Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Biology, Society, and Environment B.A.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2011
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 68
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Students in biology, society, and environment (BSE) receive comprehensive training in biology combined with an in-depth examination of the relevance of biology to social and environmental problems. Students complete coursework in the biological sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
The major curriculum includes courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Note: A course may only be used once to satisfy the major requirements.
Core Courses
Student must take BSE 3001 plus two courses from Ethics, Scientific Thought and Inquiry, and Science in Society, with no more than one course from any one set.
Take exactly 3 course(s) including exactly 2 sub-requirements(s) from the following:
· BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment (2.0 cr)
· Ethics
· BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· Scientific Thought and Inquiry
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· Science in Society
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society (3.0 cr)
General Biology
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
or PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
or VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
or take one of the following pairs of courses
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
Additional Science Requirements
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1031H {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 1032H {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Biology Concentration (Major Courses)
Take two courses from the upper division biology core list and take two additional upper level courses in biology, anthropology, geography, chemistry, or other discipline chosen in consultation with an adviser. Courses for the biology concentration should have a biology orientation and should fit with the intended theme. A total of 14 credits must be completed. Note: Many pre-health science programs require Organic Chemistry II and lab.
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3310 {Inactive} (3.0-6.0 cr)
· BIOL 3409 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4143 - Human Genetics (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· BIOL 3407 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
Theme Requirements
Take five courses from the list below or substitute courses in consultation with a BSE adviser. Courses should serve to put "science into context" and should focus on a theme. Some examples of thematic concentrations might be ethics, economics, and the politics of health care; the global environment; biology and the U.S. government; communicating biology to the public.
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4501 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3355 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4121W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 5002 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3333V {Inactive} [HIS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 4060 - Special Topics in History of Technology (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3234 - Knowledge and Society (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001V {Inactive} [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HMED 5200 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HMED 5201 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HMED 5055 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
or PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
Senior Project
The senior project may be fulfilled by registering according to one of the options listed below. Note: For GEOG 3994 students register for 3 credits of directed research with the BSE director of undergraduate studies.
Register for 2 additional credits in any upper division course taken
or Register for 3 credits of directed research with a faculty member having special expertise in the subject of the proposed project
or GEOG 3994 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements in addition to degree program requirements. For any course required in a degree program, UHP students must register for the honors version if one is offered. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements.
 
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BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intellectual threads and faculty for courses in BSE major, especially social sciences. Content varies. prereq: BSE major. Must be completed prior to senior year.
BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01202
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major topics/issues in biomedical ethics. Patients' rights/duties, informed consent, confidentiality, ethical issues in medical research, initiation/termination of medical treatment, euthanasia, abortion, allocation of medical resources. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00422 - HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01327
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of scientific knowledge. Reading of historical and contemporary sources that describe major scientific achievements and controversies. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Structure/status of evolutionary theory. Nature of molecular biology, genetics. Reductionism in biology. Legitimacy of teleology. Species concept. prereq: Courses in [philosophy or biology] or instr consent
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00145
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Science played a central role in taking scattered imperial colonies in North America to world power in just four centuries. This course investigates people, policies, and knowledge-making in a culture whose diversity was a critical part of its expanding capacities. It begins by examining the differences in ways of knowing as well as shared knowledge between Native Americans and Europeans and concludes by discussing how a powerful nation's science and technology shaped international relations. Class, race, ethnicity, and gender provided for a range of perspectives that contributed to science alongside social and economic developments. Online assignments, films and images, along with primary and secondary source readings provide the basis for class discussion.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Philosophical issues that arise out of interaction between science, technology, society (e.g., religion and science, genetics and society, science and the environment).
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The principles of evolutionary theory, behavioral biology, comparative anatomy, and Paleolithic archaeology are used to reconstruct the major events in human evolution. The course allows us to understand the behavior of our ancestors as well as ourselves.
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00469 - Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. recommended prerequisites: Introductory Biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent) and Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent) enforced prerequisite: not a CBS student
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01965 - Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: BIOL 3020 or BIOL 4003 or grad MSB
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad MSB
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01965 - Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: BIOL 3020 or BIOL 4003 or grad MSB
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
GCD 4143 - Human Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of human genetics at the molecular, cellular, individual, and populations levels. Chromosomal and biochemical disorders; gene mapping; mutation and natural selection; variation in intelligence and behavior; genetic screening, counseling and therapy. prereq: 3022 or Biol 4003 or instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent (biochemistry background coursework)
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad MSB
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02573 - GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Biopiracy, vaccine trials, use/abuse of genetics, genetically modified organisms. Who determines direction of scientific/medical research? Impact on social thinking/practices and on globalization of science. Global economics of science.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00145
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Science played a central role in taking scattered imperial colonies in North America to world power in just four centuries. This course investigates people, policies, and knowledge-making in a culture whose diversity was a critical part of its expanding capacities. It begins by examining the differences in ways of knowing as well as shared knowledge between Native Americans and Europeans and concludes by discussing how a powerful nation's science and technology shaped international relations. Class, race, ethnicity, and gender provided for a range of perspectives that contributed to science alongside social and economic developments. Online assignments, films and images, along with primary and secondary source readings provide the basis for class discussion.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00422 - HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
HSCI 4060 - Special Topics in History of Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule
JOUR 3745 - Mass Media and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01279
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mass media's role in formation of popular culture/cultural discourse. Prevalent media metaphors, caricatures, stereotypes. Social/commercial pressures influencing media representation.
PHIL 3234 - Knowledge and Society
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Critical discussion of concepts such as knowledge, objectivity, justification, rationality, evidence, authority, expertise, and trust in relation to the norms and privileges of gender, race, class, and other social categories.
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A study of the relationship among law, morality, and our role as critizens.
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of scientific knowledge. Reading of historical and contemporary sources that describe major scientific achievements and controversies. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Philosophical issues that arise out of interaction between science, technology, society (e.g., religion and science, genetics and society, science and the environment).
PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theories of mind including the "invention" of the mind by Descartes, classical empiricism, the impact of Darwinism, Freud's theories, Gestalt psychology, behaviorism, Chomsky's rationalism, contemporary functionalism, the computer model. prereq: One course in philosophy or psychology
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Structure/status of evolutionary theory. Nature of molecular biology, genetics. Reductionism in biology. Legitimacy of teleology. Species concept. prereq: Courses in [philosophy or biology] or instr consent
PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genetic methods for studying human/animal behavior. Emphasizes nature/origin of individual differences in behavior. Twin and adoption methods. Cytogenetics, molecular genetics, linkage/association studies. prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00083 - Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100
PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/5135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential methods in studying human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, social attitudes. prereq: [1001, [3801 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/5135
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Differential methods in study of human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, and environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, and social attitudes. prereq: [3001W or equiv] or [5862 or equiv] or instr consent
GEOG 3994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual guided research. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.