Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Biology, Society, and Environment B.A.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 66 to 84
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The biology, society, and environment program (BSE), housed in the Department of Geography, Environment, and Society, is a multidisciplinary biology program in the College of Liberal Arts (CLA). Majors in the program take courses in the biological, environmental, and social sciences and humanities throughout the University and frequently choose a focus on either human or environmental biology. BSE majors are exempt from the CLA requirement that 18 credits of coursework must come from outside the major. An extensive and rigorous curriculum reflects the breadth of subject matter and learning experiences vital to ensuring graduating students have maximum opportunities for employment in today’s job market and are particularly well-prepared to successfully apply to various graduate and professional programs. Major requirements are quite flexible: students are encouraged to tailor elective course options around an intellectual goal or a topical theme; for example, students have combined a specialization in human biology with a thematic focus on health policy or bioethics. Others have combined plant ecology with a focus on global environmental solutions or history of science. Still others have studied evolutionary biology through an analytic lens focusing on science and culture. Many of our students also choose their coursework in preparation for the entrance exam to a health professional degree program and to complete any necessary prerequisite courses. Students receive comprehensive training in biology, chemistry, math, and physics. They are also exposed to questions about the relevance of biology to social, environmental, and health-related problems from the various perspectives offered in the biosciences, social sciences, and humanities. The elective courses allow students to explore and deepen their understanding of biological and social systems, and their intersections. Required and elective courses in the curriculum offer individual students the opportunity to study scientific practices and social and environmental problems. Just as importantly, students have the opportunity to: • develop critical thinking skills and creative approaches to understanding such practices and problems using an array of conceptual and theoretical frameworks, • consider the ethical issues inherent to both practices and problems and, of course, solutions, • enhance their ability to communicate, particularly through writing, • work as a team member to bridge disciplinary and institutional divisions. Students are strongly encouraged to carry out independent research appropriate to the student’s intellectual, career, and professional development goals. The Senior Project, required of all CLA majors, offers a unique learning experience because it allows individuals to work with faculty members in their laboratories and in the field across the University of Minnesota’s colleges and schools. Some students complete a formal Senior Thesis in the History of Medicine or select a wide variety of research topics, others complete professional grade posters, deliver oral presentations, or produce innovative original works that cross disciplinary divides.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 4 semesters or the equivalent of a second language. CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Biology, Society, and Environment BA is BSE. The major curriculum includes courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Note: A course may only be counted once to satisfy the major requirements. At least one upper-division (3xxx-level or above) course in the major must be writing intensive. See upper-division writing intensive course list. UMNTC policy requires students to complete at least half of their upper-division major work (3xxx courses or higher) on the campus from which they are seeking to graduate. BSE students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division (UD) credits in the major by completing at least 9 credits of their biosciences and 9 credits of their science & society UD credits in UMNTC courses. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First Year Experience course sequence.
BSE Foundations
Take BSE 2001 and one Foundations in Science and Society course for a total of 5-6 credits. BSE 2001 should be taken within one semester of declaring the BSE major or prior to completing 90 credits.
BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment (2.0 cr)
Foundations in Science and Society
Students may petition to substitute an additional Science & Society Elective course or a transfer course to fulfill this requirement.
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 1003W - Introduction to Ethics [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1002W - Introduction to Philosophy [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 1026W - Philosophy and Cultural Diversity [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
Required Courses
Take 6 required courses for a total of 19-24 credits, by completing three Biosciences courses, two Science & Society courses, and one Science & Society Methods course.
Required Biosciences Courses
Take BIOL 1009 and 2 more courses from two different areas (Cell Biology, Genetics, Ecology, Evolution) for a total of 10-12 credits.
Biology
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
Genetics
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· Cell Biology
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· Ecology
(BIOL 3807 at Itasca Experiment Station)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· Evolution
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
Required Science & Society Courses
Take 2 courses for a total of 6-8 credits. Each course must be from a different department (e.g., BSE & PHIL).
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· Take PHIL 1005/1005H only prior to completing 90 credits and PHIL 4607 after completing 60 credits.
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 1005H - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Required Science & Society Methods Course
Take 1 Science & Society Methods course for 3-4 credits. Some courses are only available to students completing majors and minors in particular departments.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Quantitative Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3801H - Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Qualitative Methods
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
· Research Methods in History of Science & Medicine
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
Required Supporting Sciences Courses
Take 6 Required Supporting Sciences courses (with two labs) for a total of 22-23 credits. BIOC 3021 meets 3 of the 9 credits required in upper-division UMNTC biosciences courses.
Chemistry I
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Chemistry II
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Organic Chemistry
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
Biochemistry
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
Calculus
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Physics
(Physics 1201W is preferred; PHYS 1001W does not meet this requirement)
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take 18-27 credits (six courses) by completing 9-15 credits of Biosciences Electives and 9-12 credits of Science & Society Electives. Select coursework in consultation with BSE advisor and UMNTC faculty. Students may wish to consult admissions staff of prospective post-graduate programs about their suggested prerequisites.
Biosciences Electives
Take 3 Biosciences Electives for a total of 9-15 credits. One of the three Bioscience Electives must be a laboratory course. Developing an area of specialization is strongly encouraged (e.g., human biology, plant biology & ecology, microbial genetics). Students are advised not to take more advanced courses without adequate grades in prerequisite courses. Up to one Learning Abroad course is allowed for Biosciences Elective credit; no HECUA credit allowed.
Upper division requirement
Two Biosciences Electives must be at the 3xxx-5xxx level. CHEM 2302, 2304 and 2311 and VBS 2032 do fulfill this requirement, but do not meet the UMNTC residency requirement (upper division UMNTC residency requirement).
Laboratory Course requirement
One Biosciences Elective must be a laboratory course, taken concurrently with a lecture course to qualify for major credit.
-CHEM 2311 and CHEM 2312H do not fulfill the Lab requirement. -1 and 2 cr labs do not count as an additional course (ANAT 3601 & 3602 = 1 course); 3 cr labs may count as a course. -ANTH 1001, BIOL 2012, 2022, VBS 2032, or the 2nd course of a two semester sequence in general biology, with labs, taken at another college DOES fulfill the Lab requirement. -For reference, see list of Biosciences Electives Qualifying Laboratory Courses, with course titles, at the end of this catalog description.
Biosciences Electives - Areas of Specialization
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 - 15 credit(s) from the following:
Organic Chemistry
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· Organismal Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3270 - Introduction To Systems Biology (3.0 cr)
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4404 - Developmental Plant Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· Climate Change and Environmental Systems
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4811 - Biogeochemical Processes (4.0 cr)
· Ecological Systems
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment (3.0 cr)
· VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology (2.0 cr)
BIOL 4596 - Coral Reef Ecology (Dive Trip) (2.0 cr)
· Evolutionary Biology Options
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· Genetic, Cellular, & Developmental Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4134 - Endocrinology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4143 - Human Genetics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· Biology of Humans
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3101 - Introduction to Neurobiology I: Molecular, Cellular, and Systems (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 3102W - Introduction to Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4100 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3050 - Physiology From Cells to Systems (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis (4.0 cr)
· Human Anatomy with Lab Options
(Take lab and lectures concurrently, to receive major credit)
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· Physiology of Humans and Other Animals with Lab Options
(Take lab and lectures concurrently, to receive major credit)
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology (3.0 cr)
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· Human and Animal Behavior
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3811 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· Microbial Biology
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics (3.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
or VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· BIOL 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
or VPM 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· Plant Breeding & Agronomy
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement [WI] (4.0 cr)
Biosciences Electives - Qualifying Laboratory Courses
At least one of the Biosciences Electives must be a laboratory course. The courses listed below qualify as laboratory courses for the Biosciences Elective requirement.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
Courses with a Laboratory Component Included
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4811 - Biogeochemical Processes (4.0 cr)
· ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)
· MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I (3.0 cr)
· PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3408W - Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· Courses Requiring Concurrent Registration with a Laboratory Course
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
Students taking ANAT 3601 or 3611 must concurrently register for ANAT 3602, 3608H, or 3612
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
with ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology (3.0 cr)
with ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
with BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)
with BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
Science & Society Electives
Take 3 Science & Society Electives for a total of 9-12 credits. Exploring a theme is suggested. Some examples include: ethics in health care; health policy; global environmental solutions; science and social change; science & culture: public understanding of science.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 - 12 credit(s) from the following:
Anthropology
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5031W - Ethnographies of Science [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Cultural Studies
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Policy and Sustainability
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
· SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Geography of Health and Environments
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Health & Environmental Policy
Take no more than 3 course(s) from the following:
· POL 3872W - Science, Industry, and Social Change: The Political Economy of Global Environmental Cooperation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· Health & Environment in the City
Take no more than 1 course(s) from the following:
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Interdisciplinary Gender & Inequality Studies
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3215 - Bodies That Matter: Feminist Approaches to Disability Studies [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3415 - Feminist Perspectives on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Interdisciplinary Global Studies
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· History of Medicine and Science
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 2333V - Honors Course: A Century of Science in Modern America [HIS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Medical & Environmental Ethics
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics (3.0 cr)
· BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Philosophy of Science
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· Psychology
NURS 2001 is equivalent to taking NURS 3690 and 3691.
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
or PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences (3.0 cr)
· NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach (3.0 cr)
or NURS 3690 - Life Span, Growth, and Development I (2.0 cr)
NURS 3691 - Life Span, Growth, and Development II (1.0 cr)
· Public Health
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3802 - Health and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3807 - Global Health, Relief, Development and Religious and Non-religious NGOs (3.0 cr)
· Science, Health & Environmental Communication
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms With the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Service (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Sociology
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Theory and Practice
Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· HECU 3571 - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Environmental & Climate Justice [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· ID 3595W - HECUA Off-Campus Study Program: Agriculture and Justice Agroecosystems in Context [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ID 3596 - HECUA Off-Campus Study Program: Agriculture and Justice - Justice and the U.S. Food System (4.0 cr)
Senior Project
Take 1-2 courses for a total of 2-4 credits. Students are responsible for identifying a senior project supervisor and should begin planning during their Junior Year. All students attend a planning workshop and submit a senior project proposal that must be approved by the BSE office prior to beginning work. All forms should be submitted by published deadlines. A written component is required and students must register A-F.
Option 1: Directed Research with a UMNTC Faculty Supervisor
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
a) BSE Project Registration
Students supervised by GES (BSE, GEOG, GIS, URBS) & AHS faculty (Medical School, Dental School and others) register for a minimum of 3 credits in:
· BSE 3996 - Senior Project Directed Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
or BSE 3996H - Honors: Senior Project Directed Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
· b) Science & Society Project
Students supervised by ANTH, BTHX, CSCL, GLOS, GWSS, HSCI, PHIL, POL, PUBH or SOC faculty register for a minimum of 3 credits in:
· ANTH 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
or ANTH 4994W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
or BTHX 5900 - Independent Study in Bioethics (1.0-4.0 cr)
or CSCL 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
or GWSS 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
or HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-15.0 cr)
or HSCI 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-15.0 cr)
or PHIL 3993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
or POL 4970 - Individual Reading and Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
or PSY 4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences (1.0-6.0 cr)
or PUBH 3093 - Directed Study: Public Health (1.0-4.0 cr)
or PUBH 3893 - Directed Study: Health Services Research and Policy (1.0-4.0 cr)
or SOC 4093 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· c) Biosciences Project
Students supervised by faculty members appointed in College of Biological Sciences or other UMNTC colleges register for a minumum of 3 credits in a directed studies/research course. Follow procedures of that college.
or Option 2: Senior Project Seminar
Contact instructor prior to registration of these courses; seats are limited.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 2 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· HMED 4965W -  Senior Research in Medical History (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar [WI] (2.0 cr)
or Option 3: Supplemental Research Project
Senior Project is supervised by an instructor teaching a Science & Society Required or Elective course in a CLA Department. Obtain permission from instructor and BSE advisor prior to first day of class. Concurrently register for an eligible Science & Society course and 2 credits in one of the following courses (A-F only):
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BSE 3997 - Senior Project (2.0 cr)
· ANTH 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)
· CSCL 4993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5994 - Directed Research (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GWSS 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
· PHIL 3993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· PSY 4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences (1.0-6.0 cr)
· SOC 4093 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements. BSE majors are also encouraged to take at least one additional writing intensive course in an area related to biosciences. Honors students must complete a course from this list.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5031W - Ethnographies of Science [WI] (3.0 cr)
· BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 4965W -  Senior Research in Medical History (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3872W - Science, Industry, and Social Change: The Political Economy of Global Environmental Cooperation [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· BSE with Evolution and Culture Interest (No advanced placement (AP) in Language, Chemistry or Math)
· BSE with Health Career Interest (no advanced placement (AP) in Language, Chemistry or Math)
· BSE with Human Health & Diversity Interest (with AP in Language (1 semester), Chemistry & Math)
· BSE with Ecology and Environment Interest (with AP in Language (1 semester), Chemistry & Math)

View checkpoint chart:
· Biology, Society, and Environment B.A.
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BSE 2001 - An Introduction to Biology, Society, and Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intellectual threads and faculty for courses in BSE major, especially social sciences. Content varies. prereq: BSE major. Must be completed prior to senior year.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01971
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
PHIL 1003W - Introduction to Ethics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00814 - Phil 1003W/V/1103
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Are values/principles relative to our culture? Is pleasure valuable? Are there any absolute rules? These questions and others are addressed through critical study of moral theories.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
PHIL 1002W - Introduction to Philosophy (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1002W/V/1006W/1026W/1102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Problems, methods, historical/contemporary schools of philosophy.
PHIL 1026W - Philosophy and Cultural Diversity (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1002W/V/1006W/1026W/1102
Typically offered: Every Summer
Central problems/methods of philosophy through culturally diverse texts. Focus is critical/comparative, reflecting a range of U.S. philosophical traditions.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/1011V/1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry, honors; one term of college chemistry recommended
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: [[Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331], [any CBS major or major in [animal science or applied plant science or BA biology or BA microbiology or nutrition or physiology or biology/society/environment or biomedical engineering] or Grad MBS major]] or instr consent
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Science and technology engaged through historical and cultural manifestations from film, literature, and YouTube to scientific and philosophical essays. Relations among humanities, science, economics, politics, philosophy and history. Psychiatry and drugs, food and agriculture, sexuality, religion and science, climate change.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02573 - GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Biopiracy, vaccine trials, use/abuse of genetics, genetically modified organisms. Who determines direction of scientific/medical research? Impact on social thinking/practices and on globalization of science. Global economics of science.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Globalization produces complex, sometimes volatile, local responses. Course explores interconnectedness of the world, considering not one world, but many. Topics include colonialism, consumption, diasporic conditions, global media, nationalism, supra-national governance. Examines how globality is experienced and contested locally and specifically. prereq: [3101, 3144] or instr consent
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01327
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
PHIL 1005H - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01327 - Phil 1005/Phil 1005H
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr honors student or instr consent
PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Philosophical issues that arise out of interaction between science, technology, society (e.g., religion and science, genetics and society, science and the environment).
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Structure/status of evolutionary theory. Nature of molecular biology, genetics. Reductionism in biology. Legitimacy of teleology. Species concept. prereq: Courses in [philosophy or biology] or instr consent
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846 - GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: 1001 or environmental course recommended, [soc majors/minors must register A-F]
GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: SOC 1001 or environmental course or instr consent
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182 - GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Prerequisites: SOC 1001 recommended
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01316 - Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
PSY 3801H - Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01316 - Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: [1001 or equiv], high school algebra, honors; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01269
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00422 - HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to the present: women in science, sexual and gendered concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Body/soul in medieval theology/cosmology. Religious conceptions of body/soul. Medical conceptions in medieval world. Medieval/renaissance psychology. Medical astrology and its consequences. Medical normal/abnormal body. Medicine of reproduction and sexual identity. Death, burial, dissection, and resurrection in medical/religious perspective. Macrocosmic/microcosmic body. Limits to human power/authority over body. Anatomical/chemical body/spirit.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq:(BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003) and (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085) or equivalent AND not a CBS student
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conjugation, aromaticity, chemistry of carbonyls/amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins. Enzyme mechanisms, lipids, nucleic acids. Focuses on biological significance of organic molecules/mechanisms. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/diversity of plants. Their adaptations for survival in varied environments. Includes lab. prereq: One semester college biology, CHEM 1021
BIOL 3270 - Introduction To Systems Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Emergent properties of metabolic networks; Computational modeling of metabolism; Parameter estimation from high-throughput measurements; Prediction of metabolic phenotypes for knockout mutants; Flux balance analysis; Metabolic control analysis. prereq: Recommended prereq MATH1241, BIOC3021
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
PMB 4321 - Minnesota Flora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities. prereq: One semester college biology
PMB 4404 - Developmental Plant Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to the microscopic structure and development of plants at the cell, tissue, and organ level. Emphasis on relationships between anatomy and the ontogeny, phylogeny, and ecology of seed plants with some reference to lower vascular plants. prereq: Biol 2022 or Biol 3007
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
PMB 4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PBio 4516W/5516
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structure, function, and dynamic properties of plant cellular components. How cellular structures function and contribute to cell growth. Cell fate/development. Developing a clear/concise writing style for incisive criticism of scientific papers. prereq: [Biol 2022 or Biol 3002 or Biol 3007], [BioC 3021 or Biol 3021 or Biol 4003]
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation. prereq: Concurrent enrollment 3002
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [BIOC 2331, CHEM 2301, PHYS 1201] or #
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOC 2331, CHEM 2301, PHYS 1201] or instr consent
EEB 4811 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, physics to global biogeochemical cycles. Human impacts on biogeochemical cycles. Lab. Meets at Itasca Biological Station & Laboratories. Lodging/meal costs in addition to tuition. prereq: CHEM 2301, [PHYS 1201 or instr consent]
EEB 3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01680
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent
ENT 3925 - Insects, Aquatic Habitats, and Pollution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effects differing classes of pollutants have on insects that are aquatic. Insect life-cycle dynamics, trophic guilds, community structure. Hypotheses to explain community structure in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, lakes, reservoirs. Organic pollution, eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, runoff/siltation, acidification, thermal pollution. Changes in aquatic insect community structure. Designing/maintaining biological monitoring networks. prereq: [[3005 or Biol 3407 or FW 2001], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Natural history, identification, and behavior of honey bees and other social insects. Evolution of social behavior, pheromones and communication, organization and division of labor, social parasitism. Lab with honey bee management and maintenance of other social bees for pollination. prereq: Biol 1009 or instr consent
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
ESPM 3101 - Conservation of Plant Biodiversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3101/5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to principles underlying assessment/conservation of plant biodiversity at individual, population, and community levels. Case studies in management of biodiversity to restore/maintain ecosystem function. Issues such as genetics, timber harvesting, invasive species, plant reproduction. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 1009
ESPM 3221 - Soil Conservation and Land-Use Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide a local and global historical perspective of soil erosion (causes and consequences); develop a scientific understanding of soil erosion processes; and relates various soil conservation and land-use management strategies to real-world situations. Basics of soil erosion processes and prediction methods will be the fundamental building blocks of this course. From this understanding, we will discuss policies and socioeconomic aspects of soil erosion. Lastly, we will focus on effective land-use management using natural resource assessment tools. Case studies and real-world and current events examples will be used throughout the course to relate course material to experiences. prereq: SOIL 2125 or instr consent
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 3612W - Soil and Environmental Biology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02414 - ESPM 3612W/Soil 5611
Typically offered: Every Fall
Properties of microorganisms that impact soil fertility, structure, and quality. Nutrient requirements of microbes and plants and mineral transformations in biogeochemical cycling. Symbiotic plant/microbe associations and their role in sustainable agricultural production. Biodegradation of pollutants and bioremediation approaches. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv, Chem 1021 or equiv; SOIL 2125 recommended
FNRM 3104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/FNRM 5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions focus on research topics in forest ecology, exercises applying course concepts, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Prereq: Biol 1001, 1009 or equivalent introductory biology course; 1 semester college chemistry recommended.
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
FNRM 3411 - Managing Forest Ecosystems: Silviculture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02290
Typically offered: Every Fall
Management of forest ecosystems for sustaining ecological integrity, soil productivity, water quality, wildlife habitat, biological diversity, commodity production in landscape context. Silvics, forest dynamics, disturbances, regeneration, restoration, silvicultural systems. Ramifications of management choices. Weekend field trip. FEMC track students should take FNRM 5413 concurrently prereq: consent of instructor
FNRM 3501 - Arboriculture: Selection and Maintenance of Trees
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Selection, growth, propagation, and maintenance of trees for urban spaces. Tree selection, site preparation, plant health care management. Prevention, diagnosis, and remediation of urban tree risks such as insects, pathogens, pollution, development, and climate change.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
SOIL 3416 - Plant Nutrients in the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation, interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient problems. prereq: SOIL 2125
VPM 3850W - Health and Biodiversity (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basics of biodiversity, human/animal health, interdependence. Strategies for sustainable health. prereq: At least one year of college Biology or equivalent
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary issues in tropical reef ecology from diverse perspectives. Option of two-credit seminar during fall semester plus additional two-credit field option (BIOL 4596) to involve SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef. prereq: Introductory biology course with lab
BIOL 4596 - Coral Reef Ecology (Dive Trip)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef. Conduct primary research/writing. prereq: Introductory biology with lab, valid passport, and SCUBA certification.
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The principles of evolutionary theory, behavioral biology, comparative anatomy, and Paleolithic archaeology are used to reconstruct the major events in human evolution. The course allows us to understand the behavior of our ancestors as well as ourselves.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Vertebrate evolution (exclusive of mammals) in phylogenetic, temporal, functional, and paleoecological contexts. Vertebrate anatomy. Methods in reconstructing phylogenetic relationships and origin/history of major vertebrate groups, from Cambrian Explosion to modern diversity of vertebrate animals. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instr consent
ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Evolutionary history of mammals and their extinct relatives. Methods in reconstructing phylogeny. Place of mammals in evolutionary history of vertebrate animals. Major morphological/ecological transitions. Origins of modern groups of mammals. Continuing controversies in studying fossil mammals.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01722 - Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01722
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01870
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or BIOL 3411 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
GCD 3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of computer applications in manipulation/analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. prereq: One semester of college biology
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: 3033 or Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4134 - Endocrinology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of structure and function of invertebrate and vertebrate endocrine systems. prereq: BIOL 3211 or BIOC 3021 or BIOC 3022 or BIOC 4331 or instr consent
GCD 4143 - Human Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of human genetics at the molecular, cellular, individual, and populations levels. Chromosomal and biochemical disorders; gene mapping; mutation and natural selection; variation in intelligence and behavior; genetic screening, counseling and therapy. prereq: 3022 or Biol 4003 or instr consent
GCD 4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Regulatory pathways involved in directing normal development of complex eukaryotic organisms, how disruptions of these pathways can lead to abnormal cell growth/cancer. Causes, detection, treatment, prevention of cancer. prereq: Biol 4003
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms that govern development from gametogenesis through fertilization. Embryogenesis/postembryonic development. Mechanisms of morphogenesis/differentiation. Classical/molecular approaches in various model organisms. Genetic models such as bacteriophage, yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, and the mouse. prereq: Biol 4003; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BIOL 4004 irecommended
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: [[Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331], [any CBS major or major in [animal science or applied plant science or BA biology or BA microbiology or nutrition or physiology or biology/society/environment or biomedical engineering] or Grad MBS major]] or instr consent
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
NSCI 3101 - Introduction to Neurobiology I: Molecular, Cellular, and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00470 - Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic principles of cellular/molecular neurobiology. Nervous systems.
NSCI 3102W - Introduction to Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00471 - NSci/Phsl 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Organization of neural systems/subsystems underlying sensory/motor aspects of behavior. Writing intensive. prereq: 3101, grade of at least B+ in 3101 recommended
NSCI 4100 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01694 - Nsci 4100/Nsci 8211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How nervous system develops. General cellular/molecular mechanisms. Experimental data demonstrating mechanisms.
NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, methods, and laboratory exercises for investigating neural mechanisms and examining experimental evidence.
PHSL 3050 - Physiology From Cells to Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828 - Phsl 3050/Phsl 3051
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Basic physiology of human cells and organ systems, including nerve, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine, metabolic and reproductive systems. Critical thinking about physiological concepts through active learning exercises involving analysis and manipulation of ideas. Apply concepts in basic research or clinical settings. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv [including eukaryotic cellular biology], [[CHEM 1021, CHEM 1022] or 1 yr of college-level chemistry]
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01354
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
ANTH 3405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01627
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation/preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans.
ANTH 5405 - Human Skeletal Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01627 - Anth 3405/Anth 5405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, design, and variability of modern human skeleton. Anatomy, functional morphology, development, evolutionary history. Bone histology/biology, excavation, preservation, taphonomy, pathology, forensic analyses. Differentiating between males/females, adults/sub-adults, and humans/non-humans. Quizzes, exams, research paper, project.
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Functions of major systems in mammals. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular system, respiration, renal system. Endocrinology/metabolism. Blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Companion course to 3301. Physiological principles are demonstrated using active learning approaches. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular, respiration, renal, endocrinology/metabolism, blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3301
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways different animals solve similar physiological problems. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways different animals solve similar physiological problems. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00469 - Biol 2005/2012
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of marine animal diversity. Understanding major animal groups, how they relate to one another, how they differ in structure, how each group achieves survival/ reproduction in diverse environments. Lab includes dissections, including vertebrates, such as fish. prereq: Introductory biology with lab
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00390
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biological study of animal behavior. Mechanism development, function, and evolution. Emphasizes evolution of adaptive behavior, social behavior in the natural environment. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Writing intensive course. Introduction to animal behavior. Feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, communication. Scientific process. Formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course
EEB 3811 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00390
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Biological study of animal behavior. Mechanism development, function, evolution. Emphasizes evolution of adaptive behavior, social behavior in natural environment. Lab, field work. prereq: 1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01870
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or BIOL 3411 or instr consent
ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geosphere/biosphere interactions over temporal/spatial scales. Global biogeochemical cycling, microbe-metal interactions, microbial paleobiology, environmental geomicrobiology, life detection, habitability of planets. prereq: One semester college level biology
PMB 4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02535
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns. prereq: BioC 3021 or Biol 3021 or BioC 4331
MICB 4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora. prereq: 3301, [GCD 3022 or Biol 4003]
MICB 4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4141W/4171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, attachment, entry. Genome replication/mRNA production by RNA viruses. Reverse transcription. DNA virus templates. Replication of DNA virus genomes. Processing of viral pre-mRNA. Translational control. Assembly, host defense, tumor viruses, pathogenesis, HIV, antivirals. prereq: [BIOC 3021, BIOL 4003, [3301 or BIOL 4004]] or instr consent; seats are prioritized for CBS majors (others who meet the course prerequisites can contact the instructor for permission)
MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms. prereq: 3301 or Biol 2032 or VBS 2032 or intro microbiology course with lab
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01638
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles such as isolation of mutants, meiotic mapping, mitotic recombination, and gene replacement. Hands-on experimentation. prereq: 3301, BIOL 4003
MICB 4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques, experimental methods in microbial genetics, immunology. Virology used to study microbes/interactions with host. prereq: 3301, 4131, BIOC 3021, [completed or concurrent registration is required in MicB 4141W/4171]; access from a wait list
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/MicB 3303/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
BIOL 4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products. prereq: 3301
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01727 - /MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic, cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innate immunity. Antigen recognition by B/T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes/other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology. prereq: [2022 or VPB 2022 or BIOL 2032 or VPB 2032 or VBS 2032 or 3301 or MicB 3301], [BIOC 3021 or BIOL 3021 or BIOC 4331]
VPM 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01727
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular, genetic, and cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innage immunity. Antigen recognition by B and T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes and other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology.
HORT 3005W - Introduction to Plant Physiology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to physiological basis for effects of environment on plant growth/development. How to produce optimal plant growth. Experimental technique, data analysis, scientific writing. Lecture, readings, lab.
HORT 4071W - Applications of Biotechnology to Plant Improvement (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of plant genetics, molecular biology, and plant biotechnology. Emphasizes their applications to plant propagation and crop improvement. Hands-on experience with crossing plants, analysis of phenotypes and segregation data, plant tissue culture/transformation, gel electrophoresis, molecular cloning, use of genetically modified crops. Principles of ethics/citizenship to decision making in plant genetics and biotechnology. Debate, discussion, writing exercises. prereq: [Biol 1009 or equiv or grad student], instr consent
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The principles of evolutionary theory, behavioral biology, comparative anatomy, and Paleolithic archaeology are used to reconstruct the major events in human evolution. The course allows us to understand the behavior of our ancestors as well as ourselves.
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolution/diversity of plants. Their adaptations for survival in varied environments. Includes lab. prereq: One semester college biology, CHEM 1021
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01680
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4811 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, physics to global biogeochemical cycles. Human impacts on biogeochemical cycles. Lab. Meets at Itasca Biological Station & Laboratories. Lodging/meal costs in addition to tuition. prereq: CHEM 2301, [PHYS 1201 or instr consent]
ENT 4251 - Forest and Shade Tree Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology, ecology, population management of forest/shade tree insects. Emphasizes predisposing factors/integrated management. Lecture/lab.
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/MicB 3303/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent
MICB 4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms. prereq: 3301 or Biol 2032 or VBS 2032 or intro microbiology course with lab
MICB 4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01638
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Yeast is used as model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles such as isolation of mutants, meiotic mapping, mitotic recombination, and gene replacement. Hands-on experimentation. prereq: 3301, BIOL 4003
NSCI 4105 - Neurobiology Laboratory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, methods, and laboratory exercises for investigating neural mechanisms and examining experimental evidence.
PMB 4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
EEB 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R). prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 3409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Functions of major systems in mammals. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular system, respiration, renal system. Endocrinology/metabolism. Blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Companion course to 3301. Physiological principles are demonstrated using active learning approaches. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular, respiration, renal, endocrinology/metabolism, blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3301
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways different animals solve similar physiological problems. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
BIOL 2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.
BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00469 - Biol 2005/2012
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of marine animal diversity. Understanding major animal groups, how they relate to one another, how they differ in structure, how each group achieves survival/ reproduction in diverse environments. Lab includes dissections, including vertebrates, such as fish. prereq: Introductory biology with lab
BIOL 3002 - Plant Biology: Function
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How plants make/use food. Mineral function/uptake. Water relations. Transport processes. Growth/development. prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]
BIOL 3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Various plant processes at subcellular, organ, whole plant levels. Lab, recitation. prereq: Concurrent enrollment 3002
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological perspectives on death. Diverse understandings of afterlife, cultural variations in death ritual, secularization of death in modern era, management of death in medicine, cultural shifts/conflicts in what constitutes good or natural death.
ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Body-related practices throughout the world. Readings, documentaries, mass media.
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
ANTH 5031W - Ethnographies of Science (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Ethnographic, historical, and sociological accounts of scientific practice. How facts are constructed/negotiated. Social, cultural, and political influences on scientific methods. How scientific projects articulate with hierarchies of race/gender. International differences in scientific practice. prereq: Sr or grad student or instr consent
CSCL 3331 - Science and Culture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Science and technology engaged through historical and cultural manifestations from film, literature, and YouTube to scientific and philosophical essays. Relations among humanities, science, economics, politics, philosophy and history. Psychiatry and drugs, food and agriculture, sexuality, religion and science, climate change.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00361 - ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policies affecting land use planning at local, state, and federal levels. Ecosystem and landscape scale planning. Collaborative and community-based approaches to planning for ecological, social, and economic sustainability. Class project applies interdisciplinary perspectives on planning and policy, including information gathering techniques, conservation planning tools, and evaluation of planning options.
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01345
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies minor. Scientific, cultural, ethical, and economic concepts that affect environmental sustainability and global economic justice. Key texts. Participatory classroom environment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global flows of tourism from perspective of debates about consumption, development, identity, and the environment. Close reading, field trips, discussion of films, research paper.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
POL 3872W - Science, Industry, and Social Change: The Political Economy of Global Environmental Cooperation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Emergence of environment as key aspect of global political agenda. Non-governmental/governmental international organizations. Politics of protection of atmosphere, rain forest, seas, other selected issues. International security, environment.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways in which modern biology has been site of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender demographics of scientific professions.
GWSS 3215 - Bodies That Matter: Feminist Approaches to Disability Studies (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Dis/ability is not a physical or mental defect but a form of social meaning making mapped to certain bodies in larger systems of power and privilege. Feminist approaches to dis/ability as vector of oppression intersecting and constituted through other oppression such as race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship. Dis/ability must be understood through systems of power that construct, support, regulate, and determine the life chances of those who claim, or are claimed by disability. Deconstruct the complex ideologies of ableism and the material realities of such oppression, and work toward imagining and reconstructing a more just and equitable society.
GWSS 3415 - Feminist Perspectives on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of and contemporary thinking about public policies and legal remedies directed toward domestic violence and sexual assault. How notions of public/private spheres and social constructions of gender roles, agency, and bodies contribute to attitudes/responses.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027 - GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures in U.S. prereq: Honors
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02573 - GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Biopiracy, vaccine trials, use/abuse of genetics, genetically modified organisms. Who determines direction of scientific/medical research? Impact on social thinking/practices and on globalization of science. Global economics of science.
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. Emphasizes their daily practices and political, economic, and cultural effects around the world. Politics/business of development. Free market and trade. New transnational professional class. Social activism.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Globalization produces complex, sometimes volatile, local responses. Course explores interconnectedness of the world, considering not one world, but many. Topics include colonialism, consumption, diasporic conditions, global media, nationalism, supra-national governance. Examines how globality is experienced and contested locally and specifically. prereq: [3101, 3144] or instr consent
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
HMED 3065 - Body, Soul, and Spirit in Medieval and Renaissance European Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Body/soul in medieval theology/cosmology. Religious conceptions of body/soul. Medical conceptions in medieval world. Medieval/renaissance psychology. Medical astrology and its consequences. Medical normal/abnormal body. Medicine of reproduction and sexual identity. Death, burial, dissection, and resurrection in medical/religious perspective. Macrocosmic/microcosmic body. Limits to human power/authority over body. Anatomical/chemical body/spirit.
HMED 3075 - Technology and Medicine in Modern America (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care.
HSCI 2333V - Honors Course: A Century of Science in Modern America (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02283 - HSCI 2333V/3333V/3333W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Science and technology influence nearly every aspect of our daily lives as well as the communities in which we live, both locally and globally. How did science and technology become such ubiquitous and powerful aspects of American industry, government policy, public life, and international negotiation? What are the responsibilities of scientists and engineers who play a critical role in creating and maintaining these elements? How can the broader public position itself to provide encouragement, insight and critique of the research and applications of science and technology? This course is intended to examine these questions by exploring historical case studies that highlight ethical, political, and social issues that give meaning to, and in turn, are shaped by science and technology. Beginning with the role of scientists as professional experts in the Progressive era, we consider how ideals of scientific management impacted animal lives and workers = bodies. Ethical choices frame the application of expertise and require attention and specific decision-making. Using eugenics as an example, we will reflect upon the interplay between the often naïve understanding of heredity and public policy and continue discussion into the application of contemporary genetic testing. Ethics are framed in social and political settings, and we will follow sometimes surprisingly comparable developments in Russia and the United States, with particular attention to large-scale engineering projects in the 1920s and 1930s and the space race in the 1950s and 1960s in order to understand how these reflected, or failed to reflect, risk and human life. This course meets the Historical Perspectives, Civic Life and Ethics, and Writing Intensive requirements as defined by the Council on Liberal Education. Along with Student Learning Outcomes, these requirements will help you continue to build critical tools for your work at the university as well as ways to evaluate and create knowledge in and beyond your intended career area.
HSCI 3211 - Biology and Culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3211/5211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology.
HSCI 3242 - Navigating a Darwinian World (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00995 - HSci 3242/HSci 5242
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior.
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00421 - HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 3332 - Science in the Shaping of America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00145
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Science played a central role in taking scattered imperial colonies in North America to world power in just four centuries. This course investigates people, policies, and knowledge-making in a culture whose diversity was a critical part of its expanding capacities. It begins by examining the differences in ways of knowing as well as shared knowledge between Native Americans and Europeans and concludes by discussing how a powerful nation's science and technology shaped international relations. Class, race, ethnicity, and gender provided for a range of perspectives that contributed to science alongside social and economic developments. Online assignments, films and images, along with primary and secondary source readings provide the basis for class discussion.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00422 - HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science.
HSCI 3815 - Making Modern Science: Atoms, Genes and Quanta (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00979
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals.
HSCI 4455 - Women, Gender, and Science (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to the present: women in science, sexual and gendered concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society.
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Most frequent ethical problems faced by clinicians, patients/families, and ethics consultants. Forgoing life sustaining treatment, decisional capacity, informed consent, treatment refusals, death/dying, pediatric ethics, reproductive issues, research ethics, psychiatric illness. Real cases.
BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01202
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major topics/issues in biomedical ethics. Patients' rights/duties, informed consent, confidentiality, ethical issues in medical research, initiation/termination of medical treatment, euthanasia, abortion, allocation of medical resources. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00540 - Phil 3005W/V/3105
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major developments in philosophic thought of the modern period: renaissance beginnings, Descartes through Hume. Some attention to Kant.
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A study of the relationship among law, morality, and our role as critizens.
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of scientific knowledge. Reading of historical and contemporary sources that describe major scientific achievements and controversies. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PHIL 3602 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Philosophical issues that arise out of interaction between science, technology, society (e.g., religion and science, genetics and society, science and the environment).
PHIL 3607 - Philosophy of Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theories of mind including the "invention" of the mind by Descartes, classical empiricism, the impact of Darwinism, Freud's theories, Gestalt psychology, behaviorism, Chomsky's rationalism, contemporary functionalism, the computer model. prereq: One course in philosophy or psychology
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Structure/status of evolutionary theory. Nature of molecular biology, genetics. Reductionism in biology. Legitimacy of teleology. Species concept. prereq: Courses in [philosophy or biology] or instr consent
PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00083 - Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genetic methods for studying human/animal behavior. Emphasizes nature/origin of individual differences in behavior. Twin and adoption methods. Cytogenetics, molecular genetics, linkage/association studies. prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent
PSY 3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/5135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential methods in studying human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, social attitudes. prereq: [1001, [3801 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/5135
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Differential methods in study of human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, and environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, and social attitudes. prereq: [3001W or equiv] or [5862 or equiv] or instr consent
NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical, personal, and culturally determined theories on life span development, from prenatal period through death/dying. Psychoanalytical, behaviorism, cognitive, sociocultural, and epigenetic categories of biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains.
NURS 3690 - Life Span, Growth, and Development I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Biological/sociological/psychological perspectives of human life span development from prenatal period through young adulthood.
NURS 3691 - Life Span, Growth, and Development II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An introductory, multimedia course that incorporates biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives of human life span development for the period of young adulthood through aging and the death experience. prereq: 3690, one general psychology and one general biology course or instr consent
PUBH 3102 - Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01063
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental and Occupational Health (EOH), the impact of environmental and occupational hazards on individuals and communities, the approaches taken to address EOH issues at the community level,and the challenges that must be overcome to ensure success in dealing with EOH issues. Students will review scientific literature to learn about interventions for environmental health problems, and practice identifying environmental health problems and interventions in their communities. The focus of this course will be on the interaction between humans and the environment and how this interaction affects human health. Online Course.
PUBH 3802 - Health and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relationship of health/human rights under public health horizon. Philosophical frameworks/groundings of human rights, development of nexus between health/human rights.
PUBH 3807 - Global Health, Relief, Development and Religious and Non-religious NGOs
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intersection of global health, relief, development/roles. Interaction of intergovernmental/governmental agencies, religious/non-religious NGOs in humanitarian response, development/social welfare generation supporting global health.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms With the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of literary texts about environmental issues. Issues of language and meaning, social and historical contexts, scientific, technological, and public policy concerns, and appropriate societal responses. Active learning components. Formal and informal writing assignments.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291 - Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
Intersection of mass media, public health, behavior. Role of theory in understanding intended/unintended campaign effect. Role of health journalism. Decisions that inform media-based interventions.
SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Service
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Creating materials for effective communication with and education of Spanish-speaking patients. Students engage in service learning with community health care partners that serve the Chicano/Latino population. prereq: 3015 with grade of at least B- or [1044, high pass on at least three sections of LPE]
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Land in America as idea and as actual space. History of cultural values and the meanings land holds for us. Contrasting views of land, especially those of certain Native American peoples. Rise of the conservation movement and the urbanization of U.S. space.
WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How issues in science and technology affect 21st century practice of law. Ownership, access, ethics, information, technology used to frame topics. Intellectual property, privacy, health law, research practice. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846 - GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: 1001 or environmental course recommended, [soc majors/minors must register A-F]
GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: SOC 1001 or environmental course or instr consent
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182 - GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Prerequisites: SOC 1001 recommended
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations.
HECU 3571 - Inequality in America: A Political Economy Approach (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Roots and strategies for addressing urban inequality and poverty. Interdisciplinary field study, seminar work, internship. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3572, 3573, dept consent
HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Roots and strategies for addressing urban inequality and poverty. Interdisciplinary field study, seminar work, internship. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3571, 3573, dept consent
HECU 3591 - Environmental Sustainability: Sci, Public Policy, & Cmty Action Environmental & Climate Justice (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examine ecological and physical processes that underlie environmental degradation and learn to set up ecological monitoring through in-depth case studies of adaptive management projects. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3592, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3593, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3594, dept consent
HECU 3592 - Environmental Sustainability: Ecology and Socio-ecological Systems Change (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How power dynamics and a global free market impact efforts to promote sustainability. The state's role in regulating resources and distributing environmental benefits. How social movements develop a collective future and mobilize actors to realize it. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3591, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3593, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3594, dept consent
ID 3595W - HECUA Off-Campus Study Program: Agriculture and Justice Agroecosystems in Context (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through interdisciplinary/field-based methods, including farm stay/subsequent creation of "whole farm plan," students learn theory/practice of fundamental agroecological principles. Define, assess, interpret factors that contribute to greater sustainability of agroecosystems. prereq: instr consent
ID 3596 - HECUA Off-Campus Study Program: Agriculture and Justice - Justice and the U.S. Food System
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complexities of food system. Roots of land ownership/labor practices in U.S., unpacking economics/policies. Considering one's own role in creating sustainable future. Participatory Action Research projects place students at organizations working for food justice in Twin Cities. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3595, dept consent
BSE 3996 - Senior Project Directed Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01980
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual guided research course taken in fulfillment of BSE senior project requirement. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
BSE 3996H - Honors: Senior Project Directed Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01980 - BSE 3996/BSE 3996H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual guided research course taken in fulfillment of BSE senior project requirement. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
ANTH 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 4994W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Qualified students may conduct a well-defined research project under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
BTHX 5900 - Independent Study in Bioethics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students propose area for study with faculty guidance, write proposal which includes outcome objectives and work plan. Faculty member directs student's work and evaluates project. prereq: instr consent
CSCL 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual study.
GLOS 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Qualified students work on a tutorial basis. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
GWSS 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study.
HSCI 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent
HSCI 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -15.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
TBD prereq: instr consent
PHIL 3993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
POL 4970 - Individual Reading and Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
PSY 4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 48.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed research projects in psychology. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
PUBH 3093 - Directed Study: Public Health
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study in selected public health problems or current issues. prereq: instr consent
PUBH 3893 - Directed Study: Health Services Research and Policy
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
tbd prereq: instr consent
SOC 4093 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study at junior or senior level. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
HMED 4965W - Senior Research in Medical History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar. Reading/discussion, individual directed research project with oral presentation. Students meet in peer groups and with instructor. prereq: Sr, instr consent
URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods/resources for research. Substantial writing. prereq: dept consent
BSE 3997 - Senior Project
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01981
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Senior Project add-on credit. Must be taken concurrently with "BSE Core" or "BSE Theme Elective" course related to area of specialization. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
ANTH 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Allows students to pursue special interests in anthropology under the guidance of a faculty member. prereq: instr consent
CSCL 4993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual study.
GLOS 5994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Qualified students work on a tutorial basis. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
GWSS 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual reading or study.
PHIL 3993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
PSY 4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 48.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed research projects in psychology. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
SOC 4093 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study at junior or senior level. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 5031W - Ethnographies of Science (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Ethnographic, historical, and sociological accounts of scientific practice. How facts are constructed/negotiated. Social, cultural, and political influences on scientific methods. How scientific projects articulate with hierarchies of race/gender. International differences in scientific practice. prereq: Sr or grad student or instr consent
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027 - GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures in U.S. prereq: Honors
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways in which modern biology has been site of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender demographics of scientific professions.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 4965W - Senior Research in Medical History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Seminar. Reading/discussion, individual directed research project with oral presentation. Students meet in peer groups and with instructor. prereq: Sr, instr consent
PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00540 - Phil 3005W/V/3105
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major developments in philosophic thought of the modern period: renaissance beginnings, Descartes through Hume. Some attention to Kant.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of scientific knowledge. Reading of historical and contemporary sources that describe major scientific achievements and controversies. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
POL 3872W - Science, Industry, and Social Change: The Political Economy of Global Environmental Cooperation (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Emergence of environment as key aspect of global political agenda. Non-governmental/governmental international organizations. Politics of protection of atmosphere, rain forest, seas, other selected issues. International security, environment.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
How issues in science and technology affect 21st century practice of law. Ownership, access, ethics, information, technology used to frame topics. Intellectual property, privacy, health law, research practice. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent