Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Biology, Society, and Environment B.A.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 63 to 79
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The Biology, Society, and Environment program (BSE), housed in the Department of Geography, Environment, and Society, is a multidisciplinary biology program in the College of Liberal Arts (CLA). The BSE major is built on the idea that problems of biology, health, and the environment emerge at the intersection of natural and human systems. To understand these problems and their solutions, and to build skill sets to address them requires that students have experience in the biological and natural sciences as well as in the social sciences and humanities. The BSE degree provides a flexible curriculum that allows students to focus the degree to fit their personal, intellectual and professional goals. The BSE degree can prepare students for a wide variety of careers including laboratory science, environmental testing, health and environmental policy, public health, science education, and science communication, as well as a variety of academic and professional graduate programs. The BSE major is an excellent choice for students interested in pursuing work in the health professions. Students can design their BSE major to provide the foundational science coursework necessary for their choice of M.D., D.D.S., Pharm.D., R.N., O.T., P.T. and PA programs. Medical programs are increasingly looking for students who have an education that includes social sciences and the humanities. BSE includes courses that help students understand the relationship of a diverse society to our medical system and provides students with the opportunity to think about health not just as an attribute of the biology of the body, but also as a complicated outcome of how different bodies relate to economic, cultural, and social systems. Course work in BSE offers students the opportunity to study scientific practices and social and environmental problems. Just as importantly, students have the opportunity to: • Develop critical thinking skills and creative approaches to understanding such practices and problems using an array of conceptual and theoretical frameworks, • Consider the ethical issues inherent to both practices and problems and, of course, solutions, • Enhance their ability to communicate, particularly through writing, • Work as a team member to bridge disciplinary and institutional divisions, • Develop language skills to help them better engage with their own diverse communities or to open up opportunities for international work. Research is a regular part of the BSE curriculum, and students are encouraged to work with the BSE adviser to find opportunities to work directly with faculty on their research or to find a faculty member to supervise a research project developed by the student. Independent research can provide students with excellent experience that helps them pursue their career goals. Navigating the Catalog: There are a huge number of courses that count for the BSE major. It can be tricky to understand what is available. To see what is available semester by semester, students should look at the BSE course guide published each semester by the BSE advising office. Students can find the course guide on our webpage at z.umn.edu/BSEcourse
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Biology, Society, and Environment BA is BSE. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. At least 18 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. This includes 9 credits of biosciences and 9 credits of science and society. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
An Introduction to Biology, Society, and the Environment
Course should be taken within one semester of declaring the major or prior to completing 90 credits.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 2 credit(s) from the following:
· BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment (2.0 cr)
Science and Math Courses
Take 8 or more course(s) totaling 22 - 23 credit(s) from the following:
Chemistry Sequence
Chemistry
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 11 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
or Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 11 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)
or Honors Chemistry
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 11 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· Biochemistry
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· Calculus
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Physics
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1107 - Introductory Physics Online I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Bioscience Courses
Take exactly 6 course(s) totaling 17 - 26 credit(s) from the following:
General Biology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· Bioscience Core
Take 2 - 4 course(s) totaling 6 - 13 credit(s) from the following:
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· Bioscience Laboratory
Take 1 - 3 course(s) totaling 3 - 15 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
with ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology (3.0 cr)
with ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
with BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
or VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· Bioscience Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling 0 - 9 credit(s) from the following:
Organic Chemistry
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· Neurobiology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4101 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms (3.0 cr)
· Human and Animal Behavior
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3811W - Introduction to Animal Behavior [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Organismal Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies (3.0 cr)
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· Health and the Environment
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· AHS 3002 - Global Health in Thailand - Humans, Elephants, and Disease [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3275 - Insect-transmitted diseases of humans (3.0 cr)
· VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
· VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Climate and Environmental Systems
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3777 - Climate Change- Physics, Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History (3.0 cr)
· Ecological Systems
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 4596 - Coral Reef Ecology (Dive Trip) (2.0 cr)
· EEB 3534 - Biodiversity Science: The origins, maintenance, consequences, detection & assessment of biodiversity [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· Genetics
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4134 - Endocrinology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4143 - Human Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· Microbial Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
or VPM 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
Science and Society Courses
Students may receive credit for no more than four courses in any given designator.
Take 7 or more course(s) totaling 21 - 27 credit(s) from the following:
Foundational Courses
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 1002W - Introduction to Philosophy [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1003W - Introduction to Ethics [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1026W - Philosophy and Cultural Diversity [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Methods Courses
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Quantitative Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3801H - Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Qualitative Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3001V - Honors Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Spatial Methods
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· Historical Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· Science and Society Core Courses
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3323 - Science and Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3205 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science and Society (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Electives
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 12 credit(s) from the following:
Social Science and Humanities Perspective on Health and Medicine
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3241 - Sociology of Women's Health: Experiences from Around the World (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Social Science and Humanities Perspective on the Environment
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3206W - Art + Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Philosophy of Science, Scientific Thought and Practice
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3605 - Disease, Diagnosis, and Intervention: Conceptual Issues in Medicine (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· POL 4317 - Becoming Stupid: Anti-Science in American Politics (3.0 cr)
· Historical Perspectives on Health and the Environment
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5242 - Navigating a Darwinian World (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5331 - Technology and American Culture (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (3.0 cr)
· Health and Environmental Inequalities through Diversity
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3215 - Bodies That Matter: Feminist Approaches to Disability Studies [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Psychology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology (3.0 cr)
· NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
or PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
· Science, Health, & Environmental Communication
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· COMM 4251 - Environmental Communication [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action [LITR, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Learning (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Theory and Practice
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HECU 3571W - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (Field Seminar) (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Climate & Environment Justice (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change (4.0 cr)
· Students must choose Public Health or Sustainability and the Environment Track
· MSID 4001 - International Development: Critical Perspectives on Theory and Practice (4.0 cr)
· Grand Challenge Courses
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GCC 3003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3025 - Seeking the Good Life at the End of the World: Sustainability in the 21st Century [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3032 - Ecosystem Health: Leadership at the Intersection of Humans, Animals, and the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
Capstone registration is restricted to second semester Junior and Senior BSE majors. Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the Biology, Society, and Environment BA capstone.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 1 credit(s) from the following:
· BSE 3991 - Biology, Society and Environment Capstone (1.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements. BSE majors are also encouraged to take at least one additional writing intensive course in an area related to biosciences. Honors students must complete a course from this list.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 4965W -  Senior Research in Medical History (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PLSC 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)
· VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

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· BSE with Evolution and Culture Interest
· BSE with Health Career Interest
· BSE with Human Health & Diversity Interest
· BSE with Ecology and Environment Interest

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· Biology, Society, and Environment B.A.
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BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intellectual threads and faculty for courses in BSE major, especially social sciences. Content varies. Students may take this course to explore the BSE major. Must be completed prior to senior year.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1107 - Introductory Physics Online I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles together with quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad MSB
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: Biol 4003 or Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 or grad
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4068/EEB 5068
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, methods, and laboratory exercises for investigating neural mechanisms and examining experimental evidence.
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3050/Phsl 3051
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Functions of major systems in mammals. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular system, respiration, renal system. Endocrinology/metabolism. Blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Companion course to 3301. Physiological principles are demonstrated using active learning approaches. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular, respiration, renal, endocrinology/metabolism, blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3301
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.
BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of marine animal diversity. Understanding major animal groups, how they relate to one another, how they differ in structure, how each group achieves survival/ reproduction in diverse environments. Lab includes dissections, including vertebrates, such as fish. Prereq/coreq: BIOL 2005 or BIOL 2012
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or BIOC 3021 or GCD 3022 or instructor consent (biochemistry/molecular biology background coursework)
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
PMB 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores a range of plant physiological processes, including how plants make and use food; acquire and use minerals; transport water and nutrients; and regulate growth and development in response to hormones and environmental cues, such as light quality. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent
NSCI 3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites. Enrollment Requirements: Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 OR concurrent/previous BioC 3021/3022/4331 or equivalent. Nsci 2001/2100 highly recommended.
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
NSCI 4101 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nsci 4100/Nsci 8211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will extend students? understanding of fundamental concepts of biology and neuroscience through study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie development of the nervous system. Neurodevelopment provides a context in which to study processes active in many biological functions and diseases. Students will learn about each of the major cellular processes involved in development of the nervous system such as cell division and cell migration, and will learn about the function of molecules and signaling pathways active in each process. Human developmental pathologies will be studied as a means to better understand normal developmental processes. Some lectures will focus on current research, and students will be expected to read some scientific literature.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BIOL 3411/BIOL 3811/EEB 3411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biological study of animal behavior. Mechanism development, function, and evolution. Emphasizes evolution of adaptive behavior, social behavior in the natural environment. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3412W/EEB 3811
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Writing intensive course. Introduction to animal behavior. Feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, communication. Scientific process. Formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course
EEB 3811W - Introduction to Animal Behavior (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3412W/EEB 3811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Biological study of animal behavior. Mechanism development, function, evolution. Emphasizes evolution of adaptive behavior, social behavior in natural environment. Lab, field work. prereq: 1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv or instr consent
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effects differing classes of pollutants have on insects that are aquatic. Insect life-cycle dynamics, trophic guilds, community structure. Hypotheses to explain community structure in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, lakes, reservoirs. Organic pollution, eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, runoff/siltation, acidification, thermal pollution. Changes in aquatic insect community structure. Designing/maintaining biological monitoring networks. prereq: [[3005 or Biol 3407 or FW 2001], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Natural history, identification, and behavior of honey bees and other social insects. Evolution of social behavior, pheromones and communication, organization and division of labor, social parasitism. Lab with honey bee management and maintenance of other social bees for pollination. prereq: Biol 1009 or instr consent
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3063/Phsl 3071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation/preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans.
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
AHS 3002 - Global Health in Thailand - Humans, Elephants, and Disease (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global Health in Thailand is a Global Seminar that travels to Chiang Mai, Thailand to examine the relationship between human, animal, and environmental health through the One Health approach. The course travels to Thailand over winter break and then meets for the first half of Spring semester. For more information, see the Learning Abroad Center website.
ENT 3275 - Insect-transmitted diseases of humans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ent 3275/Ent 5275
Typically offered: Every Spring
What?s so attractive about human blood? How have human interactions with insects evolved? Insects and ticks transmit viral, bacterial, protozoan and filarial diseases to humans, particularly in tropical countries. Zika, most recently, and also dengue and other mosquito-borne viruses pose an emerging challenge in the southern US as climate change increases the range of important vector species. Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases are increasing in the US, and pose challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This course covers contemporary topics in "Medical Entomology" that will provide an overview of arthropod-borne disease and its impacts on global health from the perspective of insect vectors and microbial pathogens. Students will explore historical, contemporary and epidemiologic stories demonstrating exposure and control strategies via lecture, student discussions, laboratory demonstrations, and critical review of current best practices in medical entomology. This course is designed for upper division undergraduate and graduate students in any major or minor.
VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial distribution of disease events. Exposures/outcomes. Factors that determine where diseases occur. Analyzing spatial disease data in public health, geography, epidemiology. Focuses on human/animal health related examples. prereq: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basics of biodiversity, human/animal health, interdependence. Strategies for sustainable health. prereq: At least one year of college Biology or equivalent
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
ESPM 3777 - Climate Change- Physics, Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3777/GCC 3006
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Climate variations are the norm; not the exception. The geological and archaeological records are rich with evidence of a climate system that is dynamic and non-steady state. Yet we face the challenges of understanding the complexities of this system in order to manage our natural resources and to prepare wisely for the future. This class examines the basic theory and Physics behind the atmospheric greenhouse effect and radiative forcings in the climate system. The Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties about the climate record and feedback processes operating in the Earth-Atmosphere system will be examined. Simple models will be used to demonstrate the atmospheric greenhouse effect. Sophisticated numerical weather models, such as the Regional Weather and Forecast Chemistry (WRF-CHEM) model, will be used to demonstrate climate predictions and biophysical feedback processes. We will also study some of the classic Warming Papers that provide the physical scientific basis for the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Finally, we will explore the uncertainties related to climate predictions and how scientists use fingerprint techniques to diagnose natural versus anthropogenic climate signals. There is no prerequisite required for this course, but first year calculus and one other first year science course is recommended.
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes, their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary issues in tropical reef ecology from diverse perspectives. Option of two-credit seminar during fall semester plus additional two-credit field option (BIOL 4596) to involve SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef. prereq: Introductory biology course with lab
BIOL 4596 - Coral Reef Ecology (Dive Trip)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef. Conduct primary research/writing. prereq: Introductory biology with lab, valid passport, and SCUBA certification.
EEB 3534 - Biodiversity Science: The origins, maintenance, consequences, detection & assessment of biodiversity (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3534/EEB 5534
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biodiversity science is a rapidly expanding field of enquiry with increasing digital resources and global monitoring capabilities precisely at the moment in history that scientists recognize as the Sixth Extinction. In other words, we are currently facing a biodiversity crisis with threats to the Earth's biota not seen since the dinosaurs perished 65 million years ago. "Biodiversity" was coined by W.G. Rosen and E.O Wilson in the 1980s to describe the variation in all of life on Earth. The term is now widely used in both the scientific and popular literature and is at the center of scientific enquiry, conservation efforts, large-scale collaborative pursuits of technological advances to allow monitoring from space, and global assessments that interface with international policy. Biodiversity requires integration across multiple disciplines from evolution, to ecology, remote sensing, conservation biology, economics and the social sciences, including the environmental policy. Biodiversity science is thus inherently interdisciplinary. As a consequence, rarely does a single course provide students the opportunity to focus on this critical topic from multiple perspectives and dimensions. This new course seeks to provide students intensive study of biodiversity from six perspectives: 1) the origins of biodiversity, including the processes of speciation and extinction over macroevolutionary timescales and those involved in generating biological variation at microevolutionary scales; 2) the ecological problem of species coexistence, given the nature of competitive interactions and biological filters with a focus on the interactions of individual species and major threats to biodiversity; 3) the consequences of biodiversity and biodiversity loss for ecosystem functions, focusing on ecosystem scale processes; 4) the services or benefits to humans attributed to biodiversity, including cultural benefits of biodiversity; here we discuss both practical and ethical arguments for sustaining biodiversity; 5) methods of detecting biodiversity including classic field biodiversity observations and taxonomic collections and emerging remote sensing methods that harness hyperspectral data and satellite imagery; and 6) scientific assessments of biodiversity that communicate the science of biodiversity to policymakers, particularly the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The IPBES involves scientists from around the world and integrates indigenous and local knowledge (ILK). The United Nations and governments around the globe are sponsoring the IPBES, building on earlier assessments such as a prominent one in the UK. Several guest lecturers from across the University will participate in discussions and aid in development of computer labs (including Sharon Jansa (CBS), Keith Barker (CBS), Joe Knight (CFANS), and others). prereq: One semester college biology or instr consent, MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
ESPM 3108 - Ecology of Managed Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3108/ESPM 5108
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecology of ecosystems that are primarily composed of managed plant communities, such as managed forests, field-crop agroecosystems, rangelands and nature reserves, parks, and urban open-spaces. Concepts of ecology and ecosystem management. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or HORT 1001 or instr consent
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3575/ESPM 5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of computer applications in manipulation/analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. prereq: One semester of college biology
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: 3033 or Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4134 - Endocrinology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of structure and function of invertebrate and vertebrate endocrine systems. prereq: BIOL 3211 or BIOC 3021 or BIOC 3022 or BIOC 4331 or instr consent
GCD 4143 - Human Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Human Genetics ? the science of how our genomes function, vary, and shape our unique, individual characteristics ? is a rapidly expanding field with major implications for medical and fundamental research, clinical practice, and many other areas. In this course, students will learn about the principles of human genetics & genomics at the levels of molecules, cells, individuals, and populations. Topics include patterns of inheritance; the molecular causes and biochemical basis of genetic disorders; disease gene identification; the origin and distribution of human genetic variation; genetic influences on common, complex diseases; epigenetics and regulation of gene expression; genomic technologies for understanding human genomes; cancer genetics; behavioral genetics; human ancestry and evolution; applications such as genetic screening, genetic counseling, and gene therapy; and ethical questions raised by emerging abilities to edit the human genome, modify the human germline, and many more. prereq: 3022 or Biol 4003 or instr consent
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms that govern development from gametogenesis through fertilization. Embryogenesis/postembryonic development. Mechanisms of morphogenesis/differentiation. Classical/molecular approaches in various model organisms. Genetic models such as bacteriophage, yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, and the mouse. prereq: Biol 4003; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BIOL 4004 irecommended
ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geosphere/biosphere interactions over temporal/spatial scales. Global biogeochemical cycling, microbe-metal interactions, microbial paleobiology, environmental geomicrobiology, life detection, habitability of planets. prereq: One semester college level biology
MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora. prereq: 3301, [GCD 3022 or Biol 4003]
MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms. prereq: 3301 or Biol 2032 or VBS 2032 or intro microbiology course with lab
PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns. prereq: MicB 3301 required; BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 recommended
PMB 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products. prereq: 3301
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease, cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies. recommended prereqs: microbiology, biochemistry, cell biology
VPM 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular, genetic, and cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innage immunity. Antigen recognition by B and T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes and other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
PHIL 1002W - Introduction to Philosophy (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1002W/Phil 1002V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to some of the big questions of philosophy. What does reality consist of? Is the mind a material thing? Do any of us have free will? What is the morally right thing to do? Can we really know anything? The course will cover recent and historical approaches to these and other philosophical problems.
PHIL 1003W - Introduction to Ethics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1003W/V/1103
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Are values/principles relative to our culture? Is pleasure valuable? Are there any absolute rules? These questions and others are addressed through critical study of moral theories.
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1005/Phil 1005H
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
PHIL 1026W - Philosophy and Cultural Diversity (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1002W/Phil 1002V
Typically offered: Every Summer
Central problems/methods of philosophy through culturally diverse texts. Focus is critical/comparative, reflecting a range of U.S. philosophical traditions.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
PSY 3801H - Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: [1001 or equiv], high school algebra, honors; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent
PSY 3001V - Honors Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2081/3801 or equiv]]or dept consent, PSY major, honors student
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
CSCL 3323 - Science and Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Science and technology engaged through historical and cultural manifestations from film, literature, and YouTube to scientific and philosophical essays. Relations among humanities, science, economics, politics, philosophy and history. Psychiatry and drugs, food and agriculture, sexuality, religion and science, climate change.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Philosophical issues that arise out of interaction between science, technology, society (e.g., religion and science, genetics and society, science and the environment).
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4607/Phil 5607
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Biology dominates the landscape of contemporary scientific research, and yet "biology" consists of a variety of different disciplinary approaches: from protein biochemistry to field ecology, from developmental biology to evolutionary genetics. Many philosophical issues can be found in the concepts and practices of life science researchers from these different disciplines. What is the structure of evolutionary theory? What is a gene? What are the units of selection? What is an individual? What counts as a "cause"? What is the relationship between evolution and development? Are all biological phenomena reducible to genes or molecules? What are adaptations, and how do we identify them? What is an ecological niche? Is there a progressive trend in the history of life? Is there such a thing as 'human nature'? This course is an introduction to these and other related issues in the biological sciences with an emphasis on their diversity and heterogeneity. It is designed for advanced undergraduates with an interest in conceptual questions and debates in biology that are manifested across a variety of majors (e.g., animal science; anthropology; biochemistry; biology, society and environment; biosystems and agricultural engineering; chemistry; ecology, evolution and behavior; genetics, cell biology and development; microbiology; neuroscience; physiology; plant biology; psychology). Some of these issues will appear familiar from previous coursework or opportunities, whereas new issues will be intriguing because of their similarities and differences with those that have been encountered in other contexts.
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the interaction between human society and the natural environment, focusing on the contemporary and global situation. Takes the perspective of environmental sociology concerning the short-range profit-driven and ideological causes of ecological destruction. Investigates how society is reacting to that increasing destruction prereq: 1001 recommended or a course on the environment, soc majors/minors must register A-F
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GWSS 3205 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3302W/Phil 3322W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
One feature of life in modern society is the presence of deep moral disagreement. Individuals must decide what actions are right, and societies must make political choices. How do we know what the right answer is? Which answers and approaches are rationally defensible? Philosophical reflection, rational argument, and systematic analysis can help us think about these problems more clearly and arrive at answers that are both useful and intellectually satisfying. This course will address various rotating topics, such as abortion, animal rights, criminal punishment, censorship, personal relationships, affirmative action, and other active areas of moral and social concern.
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3302W/Phil 3322W
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological perspectives on death. Diverse understandings of afterlife, cultural variations in death ritual, secularization of death in modern era, management of death in medicine, cultural shifts/conflicts in what constitutes good or natural death.
ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Body-related practices throughout the world. Readings, documentaries, mass media.
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica. (previously 3458W)
POL 3317 - Food Politics: Actors, Arenas, and Agendas (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Food: Everyone eats it but we increasingly fight about how it is grown, transported, processed and consumed. This disagreements find their ways into politics, whether it is neighbors battling over backyard chicken ordinances, Members of Congress arguing over how best to protect the safety of the food supply, or countries engaging in trade wars to limit the importation of agricultural products. This course takes a broad, multi-disciplinary perspective on food politics drawing on concepts and ideas from political science, sociology, and economics to analyze several contemporary "food fights," including agricultural trade, U.S. farm bills, the National School Lunch Program, proposals for taxing sodas and fatty foods, and the labeling of genetically modified food. Take this course if you want to learn more about the various resources, arguments, evidence, and rules of engagement that structure contemporary food politics. This course satisfies the Social Science Core of the Liberal Education requirements and is an eligible elective for the public health minor in CLA and the Food Systems major in CFANS.
PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental and Occupational Health (EOH), the impact of environmental and occupational hazards on individuals and communities, the approaches taken to address EOH issues at the community level,and the challenges that must be overcome to ensure success in dealing with EOH issues. Students will review scientific literature to learn about interventions for environmental health problems, and practice identifying environmental health problems and interventions in their communities. The focus of this course will be on the interaction between humans and the environment and how this interaction affects human health. Online Course.
SOC 3241 - Sociology of Women's Health: Experiences from Around the World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Health care is a fundamental right, but access to it is not shared evenly by all. This course considers women's and men's health needs, and how health systems assign priority to those needs. The course also covers how differences in health policy, national medical systems, levels of wealth, and cultural contexts around the world affect women's health and treatment and their experiences of wellness and illness. Women are taking an active role in shaping healthy societies. The final portion of this course looks at the goals and successes of women's movements in the health sphere. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on how sociological approaches to health differ from medical or epidemiological approaches, the advantages of the sociological approaches, and the respective advantages and disadvantages of qualitative versus quantitative approaches to studying women's health. Pre-req: Soc majors and minors must register A-F; Soc 1001 recommended.
SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 3446 - Comparing Healthcare Systems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3446/Soc 5446
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of national health systems from an international comparative perspective, emphasizing social, organizational, political, economic, cultural, and ethical dimensions of healthcare policies and programs to deliver services and their impacts on the health of population groups. The comparative approach will enable students to acquire a better understanding of the problems and potential for reforming and improving US healthcare delivery. Pre-req: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
ANTH 4069 - Historical Ecology & Anthropology of the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar course discusses current approaches to historical ecology, the study of human-environmental relationships over time. The course draws on and combines perspectives from the four subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeological anthropology, bioarchaeological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology), and similar disciplines, to understand the varying ways that scholars have analyzed and defined ecologies and environmental problems. It places particular emphasis on theories that define human relationships to the environment as recursive and interdependent. These theories stand in contrast to common Western theological suppositions that see the environment as a framework to which human societies adapt or a set of resources for human communities to exploit. Rather, historical ecologists argue that the environment is a true ecology with humans in it. They contend that human communities are fundamentally and inextricably intertwined with the life cycles and needs of other species, and consequently they study how human-environmental interactions emerge through distinct historical processes and cultural circumstances.
ARTS 3206W - Art + Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Art + Ecology explores the history, theory, and contemporary practice of artists engaged with the ecological issues of our time. This seminar offers an introduction to the dynamic and emerging field of Environmental Art, focusing on the ways in which artists use creativity to work across disciplines to address ecological concerns. This course investigates the role contemporary artists play as catalysts in relation to a range of concerns, including environmental justice, mass extinction, climate change, and treatment of "waste" as well as issues of the quality of the air, water, soil, and habitat. This seminar also will introduce the notion of artists as agents of change who build communities of ecologically aware practices around interrelated environmental and social issues. Students will be encouraged to see how their creativity and imagination can contribute to finding solutions to pressing environmental problems.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global flows of tourism from perspective of debates about consumption, development, identity, and the environment. Close reading, field trips, discussion of films, research paper.
SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3304/Sust 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies minor. Scientific, cultural, ethical, and economic concepts that affect environmental sustainability and global economic justice. Key texts. Participatory classroom environment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
PHIL 3605 - Disease, Diagnosis, and Intervention: Conceptual Issues in Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Contemporary medicine dominates our daily concerns and societal conversation. From insurance coverage to the consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals, the variety of issues and their visibility is patently obvious. However, conceptual issues in medicine, such as what counts as health and disease or what do we mean by "evidence-based" or "precision" medicine, are arguably just as important--if not prior to--many of these other issues. For example, if doctors do not consider something an "official" disease or condition, it is unlikely your insurance company will pay to treat it. Additional conceptual questions include: what role do theories play in medicine? Can scientific experiments be replicated in clinical medicine? Should all medicine be based on evidence? How do we know what causes health or disease? What do advances in neuroscience reveal about the relationship between mind and body, especially with respect to mental health and illness? What properties do physicians measure and why? How does probability and chance enter into medical practice (e.g., diagnosis, therapy, and rehabilitation)? This course is an introduction to these and other related issues in medicine with an emphasis on their diversity and heterogeneity. It is designed for undergraduates across a variety of majors with an interest in these conceptual questions, including but not limited to Animal Science; Anthropology; Biochemistry; Biology, Society and Environment; Chemistry; Ecology, Evolution and Behavior; Genetics, Cell Biology and Development; Microbiology; Neuroscience; Physiology; Psychology). No prior knowledge of medicine or philosophy is required; I do not assume that you have any previous exposure to the material we will be covering. Most of the assignments for this course are writing oriented. The goal is to identify, characterize, and critically reflect on the issues raised in our discussions and do this in the medium of writing. At the end of the class you will possess new analytical skills and recognize the value of philosophical investigation into the medical concepts and practices, including its application to your everyday life. Additionally, it is directly relevant to the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills portion of the MCAT.
PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What are minds and mental states (like desires and beliefs)? How are these different from brains and brain states? Should scientific explanation abandon any appeal to the mental (like behaviorism) or can we offer a scientific account of mind? prereq: One course in philosophy or psychology
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4607/Phil 5607
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Biology dominates the landscape of contemporary scientific research, and yet "biology" consists of a variety of different disciplinary approaches: from protein biochemistry to field ecology, from developmental biology to evolutionary genetics. Many philosophical issues can be found in the concepts and practices of life science researchers from these different disciplines. What is the structure of evolutionary theory? What is a gene? What are the units of selection? What is an individual? What counts as a "cause"? What is the relationship between evolution and development? Are all biological phenomena reducible to genes or molecules? What are adaptations, and how do we identify them? What is an ecological niche? Is there a progressive trend in the history of life? Is there such a thing as 'human nature'? This course is an introduction to these and other related issues in the biological sciences with an emphasis on their diversity and heterogeneity. It is designed for advanced undergraduates with an interest in conceptual questions and debates in biology that are manifested across a variety of majors (e.g., animal science; anthropology; biochemistry; biology, society and environment; biosystems and agricultural engineering; chemistry; ecology, evolution and behavior; genetics, cell biology and development; microbiology; neuroscience; physiology; plant biology; psychology). Some of these issues will appear familiar from previous coursework or opportunities, whereas new issues will be intriguing because of their similarities and differences with those that have been encountered in other contexts.
POL 4317 - Becoming Stupid: Anti-Science in American Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
(1) Political attacks on basic science, including climatology & global warming, vaccines, the Big Bang, evolution, human reproduction, sexuality, and much more. (2) Pseudoscience and anti-intellectualism in American political culture. (3) Money, political interests, and propaganda that drive attacks on science.
HIST 3417W - Food in History (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3332/5332
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Science played a central role in taking scattered imperial colonies in North America to world power in just four centuries. This course investigates people, policies, and knowledge-making in a culture whose diversity was a critical part of its expanding capacities. It begins by examining the differences in ways of knowing as well as shared knowledge between Native Americans and Europeans and concludes by discussing how a powerful nation's science and technology shaped international relations. Class, race, ethnicity, and gender provided for a range of perspectives that contributed to science alongside social and economic developments. Online assignments, films and images, along with primary and secondary source readings provide the basis for class discussion.
HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 1815/HSci 3815
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals.
HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to the present: women in science, sexual and gendered concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society.
HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 5211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3242/HSci 5242
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior.
HSCI 5242 - Navigating a Darwinian World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3242/HSci 5242
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 5331 - Technology and American Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of American technology in its cultural/intellectual context from 1790 to present. Transfer of technology to America. Establishment of an infrastructure promoting economic growth. Social response to technological developments.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
HSCI 5401 - Ethics in Science and Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical issues involving ethics in science. Ethical problems posed by modern science/technology, including nuclear energy, chemical industry, and information technologies.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
What does the ?social life? of Coronavirus and Covid-19 look like? Do pandemics have politics? Are diseases biomedical or socio-political phenomena? Why are African-Americans disproportionately affected by Covid-19 and HIV in the US? Why did the US become a hotspot for the rapid transmission of Coronavirus and what does this reveal about the market-based healthcare system? What are the global stories, struggles, failures, and successes of the Covid-19 pandemic? What will a post-pandemic world look like? In this class, you will answer these questions as they learn about the intersections of science and technology with the politics of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability.
GWSS 3215 - Bodies That Matter: Feminist Approaches to Disability Studies (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The COVID-19 pandemic has made questions of disability and ableism central and visible for all of us as never before. Dis/ability is not a physical or mental defect but a form of social meaning mapped to certain bodies in larger systems of power and privilege. Feminist approaches explore dis/ability as a vector of oppression intersecting and constituted through race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. The course examines ideologies of ableism and the material realities of such oppression, and works toward imagining and constructing a more just and equitable society. As health care is differentially distributed or limited for people who are sickened by COVID-19, we see that systems of social and economic power determine the life chances of those who claim, or are claimed by disability. Meanwhile, people with disabilities have developed many daily life strategies that can be models for everyone coping with the pandemic.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures in U.S. prereq: Honors
PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3206/Psy 3206
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories/research in health psychology. Bi-directional relationships between psychological factors and physical health. Stress/coping, adjustment to chronic illness. Psychological factors in etiology/course of disease. Health behavior change. prereq: 1001
NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nurs 2001/Nurs 3690/Nurs 3691
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical, personal, and culturally determined theories on life span development, from prenatal period through death/dying. Psychoanalytical, behaviorism, cognitive, sociocultural, and epigenetic categories of biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains.
PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/Psy 5135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential methods in studying human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, social attitudes. prereq: [1001, [3801 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/Psy 5135
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Differential methods in study of human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, and environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, and social attitudes. prereq: [3001W or equiv] or [5862 or equiv] or instr consent
COMM 4251 - Environmental Communication (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 4250/Comm 5250
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical, cultural, material contexts within which environmental communication takes place. Understand environmental communication as well as develop communication strategies that lead to more sustainable social practices, institutions, and systems.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action (LITR, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore contemporary texts from multiple disciplines to analyze the role of stories in interpreting nature. Emphasis on lived experience, civic motivation, and observational research that enrich effective nature writing. Optional service-learning component.
JOUR 3757 - Principles of Health Communication Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Health information is in the news, nearly every corner of the internet, on your favorite television show, and advertising campaigns. Using principles of mass communication, public health, sociology, and psychology this course explores how mediated health content impacts students' lives at both micro- and macro-levels. We will explore questions such as: how do individuals use media to achieve health-related goals? What role does media and health literacy play in achieving these goals? What effect does health information in entertainment media or strategic public health campaigns, for example, effect your own health-related beliefs and behaviors? To what extent do media portrayals of health and illness impact society?s understanding of complex health issues such as mental health, substance use disorder, or cancers? What influence does news coverage of health issues have on health policy and health reform?
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medical Spanish and Community Health Service an advanced language and culture course is designed to train Spanish Studies majors/ minors to work with materials to achieve effective communication with Spanish-speaking patients. In addition, Span 3404 has a service-learning component in which students apply academic knowledge to work done with community health care partners that work with the Latin American immigrant population at Minnesota. It should be noted that students in Span 3404 will not be involved in direct patient health care. prereq: SPAN 3015W with grade of at least C- or better and instructor permission. Recommended one additional upper division Spanish class.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Land in America as idea and as actual space. History of cultural values and the meanings land holds for us. Contrasting views of land, especially those of certain Native American peoples. Rise of the conservation movement and the urbanization of U.S. space.
WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students explore the effects of scientific and technological development on the law?and the effects of the law on scientific and technological development. In particular, students will read and discuss government regulation, constitutional guidelines and rights, and federal and state court precedents regarding privacy, intellectual property (patients and copyright), and health law. Specific topics include the following: Search warrants and Four Amendment rights, electronic surveillance law, national security and foreign intelligence, copyright and fair use, citizens? access to creative works, informed consent, medical expert testimony in the courtroom, and the right to medical treatment. Students will have the opportunity to express their opinions and display their analytical skills in three take-home essay exams. Students from all majors are welcome, including those students interested in law school.
HECU 3571W - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar provides the theoretical foundations necessary for understanding the roots, dynamics, and reproduction of urban and regional economic, political, and social inequality and poverty. It will also equip students with the key theoretical tools for evaluating alternative policies and strategies for addressing various forms of poverty and inequality. Theory will be treated in an integrated fashion with students' field and internship work and will draw from numerous disciplines but with a particular focus on the field of political economy. Students examine a series of interrelated social systems relevant to the study of poverty and inequality such as the economy, the politics of economic policy, labor markets, geographic systems and housing, education and welfare systems. Theories of oppression help students understand how institutionalized racism, classism and gender discrimination factor in and among all of these systems. This course is one of three courses taken concurrently that make up the Inequality in America: Policy, Community, and the Politics of Empowerment program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3572 Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity and HECU 3573 Internship and Integration Seminar. prereq: departmental consent required
HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (Field Seminar)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This seminar illuminates, grounds, and 'tests' theoretical perspectives and insights gained in the "Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach" seminar. Students will examine a variety of policy alternatives and strategies for social change used to address poverty and inequality by conversing with policy makers, community activists, and public and private organizations, and by participating in a number of structured field exercises and legislative lobbying. This course is one of three courses taken concurrently that make up the Inequality in America: Policy, Community, and the Politics of Empowerment program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3571 Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach and HECU 3573 Internship and Integration Seminar. Departmental Consent Required.
HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Climate & Environment Justice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In the twenty-first century, the environmental century, human beings must decide how to deal with the many planetary consequences of the ?Great Acceleration? and its conjunction with the 500-year pattern of conquest, genocide, and extreme social marginalization of indigenous peoples and poor peoples of color. As we consider how to respond to climate change, restore degraded ecosystems, and promote a sustainable quality of life in human settlements, how might we do this in an environmentally just approach? This is the basic question to be explored in this course, in light of the past record of the inequitable distribution and accumulated disadvantage resulting from historical environmental behavior in societies and global civilization as a whole. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3592, in 3593, and in 3594, Fall semester. Dept consent required.
HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Since our original hunter-gatherer communities, humans have had an impact, sometimes quite negative, on our environment. What is different now, since the ?Great Acceleration? that began in the mid-twentieth century, is that our environmental impacts are global in scope and potentially catastrophic in scale. Learning to become ecologically wise is thus a priority for all of humanity in the twenty-first century. Socio-Ecological Systems bridges political science and environmental sciences with the intent of fostering policy responses that help human society apply ecological wisdom in a timely manner at worst, and in an ecologically regenerative manner at best. In this course, we will integrate questions regarding sustainability challenges of water, forest, wetland, climate, soil, with those involving people, cultures, politics, and economy in a comprehensive, integral framework. This investigation will build students? ability to see complex dynamics more clearly, and prepare students to be part of efforts to create ecologically wise policy and practices for a more sustainable future. This course is one of four courses which make up the Environmental Sustainability: Ecology, Policy and Social Transformation Program taught by Study Away partner HECUA. Concurrent registration is required in 3591, in 3593, and in 3594, Fall semester program. Dept consent required.
MSID 4001 - International Development: Critical Perspectives on Theory and Practice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore a wide variety of perspectives on international development, with the host country as a case study. This course begins with 20 hours of common discussion on international development. The remaining course is divided into sections, and you select from the following sections in order to prepare for your internship or research project: (see track descriptions in syllabus for more information).
GCC 3003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3003/GCC 5003/NURS 5040H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Often, the most progress on challenging issues such as health and equity is made when you apply an interdisciplinary perspective. The same is true for global health issues. Whether responding to emerging pandemics, food insecurity, maternal mortality, or civil society collapse during conflict, solutions often lie at the intersection of animal, environmental, and human health. In this course, students will work in teams to examine the fundamental challenges to addressing complex global health problems in East Africa and East African refugee communities here in the Twin Cities. Together we will seek practical solutions that take culture, equity, and sustainability into account. In-field professionals and experts will be available to mentor each team, including professionals based in Uganda and Somalia. This exploration will help students propose realistic actions that could be taken to resolve these issues. This course will help students gain the understanding and skills necessary for beginning to develop solutions to global health issues. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3013/GCC 5013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester.
GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3016/GCC 5016
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid "antibiotic apocalypse." The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3025 - Seeking the Good Life at the End of the World: Sustainability in the 21st Century (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What does it mean to live "the good life" in a time of rapid climate changes, mass extinction of plant and animal species, and the increasing pollution of our oceans, atmosphere, and soils? Is it possible to live sustainably, as individuals and societies, in what scientists are calling the Anthropocene, or this new epoch of human influence over the planet? Will sustainability require that we sacrifice the gains humanity has made in our quality of life? Or can we find a way to create a good Anthropocene? This course will attempt to answer these questions in four ways: 1. By providing an overview of sustainability science, both what it says about about human and natural systems and how it comes to make these claims 2. By examining various conceptions of the good life, both individual and social, and how they intersect with the findings of sustainability science 3. By exploring the conflicts that exist within and between differing visions of sustainability and the good life through case studies in energy, water, and food 4. By pursuing collaborative research projects that will help students apply their knowledge and skills to current problems in sustainability studies We will read widely in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities to understand a range of historical and contemporary perspectives on these questions, and in doing so we will put abstract ethical principles into conversation with a diversity of specific cultures and environments. By the end of the course, students will have examined their own assumptions about personal and professional happiness, considered how these align with and diverge from societal visions and values, and explored innovative solutions to help sustain our productive economy and our planet. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3032 - Ecosystem Health: Leadership at the Intersection of Humans, Animals, and the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3032/GCC 5032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What are the effects of climate change, disease emergence, food and water security, gender, conflict and poverty, and sustainability of ecosystem services on health, and how do we lead across boundaries for positive change? Unfortunately, these large-scale problems often become overwhelming, making single solution-based progress seem daunting and difficult to implement in policy. Fortunately, the emerging discipline of ecosystem health provides an approach to these problems grounded in trans-disciplinary science. Ecosystem health recognizes the interdependence of human, animal and environmental health, and merges theories and methods of ecological, health and political sciences. It poses that health threats can be prevented, monitored and controlled via a variety of approaches and technologies that guide management action as well as policy. Thus, balancing human and animal health with the management of our ecosystems. In this class, we will focus on the emerging discipline of ecosystem health, and how these theories, methods, and shared leadership approaches set the stage for solutions to grand challenges of health at the interface of humans, animals, and the environment. We will focus not only on the creation and evaluation of solutions but on their feasibility and implementation in the real world through policy and real-time decision making. This will be taught in the active learning style classroom, requiring pre-class readings to support didactic theory and case-based learning in class. Participation and both individual and group projects (written and oral presentation) will comprise most of the student evaluation. These projects may reflect innovative solutions, discoveries about unknowns, or development of methods useful for ecosystem health challenges. We envision that some of them will lead to peer-review publications, technical reports, or other forms of publication. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
BSE 3991 - Biology, Society and Environment Capstone
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3991/BSE 3991H
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will help you reflect on your path through the BSE major, assess the knowledge and skills you developed during your degree program, and articulate how your knowledge and skills support your personal and professional interests and goals. BSE 3991 is open to second-semester Junior and Senior BSE majors.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica. (previously 3458W)
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3412W/EEB 3811
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Writing intensive course. Introduction to animal behavior. Feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, communication. Scientific process. Formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Vertebrate evolution (exclusive of mammals) in phylogenetic, temporal, functional, and paleoecological contexts. Vertebrate anatomy. Methods in reconstructing phylogenetic relationships and origin/history of major vertebrate groups, from Cambrian Explosion to modern diversity of vertebrate animals. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instr consent
ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Evolutionary history of mammals and their extinct relatives. Methods in reconstructing phylogeny. Place of mammals in evolutionary history of vertebrate animals. Major morphological/ecological transitions. Origins of modern groups of mammals. Continuing controversies in studying fossil mammals.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
What does the ?social life? of Coronavirus and Covid-19 look like? Do pandemics have politics? Are diseases biomedical or socio-political phenomena? Why are African-Americans disproportionately affected by Covid-19 and HIV in the US? Why did the US become a hotspot for the rapid transmission of Coronavirus and what does this reveal about the market-based healthcare system? What are the global stories, struggles, failures, and successes of the Covid-19 pandemic? What will a post-pandemic world look like? In this class, you will answer these questions as they learn about the intersections of science and technology with the politics of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability.
HIST 3417W - Food in History (HIS, ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Significance of food in society, from earliest times to present. Why we eat what we eat. How foods have been "globalized." Dietary effects of industrial modernity. Material culture, social beliefs. Examples from around world.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 4965W - Senior Research in Medical History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar. Reading/discussion, individual directed research project with oral presentation. Students meet in peer groups and with instructor. prereq: Sr, instr consent
HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This online course with required synchronous meetings is designed to provide a foundation in the theory and application of plant biotechnology used in crop improvement. The online lecture meets twice per week to introduce and discuss the basic concepts of plant genetics, molecular biology, DNA manipulation, plant tissue culture, gene introduction, and analysis of gene expression. The diversity of perspectives surrounding the application of biotechnology to plant improvement will be discussed. Course content consists of lecture, reading assignments, practice writing, peer review, discussions, and group work. prereq: [Biol 1009 or equiv or grad student], instr consent
MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora. prereq: 3301, [GCD 3022 or Biol 4003]
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methods prereq: 3301, BIOL 4003
NSCI 3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3005W/V/3105
Typically offered: Every Spring
Can anything be known beyond a shadow of a doubt? How ought scientific knowledge be discovered and justified? In what does one's identity as a person consist? How does our human nature affect the way that we conceive of and come to know the world? This course examines the momentous intellectual transformations in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries that inspired such questions and their innovative solutions.
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Science influences us daily, shaping how we understand ourselves and interpret nature. This course is an introduction to how scientists reason about the world, what that means for our lives, and the status of science as a human activity. What is science and what?s so great about it? Is science the ultimate authority on the world and our place in it? This course examines the authority of science, how scientists reason, and science?s status as a human activity. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PLSC 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to physiological basis for effects of environment on plant growth/development. How to produce optimal plant growth. Experimental technique, data analysis, scientific writing. Lecture, readings, lab. Prerequisites: Biol 1009 or Hort 1001 and BioC 3021 or Hort 2100 or BioC 2011
PMB 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation.
PMB 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PBio 4516W/5516
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structure, function, and dynamic properties of plant cellular components. How cellular structures function and contribute to cell growth. Cell fate/development. Developing a clear/concise writing style for incisive criticism of scientific papers. prereq: [Biol 2022 or Biol 3002 or Biol 3007], [BioC 3021 or Biol 3021 or Biol 4003]
VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basics of biodiversity, human/animal health, interdependence. Strategies for sustainable health. prereq: At least one year of college Biology or equivalent
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course students explore the effects of scientific and technological development on the law?and the effects of the law on scientific and technological development. In particular, students will read and discuss government regulation, constitutional guidelines and rights, and federal and state court precedents regarding privacy, intellectual property (patients and copyright), and health law. Specific topics include the following: Search warrants and Four Amendment rights, electronic surveillance law, national security and foreign intelligence, copyright and fair use, citizens? access to creative works, informed consent, medical expert testimony in the courtroom, and the right to medical treatment. Students will have the opportunity to express their opinions and display their analytical skills in three take-home essay exams. Students from all majors are welcome, including those students interested in law school.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures in U.S. prereq: Honors
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3302W/Phil 3322W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
One feature of life in modern society is the presence of deep moral disagreement. Individuals must decide what actions are right, and societies must make political choices. How do we know what the right answer is? Which answers and approaches are rationally defensible? Philosophical reflection, rational argument, and systematic analysis can help us think about these problems more clearly and arrive at answers that are both useful and intellectually satisfying. This course will address various rotating topics, such as abortion, animal rights, criminal punishment, censorship, personal relationships, affirmative action, and other active areas of moral and social concern.
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 3302W/Phil 3322W
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).