at community/regional level. Role of public sector in guiding private development. Land use regulations, comprehensive planning, growth management, innovative land use planning/policies. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5221 - Private Sector Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of various participants in land development. Investment objectives, effects of regulation. Overview of development process from private/public perspective. prereq: [Grad or instr consent], college algebra required
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of design, implementation, evaluation of planning/participation processes. Types of planning. Stakeholders, including underrepresented groups. Costs/benefits of participation. Participant roles. Planning/participation tools/techniques. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/practices of wildland recreation management. Federal recreation land management policy/organization. Recreation resource and visitor use management. Visitor-caused impacts. Management tools. Exams, applied assignments.
URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3301W - American Cities As Settings for Cultural Diversity (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explores cultural diversity in American cities, considering patterns of and reasons for racial and class segregation and interaction. Its foci are the problems, conflicts, and successes of cultural diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.