Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Journalism B.A.

School of Journalism & Mass Communication
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2020
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 37 to 38
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The Journalism major prepares students for careers such as news reporting, writing, editing, producing, and photojournalism in traditional and emerging media. Students learn how to inform the public through newspapers, television, radio, magazines, blogs, websites, mobile apps, and social media, as well as preparing students for careers outside the traditional and emerging news media by preparing students to know how to write and edit content and create stories for an audience. The program offers a variety of professional courses and workplace experiences at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. The major is based on a liberal arts foundation, knowledge of the social context in which the profession is practiced, and the skills and experiences needed to succeed in the marketplace. About two-thirds of the coursework for the BA degree is outside of journalism. The 120-credit requirement must include at least 72 non-journalism credits. Total program credits may not exceed 48.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Freshman and transfer students are usually admitted to pre-major status before admission to this major.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 3.00 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 3.00 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 3.00 transferring from outside the University
Students must apply to the major. To apply, students must have completed, or be enrolled in, JOUR 1001 and at least 30 graded (A-F) credits, including at least one semester of study (13 credits) at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. Students must write a statement of intent for the major application. The statement of intent provides a writing sample for the Admissions Committee, addressing information about academic interests, professional goals, and mass communication or related experience, if any. Students who are admitted usually have a 3.00 or higher overall GPA, and must have a grade of C or better in JOUR 1001.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Preparatory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 1001 - Media in a Changing World [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or JOUR 1001H - Media in a Changing World [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Journalism BA is JOUR. The 120-credit requirement must include at least 72 non-journalism credits. Total program credits may not exceed 48. At least 24 credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. Students may combine the Journalism BA with the Digital Media Studies minor, but not with the Mass Communication minor. Students may earn no more than one undergraduate major in Journalism, Strategic Communication: Advertising and Public Relations, and Mass Communication. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence.
Core Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3004 - Information for Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
or JOUR 3004H - Information for Mass Communication (3.0 cr)
News Reporting and Writing
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3101W - News Reporting and Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
Mass Communication Law
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3776H - Mass Communication Law (3.0 cr)
Professional Courses
Take exactly 15 credit(s) from the following:
3xxx
Take no more than 3 course(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3102 - Multimedia Production and Storytelling (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3103 - Interactive and Data Journalism (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3121 - Intermediate News Reporting (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3155 - Editing for Print and Digital Audiences (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3321 - Media Design (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3451 - TV, Radio and Digital News Reporting (3.0 cr)
· 4xxx-5xxx
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· JOUR 4171 - Covering the Arts (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4172 - Sports Reporting (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4175 - Brovald-Sim Community Journalism Practicum (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4302 - Photojournalism (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4303 - Advanced Visual Storytelling (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4451 - Long-form Video Reporting (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4452 - Newscast Producing (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4990 - Special Topics in Mass Communication: Professional (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5196 - Field Based Practicum (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5131 - In-Depth Reporting (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5174 - Magazine Editing and Production (3.0 cr)
Context Courses
Take exactly 3 course(s) totaling exactly 9 credit(s) from the following:
3xxx
Take no more than 2 course(s) totaling at most 6 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3201 - Principles of Strategic Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation [TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society [GP] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Mass Communication [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3771 - Media Ethics [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3775 - Administrative Law and Regulation for Strategic Communication [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3796 - Media and Politics (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· 4xxx-5xxx
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4721 - Mass Media and U.S. Society [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or JOUR 4721H - Mass Media and U.S. Society [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4733V - Honors Thesis Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4801 - Global Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4993H - Honors: Projects (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
Capstone
The capstone requirement is fulfilled by taking JOUR 4995 after 90 credits have been earned. Students who double major within CLA can choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major and only have to complete 36 credits within the major.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 1 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 4995 - Capstone (1.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· JOUR 3101W - News Reporting and Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

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· Journalism BA Sample Plan

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· Journalism B.A.
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JOUR 1001 - Media in a Changing World (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01664
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In an era when almost everybody's a content creator and just about every company is connected with media, what makes mass communication different from other forms of message exchange? We'll examine journalism, advertising, public relations, video gaming, music recording, music and more. We'll think about issues like free speech, "fake news," censorship, social media, demographics, psychographics and graphic content. Hear from mass media professionals who provide real-world, real-time material for discussion and debate. This class covers ground that is shifting by the day and uses current cases to help you apply what you learn and sharpen your own media literacy skills.
JOUR 1001H - Media in a Changing World (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01664 - Jour 1001/Jour 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
In an era when almost everybody's a content creator and just about every company is connected with media, what makes mass communication different from other forms of message exchange? We?ll examine journalism, advertising, public relations, video gaming, music recording, music and more. We'll think about issues like free speech, fake news, censorship, social media, demographics, psychographics and graphic content. Hear from mass media professionals who provide real-world, real-time material for discussion and debate. This class covers ground that is shifting by the day and uses current cases to help you apply what you learn and sharpen your own media literacy skills.
JOUR 3004 - Information for Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00890
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ability to acquire, evaluate, and use different information sources are essential skills for professional communicators and citizens. This course teaches the process of information gathering, evaluation, and implications through the lens of mass communication. A case study is used to study this process in depth throughout the semester. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 3004H - Information for Mass Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00890
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The ability to acquire, evaluate, and use different information sources are essential skills for professional communicators and citizens. This course teaches the process of information gathering, evaluation, and implications through the lens of mass communication. A case study is used to study this process in depth throughout the semester. prereq: Honors [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3101W - News Reporting and Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00882
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the foundation for training as a working journalist--students will learn how to write and report news accurately, quickly, fairly and with a clear, informative style that reflects today?s news demands. Its main focus is on news writing. Students will be expected to model proper journalistic forms and style, for a variety of platforms, as well as demonstrate proper English usage, grammar, spelling and style. Students will also be asked to think about ? and analyze ? news and the varying ways it is presented in today?s media world. At the end of the course, students must demonstrate the ability to write clearly, report accurately, adhere to AP style, meet deadlines and judge what is newsworthy. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist 'shield laws.' We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us.
JOUR 3776H - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist "shield laws." We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us. prereq: Honors
JOUR 3102 - Multimedia Production and Storytelling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to photography, video, audio and slideshow storytelling and production; understanding the differences in content for different media; and understanding content management. Students will learn basic skills in understanding the differences in content for different platforms (Web, print, radio, mobile and television), in identifying, writing and producing different story forms for video, audio and social media and in understanding content management. Students will tell stories using a variety of technologies to gather, edit and disseminate information for journalism and strategic communication messages. We?ll work to understand how each technology has a particular audience or application, apply visual principles, and use the principles of visual grammar. Students will gain a basic proficiency in still and video camera operation, in video, audio and mixed media writing and production, in creating images for a video and social media or other mixed media story. They will also learn to manage and publish content in an organized manner. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour 3101 or concurrent registration or Jour 3279 or concurrent registration or Jour 3241 or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3103 - Interactive and Data Journalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course teaches concepts, tools and techniques for effective data journalism storytelling on digital platforms. Students will develop ways to display stories through the most important emerging tools for using structured information in journalism, including learning the fundamentals of gathering data and performing analyses to find stories and creating visualizations to illustrate trends and patterns. Students will use maintain a blog to curate their work, learning how to use what they build in one of the most common content management systems. Students will rely on open-source tools, but will also learn basic coding to customize those tools for more effective digital presentation. Students will also learn about and critique other digital storytelling formats, user experience concepts and web analytics. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3121 - Intermediate News Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is a skills-based course designed to teach journalism students how to report and write the types of stories that are central to the basic beats in most newsrooms. The course expands upon the competencies learned in JOUR 3101, but requires more in-depth records searches, interviewing and writing. Students also learn the basics of such subjects as libel law, public records law and media ethics. Students will learn in this course how to find news that matters to people, and how to write it so that readers understand it. Whether a student is planning a career in newspapers, television or other media, they will learn enough to get started as a reporter and to understand how things work (or don't work) in a real newsroom . prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3155 - Editing for Print and Digital Audiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of editing for print and digital publications. Students will learn to edit copy, to exercise news judgment and to improve the flow and accuracy of stories. The course will also cover how to write search-engine friendly headlines, to utilize online tools for fact-checking and to execute compelling visual designs for digital and print. Successful students will develop an excellent understanding of AP style, hone their ability to improve copy and learn to navigate legal, ethical and production challenges. These skills are particularly important in the modern newsroom ? where economic pressures have removed some layers of fact-checking and editing and forced traditional roles to shift and expand. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about writing feature stories for magazines. You?ll learn how that enterprise differs from newspaper writing. You?ll also learn about the various types of magazines that exist as well as what constitutes a magazine in this digital age. We will focus on niche ? on the importance of writing for the magazine?s audience. You?ll learn how to sell your work to different markets and platforms. You?ll also discover, you if don?t already know it, that the best magazine writing is rooted in solid reporting. You?ll be doing more interviewing, fact-finding and field work than you may have imagined, all of which will improve your writing. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3321 - Media Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to basic skills in visual communication through hands-on projects, observation, discussion, and collaboration. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to communicate effectively about graphic design processes. Students will develop a sense of their own design aesthetic and be able to talk about their solutions to design communication challenges by producing and presenting the projects assigned in the course. They also will learn to provide and receive constructive criticism and encouragement with their peers through both process and final class project critiques. Students will become familiar with the tools and processes necessary to execute simple design projects, from concept through production. Course projects will facilitate diversity through projects that reflect each students interests and research. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3451 - TV, Radio and Digital News Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the introductory broadcast and digital writing and reporting course. It is the student?s introduction to writing in broadcast and digital style, video photojournalism and digital video editing. This is ?not? a production class. It will apply journalism to the production techniques learned in JOUR 3102. Also included: source and story development, ethical decision-making, audio storytelling and vocal and on-camera delivery. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4171 - Covering the Arts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As arts journalism continues to migrate from print to online media, the distinctions between entertainment and art have begun to merge, and the boundaries between professional journalism and promotion have blurred. Yet the task of the arts journalist remains an important independent voice for developing arts literacy on print and digital platforms. This course will not only develop practical and critical thinking needed to write about the arts as a journalist but will also do so via digital approaches to arts coverage. Accordingly, students will be immersed and engaged on a variety of platforms to produce relevant journalism about a wide variety of arts for 21st century readers. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4172 - Sports Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will cover game-story writing, multimedia/digital storytelling, interview/press conference techniques, sports-business reportage, data-driven journalism, effective use of social media and opinion/column writing. Top sports media professionals and other local sports personalities will come in periodically to tell their stories and teach students some of what they know about good sports journalism. The aim of this course is to provide first steps toward working in today?s sports media environment. Some possible sports career destinations include becoming: an authoritative sports blogger; TV sports anchor, reporter or sideline analyst; beat reporter or sports editor for a newspaper (and its website); team sports information director; writer of long, beautiful prose for a national magazine or website. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3121 or instructor permission, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4175 - Brovald-Sim Community Journalism Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Community journalism is arguably the most relevant source of news and information for our citizenry, whether in urban, suburban or rural settings. That?s still true today, but the nature of what we call community journalism is changing. For decades, community journalism has been defined by its geographical boundaries, concerning chiefly the institutions ? schools, churches, businesses or government ? within those borders. While that traditional community journalism is certainly still alive today, the reach of digital journalism and social media has transformed the notion of community. New communities can define themselves beyond geography, a shift that creates opportunities for journalists to cover a broader sense of ?where? people live. This course will explore this shift through practical, hands-on experience and thoughtful consideration of the journalist?s role in covering diverse communities. Through readings, lectures and discussions with professionals who do the work, students will consider the notion of community journalism and the best practices for it. Students will target a community in and around the University of Minnesota and develop cover that community on the student-run website AccessU. The goal is for those teams to publish relevant stories about the community on that site in text, photos, video and visualizations. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour 3103 or Jour 3121 or Jour 3155 or Jour 3173 or Jour 4302], [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4302 - Photojournalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students in this course can expect to learn skills in understanding convergence journalism and visual roles and responsibilities in newsrooms, understanding basic video news production using a DSLR, and using those to create a portfolio of still images with significant journalistic content. Students will study some concept and theory, plus approaches in covering story events and using a variety of technologies to gather, edit and disseminate stories. Students will look at ways to tailor stories for print, broadcast, web and mobile reporting, and talk about the differences in audience and will study ethics all along the way, too. Students will get photo-nerdy. They will learn production skills that include visual grammar and application, how to use a DSLR camera for both still and video images, and how to use light and color to tell news and feature stories. Plus, students will learn to edit photos and video for great images and for great stories. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4303 - Advanced Visual Storytelling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students produce in-depth multimedia stories, using photography, audio, video, text and infographics, working both individually and in groups. Students will produce and participate in a completed multimedia project (with at least three story forms) by the end of the semester. Students examine the implications of differing approaches to multimedia production and consider ethical issues raised by it. Exemplary work of multimedia journalism is regularly presented and reviewed. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4451 - Long-form Video Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis in this course is on longer-form storytelling using video, audio, graphics and still photography, edited into multimedia presentations for journalistic and persuasive messages. Story conceptualization, enterprise, source development, access, narrative approaches and related issues will be addressed. Ethical and legal implications of multimedia storytelling in journalistic and strategic communications settings will be reviewed. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, Jour 3451 [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4452 - Newscast Producing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The emphasis of the course is planning, writing, producing and presenting live TV newscasts. Students will produce University Report newscasts during the semester. Much of the class will also be spent writing broadcast news copy. Students will also generate their own stories as needed and anchor newscasts or segments. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, Jour 3451, [Jour 3121 or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4990 - Special Topics in Mass Communication: Professional
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Professional-skills-learning opportunity not regularly offered. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [3101 or 3201 or 3202)], 3004, [Jour major or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major]
JOUR 5196 - Field Based Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This class will teach advanced reporting skills through hands-on experience, professional oversight and thoughtful discussions with working journalists. Classes will be held at news organizations, where students will also work directly with editors to produce news, features or other content. That work experience will be complemented in weekly sessions by readings, projects and discussions and with journalists. Students apply to this course and completion of Jour 3121 is encouraged. Applications are available in the HSJMC student services office about a month before registration begins. prereq: Jour major and instructor permission
JOUR 5131 - In-Depth Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The approach to the class is dual: First, there is an academic component ? studying the best examples in-depth reporting from muckrakers to yesterday?s New York Times. This part of the course will be presented in a seminar style with a high-expectation for student involvement. Second, there is a hands-on component ? giving students the opportunity to exercise what they learn in this class and elsewhere in their journalism program. This part of the course will require students to identify appropriate stories for in-depth reporting, outline the proposed stories to the instructor, thoroughly report the stories and go through the editing process. Students will also produce graphics and photographs, and might consider various multi-media possibilities. The class topics will be organized around essential social issues, such as health care, politics, poverty, business or other topics. During some semesters, students will produce news stories for publication at a professional news organization, such as MinnPost.com. Such opportunities in past classes have allowed students to work with professional reporters and editors and get bylines stories read by thousands. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3121, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 5174 - Magazine Editing and Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on magazine and web writing, editing, photography, graphic design, and production. Students will study concepts of magazine and web communication with a special concern for how words, pictures, multimedia and design can be combined effectively. Over the semester, the class will create and produce a professional quality single-theme magazine and website. During this process, students will experience firsthand the organization and working of an editorial and production staff, and the implications of specific divisions of labor and working relationships. All students will write an article and/or produce web content as well as hold a staff job. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279], [Jour 3155 or Jour 3173 or Jour 3321 or Jour 4171 or Jour 4302], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Does the media cause social problems, or just reflect them? Why and how have mass media been feared, bemoaned, used, and dismissed as tools to change public beliefs, attitudes, and behavior? This course explores a century's worth of thinking as to how and when media might have such effects. We examine media influence in a range of contexts, including political advertising, health campaigns, video game violence, pornography, and educational television. We approach the topic largely from a social science perspective (for example, by reviewing experimental tests of the effects of media violence) but we will address some of the advantages and limitations inherent in looking for effects in that way. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From Instagram to YouTube to memes-we live in a visual culture. How can we interpret this flood of images? Learn how to analyze advertisements, photographs, television, and social media from multiple perspectives. Historical, cultural, and ethical approaches unearth the changing role of visual media in society. You'll actively interpret current images to learn how to effectively communicate with visuals.
JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this class, you'll study mass media and its impact during a specific historical time period, based on the instructor's expertise and area of research. Examples include: Journalism during the Civil War; Mass media and the African American struggle for civil rights; the Sixties and rise of the New Journalism.
JOUR 3201 - Principles of Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
So, you have declared your journalism major and selected the strategic communication track? Or maybe, you are studying something completely different, but you have heard that advertising and public relations are great fields to work in? In this class, we will foster career exploration as you learn about key areas of advertising and public relations (history, theory, ethics, etc). In the second half of the class, you will take a journey from media consumer to strategic planner as you create a strategic communication campaign as part of a group project that will start off your strategic communication portfolio. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital media enterprises have uprooted many established industries and continue to be among the most important factors shaping our economy and society today. Where do these innovations come from? Why do some startups prosper while others fail? How do legacy firms respond to disruptions to their business models? What makes adaptations possible? What makes them risky? Learn to analyze and evaluate the economic strategies of existing digital media firms across various sectors of society including news, entertainment, social media, mobile, and retail. Assess their impacts on cultural and civic life for better and for worse. Use these skills to incubate your own ideas for the next great media innovations of the future.
JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines the various ways in which technology continues to evolve, and to have a role in ongoing societal changes. The course focuses on unpacking the specific ways in which technology are evolving, and connecting those changes to impacts on communication and media A variety of theories or perspectives relevant or related to technology use and global communication will be considered to help make sense of the interplay between the technology use and societies in a global setting. The course is divided into three main parts: first, understanding of the specifics of relevant technology; second, connecting the technical features to theoretical views of technology; third, examining global patterns of technology use in media and communication. The readings and discussions place special emphasis on specific forms of technology, including mobile phones, Web, and social media. Grounded in a global context, we will investigate the political, cultural, social, technological, and economic conditions that shape and are shaped by the presence of the Internet at the national and cross-national levels; the effects of technology use on the form and content of mass communication at the global level; and the implications of technology use for human and social relations across national borders.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01819 - Glos 3605/Hist 3705/Jour 3614
Typically offered: Every Spring
In the history of humankind, there have been five major changes in how we communicate and we're in the middle of the latest revolution. This class helps you make sense of these uncharted waters by exploring how humanity adopted, and adapted to, past disruptions. From the alphabet to the internet and social media, learn how technological innovations in the media have changed not only how people share information and values but also what people have communicated throughout history. We will learn about these five phases in mediated communication over 5,000 years, and how they relate to major changes in politics, society and culture. And then we'll use history's lessons to peek into the future: When presidents tweet and everyone's foodie photos are on Instagram, how does the world communicate?
JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Mass Communication (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How are our perceptions of crime been influenced by the news? How do social movements use media to share their messages? What can we as audiences do? Social media, news and entertainment media help shape our ideas about identity and differences. Learn how representation and inclusion have been negotiated through media with a particular focus on local case studies. Topics include race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, and gender. Students will learn how to use media literacy to build a just and equitable society.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How have digital media innovations like social media, mobile phones, artificial intelligence, drones and games shaped and been shaped by a culture and society globally? Learn to critically examine the function of digital media in your life. Take away a socio-historical understanding of digital media innovation, and the social, political, and economical impact of new media in creativity, industry, and culture from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Topics range from the concept of branding in an online context, to the varied uses of digital media in the context of journalism, social mobilization, law and privacy, business, globalization, content creation, and beyond. You will read, discuss, and debate cutting edge material from documentaries, podcasts, popular press, and academic literature. This course balances local contexts with global perspectives, and provides details into the practicalities of working and living in a new media environment.
JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Health information is in the news, nearly every corner of the internet, on your favorite television show, and advertising campaigns. Using principles of mass communication, public health, sociology, and psychology this course explores how mediated health content impacts students' lives at both micro- and macro-levels. We will explore questions such as: how do individuals use media to achieve health-related goals? What role does media and health literacy play in achieving these goals? What effect does health information in entertainment media or strategic public health campaigns, for example, effect your own health-related beliefs and behaviors? To what extent do media portrayals of health and illness impact society?s understanding of complex health issues such as mental health, substance use disorder, or cancers? What influence does news coverage of health issues have on health policy and health reform?
JOUR 3771 - Media Ethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Citizens expect journalists to separate fact from falsehoods, opinion and propaganda. But is it possible for journalists to be unbiased and objective? Advertisers are expected to push products. But is it acceptable to mislead by exaggerating what the product can do? Public relations professionals must protect a company's brand. But what should they do when a company becomes entangled in a scandal? This course examines the ethical and unethical ways that communicators respond to such challenges, and uses real-life examples to identify values and principles that can lead to sound, ethical decisions under the most difficult circumstances. Learn about ethical communication on all platforms, from television to social media to newspapers and magazines. Build a solid foundation for you own ethical thinking that can guide you as a student and as a professional communicator.
JOUR 3775 - Administrative Law and Regulation for Strategic Communication (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn practical legal skills and ethics as they pertain to marketing, public relations and advertising by focusing on the actions of the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications, and the Federal Elections Commission. Learn about the administrative process including adjudication and rule making. Learn through a range of legal, policy and ethics discussions ranging from the First Amendment, the regulation of commercial speech, advertising deception, substantiation of material claims, digital privacy, contesting, political advertising, and controls on native advertising and social media influencers.
JOUR 3796 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02716
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
JOUR 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study, projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ever wonder what your brain does when you see an advertisement? Ever wonder why advertisements work? And why sometimes they don't? How does advertising compel you to buy things you don't need and what strategies do you use to resist these messages? In this course we explore a range of theories that explain how advertisements influence memory, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how humans actively process and resist persuasive messages.
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or Digital Media Studies minor approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
JOUR 4721 - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes.
JOUR 4721H - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes. prereq: honors
JOUR 4733V - Honors Thesis Seminar (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students work under supervision of instructor, with input from subject or methodological advisers, to define research question, conduct research, and write thesis. Students serve as consultants to one another. prereq: Jour major, [jr or sr], honors
JOUR 4801 - Global Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How does communication affect international affairs? That's literally a question of war and peace, and this class guides you through the big theories and the real life stories of how news, information and entertainment travels around the world. Analyze the role of communication in globalization, addressing possible interpretations ranging from cultural imperialism to democratic development. Examine how different media cover foreign countries. What does it take to cover the world, historically and at a time of unprecedented challenges for professional journalism? What are the practices that have made international news what it is for the last century? Through theory and case studies from journalists and diplomats, examine the possible effects of international communication on international relations and policy making.
JOUR 4993H - Honors: Projects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Honors projects. Prereq Jour major, honors div regis, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital communication technologies continue to raise a variety of legal issues, including whether and how (and which) traditional media and regulatory laws will apply, and how policy should be applied through regulatory law to enhance and regulate that communication. This course is conducted as a seminar, with an open discussion of legal precedent and the influence of policy on internet and digital communications. This course covers the First Amendment as it applies in a digital era as well as regulatory topics like net neutrality, broadband access, privacy, and copyright.
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts/principles of media management. Strategic planning, leadership, organizational strategies, ethical/legal issues. Working in teams. Balance sheets, income statements. Motivating/promoting people.
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most of us use devices like Smartphones, GPS, streaming services, or hands-free speakers like Amazon's Echo that connect to online voice services like Alexa without thinking about them very much. But, what kind of information are they collecting? Are merchants allowed to gather your shopping history and use it to send you targeted advertising, or to sell it to other companies for profit? Should other people be able to post your personal information or photos online without your consent? Can the government read your emails, track your online browsing, or intercept your text messages? This course considers how growing concerns about privacy and national security affect the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to gather and report the news. We will read significant court decisions and take a look at current statutory and regulatory initiatives both in the United States and abroad. You can expect lively debates and discussion, and the opportunity to explore a privacy or national security issue in depth in a substantial research paper. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program or graduate or law student status. Course is open to students have previously taken a relevant law course - contact instructor for permission.
JOUR 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study/projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], GPA of at least 3.00, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 4995 - Capstone
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The purpose of this course is to round out professional career competencies for Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication majors. It is designed to complement and provide capstone reflection on a student's development through HSJMC's curriculum in the professional journalism, strategic communication and mass communication programs. This course has four parts: career competency reflections of previously taken JOUR courses using CLA's RATE tool; a networking unit; a written reflection of the students' HSJMC experiences projecting to career readiness; and an assessment of context course learning outcomes. Students enroll in this course along with an advanced skills or context course during their last semester.
JOUR 3101W - News Reporting and Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00882
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the foundation for training as a working journalist--students will learn how to write and report news accurately, quickly, fairly and with a clear, informative style that reflects today?s news demands. Its main focus is on news writing. Students will be expected to model proper journalistic forms and style, for a variety of platforms, as well as demonstrate proper English usage, grammar, spelling and style. Students will also be asked to think about ? and analyze ? news and the varying ways it is presented in today?s media world. At the end of the course, students must demonstrate the ability to write clearly, report accurately, adhere to AP style, meet deadlines and judge what is newsworthy. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about writing feature stories for magazines. You?ll learn how that enterprise differs from newspaper writing. You?ll also learn about the various types of magazines that exist as well as what constitutes a magazine in this digital age. We will focus on niche ? on the importance of writing for the magazine?s audience. You?ll learn how to sell your work to different markets and platforms. You?ll also discover, you if don?t already know it, that the best magazine writing is rooted in solid reporting. You?ll be doing more interviewing, fact-finding and field work than you may have imagined, all of which will improve your writing. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this class, you'll study mass media and its impact during a specific historical time period, based on the instructor's expertise and area of research. Examples include: Journalism during the Civil War; Mass media and the African American struggle for civil rights; the Sixties and rise of the New Journalism.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01819 - Glos 3605/Hist 3705/Jour 3614
Typically offered: Every Spring
In the history of humankind, there have been five major changes in how we communicate and we're in the middle of the latest revolution. This class helps you make sense of these uncharted waters by exploring how humanity adopted, and adapted to, past disruptions. From the alphabet to the internet and social media, learn how technological innovations in the media have changed not only how people share information and values but also what people have communicated throughout history. We will learn about these five phases in mediated communication over 5,000 years, and how they relate to major changes in politics, society and culture. And then we'll use history's lessons to peek into the future: When presidents tweet and everyone's foodie photos are on Instagram, how does the world communicate?
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines the various ways in which technology continues to evolve, and to have a role in ongoing societal changes. The course focuses on unpacking the specific ways in which technology are evolving, and connecting those changes to impacts on communication and media A variety of theories or perspectives relevant or related to technology use and global communication will be considered to help make sense of the interplay between the technology use and societies in a global setting. The course is divided into three main parts: first, understanding of the specifics of relevant technology; second, connecting the technical features to theoretical views of technology; third, examining global patterns of technology use in media and communication. The readings and discussions place special emphasis on specific forms of technology, including mobile phones, Web, and social media. Grounded in a global context, we will investigate the political, cultural, social, technological, and economic conditions that shape and are shaped by the presence of the Internet at the national and cross-national levels; the effects of technology use on the form and content of mass communication at the global level; and the implications of technology use for human and social relations across national borders.
JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Mass Communication (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How are our perceptions of crime been influenced by the news? How do social movements use media to share their messages? What can we as audiences do? Social media, news and entertainment media help shape our ideas about identity and differences. Learn how representation and inclusion have been negotiated through media with a particular focus on local case studies. Topics include race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, and gender. Students will learn how to use media literacy to build a just and equitable society.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 4801 - Global Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How does communication affect international affairs? That's literally a question of war and peace, and this class guides you through the big theories and the real life stories of how news, information and entertainment travels around the world. Analyze the role of communication in globalization, addressing possible interpretations ranging from cultural imperialism to democratic development. Examine how different media cover foreign countries. What does it take to cover the world, historically and at a time of unprecedented challenges for professional journalism? What are the practices that have made international news what it is for the last century? Through theory and case studies from journalists and diplomats, examine the possible effects of international communication on international relations and policy making.
JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Does the media cause social problems, or just reflect them? Why and how have mass media been feared, bemoaned, used, and dismissed as tools to change public beliefs, attitudes, and behavior? This course explores a century's worth of thinking as to how and when media might have such effects. We examine media influence in a range of contexts, including political advertising, health campaigns, video game violence, pornography, and educational television. We approach the topic largely from a social science perspective (for example, by reviewing experimental tests of the effects of media violence) but we will address some of the advantages and limitations inherent in looking for effects in that way. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From Instagram to YouTube to memes-we live in a visual culture. How can we interpret this flood of images? Learn how to analyze advertisements, photographs, television, and social media from multiple perspectives. Historical, cultural, and ethical approaches unearth the changing role of visual media in society. You'll actively interpret current images to learn how to effectively communicate with visuals.
JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Health information is in the news, nearly every corner of the internet, on your favorite television show, and advertising campaigns. Using principles of mass communication, public health, sociology, and psychology this course explores how mediated health content impacts students' lives at both micro- and macro-levels. We will explore questions such as: how do individuals use media to achieve health-related goals? What role does media and health literacy play in achieving these goals? What effect does health information in entertainment media or strategic public health campaigns, for example, effect your own health-related beliefs and behaviors? To what extent do media portrayals of health and illness impact society?s understanding of complex health issues such as mental health, substance use disorder, or cancers? What influence does news coverage of health issues have on health policy and health reform?
JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ever wonder what your brain does when you see an advertisement? Ever wonder why advertisements work? And why sometimes they don't? How does advertising compel you to buy things you don't need and what strategies do you use to resist these messages? In this course we explore a range of theories that explain how advertisements influence memory, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how humans actively process and resist persuasive messages.
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or Digital Media Studies minor approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital media enterprises have uprooted many established industries and continue to be among the most important factors shaping our economy and society today. Where do these innovations come from? Why do some startups prosper while others fail? How do legacy firms respond to disruptions to their business models? What makes adaptations possible? What makes them risky? Learn to analyze and evaluate the economic strategies of existing digital media firms across various sectors of society including news, entertainment, social media, mobile, and retail. Assess their impacts on cultural and civic life for better and for worse. Use these skills to incubate your own ideas for the next great media innovations of the future.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 3771 - Media Ethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Citizens expect journalists to separate fact from falsehoods, opinion and propaganda. But is it possible for journalists to be unbiased and objective? Advertisers are expected to push products. But is it acceptable to mislead by exaggerating what the product can do? Public relations professionals must protect a company's brand. But what should they do when a company becomes entangled in a scandal? This course examines the ethical and unethical ways that communicators respond to such challenges, and uses real-life examples to identify values and principles that can lead to sound, ethical decisions under the most difficult circumstances. Learn about ethical communication on all platforms, from television to social media to newspapers and magazines. Build a solid foundation for you own ethical thinking that can guide you as a student and as a professional communicator.
JOUR 3775 - Administrative Law and Regulation for Strategic Communication (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn practical legal skills and ethics as they pertain to marketing, public relations and advertising by focusing on the actions of the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications, and the Federal Elections Commission. Learn about the administrative process including adjudication and rule making. Learn through a range of legal, policy and ethics discussions ranging from the First Amendment, the regulation of commercial speech, advertising deception, substantiation of material claims, digital privacy, contesting, political advertising, and controls on native advertising and social media influencers.
JOUR 3796 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02716
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How have digital media innovations like social media, mobile phones, artificial intelligence, drones and games shaped and been shaped by a culture and society globally? Learn to critically examine the function of digital media in your life. Take away a socio-historical understanding of digital media innovation, and the social, political, and economical impact of new media in creativity, industry, and culture from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Topics range from the concept of branding in an online context, to the varied uses of digital media in the context of journalism, social mobilization, law and privacy, business, globalization, content creation, and beyond. You will read, discuss, and debate cutting edge material from documentaries, podcasts, popular press, and academic literature. This course balances local contexts with global perspectives, and provides details into the practicalities of working and living in a new media environment.
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital communication technologies continue to raise a variety of legal issues, including whether and how (and which) traditional media and regulatory laws will apply, and how policy should be applied through regulatory law to enhance and regulate that communication. This course is conducted as a seminar, with an open discussion of legal precedent and the influence of policy on internet and digital communications. This course covers the First Amendment as it applies in a digital era as well as regulatory topics like net neutrality, broadband access, privacy, and copyright.
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts/principles of media management. Strategic planning, leadership, organizational strategies, ethical/legal issues. Working in teams. Balance sheets, income statements. Motivating/promoting people.
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most of us use devices like Smartphones, GPS, streaming services, or hands-free speakers like Amazon's Echo that connect to online voice services like Alexa without thinking about them very much. But, what kind of information are they collecting? Are merchants allowed to gather your shopping history and use it to send you targeted advertising, or to sell it to other companies for profit? Should other people be able to post your personal information or photos online without your consent? Can the government read your emails, track your online browsing, or intercept your text messages? This course considers how growing concerns about privacy and national security affect the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to gather and report the news. We will read significant court decisions and take a look at current statutory and regulatory initiatives both in the United States and abroad. You can expect lively debates and discussion, and the opportunity to explore a privacy or national security issue in depth in a substantial research paper. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program or graduate or law student status. Course is open to students have previously taken a relevant law course - contact instructor for permission.
JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist 'shield laws.' We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us.
JOUR 3776H - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist "shield laws." We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us. prereq: Honors
JOUR 4721 - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes.
JOUR 4721H - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes. prereq: honors
JOUR 3201 - Principles of Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
So, you have declared your journalism major and selected the strategic communication track? Or maybe, you are studying something completely different, but you have heard that advertising and public relations are great fields to work in? In this class, we will foster career exploration as you learn about key areas of advertising and public relations (history, theory, ethics, etc). In the second half of the class, you will take a journey from media consumer to strategic planner as you create a strategic communication campaign as part of a group project that will start off your strategic communication portfolio. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4263 - Strategic Communication Campaigns
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an in-depth look at all aspects of strategic communications culminating in the development of a strategically sound communications campaign. Emphasis is on ?real-life? examples of campaigns, their creation and development. All essentials of developing a strategic campaign are covered, including advertising strategy, positioning, developing creative, consumer research, planning and setting objectives, media strategies, budgeting, public relations programs and promotion. This course is designed to bring together all aspects of communications planning that students have gained from previous classes. The class will focus on the integration of various techniques and elements available to most effectively create a strategic communications campaign. This course will simulate the teamwork involved in working in a strategic communications agency. Case studies will be used extensively to apply the theory to the practice in a meaningful, memorable way. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, any 32xx skills course, [any 42xx skills course or Flor 3007 or concurrent registration], [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3102 - Multimedia Production and Storytelling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to photography, video, audio and slideshow storytelling and production; understanding the differences in content for different media; and understanding content management. Students will learn basic skills in understanding the differences in content for different platforms (Web, print, radio, mobile and television), in identifying, writing and producing different story forms for video, audio and social media and in understanding content management. Students will tell stories using a variety of technologies to gather, edit and disseminate information for journalism and strategic communication messages. We?ll work to understand how each technology has a particular audience or application, apply visual principles, and use the principles of visual grammar. Students will gain a basic proficiency in still and video camera operation, in video, audio and mixed media writing and production, in creating images for a video and social media or other mixed media story. They will also learn to manage and publish content in an organized manner. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour 3101 or concurrent registration or Jour 3279 or concurrent registration or Jour 3241 or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about writing feature stories for magazines. You?ll learn how that enterprise differs from newspaper writing. You?ll also learn about the various types of magazines that exist as well as what constitutes a magazine in this digital age. We will focus on niche ? on the importance of writing for the magazine?s audience. You?ll learn how to sell your work to different markets and platforms. You?ll also discover, you if don?t already know it, that the best magazine writing is rooted in solid reporting. You?ll be doing more interviewing, fact-finding and field work than you may have imagined, all of which will improve your writing. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3241W - Advertising Strategy and Creative Development (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is focused on giving strategic communications students the tools needed to better understand how the creative process works to help solve business problems. We will accomplish this by studying successful advertising campaigns (current and past) and by creating concepts for campaigns. Advertising today is more than just the development of a traditional TV or print ad. Creative concepts include the traditional advertising platforms of TV, Radio, Print and Outdoor along with the vast array of digital platforms. The strategic and creative development experiences and discussions from this class will help aid students in the development of decision-making and concept development skills that are needed to pursue a career in this field. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3279W - Professional Writing for Strategic Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to develop writing expertise for public relations and advertising agency work, corporate and non-profit strategic communication and development of tactical thinking and publicity techniques. The course focuses on developing the essential writing capabilities needed to complete a wide variety of projects in public relations and related strategic communication professions. It is designed to help students gain experience in researching, interviewing, writing, and producing materials used by strategic communication professionals. These include biographies, press releases, fact sheets, backgrounders, newsletters, brochures, speeches, A/V scripts and other materials for broadcast. Discussion of public relations tactics, the role of public relations and advertising agencies and various media channels is integrated into the course ? so that students should develop a strong understanding of the many aspects of the strategic communication profession. Theories of persuasion, social influence and compliance gaining are interwoven into class discussions. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3321 - Media Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to basic skills in visual communication through hands-on projects, observation, discussion, and collaboration. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to communicate effectively about graphic design processes. Students will develop a sense of their own design aesthetic and be able to talk about their solutions to design communication challenges by producing and presenting the projects assigned in the course. They also will learn to provide and receive constructive criticism and encouragement with their peers through both process and final class project critiques. Students will become familiar with the tools and processes necessary to execute simple design projects, from concept through production. Course projects will facilitate diversity through projects that reflect each students interests and research. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3451 - TV, Radio and Digital News Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the introductory broadcast and digital writing and reporting course. It is the student?s introduction to writing in broadcast and digital style, video photojournalism and digital video editing. This is ?not? a production class. It will apply journalism to the production techniques learned in JOUR 3102. Also included: source and story development, ethical decision-making, audio storytelling and vocal and on-camera delivery. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4242 - Advertising Portfolio Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course improves students' creative development and conceptual thinking. Students will develop creative ideas based on sound strategies, with emphasis on print, video and social media. At the end of the term, successful students will be able to apply strategic and insightful creativity to advertising ideas and will have a basic understanding of how to put a book together to get a job in advertising. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, Jour 3241, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4243 - Digital Content Development and Production for Brand Communications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the conceptual and practical skills necessary for strategic communication practitioners, especially those focused on careers in public relations, corporate communications and sponsored content generation, to create, produce, publish and distribute content for brands. The course addresses new technologies for branded storytelling including various forms of online video, longer form digital content such as blogs and web sites, and social media community content created for social platforms. The course also incorporates elements of user experience and graphic design and the skills necessary to adapt and modify content in an iterative process after analyzing audience data. Discussion of professional ethics in the creation of branded content is incorporated throughout. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Jour 3241 or Jour 3279], [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 5174 - Magazine Editing and Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on magazine and web writing, editing, photography, graphic design, and production. Students will study concepts of magazine and web communication with a special concern for how words, pictures, multimedia and design can be combined effectively. Over the semester, the class will create and produce a professional quality single-theme magazine and website. During this process, students will experience firsthand the organization and working of an editorial and production staff, and the implications of specific divisions of labor and working relationships. All students will write an article and/or produce web content as well as hold a staff job. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279], [Jour 3155 or Jour 3173 or Jour 3321 or Jour 4171 or Jour 4302], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3251 - Evaluative Research in Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to teach strategic communication students the fundamentals of research used by communication and marketing research professionals to evaluate the effectiveness of campaigns. Students will be exposed to various data collection and analysis methods with particular emphasis on quantitative research methods (e.g., surveys, experiments, digital analytics) commonly used to collect data to aid strategic communication decision making. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3253 - Account Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course examines the role of account planning in integrated marketing communications development in today?s complex cultural and media environments. It is designed to teach students how to use research and analytic tools to identify strategic insights about target consumers. These insights will then be used to develop effective brand positions and message strategies. Students will develop an awareness and understanding of the skills needed to become an account planner and an opportunity to apply those skills in various situations and settings. Although account planners conduct both formative and evaluative research using both primary and secondary research approaches throughout a campaign, the emphasis in this course will be on qualitative formative research, brand planning, positioning and message development. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3261 - Media Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The objective of the course is to provide a basic understanding of the media strategy, planning, and selection process within the context of the broader marketing communications process. The course will cover paid, owned and earned media across advertising, digital (including social), and direct marketing disciplines. The media planning process incorporates subjective decision making after reviewing significant amounts of objective data. The development of recommendations with supporting rationale is the basis for the process. Students are introduced to this process focusing on the prioritization of strategies and media selection within a fixed budget. Marketing and media examples covering number industries to help students grasp theoretical concepts. The media selection process incorporates the demographic media consumption patterns of the American consumer. Students will also be exposed to the measurement methodologies for all major media. The course will cover the strengths and weaknesses of various media and how they are applied to accomplish marketing communication objectives. Students will garner hands on experience with data and planning resources. prereq: [3004W or 3004V], [3201 or 3202], [jour major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3275 - Digital Strategy in Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of digital communications and strategy development. The course covers the digital communications planning process and emphasizes how to develop effective communications strategies in today?s digital-centric environment. The digital revolution of the last fifteen years makes it imperative for communications professionals to understand how to evaluate and select digital marketing channels to best achieve business goals. This course is designed to assist students to build the professional skills they need to compete in a digital world. This course teaches students how to develop a digital communications plan from start to finish. Students will increase their understanding of how digital communications relate to more traditional marketing and PR tactics. Students will move through a discovery process learning to analyze consumers? digital marketing behavior, their demand for content, the effectiveness of various social media channels including website performance. The course will review current digital tools, trends and tactics; weighing the difference between what is ?hot? versus which channels can best be used to achieve a brand?s communications goals. Students will leave the course with an increased knowledge of digital communications and ability to evaluate and strategically apply digital marketing techniques in a real-world communications environment. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4259 - Strategic Communication Case Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores a wide range of strategic communications campaigns in a case study setting. Students will explore real-life situations and analyze them from a strategic, integrated communications point of view. The cases will focus on building relationships with key stakeholder groups, using strategic communication in today?s global environment, and critically analyzing ethical and legal issues. The course objective is to provide students with opportunities to apply their analytical skills when identifying communication opportunities and problems, evaluating the cost and benefits of alternative communication strategies, and evaluating the outcomes of communication campaign decisions. Students will learn how quantitative and qualitative evidence can be used to support strategic decisions, recommendations and campaign evaluation. Campaigns are drawn from the business, nonprofit, government and political sectors and they focus on communication issues addressed through strategic communication, including public relations, advertising, marketing and/or social media. Students also examine cases involving crisis communication, media relations and multicultural communication. The case study approach will prepare students to develop their decision-making skills based on best practices learned through the critical evaluation of past and present campaigns. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, any 32xx skills course, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4262 - Management for Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course teaches the concepts and methods for effective management by placing them in the context of organizations in the field of strategic communication. These organizations are diverse in their scale of operations and in the products and services they produce. They are highly responsive to the latest developments in digital media technology, conditions in the local and global economy and trends in society. They include advertising agencies, public relations firms, media organizations, digital media agencies, brand content developers and communication departments in client organizations, both for profit and nonprofit businesses. The topics taught in this course include strategic business planning, budgeting, understanding fundamental financial concepts, leadership skills, human resource management, project management and marketing and selling skills. The concepts, skills and perspectives covered in this course apply to both working within organizations and to understanding the business circumstances of clients and competitors. The course also serves to awaken students to the potential, when opportunities arise, to propose and develop new business ideas of their own. prereq: [Jour 3004W or 3004V], Jour 3201, any 32xx skills course, [Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Does the media cause social problems, or just reflect them? Why and how have mass media been feared, bemoaned, used, and dismissed as tools to change public beliefs, attitudes, and behavior? This course explores a century's worth of thinking as to how and when media might have such effects. We examine media influence in a range of contexts, including political advertising, health campaigns, video game violence, pornography, and educational television. We approach the topic largely from a social science perspective (for example, by reviewing experimental tests of the effects of media violence) but we will address some of the advantages and limitations inherent in looking for effects in that way. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From Instagram to YouTube to memes-we live in a visual culture. How can we interpret this flood of images? Learn how to analyze advertisements, photographs, television, and social media from multiple perspectives. Historical, cultural, and ethical approaches unearth the changing role of visual media in society. You'll actively interpret current images to learn how to effectively communicate with visuals.
JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this class, you'll study mass media and its impact during a specific historical time period, based on the instructor's expertise and area of research. Examples include: Journalism during the Civil War; Mass media and the African American struggle for civil rights; the Sixties and rise of the New Journalism.
JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital media enterprises have uprooted many established industries and continue to be among the most important factors shaping our economy and society today. Where do these innovations come from? Why do some startups prosper while others fail? How do legacy firms respond to disruptions to their business models? What makes adaptations possible? What makes them risky? Learn to analyze and evaluate the economic strategies of existing digital media firms across various sectors of society including news, entertainment, social media, mobile, and retail. Assess their impacts on cultural and civic life for better and for worse. Use these skills to incubate your own ideas for the next great media innovations of the future.
JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines the various ways in which technology continues to evolve, and to have a role in ongoing societal changes. The course focuses on unpacking the specific ways in which technology are evolving, and connecting those changes to impacts on communication and media A variety of theories or perspectives relevant or related to technology use and global communication will be considered to help make sense of the interplay between the technology use and societies in a global setting. The course is divided into three main parts: first, understanding of the specifics of relevant technology; second, connecting the technical features to theoretical views of technology; third, examining global patterns of technology use in media and communication. The readings and discussions place special emphasis on specific forms of technology, including mobile phones, Web, and social media. Grounded in a global context, we will investigate the political, cultural, social, technological, and economic conditions that shape and are shaped by the presence of the Internet at the national and cross-national levels; the effects of technology use on the form and content of mass communication at the global level; and the implications of technology use for human and social relations across national borders.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01819 - Glos 3605/Hist 3705/Jour 3614
Typically offered: Every Spring
In the history of humankind, there have been five major changes in how we communicate and we're in the middle of the latest revolution. This class helps you make sense of these uncharted waters by exploring how humanity adopted, and adapted to, past disruptions. From the alphabet to the internet and social media, learn how technological innovations in the media have changed not only how people share information and values but also what people have communicated throughout history. We will learn about these five phases in mediated communication over 5,000 years, and how they relate to major changes in politics, society and culture. And then we'll use history's lessons to peek into the future: When presidents tweet and everyone's foodie photos are on Instagram, how does the world communicate?
JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Mass Communication (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How are our perceptions of crime been influenced by the news? How do social movements use media to share their messages? What can we as audiences do? Social media, news and entertainment media help shape our ideas about identity and differences. Learn how representation and inclusion have been negotiated through media with a particular focus on local case studies. Topics include race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, and gender. Students will learn how to use media literacy to build a just and equitable society.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How have digital media innovations like social media, mobile phones, artificial intelligence, drones and games shaped and been shaped by a culture and society globally? Learn to critically examine the function of digital media in your life. Take away a socio-historical understanding of digital media innovation, and the social, political, and economical impact of new media in creativity, industry, and culture from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Topics range from the concept of branding in an online context, to the varied uses of digital media in the context of journalism, social mobilization, law and privacy, business, globalization, content creation, and beyond. You will read, discuss, and debate cutting edge material from documentaries, podcasts, popular press, and academic literature. This course balances local contexts with global perspectives, and provides details into the practicalities of working and living in a new media environment.
JOUR 3771 - Media Ethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Citizens expect journalists to separate fact from falsehoods, opinion and propaganda. But is it possible for journalists to be unbiased and objective? Advertisers are expected to push products. But is it acceptable to mislead by exaggerating what the product can do? Public relations professionals must protect a company's brand. But what should they do when a company becomes entangled in a scandal? This course examines the ethical and unethical ways that communicators respond to such challenges, and uses real-life examples to identify values and principles that can lead to sound, ethical decisions under the most difficult circumstances. Learn about ethical communication on all platforms, from television to social media to newspapers and magazines. Build a solid foundation for you own ethical thinking that can guide you as a student and as a professional communicator.
JOUR 3775 - Administrative Law and Regulation for Strategic Communication (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn practical legal skills and ethics as they pertain to marketing, public relations and advertising by focusing on the actions of the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications, and the Federal Elections Commission. Learn about the administrative process including adjudication and rule making. Learn through a range of legal, policy and ethics discussions ranging from the First Amendment, the regulation of commercial speech, advertising deception, substantiation of material claims, digital privacy, contesting, political advertising, and controls on native advertising and social media influencers.
JOUR 3796 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02716
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
JOUR 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study, projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist 'shield laws.' We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us.
JOUR 3776H - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist "shield laws." We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us. prereq: Honors
JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ever wonder what your brain does when you see an advertisement? Ever wonder why advertisements work? And why sometimes they don't? How does advertising compel you to buy things you don't need and what strategies do you use to resist these messages? In this course we explore a range of theories that explain how advertisements influence memory, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how humans actively process and resist persuasive messages.
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or Digital Media Studies minor approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
JOUR 4733V - Honors Thesis Seminar (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students work under supervision of instructor, with input from subject or methodological advisers, to define research question, conduct research, and write thesis. Students serve as consultants to one another. prereq: Jour major, [jr or sr], honors
JOUR 4801 - Global Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How does communication affect international affairs? That's literally a question of war and peace, and this class guides you through the big theories and the real life stories of how news, information and entertainment travels around the world. Analyze the role of communication in globalization, addressing possible interpretations ranging from cultural imperialism to democratic development. Examine how different media cover foreign countries. What does it take to cover the world, historically and at a time of unprecedented challenges for professional journalism? What are the practices that have made international news what it is for the last century? Through theory and case studies from journalists and diplomats, examine the possible effects of international communication on international relations and policy making.
JOUR 4993H - Honors: Projects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Honors projects. Prereq Jour major, honors div regis, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5542 - Theory-based Health Message Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide an overview of theory and research relevant for the design of health messages, and specifically focuses on how such theory and research informs message design. It builds on social and behavioral science approaches to public health communication and media effects with the primary objective to better understand issues and strategies related to the design of media health messages. Prerequisites: Jour 3005 or Jour 3757 or Jour 5541
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital communication technologies continue to raise a variety of legal issues, including whether and how (and which) traditional media and regulatory laws will apply, and how policy should be applied through regulatory law to enhance and regulate that communication. This course is conducted as a seminar, with an open discussion of legal precedent and the influence of policy on internet and digital communications. This course covers the First Amendment as it applies in a digital era as well as regulatory topics like net neutrality, broadband access, privacy, and copyright.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts/principles of media management. Strategic planning, leadership, organizational strategies, ethical/legal issues. Working in teams. Balance sheets, income statements. Motivating/promoting people.
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most of us use devices like Smartphones, GPS, streaming services, or hands-free speakers like Amazon's Echo that connect to online voice services like Alexa without thinking about them very much. But, what kind of information are they collecting? Are merchants allowed to gather your shopping history and use it to send you targeted advertising, or to sell it to other companies for profit? Should other people be able to post your personal information or photos online without your consent? Can the government read your emails, track your online browsing, or intercept your text messages? This course considers how growing concerns about privacy and national security affect the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to gather and report the news. We will read significant court decisions and take a look at current statutory and regulatory initiatives both in the United States and abroad. You can expect lively debates and discussion, and the opportunity to explore a privacy or national security issue in depth in a substantial research paper. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program or graduate or law student status. Course is open to students have previously taken a relevant law course - contact instructor for permission.
JOUR 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study/projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], GPA of at least 3.00, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 4721 - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes.
JOUR 4721H - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes. prereq: honors
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
JOUR 3101W - News Reporting and Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00882
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the foundation for training as a working journalist--students will learn how to write and report news accurately, quickly, fairly and with a clear, informative style that reflects today?s news demands. Its main focus is on news writing. Students will be expected to model proper journalistic forms and style, for a variety of platforms, as well as demonstrate proper English usage, grammar, spelling and style. Students will also be asked to think about ? and analyze ? news and the varying ways it is presented in today?s media world. At the end of the course, students must demonstrate the ability to write clearly, report accurately, adhere to AP style, meet deadlines and judge what is newsworthy. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist 'shield laws.' We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us.
JOUR 3776H - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech, and of the press. Does that mean that journalists can write anything they want, broadcast any video images they choose, or go wherever they like in order to gather news? In this course, we will examine significant court decisions that have defined the legal rights and privileges of journalists. We will look at statutes like the Freedom of Information Act and journalist "shield laws." We will consider how new technology raises questions, and challenges, about how to balance First Amendment freedoms with other interests, like privacy and national security. Learn legal rules and principles, and apply them in classroom debate and discussion and in written exercises and examinations. The goal is to understand how the First Amendment and other laws protect the rights of freedom of expression, not just for journalists, but for all of us. prereq: Honors
JOUR 3102 - Multimedia Production and Storytelling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to photography, video, audio and slideshow storytelling and production; understanding the differences in content for different media; and understanding content management. Students will learn basic skills in understanding the differences in content for different platforms (Web, print, radio, mobile and television), in identifying, writing and producing different story forms for video, audio and social media and in understanding content management. Students will tell stories using a variety of technologies to gather, edit and disseminate information for journalism and strategic communication messages. We?ll work to understand how each technology has a particular audience or application, apply visual principles, and use the principles of visual grammar. Students will gain a basic proficiency in still and video camera operation, in video, audio and mixed media writing and production, in creating images for a video and social media or other mixed media story. They will also learn to manage and publish content in an organized manner. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour 3101 or concurrent registration or Jour 3279 or concurrent registration or Jour 3241 or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3103 - Interactive and Data Journalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course teaches concepts, tools and techniques for effective data journalism storytelling on digital platforms. Students will develop ways to display stories through the most important emerging tools for using structured information in journalism, including learning the fundamentals of gathering data and performing analyses to find stories and creating visualizations to illustrate trends and patterns. Students will use maintain a blog to curate their work, learning how to use what they build in one of the most common content management systems. Students will rely on open-source tools, but will also learn basic coding to customize those tools for more effective digital presentation. Students will also learn about and critique other digital storytelling formats, user experience concepts and web analytics. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3121 - Intermediate News Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is a skills-based course designed to teach journalism students how to report and write the types of stories that are central to the basic beats in most newsrooms. The course expands upon the competencies learned in JOUR 3101, but requires more in-depth records searches, interviewing and writing. Students also learn the basics of such subjects as libel law, public records law and media ethics. Students will learn in this course how to find news that matters to people, and how to write it so that readers understand it. Whether a student is planning a career in newspapers, television or other media, they will learn enough to get started as a reporter and to understand how things work (or don't work) in a real newsroom . prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3155 - Editing for Print and Digital Audiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of editing for print and digital publications. Students will learn to edit copy, to exercise news judgment and to improve the flow and accuracy of stories. The course will also cover how to write search-engine friendly headlines, to utilize online tools for fact-checking and to execute compelling visual designs for digital and print. Successful students will develop an excellent understanding of AP style, hone their ability to improve copy and learn to navigate legal, ethical and production challenges. These skills are particularly important in the modern newsroom ? where economic pressures have removed some layers of fact-checking and editing and forced traditional roles to shift and expand. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3173W - Magazine & Feature Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about writing feature stories for magazines. You?ll learn how that enterprise differs from newspaper writing. You?ll also learn about the various types of magazines that exist as well as what constitutes a magazine in this digital age. We will focus on niche ? on the importance of writing for the magazine?s audience. You?ll learn how to sell your work to different markets and platforms. You?ll also discover, you if don?t already know it, that the best magazine writing is rooted in solid reporting. You?ll be doing more interviewing, fact-finding and field work than you may have imagined, all of which will improve your writing. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279W], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3321 - Media Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to basic skills in visual communication through hands-on projects, observation, discussion, and collaboration. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to communicate effectively about graphic design processes. Students will develop a sense of their own design aesthetic and be able to talk about their solutions to design communication challenges by producing and presenting the projects assigned in the course. They also will learn to provide and receive constructive criticism and encouragement with their peers through both process and final class project critiques. Students will become familiar with the tools and processes necessary to execute simple design projects, from concept through production. Course projects will facilitate diversity through projects that reflect each students interests and research. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3451 - TV, Radio and Digital News Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is the introductory broadcast and digital writing and reporting course. It is the student?s introduction to writing in broadcast and digital style, video photojournalism and digital video editing. This is ?not? a production class. It will apply journalism to the production techniques learned in JOUR 3102. Also included: source and story development, ethical decision-making, audio storytelling and vocal and on-camera delivery. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4171 - Covering the Arts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As arts journalism continues to migrate from print to online media, the distinctions between entertainment and art have begun to merge, and the boundaries between professional journalism and promotion have blurred. Yet the task of the arts journalist remains an important independent voice for developing arts literacy on print and digital platforms. This course will not only develop practical and critical thinking needed to write about the arts as a journalist but will also do so via digital approaches to arts coverage. Accordingly, students will be immersed and engaged on a variety of platforms to produce relevant journalism about a wide variety of arts for 21st century readers. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4175 - Brovald-Sim Community Journalism Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Community journalism is arguably the most relevant source of news and information for our citizenry, whether in urban, suburban or rural settings. That?s still true today, but the nature of what we call community journalism is changing. For decades, community journalism has been defined by its geographical boundaries, concerning chiefly the institutions ? schools, churches, businesses or government ? within those borders. While that traditional community journalism is certainly still alive today, the reach of digital journalism and social media has transformed the notion of community. New communities can define themselves beyond geography, a shift that creates opportunities for journalists to cover a broader sense of ?where? people live. This course will explore this shift through practical, hands-on experience and thoughtful consideration of the journalist?s role in covering diverse communities. Through readings, lectures and discussions with professionals who do the work, students will consider the notion of community journalism and the best practices for it. Students will target a community in and around the University of Minnesota and develop cover that community on the student-run website AccessU. The goal is for those teams to publish relevant stories about the community on that site in text, photos, video and visualizations. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, [Jour 3103 or Jour 3121 or Jour 3155 or Jour 3173 or Jour 4302], [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4302 - Photojournalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students in this course can expect to learn skills in understanding convergence journalism and visual roles and responsibilities in newsrooms, understanding basic video news production using a DSLR, and using those to create a portfolio of still images with significant journalistic content. Students will study some concept and theory, plus approaches in covering story events and using a variety of technologies to gather, edit and disseminate stories. Students will look at ways to tailor stories for print, broadcast, web and mobile reporting, and talk about the differences in audience and will study ethics all along the way, too. Students will get photo-nerdy. They will learn production skills that include visual grammar and application, how to use a DSLR camera for both still and video images, and how to use light and color to tell news and feature stories. Plus, students will learn to edit photos and video for great images and for great stories. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4303 - Advanced Visual Storytelling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students produce in-depth multimedia stories, using photography, audio, video, text and infographics, working both individually and in groups. Students will produce and participate in a completed multimedia project (with at least three story forms) by the end of the semester. Students examine the implications of differing approaches to multimedia production and consider ethical issues raised by it. Exemplary work of multimedia journalism is regularly presented and reviewed. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4451 - Long-form Video Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Emphasis in this course is on longer-form storytelling using video, audio, graphics and still photography, edited into multimedia presentations for journalistic and persuasive messages. Story conceptualization, enterprise, source development, access, narrative approaches and related issues will be addressed. Ethical and legal implications of multimedia storytelling in journalistic and strategic communications settings will be reviewed. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, Jour 3451 [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4452 - Newscast Producing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The emphasis of the course is planning, writing, producing and presenting live TV newscasts. Students will produce University Report newscasts during the semester. Much of the class will also be spent writing broadcast news copy. Students will also generate their own stories as needed and anchor newscasts or segments. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3102, Jour 3451, [Jour 3121 or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 4990 - Special Topics in Mass Communication: Professional
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Professional-skills-learning opportunity not regularly offered. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [3101 or 3201 or 3202)], 3004, [Jour major or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major]
JOUR 5196 - Field Based Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This class will teach advanced reporting skills through hands-on experience, professional oversight and thoughtful discussions with working journalists. Classes will be held at news organizations, where students will also work directly with editors to produce news, features or other content. That work experience will be complemented in weekly sessions by readings, projects and discussions and with journalists. Students apply to this course and completion of Jour 3121 is encouraged. Applications are available in the HSJMC student services office about a month before registration begins. prereq: Jour major and instructor permission
JOUR 5131 - In-Depth Reporting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The approach to the class is dual: First, there is an academic component ? studying the best examples in-depth reporting from muckrakers to yesterday?s New York Times. This part of the course will be presented in a seminar style with a high-expectation for student involvement. Second, there is a hands-on component ? giving students the opportunity to exercise what they learn in this class and elsewhere in their journalism program. This part of the course will require students to identify appropriate stories for in-depth reporting, outline the proposed stories to the instructor, thoroughly report the stories and go through the editing process. Students will also produce graphics and photographs, and might consider various multi-media possibilities. The class topics will be organized around essential social issues, such as health care, politics, poverty, business or other topics. During some semesters, students will produce news stories for publication at a professional news organization, such as MinnPost.com. Such opportunities in past classes have allowed students to work with professional reporters and editors and get bylines stories read by thousands. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], Jour 3101, Jour 3121, [Jour major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 5174 - Magazine Editing and Production
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on magazine and web writing, editing, photography, graphic design, and production. Students will study concepts of magazine and web communication with a special concern for how words, pictures, multimedia and design can be combined effectively. Over the semester, the class will create and produce a professional quality single-theme magazine and website. During this process, students will experience firsthand the organization and working of an editorial and production staff, and the implications of specific divisions of labor and working relationships. All students will write an article and/or produce web content as well as hold a staff job. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H], [Jour 3101 or Jour 3279], [Jour 3155 or Jour 3173 or Jour 3321 or Jour 4171 or Jour 4302], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3005 - Mass Media Effects (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Does the media cause social problems, or just reflect them? Why and how have mass media been feared, bemoaned, used, and dismissed as tools to change public beliefs, attitudes, and behavior? This course explores a century's worth of thinking as to how and when media might have such effects. We examine media influence in a range of contexts, including political advertising, health campaigns, video game violence, pornography, and educational television. We approach the topic largely from a social science perspective (for example, by reviewing experimental tests of the effects of media violence) but we will address some of the advantages and limitations inherent in looking for effects in that way. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
From Instagram to YouTube to memes-we live in a visual culture. How can we interpret this flood of images? Learn how to analyze advertisements, photographs, television, and social media from multiple perspectives. Historical, cultural, and ethical approaches unearth the changing role of visual media in society. You'll actively interpret current images to learn how to effectively communicate with visuals.
JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this class, you'll study mass media and its impact during a specific historical time period, based on the instructor's expertise and area of research. Examples include: Journalism during the Civil War; Mass media and the African American struggle for civil rights; the Sixties and rise of the New Journalism.
JOUR 3201 - Principles of Strategic Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
So, you have declared your journalism major and selected the strategic communication track? Or maybe, you are studying something completely different, but you have heard that advertising and public relations are great fields to work in? In this class, we will foster career exploration as you learn about key areas of advertising and public relations (history, theory, ethics, etc). In the second half of the class, you will take a journey from media consumer to strategic planner as you create a strategic communication campaign as part of a group project that will start off your strategic communication portfolio. prereq: [Jour 3004 or 3004H or concurrent registration], [Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program]
JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital media enterprises have uprooted many established industries and continue to be among the most important factors shaping our economy and society today. Where do these innovations come from? Why do some startups prosper while others fail? How do legacy firms respond to disruptions to their business models? What makes adaptations possible? What makes them risky? Learn to analyze and evaluate the economic strategies of existing digital media firms across various sectors of society including news, entertainment, social media, mobile, and retail. Assess their impacts on cultural and civic life for better and for worse. Use these skills to incubate your own ideas for the next great media innovations of the future.
JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course examines the various ways in which technology continues to evolve, and to have a role in ongoing societal changes. The course focuses on unpacking the specific ways in which technology are evolving, and connecting those changes to impacts on communication and media A variety of theories or perspectives relevant or related to technology use and global communication will be considered to help make sense of the interplay between the technology use and societies in a global setting. The course is divided into three main parts: first, understanding of the specifics of relevant technology; second, connecting the technical features to theoretical views of technology; third, examining global patterns of technology use in media and communication. The readings and discussions place special emphasis on specific forms of technology, including mobile phones, Web, and social media. Grounded in a global context, we will investigate the political, cultural, social, technological, and economic conditions that shape and are shaped by the presence of the Internet at the national and cross-national levels; the effects of technology use on the form and content of mass communication at the global level; and the implications of technology use for human and social relations across national borders.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01819 - Glos 3605/Hist 3705/Jour 3614
Typically offered: Every Spring
In the history of humankind, there have been five major changes in how we communicate and we're in the middle of the latest revolution. This class helps you make sense of these uncharted waters by exploring how humanity adopted, and adapted to, past disruptions. From the alphabet to the internet and social media, learn how technological innovations in the media have changed not only how people share information and values but also what people have communicated throughout history. We will learn about these five phases in mediated communication over 5,000 years, and how they relate to major changes in politics, society and culture. And then we'll use history's lessons to peek into the future: When presidents tweet and everyone's foodie photos are on Instagram, how does the world communicate?
JOUR 3741 - Diversity and Mass Communication (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How are our perceptions of crime been influenced by the news? How do social movements use media to share their messages? What can we as audiences do? Social media, news and entertainment media help shape our ideas about identity and differences. Learn how representation and inclusion have been negotiated through media with a particular focus on local case studies. Topics include race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, and gender. Students will learn how to use media literacy to build a just and equitable society.
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Popular culture is everywhere. Social media, film, music, video games, television, websites, and news bring popular culture into our daily lives. In this class, we will examine popular culture in modern and historical contexts through various mass communication, sociological, and cultural theories. Is popular culture of the people? or dictated by corporate interests? What social and commercial pressures result in stereotypes, misrepresentation and exclusion in popular culture? Does popular culture mirror or shape social reality? This course will provide you with the tools to become active and thoughtful consumers of media and popular culture.
JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How have digital media innovations like social media, mobile phones, artificial intelligence, drones and games shaped and been shaped by a culture and society globally? Learn to critically examine the function of digital media in your life. Take away a socio-historical understanding of digital media innovation, and the social, political, and economical impact of new media in creativity, industry, and culture from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Topics range from the concept of branding in an online context, to the varied uses of digital media in the context of journalism, social mobilization, law and privacy, business, globalization, content creation, and beyond. You will read, discuss, and debate cutting edge material from documentaries, podcasts, popular press, and academic literature. This course balances local contexts with global perspectives, and provides details into the practicalities of working and living in a new media environment.
JOUR 3771 - Media Ethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Citizens expect journalists to separate fact from falsehoods, opinion and propaganda. But is it possible for journalists to be unbiased and objective? Advertisers are expected to push products. But is it acceptable to mislead by exaggerating what the product can do? Public relations professionals must protect a company's brand. But what should they do when a company becomes entangled in a scandal? This course examines the ethical and unethical ways that communicators respond to such challenges, and uses real-life examples to identify values and principles that can lead to sound, ethical decisions under the most difficult circumstances. Learn about ethical communication on all platforms, from television to social media to newspapers and magazines. Build a solid foundation for you own ethical thinking that can guide you as a student and as a professional communicator.
JOUR 3775 - Administrative Law and Regulation for Strategic Communication (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn practical legal skills and ethics as they pertain to marketing, public relations and advertising by focusing on the actions of the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications, and the Federal Elections Commission. Learn about the administrative process including adjudication and rule making. Learn through a range of legal, policy and ethics discussions ranging from the First Amendment, the regulation of commercial speech, advertising deception, substantiation of material claims, digital privacy, contesting, political advertising, and controls on native advertising and social media influencers.
JOUR 3796 - Media and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02716
Typically offered: Every Fall
Do facts matter anymore? Is press freedom under threat? Are audiences trapped in filter bubbles? Why do people hate the media, and how can the news be improved to better serve citizens? Explore the historical and contemporary dynamics that shape the relationship between professionals in the media, the mass public, and political actors across different parts of government. Study major forms of mass media, including television and newspapers, alongside new forms such as digital and social media. Look at specific reporting rituals and practices, as well as issues involving media ownership, regulation, ethics, and press freedom. We will study politicians? efforts to craft messages, advertise strategically, and target select audiences for political gain. The course will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the United States, and you will be asked to engage with current events and the role of communication technologies in political and civic life.
JOUR 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study, projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
JOUR 4251 - Psychology of Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ever wonder what your brain does when you see an advertisement? Ever wonder why advertisements work? And why sometimes they don't? How does advertising compel you to buy things you don't need and what strategies do you use to resist these messages? In this course we explore a range of theories that explain how advertisements influence memory, attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how humans actively process and resist persuasive messages.
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or Digital Media Studies minor approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 4274W - Advertising in Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advertising in Society asks students to think about the ways that advertising intersects with cultural and political life in the 21st century, examining the influence of advertising from many perspectives?legal, constitutional, social and ethical. This course tackles a variety of current topics in advertising, including the many other powerful social institutions that advertising underpins (such as journalism and entertainment content), the role of American political advertising, the way advertising depicts gender and sexuality, the obligations of advertisers toward vulnerable audiences, and the ethics and impact of increasingly pervasive personalized hyper-niche ads on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This course helps students learn how to conduct thorough analyses of issues, develop positions on issues, and present coherent and convincing arguments for the positions they have taken.
JOUR 4733V - Honors Thesis Seminar (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students work under supervision of instructor, with input from subject or methodological advisers, to define research question, conduct research, and write thesis. Students serve as consultants to one another. prereq: Jour major, [jr or sr], honors
JOUR 4801 - Global Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How does communication affect international affairs? That's literally a question of war and peace, and this class guides you through the big theories and the real life stories of how news, information and entertainment travels around the world. Analyze the role of communication in globalization, addressing possible interpretations ranging from cultural imperialism to democratic development. Examine how different media cover foreign countries. What does it take to cover the world, historically and at a time of unprecedented challenges for professional journalism? What are the practices that have made international news what it is for the last century? Through theory and case studies from journalists and diplomats, examine the possible effects of international communication on international relations and policy making.
JOUR 4993H - Honors: Projects
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Honors projects. Prereq Jour major, honors div regis, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital communication technologies continue to raise a variety of legal issues, including whether and how (and which) traditional media and regulatory laws will apply, and how policy should be applied through regulatory law to enhance and regulate that communication. This course is conducted as a seminar, with an open discussion of legal precedent and the influence of policy on internet and digital communications. This course covers the First Amendment as it applies in a digital era as well as regulatory topics like net neutrality, broadband access, privacy, and copyright.
JOUR 5601W - History of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is (real/fake) news? Who's a journalist? What is journalism? How did we get to where we are today regarding journalism both as a profession and as an essential tool of democracy? Learn the fundamental chronology of the development of journalism in the United States from the Revolution to today, and then delve into the big quandaries: How free has journalism been? What have been its professional standards? How has journalism affected a diverse audience? What are the challenges of international journalism? And how have new communication technologies interacted with journalism?
JOUR 5725 - Management of Media Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts/principles of media management. Strategic planning, leadership, organizational strategies, ethical/legal issues. Working in teams. Balance sheets, income statements. Motivating/promoting people.
JOUR 5777 - Contemporary Problems in Freedom of Speech and Press
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01143
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most of us use devices like Smartphones, GPS, streaming services, or hands-free speakers like Amazon's Echo that connect to online voice services like Alexa without thinking about them very much. But, what kind of information are they collecting? Are merchants allowed to gather your shopping history and use it to send you targeted advertising, or to sell it to other companies for profit? Should other people be able to post your personal information or photos online without your consent? Can the government read your emails, track your online browsing, or intercept your text messages? This course considers how growing concerns about privacy and national security affect the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to gather and report the news. We will read significant court decisions and take a look at current statutory and regulatory initiatives both in the United States and abroad. You can expect lively debates and discussion, and the opportunity to explore a privacy or national security issue in depth in a substantial research paper. prereq: Jour major, Strat Comm major, Mass Comm major or Mass Comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program or graduate or law student status. Course is open to students have previously taken a relevant law course - contact instructor for permission.
JOUR 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study/projects. Prereq [Jour major or jour minor or approved IDIM major or ICP major or BIS major], GPA of at least 3.00, college consent, dept consent, instr consent.
JOUR 4721 - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes.
JOUR 4721H - Mass Media and U.S. Society (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01503 - Jour 4721/Jour 4721H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are the news media doing a good job? How can you tell? Does it matter? Is The Daily Show the best news program on television? Why or why not? Most people seem to have an opinion about all of these questions. Most discussions seem to center on one of four themes: 1) who owns the media and what they care about; 2) whether the news media are becoming more or less credible and/or biased; 3) whether entertainment is replacing or enhancing information in news programming; and 4) how much, if at all, is the Internet changing everything about the way the media work, including who we think of as a journalist. Mass Media and U.S. Society explores the validity and importance of these themes in terms of what roles can the media play in society, what roles does it play, and how have those roles have changed over time. The course draws on ideas from various social sciences to develop tools for discussing a number of specific issues related to these themes. prereq: honors
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW 5606W/Jour 5606W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journalism isn't fiction. Yet the relationship between what is true and what is artfully constructed toward a "larger truth" -- beyond the facts -- has a complex and intriguing history. This writing-intensive course explores that relationship through close readings of some the best writers of long-form nonfiction, starting with the birth of the novel from journalistic roots in the 18th century and ending with postmodern forms that challenge the notion of what we can ever know. Discover the literary devices used by Stephen Crane's reported street scenes or Nellie Bly's first-hand investigations into conditions for the mentally ill in the 19th century, and, later, Truman Capote's nonfiction novel about a Kansas farm family's murder. Readings include works by pivotal 20th-century writers such as John Hersey, Joseph Mitchell, Lillian Ross, Michael Herr, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson, and will trace how their pioneering methods influenced contemporary journalism as well as the documentary films of Errol Morris and contemporary nonfiction writers expanding into new forms.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
JOUR 5542 - Theory-based Health Message Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide an overview of theory and research relevant for the design of health messages, and specifically focuses on how such theory and research informs message design. It builds on social and behavioral science approaches to public health communication and media effects with the primary objective to better understand issues and strategies related to the design of media health messages. Prerequisites: Jour 3005 or Jour 3757 or Jour 5541
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
PSY 5205 - Applied Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Applications of social psychology research/theory to domains such as physical/mental health, education, the media, desegregation, the legal system, energy conservation, public policy. prereq: 3201 or grad student or instr consent
WRIT 4501 - Usability and Human Factors in Technical Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/concepts of human factors/usability testing. Developing objectives, criteria, and measures. Conducting tests in lab, field, and virtual environments. Using software programs to analyze qualitative/quantitative data.