Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Acting B.F.A.

Theatre Arts & Dance Dept
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 86 to 91
  • Degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts
The University of Minnesota/Guthrie Theater BFA Actor Training Program provides students with a holistic liberal arts education paired with rigorous professional actor training. In a unique partnership between the University of Minnesota and the Guthrie Theater, students benefit from outstanding academic preparation and world-class artistic experiences. This program is designed to develop actors in both mind and body. We provide our students with the essential skills for exploring text in performance through layers of classic text exploration and contemporary literature. This training includes integration of voice, movement, and acting within a within a range of styles. The combination of experiences within both the University of Minnesota and at the Guthrie Theater offers students a deeper understanding of the performing arts community within todayís landscape. We see students from diverse backgrounds and experiences who are: - Serious about pursuing acting as a profession - Curious and inquisitive - Willing to take risks - Interested in artistic exploration individually and as an ensemble We embrace the continual development of the artistís distinctive voice and encourage students to design their individual paths towards artistic fulfillment.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Entry into the BFA acting program is by audition only, and students are admitted only in fall semester.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students may earn no more than one undergraduate degree from the theatre arts program: a BA in theatre arts, or a BFA in acting, or a minor in theatre arts. At least 28 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. This includes learning abroad courses taken for resident credit. All Acting BFA students participate in the London Study Abroad program during the Fall semester of their junior year. The courses taken in London are included in these requirements. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Students completing an additional degree must complete the capstone in each degree.
New Voices
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 1 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1381 - New Voices (1.0 cr)
Acting
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 15 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1391 - BFA Acting I (3.0 cr)
· TH 1395 - BFA Acting II (3.0 cr)
· TH 2391 - BFA Acting III (3.0 cr)
· TH 2395 - BFA Acting IV (3.0 cr)
· TH 3391 - BFA Acting V (3.0 cr)
Voice and Speech
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 10 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1392 - BFA Voice and Speech I (2.0 cr)
· TH 1396 - BFA Voice and Speech II (2.0 cr)
· TH 2392 - BFA Voice and Speech III (2.0 cr)
· TH 2396 - BFA Voice and Speech IV (2.0 cr)
· TH 3392 - BFA Voice and Speech V (2.0 cr)
Movement
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 10 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1393 - BFA Movement I (2.0 cr)
· TH 1397 - BFA Movement II (2.0 cr)
· TH 2393 - BFA Movement III (2.0 cr)
· TH 2397 - BFA Movement IV (2.0 cr)
· TH 3393 - BFA Movement V (2.0 cr)
Design and Technology
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1501 - Introduction to Design and Technology for Live Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance (3.0 cr)
or TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design (3.0 cr)
or TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design (3.0 cr)
or TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology (3.0 cr)
Makeup
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 2 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor (2.0 cr)
Intensive
Take exactly 3 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3395 - BFA Intensive I (2.0 cr)
· TH 4391 - BFA Intensive II (2.0 cr)
· TH 4395 - BFA Intensive III (2.0 cr)
Rehearsal and Performance
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 10 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3398 - BFA Rehearsal & Performance I (2.0 cr)
· TH 3399 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance II (2.0 cr)
· TH 4393 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance III (2.0 cr)
· TH 4394 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance IV (2.0 cr)
· TH 4399 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance VI (2.0 cr)
Shakespeare
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGL 1181W - Introduction to Shakespeare [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
History of the Theatre
Take exactly 3 course(s) totaling exactly 9 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism (3.0 cr)
· TH 3172 - History of the Theatre: Age of Enlightenment to Present (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3523 - Theatricality: Understanding the Possibilities in Theater (3.0 cr)
Theatre Literature
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3314 - Text and the Actor (3.0 cr)
· TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Blacks in American Theatre
· TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
London Elective
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LNDN 3210 - Historical Backgrounds of English Literature (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3211 - Terror and the Witch: Fictions of Witchcraft from Shakespeare to Harry Potter (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3212W - Travel Writing: Topics in Composition [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3213 - 20th and 21st Century Art (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3215 - British Theatre Now and Then (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3217W - Writing the City: London [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3218 - Contemporary British Film (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3219 - London Across History, Literature and Film (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3220W - Contemporary World Architecture in London [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3221W - Writing a Play [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3222 - Detective Fiction: Crime and the City (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3223 - Special Studies in Economics: Globalization Studies (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3226 - Religion in Modern Britain: A Comparative Perspective (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3230 - The Aesthetics of Power, Prestige and Social Change: A Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art Hist (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3232 - Modern Art in London: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3233 - Queer Studies and LGBTQ Life in London and the Global World (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3235 - Witchcraft and Magical Performance in London (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3236 - The Law of Wrongful Convictions (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3237 - International Comparative Studies of Issues Impacting Education Systems (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3238 - Literature and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3239 - Theatre in the City (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3242 - Global Perspectives on Human Rights in Action (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3243 - London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3245 - Comparative Health Systems (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3249W - Experiencing Globalization: Society, Space and Everyday Life in London [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3251 - Strategic Communication and Social Media: Theory and Practice [GP] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3253W - Contemporary Issues through Community Engagement: Social Dynamics of London [CIV, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3254W - Introduction to Science Fiction [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3255 - Moving Images Editing: Theory and Practice [AH] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3256 - Digital Media Practice (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3323 - Shakespeare in London (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3324 - 20th Century British Fiction (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3328 - British Cinema (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3333 - Understanding Modern Britain (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3342 - European Economic History (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3343W - Post War Popular Culture [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3432 - Western European Government and Politics (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3500 - CAPA Seminar in London (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3530 - Ethical Issues and the Media (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3531 - Advertising and Marketing in Britain (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3532 - Visualizing Britain: Film and Television Documentaries (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3533 - Women in Britain in the 21st Century (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3534 - Criminal London: Aspects of Crime and Criminal Justice in Britain (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3536 - Child Development in a British Context (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3613 - Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: London--Modernity, Empire, and Globalization (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3614 - Citizenship and Gender in Modern Europe (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3615 - Urban Underworlds in Medieval and Early Modern London: A Literary Exploration (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3733 - International Finance (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3752 - International Marketing (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3753 - International Economics (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3754 - Creative Writing (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3756 - Topics in London (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3757 - British History in the 20th Century (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3758 - International Business Environment (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3759 - Islam, Politics, and Britain: A Case Study of London's East End (3.0 cr)
· On-Campus Elective
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum (1.0 cr)
· TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· TH 3314 - Text and the Actor (3.0 cr)
· TH 3316 - Voice for the Actor (3.0 cr)
· TH 3321 - Acting I (3.0 cr)
· TH 3322 - Acting II (3.0 cr)
· TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3332 - Circus Performance (1.0 cr)
· TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 3711 - Beginning Directing (3.0 cr)
· TH 3716 - Stage Management (4.0 cr)
· TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4321 - Career Preparation for the Theatre Artist (3.0 cr)
· TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera (3.0 cr)
· TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 4555 - Audio Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 4711 - Intermediate Stage Direction (3.0 cr)
· TH 4905H - Honors: Tutorial Seminar in Theatre Arts (2.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 5100 - Theatre Practicum (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
· TH 5179W - Text and Performance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama (3.0 cr)
· TH 5330 - Comedy: Advanced Physical Performance Studio (3.0 cr)
· TH 5340 - Tragedy/Poetry: Advanced Physical Performance Studio (3.0 cr)
· TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 5370 - Hand, Mind, and Gesture: An Independent Study in the Creation of Image Driven Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 5500 - Theatre Design Practicum (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5510 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer I (3.0 cr)
· TH 5520 - Scene Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 5530 - Costume Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 5540 - Lighting Design for the Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 5545 - Stage Lighting Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 5559 - Sound Design for Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 5560 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer II (3.0 cr)
· TH 5570 - Properties/Scenery Technology (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5580 - Costume Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 5590 - Theatre Technology Practicum (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5711 - Advanced Stage Direction (3.0 cr)
· TH 5716 - Stage Management for the Theatre (4.0 cr)
· TH 5760 - Advanced Stage Management (2.0 cr)
· TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
Movement Electives
Note: Upper-division DNCE courses require placement based on audition or consent.
Take exactly 3 course(s) totaling 3 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· DNCE 1001 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 1 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1010 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 3 (1.0-2.0 cr)
· DNCE 1020 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 4 (1.0-2.0 cr)
· DNCE 1040 - Modern Dance Partnering Technique (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1110 - Ballet Technique 3 (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 1120 - Ballet Technique 4 (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 1210 - Jazz Technique 3 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1302 - Tap Technique 2 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1331 - Yoga (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1343 - Urban & Street Dance Forms 1: Introduction (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 1345 - Alexander Technique for Movement Artists (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 1349 - Contact Improvisation (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 3110 - Ballet Technique 5 (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 3120 - Ballet Technique 6 (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 3220 - Jazz Technique 6 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 3337 - Body Mind Centering (2.0 cr)
· DNCE 3351 - African Diasporic Movement 5 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 5110 - Ballet Technique 7 (1.0 cr)
· DNCE 5120 - Ballet Technique 8 (1.0 cr)
· PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming (1.0 cr)
· PE 1012 - Beginning Running (1.0 cr)
· PE 1014 - Conditioning (1.0 cr)
· PE 1015 - Weight Training (1.0 cr)
· PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise (1.0 cr)
· PE 1029 - Handball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1032 - Badminton (1.0 cr)
· PE 1033 - Foil Fencing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1034 - Judo (1.0 cr)
· PE 1035 - Karate (1.0 cr)
· PE 1036 - Racquetball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1037 - Squash Racquets (1.0 cr)
· PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis (1.0 cr)
· PE 1044 - Self-Defense (1.0 cr)
· PE 1045 - Rock Climbing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do (1.0 cr)
· PE 1048 - Bowling (1.0 cr)
· PE 1053 - Ice Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1055 - Golf (1.0 cr)
· PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing (1.0 cr)
· PE 1058 - Snowboarding (1.0 cr)
· PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics (1.0 cr)
· PE 1067 - Basketball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket (1.0 cr)
· PE 1072 - Soccer (1.0 cr)
· PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball (1.0 cr)
· PE 1076 - Flag Football (1.0 cr)
· PE 1077 - Lacrosse (1.0 cr)
· PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash (1.0 cr)
· PE 1146 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· PE 1154 - Figure Skating (1.0 cr)
· PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving (1.0 cr)
· PE 1262 - Marathon Training (3.0 cr)
· PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· TH 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-5.0 cr)
Capstone
The senior capstone in the BFA Program leads students to develop an individual artistic process. The capstone asks students to identify skills that an artist needs to further their own work, while working both independently and collaboratively. Students will integrate the skills acquired through past training in the BFA Program. The BFA Capstone provides concentrated opportunities to examine artistic possibilities as they begin their life-long journey of learning and artistic expression.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 2 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the Acting BFA capstone.
· TH 4398 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance V (2.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· LNDN 3212W - Travel Writing: Topics in Composition [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3217W - Writing the City: London [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3220W - Contemporary World Architecture in London [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3221W - Writing a Play [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3249W - Experiencing Globalization: Society, Space and Everyday Life in London [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3253W - Contemporary Issues through Community Engagement: Social Dynamics of London [CIV, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3254W - Introduction to Science Fiction [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· LNDN 3343W - Post War Popular Culture [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5179W - Text and Performance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Acting BFA

View checkpoint chart:
· Acting B.F.A.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Liberal Arts

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
TH 1381 - New Voices
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Instructors lead students in four Saturday workshop intensives. Student forge interdisciplinary collaborations as they journey through their respective programs. prereq: [Fr or transfer] student from BFA actor training or BA or BFA dance or BA theater
TH 1391 - BFA Acting I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acting. prereq: Accepted into BFA acting program
TH 1395 - BFA Acting II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuing the process of interpreting dramatic material. prereq: 1391
TH 2391 - BFA Acting III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Applying concepts of first year of training to an ensemble performance project. Beginning of Shakespeare foundation unit. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 2395 - BFA Acting IV
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Application of process towards performance. Emphasizes Shakespeare. prereq: BFA-Acting sophomore
TH 3391 - BFA Acting V
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiencing a foreign theater culture/history. Applying process of interpreting dramatic material to plays of that culture.
TH 1392 - BFA Voice and Speech I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study/practice in breath centering/expansion; vocal resonance, musicality, placement; ear training; strengthening and making more flexible the muscles of speech. prereq: Accepted into BFA acting prog
TH 1396 - BFA Voice and Speech II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Building a foundation for further work in the program. Emphasizes practicing the sounds of good American speech and of the written phonetic alphabet. prereq: 1392
TH 2392 - BFA Voice and Speech III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuing to build a strong, healthy voice. Mastering written phonetics, sounds of good American speech for stage. Students begin to explore speaking of heightened verse, particularly Shakespearean text. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 2396 - BFA Voice and Speech IV
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuing to build a strong, healthy voice. Mastering written phonetics and the sounds of good American speech for the stage. Students begin basic dialect acquisition work for the stage. Emphasizes English/Irish dialects. prereq: BFA-acting, sophmore
TH 3392 - BFA Voice and Speech V
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experiencing a foreign theater culture/history. Applying voice training to dramatic material of that culture.
TH 1393 - BFA Movement I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Focuses on building a foundation for further work in program. prereq: BFA-acting major
TH 1397 - BFA Movement II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
May include sections such as African dance, yoga, movement for actors, and circus techniques. Focuses on building a foundation for further work in the program. prereq: 1393
TH 2393 - BFA Movement III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Deepens/refines foundation laid in BFA Movement I/II. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 2397 - BFA Movement IV
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
May include sections such as jazz dance, partner dances, and movement for actors. prereq: BFA-acting sophmore
TH 3393 - BFA Movement V
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiencing a foreign theatre culture/history, applying training to dramatic material of that culture. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 1501 - Introduction to Design and Technology for Live Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles, processes, and possibilities in all areas of stage design and production. Process and relationship between artistic and production staff members. Collaboration, compromise, creation. Student are assigned to a lab in a technical area. prereq: 1101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1101
TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of space/illusion to create environments for theater/performance. Collaborative vocabulary through script interpretation/analysis. Visual literacy through sketching, painting, and drafting. Individual/group projects. prereq: 3571
TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Costume design process, including, researching, script analysis, the costume designer's role throughout the production process, and design problems. prereq: TH 3571
TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Composition, color theory, instrumentation, and control (dimming) as they apply to theater, opera, and dance. Collaborative process of the lighting designer through individual and group projects in a lab setting (i.e., a theater.) prereq: 3571
TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hands-on techniques. Stage lighting technology in a lab (theater) setting. Electricity, optics, color, control (dimming). Construction/rigging of scenery. Operation of counter weight fly systems and power tools. Constructing a garment. Hand/machine sewing, pinning, marking, measuring, seam finishes, fabric identification. prereq: 1501
TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. May include functions/aesthetics of stage makeup, application techniques, prosthetics, and facial hair.
TH 3395 - BFA Intensive I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Incorporating disciplines of acting/voice/movement. prereq: BFA-acting jr
TH 4391 - BFA Intensive II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applying first three years of training toward performance. Seventh in sequence of eight. Acting, voice, and movement. Integrating the disciplines. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 4395 - BFA Intensive III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Incorporating the disciplines of acting/voice/movement. prereq: BFA-acting sr
TH 3398 - BFA Rehearsal & Performance I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuing the application of process towards performance. prereq: BFA-acting jr
TH 3399 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Continuing the application of process towards performance. prereq: BFA-acting jr
TH 4393 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acting, voice, movement. Application of process toward performance. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 4394 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance IV
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acting, voice and movement. Application of process toward performance. prereq: BFA student in theatre arts
TH 4399 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance VI
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acting, voice, and movement. Continuing the application of process towards performance. prereq: BFA-acting sr
ENGL 1181W - Introduction to Shakespeare (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the richness and variety of the playwright William Shakespeare through intensive study of representative plays and poems. Although Shakespeare died over 400 years ago, he is now more popular than ever. In his own day, Shakespeare was able to entertain, shock, amuse, and inform his audiences. Today, his work continues to have a global influence in nearly every corner of the world. Through class lectures, discussions and written work, students will be challenged and inspired by the many complexities and connections that we still have with the world's greatest playwright.
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For over four hundred years, William Shakespeare has remained the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright in the world. From Nelson Mandela to Toni Morrison, from South African playwright Welcome Msomi to Kuwaiti playwright Sulayman Al-Bassam, Shakespeare's works have continued to influence and inspire authors and audiences everywhere. This course examines representative works of Shakespeare from a variety of critical perspectives, as cultural artifacts of their day, but also as texts that have had a long and enduring vitality. This is a required course for English majors and minors, but it should also interest any student who wants to understand why and how Shakespeare continues to be one of the most important literary figures in the English language. English majors/minors must take this course A-F only grading basis.
ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Plays from all of Shakespeare's periods, including at least A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, the history plays, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello, and The Winter's Tale. prereq: Honors or instr consent
TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of Western theatre and drama; theatrical practices, staging conventions, and dramatic structure of plays. Ancient to mid-18th century. prereq: Th major or instr consent
TH 3172 - History of the Theatre: Age of Enlightenment to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theatrical practices, staging conventions, dramatic structure of plays. prereq: Th major or instr consent
LNDN 3523 - Theatricality: Understanding the Possibilities in Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In-depth understanding of art of theater via survey of historical influences, changing styles/approaches to theater. Concept of theatricality.
TH 3314 - Text and the Actor
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Standard stage speech, international phonetic alphabet transcription, and textual analysis to perform heightened language texts such as Shakespearean/Shavian monologues, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Beowulf. Videos viewed/discussed. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage practice from traditional/postmodern approaches. Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion, critical writing, performance. prereq: [[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
AFRO 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theater traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theaters from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
LNDN 3210 - Historical Backgrounds of English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3211 - Terror and the Witch: Fictions of Witchcraft from Shakespeare to Harry Potter
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3212W - Travel Writing: Topics in Composition (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3213 - 20th and 21st Century Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Art movements and major artists of Modern period, 1900-1970. Various visual media in relation to theories, historic events, scientific/technological changes, and literature. Emphasizes European art. Influences from other cultures.
LNDN 3215 - British Theatre Now and Then
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3217W - Writing the City: London (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3218 - Contemporary British Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3219 - London Across History, Literature and Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad.
LNDN 3220W - Contemporary World Architecture in London (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3221W - Writing a Play (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3222 - Detective Fiction: Crime and the City
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3223 - Special Studies in Economics: Globalization Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3226 - Religion in Modern Britain: A Comparative Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3230 - The Aesthetics of Power, Prestige and Social Change: A Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art Hist
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3232 - Modern Art in London: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3233 - Queer Studies and LGBTQ Life in London and the Global World
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3235 - Witchcraft and Magical Performance in London
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3236 - The Law of Wrongful Convictions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Wrongful convictions are a universal problem that in recent years has received a great deal of attention from the media, legislatures, and courts around the world. From the Netflix series "The Making of a Murderer" to the NPR podcast "Serial" there is a growing fascination with how people are wrongfully convicted and the processes and procedures used to right these wrongs. This course is taught by a law professor who has spent his career litigating wrongful conviction cases and directing the California Innocence Project. It is designed to provide students with an overview of the issues and case law related to wrongful convictions through the use of interactive exercises, lectures, readings, videos, and case studies.
LNDN 3237 - International Comparative Studies of Issues Impacting Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The course provides students with an introduction to the school system in their study location and that of the other CAPA study locations. There will then be opportunities to compare it to the American system and to other learning communities in the world to better understand how they reflect and perpetuate the cultural values and identity of a country. Students will explore current educational issues from an intercultural perspective and develop their own informed views. At the end of the course, students are expected to have acquired a basic knowledge and understanding about the structure and content of contemporary school systems and a capacity to use this knowledge for cross-national comparisons. The insights gained will allow students to consider a key question: how can we all contribute to the school of the future? This course is designed as a CAPA Globally Networked Programme (GNL) connecting CAPA students in different study locations in order to examine issues from a transnational perspective. It will provide a unique opportunity to broaden critical understanding of the school system role in the identity building process at an individual, social, political, and national level. Through collaborative and comparative learning processes in both local environments and transnational communities, students will develop a deeper understanding of the school system role in shaping values, societies, and cultures.
LNDN 3238 - Literature and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course examines the ways in which writers in English have engaged with the natural environment. We will read a range of authors, from the advent of industrialization in the late eighteenth century up to the present age of climate change, to consider how they have celebrated the ?natural world,? and looked critically at human effects on ecosystems. Throughout, we will be attentive both to the literary qualities of writings about the environment and to their historical and political contexts. We will be studying a range of genres, including poetry, fiction, nonfiction, websites and photographic texts. The course will be organized chronologically, with units on key ideas in the study of literature in relation to the environment: pastoral, wilderness, pollution, apocalypse, and ecosystems. Since the course will be set in London, we will also consider the design and representation of ?urban nature,? including parks, gardens, zoos, riverbanks, and art exhibits. There will be some out-of-class visits and walks (with attention to accessibility, as needed).
LNDN 3239 - Theatre in the City
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Plays are written to be appreciated in performance, not only to be read; a play does not truly come to life until it appears on a stage. The course will introduce students to the current variety of theatre being produced in London. The course aims to provide multiple levels of theatre appreciation, and is therefore open to students who both have a background in theatre and those who have a general interest in expanding their knowledge.
LNDN 3242 - Global Perspectives on Human Rights in Action
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The notion of human rights has become central to global politics today. It is not a single subject but a broad field of potential investigation: this intensive seminar provides a multi-disciplinary introduction to the topic, critically examining the politics of human rights, their contentious nature and uneven global implementation. Throughout, the focus will be on practical issues and the contested politics of human rights in action through a range of topical case studies. Students will evaluate key debates about the politics and morality of human rights, analyze and explore the theoretical foundations of human rights concepts and topical issues relating to human rights from a variety of global, regional and local perspectives. The course critically examines the history and development of concepts of human rights and the philosophies underpinning them, as well as current frame-works of international human rights law and the relationship among current debates in human rights, political power and social injustice. Topics to be covered will include human rights and international relations; humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect; postcolonial and feminist critiques of human rights; the intersection of human rights with gender, sexuality, ethnicity and class; the relationship between human and civil rights; women's, children's and indigenous peoples' rights; and the practical implementation and enforcement of human rights.
LNDN 3243 - London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the early twenty-first century, museums are becoming increasingly more relevant to all parts of society, exhibition displays are often controversial and politically charged. This course is an introduction to both British society, culture and museology. The course considers museums as reflections of the British psyche, unique cultural constructs that help us understand "Britishness". We will also be looking at museums as institutions of "global" heritage in the context of a global city, with a unique British perspective. As an introduction to museology, the course will look at the development of the modern museum and its operation, as well as interrogate the different types of museums. We will look at the impact British history, society and politics have had on London museums, their creation and their day to day operations and audiences. Taking advantage of our location, we will do field work in eight different museums, from the famous and vast "global" British Museum to the small and privately-owned Saatchi Gallery. Students will analyze the ways in which imperialism and its legacy, as well as Britain's global relationships have influenced museum development and how this gives rise to the politics of patrimony. We will look at questions of cultural appropriation and the political debate on repatriation versus protection. This debate has recently been energized by the depredations of IS on what many would call the global heritage of Iraq and Syria. We will also be looking at material culture and what it says about individuals and society. Students will examine the choices, ethics and political and social meanings of both creating material culture and collecting it, and the ethics of preservation and restoration. While the creation of material culture has specific psychological, social and often political meanings; collecting, preserving and displaying one particular object involves a very complex decision-making process which is influenced by the cultural values of the decision maker. We will examine, for example, the impact of the Classical period on British society in the past and present, its importance to class and education in Britain, and how this is reflected in museum collections. Students will also look at the complex decision making of conservators and restorers. These decisions have social and political impact, choosing to emphasize one period and use over another. The course will also look closely at decision makers and their role in the museum industry, the origins of museums from individuals to trade exhibitions and current museum professionals, as well as the impact museum audiences have on the work of museums. Students will also examine the impact of communities on museum development, on exhibition creation, how engaged museums are with their communities, and how the unique diversity of London is reflected (or not) in its museums.
LNDN 3245 - Comparative Health Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Health care systems are having to respond to a number of competing challenges. The pressures of globalization, aging populations, increasing patient demands and the rising costs of research and medical treatments are forcing us to look more critically at how healthcare is delivered to devise changes for the future. Changes made to health systems are often based on economic and political rationale and with many countries currently experiencing significant changes to the way in which health care systems have historically been funded and delivered. This course will introduce students to the healthcare system in the UK and the context within which it operates. It will start by looking at the introduction of the National Health System (NHS) in 1948 and take students through the key changes that have taken place right up to the present day. Drawing on a series of cases studies, students will be able to compare the UK model of healthcare with other healthcare systems such as in the USA, France, Sweden and/or from low and middle-income countries. Students will explore a range of key concepts and themes in comparative healthcare from a multidisciplinary perspective. They will also develop critical appraisal skills to assess the quality of evidence used to support developments in healthcare policy and practice and help students to look critically at the role that governmental and non-governmental organizations play in healthcare. Throughout this course, special attention will be paid to comparisons between the UK, USA and low and middle-income countries to allow students to directly relate their learning to their own educational and healthcare setting and contrasting health systems worldwide. Emphasis will be placed on the multiple factors that determine health at the individual and population levels. By comparing patterns of health across different demographic groups, immigration status and so on, students will explore a range of different intersections to expand their understanding of impacts of health inequalities on different populations, and how different countries have sought to address these inequalities.
LNDN 3249W - Experiencing Globalization: Society, Space and Everyday Life in London (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What is globalisation? How is it transforming the world and everyday life, and why has it become so controversial? Who are the winners and losers in a globalising world and what are the implications for our shared global future? How do developments in London relate to major shifts in the workings of the world over the last four decades? As a city with complex global connections, London has been enmeshed in deepening global social, political and ecological crises, as well as becoming an important arena of conflict over efforts to address them. This course critically explores these issues by examining the city?s complex relationship with the forces of globalisation and the ways in which everyday life and experience in London, as well as its people, institutions, and organizations, have been shaped by - and are contributing to - global change. Emphasis will be placed on critically examining the effects of neoliberal globalisation, the growing (though uneven) global dominance of projects promoting increasing freedoms for capital under the banners of ?free markets? and ?free trade.? This course also highlights a variety of collective challenges to these projects, some of which operate largely within the confines of London, others organized along trans-local and transnational lines. Their economic, political, cultural, and ecological aspects will be analyzed, examining the importance of class dynamics and their intersection with gender, ethnicity and other processes of hierarchical ordering. Theoretical and conceptual concerns will also be addressed, such as relations between the local and the global, the workings of power and contestation under neoliberal conditions, the interplay of space, class, and gender, and questions of responsibility within and beyond the limits of community and place.
LNDN 3251 - Strategic Communication and Social Media: Theory and Practice (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This class combines theoretical analysis, case studies, and hands-on practice to understand and execute traditional and online communications strategies. The course will begin with a literature review of theories and principles relevant to the practice of strategic communication and social media practices including media effects, Internet effects, and uses and gratification theory. Second, cases studies will be utilized to investigate the effectiveness of messaging strategies employed by not-for-profit and commercial organizations as well as individual actors such as businesses, politicians, and influencers. Finally, students will work for a real-world client and their own portfolios to formulate an overarching communication strategy inclusive of recommendations for messaging strategies across all platforms (traditional messaging, website, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, press releases, e-blasts, and speeches.)
LNDN 3253W - Contemporary Issues through Community Engagement: Social Dynamics of London (CIV, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an interdisciplinary course with a sociological focus, as well as a unique opportunity to become directly involved in the realities of community engagement and grassroots politics. It is designed to stimulate critical thought and reflection on urban inequalities in London and to introduce students to topical debates about how best to manage the challenges of a diverse city. The course will explore the historical, sociological, and political context of community and service in the United Kingdom (UK). It will also examine in depth forms of social, economic, and political exclusion, such as uneven access to health care, education, financial resources and political representation, and analyse the social dynamics within and between the multiple communities which co-exist in London. The course therefore combines classroom learning with practical exposure in placements to foster knowledge and understanding of community service in the UK today. Weekly seminars and readings enable participants to understand contemporary social dynamics and illuminate such issues as the history of welfare provision, urban regeneration, political power, social deprivation, and the interplay of class, gender, and ethnicity in the city. Three key interrelated themes will be followed throughout the semester in order to provide a structured reflection on questions which affect society today: urban life?including topical issues such as social polarization and neighbourhood change; super-diversity?multiculturalism and the impact of immigration on identity politics and community relations; welfare and exclusion?marginalized groups, uneven access to services, the changing role of the state, poverty, housing, and homelessness.
LNDN 3254W - Introduction to Science Fiction (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What lies beyond ?The Final Frontier?? Why does it matter if androids dream of electric sheep? What will our future look like and who will be there to enjoy it? What role do technology, ethics, and/or politics play in imagining our future? Why has science fiction become such a central metaphor for our daily, lived experiences? Introduction to Science Fiction discusses them all. This course is designed to expose students to a broad spectrum of science fiction. We will examine representative texts from each of the modern, roughly defined as the 20th and 21st Centuries, ?periods? of the genre. The class will discuss the ongoing debate surrounding the ?work? performed by the genre, as well as its themes, and stylistic movements.
LNDN 3255 - Moving Images Editing: Theory and Practice (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Moving images are ubiquitous. As one of the most pervasive manifestations of the digital age, they broke out with the confines of the cinema theatre and show up on the multitude of screens around us. Just as we are surrounded by many forms of the audio-visual, we also encounter a multitude of editing practices. From blockbusters to YouTube videos, we experience images that are carefully selected and artfully cut in a way that is entertaining, persuasive, or simply moving. The course is designed to introduce students to the theory, practice, and art of editing. It intertwines historical accounts of editing practice with media analysis and hands-on exercises. Each of the first nine sessions is devoted to one of the key concepts that illuminates intersections between media and culture: conversation, gaze, action, persuasion, story, beat, humour, metaphor, and voice. Each session is then divided into three distinctive parts. The first uses film excerpts to showcase editing devices employed in relation to the theme of the class. The second introduces a theoretical understanding of the pertinent editing procedures and instigates a discussion around them. In the last part of the session, students will use a pre-selected set of clips to create their own edit. The course is based on an innovative approach to editing techniques that sees them in a close dialogue with the underlying cultural phenomena that shape the current media landscape.
LNDN 3256 - Digital Media Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Digital media permeate most social and economic interactions of today. Still and moving images not only serve entertainment but also inform the way we communicate, learn about the world, purchase goods, and express our identities. This course focuses on digital media as a contemporary means of communication placing them in the context of remix culture. It will take students through the core themes of narrative, rhetoric, remix, and voice, exploring them through two areas of practice-based investigation: composition and audio-visual techniques. This intensive and comprehensive course will allow students to create their own portfolio, including a selection of digital media techniques used in a wide range of settings, from marketing videos to audio-visual essays. Quickly and efficiently students will learn how to produce videos for social media, conduct interviews, and present themselves in front of the camera. The course will offer basic skills in digital photography, camerawork, editing and podcast production. Students will also be able to choose one of the four specialised areas which include VR production, social media advertising, audiovisual essay filmmaking, and digital journalism. The content of the students? portfolios will be produced as part of weekly assignments throughout the course, as students develop their skills, with a final project in their area of specialisation. While the emphasis is on practice, each class includes a theoretical discussion that provides a critical framework for working with visual media. Topics explored include copyright and political aspects of the online, as well as its business and marketing side. This will allow students to both understand the cultural context of digital media and use them effectively.
LNDN 3323 - Shakespeare in London
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Representative sampling of Shakespeare, including the four major tragedies. Some attention to English Renaissance period and Shakespeare's time.
LNDN 3324 - 20th Century British Fiction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Responses to colonialism, impact of World War I, changing conditions for women and for contemporary multicultural Britain. Literary movements/styles (realism, modernism), narrative techniques/perspectives (1st/3rd person, limited point-of-view, stream of consciousness). Use of symbolism, imagery, irony, etc. Role of author/reader. Problems of interpretation.
LNDN 3328 - British Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major works of 20th century British drama. Focuses on postwar period. Students read/see plays.
LNDN 3333 - Understanding Modern Britain
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to social/cultural differences between Britain and the United States. British class/culture, monarchy/aristocracy, education system, media.
LNDN 3342 - European Economic History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
European economic history, 1000 AD to today. Industrial revolution, development of capitalism from feudalism. Reasons Europe took world technological lead during Middle Ages. Factors affecting economic growth, prosperity, and technological change.
LNDN 3343W - Post War Popular Culture (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
London as center for international popular culture, from WWII to present.
LNDN 3432 - Western European Government and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative framework. Assumes that West European states maintain types of institutions/processes in common (e.g., legislatures, parties, elections) but that country-to-country institutions/processes are distinct. Reasons for differences, impact that such diversity has on course of politics as east/west divisions dissolve. Focuses on Great Britain.
LNDN 3500 - CAPA Seminar in London
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Study abroad course
LNDN 3530 - Ethical Issues and the Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principal ethical issues facing print/broadcast journalism. Practical dilemmas, moral framework. Real time arguments that arise in media coverage of matters of public controversy. Regulation, codes of practice. Case studies, visits, guest lectures.
LNDN 3531 - Advertising and Marketing in Britain
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Forms of advertising and public relations techniques used by organizations to communicate with stakeholders. Consumer motivation/appeal. Media structures, effectiveness. Target audiences. Print/broadcast production, budgeting and promotion mix planning. Students design, cost, and implement an advertising campaign, and project the likely success rate.
LNDN 3532 - Visualizing Britain: Film and Television Documentaries
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Canon of British film/television d00ocumentary from end of the 19th century to beginning of 21st Century. Drama-documentaries tackling/attracting major public controversies.
LNDN 3533 - Women in Britain in the 21st Century
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Momentous changes in women's lives during 20th Century. Impact of two world wars, economic dislocation/recovery, revolutions in colonial states, super power rivalry, proxy wars, end of cold war, new international alliances/collectivities.
LNDN 3534 - Criminal London: Aspects of Crime and Criminal Justice in Britain
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Late Middle Ages, Tudor/Stuart periods. Eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Evolution of courts/criminal procedure. Debates, including death penalty and jury system. Visits to courts and places of interest.
LNDN 3536 - Child Development in a British Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scio-cultural approach to contemporary issues of children?s development. How life in the UK shapes children?s development. Early attachments. Development of the self. Emergence of consciousness. Role of play. Origins of disturbing behavior.
LNDN 3613 - Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: London--Modernity, Empire, and Globalization
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3614 - Citizenship and Gender in Modern Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3615 - Urban Underworlds in Medieval and Early Modern London: A Literary Exploration
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3733 - International Finance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Focuses on Europe. International marketing strategies of European companies. Special features of European Common Market, business environment.
LNDN 3752 - International Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Focuses on Europe. International marketing strategies of European companies. Special features of European Common Market and business environment.
LNDN 3753 - International Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative advantage, classical/neoclassical models, distribution consequences of trade. Resource endowments, technological gaps, economies of scale, product differentiation, location. Tariffs, quotas, other forms of intervention. Preferential trading arrangements.
LNDN 3754 - Creative Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Creative writing course for the Study and Internships in London program.
LNDN 3756 - Topics in London
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics course for the Study and Internships in London program.
LNDN 3757 - British History in the 20th Century
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
British history course for the Study and Internships in London program.
LNDN 3758 - International Business Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course on Study and Internships in London program.
LNDN 3759 - Islam, Politics, and Britain: A Case Study of London's East End
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study abroad course.
TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Participation in University Theatre main stage play as actor, construction/running crew personnel, or theatre management operations personnel. prereq: 1101; only two enrollments as actor may count toward a major
TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of traditional play structure, characterization, dialogue, dramatic action, and theme. Final project is a one-act play.
TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introdution to diverse ways of thinking about theatre and its representational practices. Students explore traditional/non-traditional modes of performance through readings, discussions, and hands-on performance projects. Seminar-style course. prereq: 1101
TH 3314 - Text and the Actor
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Standard stage speech, international phonetic alphabet transcription, and textual analysis to perform heightened language texts such as Shakespearean/Shavian monologues, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Beowulf. Videos viewed/discussed. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3316 - Voice for the Actor
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Anatomy/physiology of vocal/respiratory mechanisms. Abdominal breathing, forward tonal placement, articulation of consonants, vocal projection. IPA phonetic transcription and vowel standardization for American Standard Stage Speech. Techniques applied to performance of monologues. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3321 - Acting I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acting I explores the acting process using the canon of 20th century realism. The class will cover the basics of embodiment for the actor, observation as the root of character creation, analysis of text from an actors perspective, and rehearsal techniques. The core of the course is the preparation of scenes and monologues in class. Students will also complete a variety of class compositions, readings, and will see and analyze live performances.
TH 3322 - Acting II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Acting II explores the acting process using scripts from primarily heightened or non-realistic texts. This can include a range of genres from Shakespeare to absurdism to contemporary performance and plays. This course covers the basics of embodiment for the actor, creativity and observation as the roots of character creation, analysis of text from an actors perspective and rehearsal techniques. The core of the course is the preparation of scenes and monologues in class. Students will also complete a variety of class compositions, readings and will see and analyze live performances.
TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Dynamic physical approach to acting. Expanding expressiveness/creativity. Strengthening connections between physical/vocal expression. Uniting instinct and intellectual analysis. Techniques as advanced by Delsarte, Meyerhold, Grotowski, Kantor, Suzuki, Barba, etc., and structured improvisation, are incorporated in solo/collaborative performance projects. prereq: 1322, [3314 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3314], audition, instr consent
TH 3332 - Circus Performance
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strength/conditioning, aerial techniques. Acrobatics to improve timing/muscular structure. Juggling to improve hand-eye coordination and showmanship.
TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of American musical theater. Videos/discussions, basic music theory, voice, dance, acting, audition techniques. Solo/ensemble presentations for public class performance.
TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Live storytelling and solo performance as theatrical art form. How to turn personal experiences into stage stories. Guests perform, discuss their work, and critique student work. Students develop short monologues/performances and conclude with original solo theater performance/story.
TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of space/illusion to create environments for theater/performance. Collaborative vocabulary through script interpretation/analysis. Visual literacy through sketching, painting, and drafting. Individual/group projects. prereq: 3571
TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Costume design process, including, researching, script analysis, the costume designer's role throughout the production process, and design problems. prereq: TH 3571
TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Composition, color theory, instrumentation, and control (dimming) as they apply to theater, opera, and dance. Collaborative process of the lighting designer through individual and group projects in a lab setting (i.e., a theater.) prereq: 3571
TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basics of audio design for theatre. Script analysis, audio editing, music research, basic system design, paperwork, cue building. Basic components of audio design. Final project will involve applying skills to partially realized design. prereq: 1501
TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hands-on techniques. Stage lighting technology in a lab (theater) setting. Electricity, optics, color, control (dimming). Construction/rigging of scenery. Operation of counter weight fly systems and power tools. Constructing a garment. Hand/machine sewing, pinning, marking, measuring, seam finishes, fabric identification. prereq: 1501
TH 3711 - Beginning Directing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to/application of techniques/theories of stage direction. Script analysis, composition, blocking, rehearsal methods, improvisation, actor coaching, scene production. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3716 - Stage Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Production process, pre-production to maintaining/closing. Managing rehearsals, communication, conflict resolution. Individual/group projects: promptbook building, blocking notation, Cue placement/execution, scene breakdowns, creating/maintaining checklist, building a form library. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
New methods of play construction. How characteristic plays from particular contemporary styles create original theatrical effects by using/breaking dramatic conventions. Writing exercises, workshoping of student plays. prereq: 3115 or [writing sample, instr consent]
TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage practice from traditional/postmodern approaches. Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion, critical writing, performance. prereq: [[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
TH 4321 - Career Preparation for the Theatre Artist
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
From personal reflection to real-world insights and hands-on experiences, this course will delve deeply into the skill sets and mindsets important for arts professionals in theater and related fields. I envision our time together as a combined exploration of philosophical, political, and practical questions, thinking through who you want to BE as an artist, what you want your art to DO, and the TOOLS you'll need to manifest that vision in the world. The course will connect you with resources on and off campus, introduce you to professionals working in various facets of the field, engage you in readings and hands-on workshops to deepen your thinking and expand your toolkit, and will culminate in a portfolio project that you can take with you as you transition to life after college. Most importantly, I want this course to be useful and valuable to you, so I will be seeking your input about what you most need, and we'll shape the course accordingly.
TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differences between stage acting and acting for camera. Hands-on experience with film equipment. Scenes/monologues rehearsed/performed for camera. Videotape playback for class critique. prereq: 1301 or 3321
TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ensemble creation of a single theatre performance work. Creative/dramaturgical work. Public showing of work, completed or in-progress. Students work collaboratively with faculty or affiliate guest artists. prereq: Audition, interview, instr consent
TH 4555 - Audio Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sound as science. Technology to create/manipulate sound. Recording techniques. Effects/signal processing. Microphone/mixing techniques. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
TH 4711 - Intermediate Stage Direction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Coordinating/guiding collaborative artistic team. Script selection, textural analysis, concept development, space use, composition, movement, dialogue. Final presentation of scene. Intensive research, textural examination, journal. prereq: 1322 or instr consent
TH 4905H - Honors: Tutorial Seminar in Theatre Arts
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent reading/research in preparing honors thesis or selected creative project. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: 4905; honors, theatre arts, dept consent; limit [2 cr for [cum laude or magna cum laude], 4 cr for summa cum laude]
TH 5100 - Theatre Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individual creative projects in production of approved plays as an actor, director, dramaturg, or playwright. (See 5500 for design practicums.) prereq: instr consent, dept consent; 4 cr of 3100 for undergrads
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
TH 5179W - Text and Performance (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to read texts toward performance in various dramatic/nondramatic material. Method of unlocking metaphoric energy of texts. Vocabulary/techniques of analysis that transform text from page to stage. prereq: [1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student
TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 5483/ TH 5183
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course examines and embodies how storytelling and creative drama can be used as tools to help develop students? critical literacy and to assist them in becoming more fluent readers and writers. Critical literacy is the focus; theater and storytelling are the vehicles. Key topics to be covered include: 1) A historical background on fairy and folk tales, legends, fables, myths, and the different oral traditions; 2) Tools for developing a critical view of diverse tales; 3) Practical instruction on how to use storytelling and story genres in the classroom to develop critical literacy; 4) Assessing storytelling work in the classroom. Students will meet in the first week at the University to learn tools of the Neighborhood Bridges program and in the second week will practice and observe each other?s teaching with local school classrooms. In the past we have worked with 4th graders and 6th graders, though we will also discuss how course content applies to high school students. The class meets for two intensive weeks in person, however, we additionally assign pre-readings and post-class reflections and papers.
TH 5330 - Comedy: Advanced Physical Performance Studio
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Mechanics of creating physical comedy. Focuses on process using clown, Comedia dell'arte, Bouffons, or improvisational comedy. Exercises on how comedy is born from tragedy and state of conflict within one's self. prereq: 3330, audition
TH 5340 - Tragedy/Poetry: Advanced Physical Performance Studio
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Specific tragic/poetic training paradigms in physical theater employed by Stanislavski, Grotowski, Brecht, Lecoq, etc. Psychological, emotional, technical, and physical work. Tragic action in Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Melodrama, operatic characterization, Brecht. Original tragic/poetical work. prereq: [3322, 3331, grad student] or instr consent
TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/performance are introduced through traditional/contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short works for in-class performance. prereq: [[3513 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3513], instr consent] or grad student
TH 5370 - Hand, Mind, and Gesture: An Independent Study in the Creation of Image Driven Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Create single or collaborative performance/event that lives in time/space. Work will draw from personal investigation, amplify personal signature, explore modalities of image driven forms. Propose, develop, construct, rehearse, present finished public performance. prereq: 5355, instr consent
TH 5500 - Theatre Design Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 20.0]
Prerequisites: Th 3521, 3531, or 3541
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual projects in production of approved plays as a designer of scenery/properties, costumes, lighting, or sound. (See 5100 for other creative practicums.) prereq: Th 3521, 3531, or 3541
TH 5510 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1501 or grad
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of skills necessary for presentation of theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and techniques in scene painting. Basic drawing/graphic skills. prereq: 1501 or grad
TH 5520 - Scene Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Prerequisites: 3521
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceiving/communicating design ideas in both two-dimensional sketches and three-dimensional models for theatre and allied venues. Drafting. prereq: 3521
TH 5530 - Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory and process of costume design for theatrical productions (e.g., dance, opera, film) through hypothetical productions. prereq: 3531
TH 5540 - Lighting Design for the Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Prerequisites: 3541
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design aesthetics and exploration of design for various stage forms and venues. Development of the lighting plot and paperwork; use of the computer in lighting design. prereq: 3541
TH 5545 - Stage Lighting Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The lighting technician's skills and crafts: equipment, techniques, control operation, wiring, and maintenance. prereq: 3515 or grad or instr consent
TH 5559 - Sound Design for Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Audio technology/psychology, their impact on audience in a performance. Communication, design process, psychoacoustics, script analysis. prereq: 4555 or instr consent
TH 5560 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Development of skills necessary for presentation of theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and techniques in scene painting. Rendering and scene painting skills. prereq: 5510
TH 5570 - Properties/Scenery Technology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management, structures, upholstery, mask-making, furniture construction, stage mechanics, soft properties, faux finishes. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 3515 or grad or instr consent
TH 5580 - Costume Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fabric enhancement techniques, masks, wig-making, millinery, makeup prosthetics, pattern drafting, and draping. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 3571 or grad or instr consent
TH 5590 - Theatre Technology Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual creative project in technology/craft area of theatre. Practical work in costume, lighting, makeup, props, scenery, sound, or theatre management. prereq: 3515, instr consent, dept consent; 4 cr max for undergrads
TH 5711 - Advanced Stage Direction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Realistic/nonrealistic dramatic forms. Theory/technique of rehearsal. Production problems. Includes directing of three one-act plays. prereq: [4711, instr consent] or grad student
TH 5716 - Stage Management for the Theatre
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, practicalities, and techniques for rehearsal/performance. Organizing/managing various types of performance venues. prereq: [1101, 1321, soph] or grad
TH 5760 - Advanced Stage Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical experience in stage management for specific productions of the University Theatre with emphasis on rehearsal and performance. prereq: 5716 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 5716, instr consent; [4 cr max for undergrads]
TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5182W/Th 5182W
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
DNCE 1001 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 1
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
First course in ten-section sequence of modern dance technique. Introductory modern dance technique training. Dance form varies according to instructor.
DNCE 1010 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 3
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Third course in ten-section sequence of modern dance technique. Beginning modern dance technique training. Dance form varies by instructor. prereq: dept consent, audition
DNCE 1020 - Modern/Contemporary Dance Technique 4
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fourth course in ten-section sequence of modern dance technique. Beginning modern dance technique training. Dance form varies by instructor. prereq: 1010, dept consent, audition
DNCE 1040 - Modern Dance Partnering Technique
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Technical demands, approaches, and skills needed for partnering in modern dance. prereq: Dance major or instr consent
DNCE 1110 - Ballet Technique 3
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of two-semester sequence of beginning ballet technique. Level 3 in eight-level sequence of ballet technique. Practical application of ballet principles. Barre work needed for center work. Center work will consist of adagio, basic turns, petit, grand allegro. prereq: dept consent, audition
DNCE 1120 - Ballet Technique 4
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-semester sequence in beginning ballet. Practical application of ballet principles. Barre/center work. Ever-changing combinations/steps learned in previous level. prereq: 1110, dept consent, audition
DNCE 1210 - Jazz Technique 3
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Third of six-semester sequence of jazz dance. Vocabulary. Technical skills using variety of jazz dance styles while increasing flexibility, groundedness, strength. Increase understanding of musicality, dynamics, style, improvisation. prereq: dept consent, audition
DNCE 1302 - Tap Technique 2
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental terms, basic rhythms and syncopation, stock steps, and standard time steps; clarity of sound and rhythm. prereq: 1301 or instr consent
DNCE 1331 - Yoga
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theory/practice of Yoga. Standing postures, forward bends, twists, balancing, seated postures, inversions, back bends, guided relaxation/meditation. Proper alignment, weight placement, body awareness, relaxation, breathing techniques. Midterm paper, movement demonstration final.
DNCE 1343 - Urban & Street Dance Forms 1: Introduction
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We study the origins of Hip Hop dance and how it has evolved to the current incarnations of the form. There is also a focus on Hip Hop culture as a whole and we have many discussions about issues of identity, relation to power, appropriation, and youth culture. The specific forms of movement in this course are toprocking, rocking, breakdancing (breaking), New Jack Swing, and house dance. Some questions to focus on: What is Hip Hop dance? Where does it originate? Who created Hip Hop artistic expressions? What voices/bodies are heard/seen or not heard/not seen in the films assigned?
DNCE 1345 - Alexander Technique for Movement Artists
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Increased kinesthetic awareness of habitual movement patterns in order to improve dance/movement technique and prevent related injuries.
DNCE 1349 - Contact Improvisation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Safe, clear introduction to principles of contact improvisation. Rolling point of contact, supporting/being supported, falling/recovering, connecting with center as source/support for movement. Classes include warm-up.
DNCE 3110 - Ballet Technique 5
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Stretch, strength, balance, musicality. Longer phrases in adagio/allegro work. More complex elevations in petit allegro. Practical work conducted in context of study of technical development of ballet. prereq: dept consent, audition
DNCE 3120 - Ballet Technique 6
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 3110. Ballet technique. Stretch, strength, balance, musicality. Longer phrases in adagio/allegro work. More complex elevations in petit allegro. prereq: 3110, dept consent, audition
DNCE 3220 - Jazz Technique 6
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 3210. Jazz technique. Rhythm structures, longer phrases, greater physical speed, attack/control. prereq: 3210, dept consent, audition
DNCE 3337 - Body Mind Centering
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Improvisational movement explorations, hands-on re-patterning work. Direct experience of the way mind (desire, attention, intention) is expressed through various body systems. Students use imagery, touch, and anatomical information to access a range of inner sensations and movement experiences. Emphasizes each individual's unique experience of the body.
DNCE 3351 - African Diasporic Movement 5
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Rigorous practice. West African techniques. Cardiovascular endurance of students will improve as a result. Live drummers, students can expect to learn drum parts to enhance the understanding of the rhythms. prereq: 1354 or audition or instr consent
DNCE 5110 - Ballet Technique 7
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Continuation of ballet technique. Musicality, performance, stylistic differences. Practical work conducted within context of choreographic/aesthetic development of ballet. prereq: dept consent, audition
DNCE 5120 - Ballet Technique 8
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 5110. Musicality, performance, stylistic differences. Practical work conducted within context of choreographic/aesthetic development of ballet. prereq: 5110, dept consent, audition
PE 1007 - Beginning Swimming
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic aquatic safety, fundamentals of swimming and hydrodynamics. Principles of hydrodynamics and stroke mechanics; five basic strokes; basic rescue techniques with use of pool equipment; hydrotherapy for disabilities and other conditions, opportunities for competitive activities, lifetime enjoyment of aquatics.
PE 1012 - Beginning Running
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This physically active class will expose students to the joys of running. Course topics and physical activities will explore technique, equipment, safety, etiquette, injury prevention, full-body conditioning, endurance, mobility, strength, and long-term training and goal setting. This course is designed for novices who aspire to run 5K.
PE 1014 - Conditioning
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of personal fitness. Principles of fitness; health and motor skill components of fitness; principles of training/conditioning programs; nutrition; weight control; common fitness injuries; motivation and consistency in fitness programs; stress management.
PE 1015 - Weight Training
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to weight training. Basic aspects of weight training including exercise selection and technique, charting workouts, program design, nutritional considerations, and safety.
PE 1016 - Posture and Individual Exercise
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Good posture techniques, individual exercises, fitness concepts, and mental techniques. Specific overall sound body and mind techniques to include flexibility exercises, cardiovascular fitness, resistance training, nutrition management, weight control, stress management, and self-thought.
PE 1029 - Handball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hand and eye coordination, footwork in practice and game conditions, and skills and strategies of service and rally for the court sport handball (four-wall version). Novice to intermediate levels of play accommodated.
PE 1031 - Sabre Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic sabre techniques, movement, an overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1032 - Badminton
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals including etiquette, terminology, game rules for singles and doubles, footwork, shot selection, and strategy.
PE 1033 - Foil Fencing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fending fundamentals, including basic foil techniques, movement, a general overview of fencing as a recreational sport and an Olympic sport, and the history of fencing.
PE 1034 - Judo
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills for throwing, falling, grappling (matwork), choking, arm and neck techniques; contest judo from Jiu-Jitsu; fundamental rules and scoring of contests. Videotapes used for technique instruction and contest appreciation.
PE 1035 - Karate
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Traditional Japanese Shotokan Karate. Students learn to punch, block, strike, & kick with a focus on proper form, posture, & body mechanics. Students also learn a Kata (choreographed form), techniques with partners, & practical self-defense. Non-contact - no pads, hitting, or throwing.
PE 1036 - Racquetball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of racquetball, including equipment; safety and etiquette; terminology; game rules of singles, doubles, and cutthroat; grips; basic strategies; serves and shots.
PE 1037 - Squash Racquets
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Entry-level technique, basic equipment, international dimension courts, and fitness.
PE 1038 - Beginning Tennis
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental strokes, including forehands, backhands, volleys, lobs, overheads, and serves; introduction to doubles play; terminology, rules, and etiquette.
PE 1044 - Self-Defense
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical, psychological, and de-escalation skills for acting in crisis situations. Distance, body language, and tone of voice are addressed. Physical skills include striking, kicking, shifting, blocking, releasing techniques, floor defenses, and applications to armed attackers and multiple attackers.
PE 1045 - Rock Climbing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Safety, knots, equipment, techniques, and anchor systems used in climbing. Course includes all necessary equipment. prereq: Good general health, no [neck or back] problems
PE 1046 - Tae Kwon Do
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Tae Kwon Do. Principles of martial arts, body mechanics of Tae Kwon Do, practical self-defense.
PE 1048 - Bowling
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals, including stance, approach and delivery, scoring, bowling terminology, and etiquette.
PE 1053 - Ice Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic turns, basic stops, balance techniques, and various other skills from both the forward and backward positions. Equipment, safety issues, ice skating terminology.
PE 1055 - Golf
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Proper grip, stance, ball address, swing, club selection, psychological management, rules, and etiquette. Basic instruction in analyzing, assisting with, and coaching golf.
PE 1057 - Beginning Skiing
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine skiing. How to stop, turn, and use lifts. Safety, etiquette, and purchase of equipment. Class held at Highland Hills ski area in Bloomington.
PE 1058 - Snowboarding
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Alpine snowboarding. Uses American Teaching System. Classes are split into nine skill levels, beginning through advanced. Held at Hyland Ski and Snowboard School in Bloomington. prereq: Good general health, injury free
PE 1065 - Beginning Tumbling and Gymnastics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Rolls, handstands, cartwheels, extensions, handsprings, tucks (flips). Spotting techniques. Skills on bars, vault, and beam.
PE 1067 - Basketball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental skills and rules of basketball, with emphasis on basic court movement and different offensive and defensive strategies.
PE 1071 - Beginning Cricket
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of Cricket. Laws of Cricket, bowling/batting techniques, competitive/recreational Cricket opportunities.
PE 1072 - Soccer
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of soccer including sporting behavior both on and off the field, game rules, soccer terminology, participation and competition drills, fundamental soccer skills, practical instruction in strategy.
PE 1074 - Beginning Volleyball
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic skills, team play, rules, officiating, and strategy.
PE 1076 - Flag Football
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to flag football, techniques, field positions, rules/regulations. Students will participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, kicking, and catching.
PE 1077 - Lacrosse
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to lacrosse, techniques, field positions, rules, regulations. Students participate in vigorous exercise activities including running, throwing, catching, and stick handling.
PE 1137 - Intermediate Squash
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Stroke mechanics, shot placement, changing pace. Court movement/positioning. Fitness requirements, joint/muscle stresses. Weight training for squash. On-court etiquette. prereq: 1037 or instr consent
PE 1154 - Figure Skating
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Terminology, rules. Basic moves, jumps, spins. On-/off-ice assignments. prereq: 1053 or equiv or instr consent
PE 1205 - Scuba and Skin Diving
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diving equipment, physics, physiology, decompression, emergencies, recreational dive planning, oceans, currents and aquatic life, snorkeling/SCUBA equipment usage, buoyancy control, entries, emergencies. prereq: Ability to swim 400 yds comfortably or instr consent
PE 1262 - Marathon Training
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Physical challenge achieved through physiological/psychological adaptation. Goal setting that fosters adaptation in many facets of life. Marathon history. prereq: No pre-existing medical condition that would prevent finishing a marathon, instr consent
PE 1720 - Special Activities in Physical Education
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Activities or related opportunities not normally available through regular course offerings.
TH 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: 6 Th cr, instr consent, dept consent, college consent
TH 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq 6 Th cr, instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
TH 4398 - BFA Rehearsal and Performance V
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Acting, voice and movement. Continuing the application of process towards performance. prereq: BFA-acting sr
LNDN 3212W - Travel Writing: Topics in Composition (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3217W - Writing the City: London (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3220W - Contemporary World Architecture in London (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3221W - Writing a Play (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
LNDN 3249W - Experiencing Globalization: Society, Space and Everyday Life in London (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What is globalisation? How is it transforming the world and everyday life, and why has it become so controversial? Who are the winners and losers in a globalising world and what are the implications for our shared global future? How do developments in London relate to major shifts in the workings of the world over the last four decades? As a city with complex global connections, London has been enmeshed in deepening global social, political and ecological crises, as well as becoming an important arena of conflict over efforts to address them. This course critically explores these issues by examining the city?s complex relationship with the forces of globalisation and the ways in which everyday life and experience in London, as well as its people, institutions, and organizations, have been shaped by - and are contributing to - global change. Emphasis will be placed on critically examining the effects of neoliberal globalisation, the growing (though uneven) global dominance of projects promoting increasing freedoms for capital under the banners of ?free markets? and ?free trade.? This course also highlights a variety of collective challenges to these projects, some of which operate largely within the confines of London, others organized along trans-local and transnational lines. Their economic, political, cultural, and ecological aspects will be analyzed, examining the importance of class dynamics and their intersection with gender, ethnicity and other processes of hierarchical ordering. Theoretical and conceptual concerns will also be addressed, such as relations between the local and the global, the workings of power and contestation under neoliberal conditions, the interplay of space, class, and gender, and questions of responsibility within and beyond the limits of community and place.
LNDN 3253W - Contemporary Issues through Community Engagement: Social Dynamics of London (CIV, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an interdisciplinary course with a sociological focus, as well as a unique opportunity to become directly involved in the realities of community engagement and grassroots politics. It is designed to stimulate critical thought and reflection on urban inequalities in London and to introduce students to topical debates about how best to manage the challenges of a diverse city. The course will explore the historical, sociological, and political context of community and service in the United Kingdom (UK). It will also examine in depth forms of social, economic, and political exclusion, such as uneven access to health care, education, financial resources and political representation, and analyse the social dynamics within and between the multiple communities which co-exist in London. The course therefore combines classroom learning with practical exposure in placements to foster knowledge and understanding of community service in the UK today. Weekly seminars and readings enable participants to understand contemporary social dynamics and illuminate such issues as the history of welfare provision, urban regeneration, political power, social deprivation, and the interplay of class, gender, and ethnicity in the city. Three key interrelated themes will be followed throughout the semester in order to provide a structured reflection on questions which affect society today: urban life?including topical issues such as social polarization and neighbourhood change; super-diversity?multiculturalism and the impact of immigration on identity politics and community relations; welfare and exclusion?marginalized groups, uneven access to services, the changing role of the state, poverty, housing, and homelessness.
LNDN 3254W - Introduction to Science Fiction (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What lies beyond ?The Final Frontier?? Why does it matter if androids dream of electric sheep? What will our future look like and who will be there to enjoy it? What role do technology, ethics, and/or politics play in imagining our future? Why has science fiction become such a central metaphor for our daily, lived experiences? Introduction to Science Fiction discusses them all. This course is designed to expose students to a broad spectrum of science fiction. We will examine representative texts from each of the modern, roughly defined as the 20th and 21st Centuries, ?periods? of the genre. The class will discuss the ongoing debate surrounding the ?work? performed by the genre, as well as its themes, and stylistic movements.
LNDN 3343W - Post War Popular Culture (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
London as center for international popular culture, from WWII to present.
TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage practice from traditional/postmodern approaches. Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion, critical writing, performance. prereq: [[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
TH 5179W - Text and Performance (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to read texts toward performance in various dramatic/nondramatic material. Method of unlocking metaphoric energy of texts. Vocabulary/techniques of analysis that transform text from page to stage. prereq: [1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5182W/Th 5182W
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.