Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Scientific and Technical Communication B.S.

Writing Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 50
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The Department of Writing Studies offers a B.S. in scientific and technical communication (S&TC). This degree offers a unique combination of written, oral, and visual communication theory and practice as it applies to interdisciplinary areas of science and technology. This program examines how communication is a complex process that involves both the robust principles of audience, persuasion, clarity, accuracy, and ethical integrity, and a command of the knowledge of scientific and technical topics that one communicates. Students have the opportunity to examine social, legal, ethical, and political implications of communication as they relate to science, environment, gender, technology, diverse cultures, and workplace practices. Students study theories of rhetoric and communication and apply principles of audience analysis, writing and editing, information design, oral communication, and visual rhetoric. They engage in writing as a process and examine writing within communities of practice.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major or minor in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major or minor (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All required courses must be taken A-F (except for the internship, which is taken S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C-. Equivalent transfer courses are accepted in all areas (except for required WRIT courses). Students need to complete a minimum of 35 credits of WRIT courses, plus 15 credits of courses within one of four sub-plan areas.
Core Courses
Current WRIT 3441 requirement replaces former WRIT 4561/5561 requirement. If students have already taken WRIT 4561/5561, they will not be required to take WRIT 3441.
WRIT 3001 - Introduction to Technical Writing and Communication (3.0 cr)
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
WRIT 3441 - Editing, Critique, and Style (3.0 cr)
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
WRIT 3671 - Visual Rhetoric and Document Design (3.0 cr)
WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies [WI] (4.0 cr)
WRIT 4501 - Usability and Human Factors in Technical Communication (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 4258 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Required Electives
Students must take at least 6 credits from each of the two categories, for a total of 12 credits.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Oral, Written, Visual, and Digital Communication
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3101W - Writing Arguments [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3533 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3672W - Project Design and Development [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3751W - Seminar: Theory and Practice of Writing Consultancy [WI] (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 4196 - Internship in Technical Writing and Communication (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4573W - Writing Proposals and Grant Management [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4662W - Writing With Digital Technologies [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Science, Technology, and Society
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· WRIT 3108 {Inactive} [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3361 - Literature of Social Movements in the United States: 1950 to Present [LITR, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3371W - Technology, Self, and Society [TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet [TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4562 - International Professional Communication (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans. (Note for the Twin Cities and Morris campuses: The honors sub-plan does not meet this requirement. Honors students are required to complete one sub-plan plus the honors sub-plan. Please see an adviser if no honors sub-plan is listed for the program.)
Information Technology and Design
Required Courses
Students must complete 15 credits in the sub-plan. Six of the 15 credits must be taken at 3xxx or above. Other courses may be allowed in consultation with department adviser. Recommended writing studies course: WRIT 3577W Note: Students completing the information technology and design sub-plan are encouraged to take WRIT 3577W as one of their required electives. This course counts as a required elective for the major, but does not count toward the required 15 credits in the sub-plan.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 3112 - Building Construction Technology (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production (3.0-4.0 cr)
· COMM 3204 - Advanced Electronic Media Production (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3211 - Introduction to U.S. Electronic Media (3.0 cr)
· COMM 4291 - New Telecommunication Media (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 1001 - Overview of Computer Science [MATH, TS] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1901 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 2011 - Discrete Structures of Computer Science (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· DES 1101W - Introduction to Design Thinking [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· DES 2101 - Design and Visual Presentation (3.0 cr)
· DES 3311 - Travels in Typography (3.0 cr)
· GDES 1315 - Foundations: The Graphic Studio (4.0 cr)
· GDES 4131W - History of Graphic Design [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3714 - Technology and Civilization: Stone Tools to Steam Engines [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3715 - Technology and Civilization: Waterwheels to the Web [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HSCI 4321 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HUMF 5001 - Foundations of Human Factors/Ergonomics (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4272 - Interactive Advertising (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4551 - New Media and Culture [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· KIN 3505 - Intro to Human-Centered Design (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines (3.0 cr)
· UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction (4.0 cr)
Biological and Health Sciences
Required Courses
Students must complete 15 credits in the sub-plan. Six of the 15 credits must be taken at 3xxx or above. Other courses may be allowed in consultation with department adviser. Students are strongly encouraged to take BIOL 1009 and ANAT 3001 within this sub-plan to facilitate a stronger knowledge base for other required courses.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1101 - Genetics and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 2012 - General Zoology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3811 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3825 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1011 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 1021 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 1022 {Inactive} [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 2101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 4001 - Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products (4.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· PHAR 1002 - Medical Terminology (2.0 cr)
· PHAR 5201 - Applied Health Sciences Terminology (2.0 cr)
· PHCL 3100 - Pharmacology for Pre-Med and Life Science Students (2.0 cr)
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Legal Discourse and Public Policy
Required Courses
Students must complete 15 credits in the sub-plan. Six of the 15 credits must be taken at 3xxx or above. Other courses may be allowed in consultation with department adviser. Recommended writing studies courses: WRIT 3577W and WRIT 4431 Note: Students completing this sub-plan are encouraged to take WRIT 3577W and WRIT 4431 as two of their required electives. These courses count as required electives for the major, but do not count toward the required 15 credits in the sub-plan.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3631 - Freedom of Speech [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 4337 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communications (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1004W - Introduction to Political Philosophy [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4321W - Theories of Justice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 1201 - Political Ideas and Ideologies [HIS, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3225 - American Political Thought [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3309 - Justice in America (3.0 cr)
· POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4485 - Human Rights and Democracy in the World [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4502W - The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3101 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4161 - Criminal Law in American Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4162 - Criminal Procedure in American Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4170 - Soc of International Law: Trafficking, Human Rights, & Business Regulation [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4175 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
Environmental Science
Required Courses
Students must complete 15 credits in the sub-plan. Six of the 15 credits must be taken at 3xxx or above. Other courses may be allowed in consultation with department adviser.
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3041 - Ecological Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4069 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 4561 - Architecture and Ecology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· BBE 4733 - Renewable Energy Technologies [TS] (3.0 cr)
· CE 3501 - Environmental Engineering [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CHEN 5551 - Survey of Renewable Energy Technologies (3.0 cr)
· ECON 3611 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy (3.0 cr)
· FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5455 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1002 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3003 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3004 - Water and Society (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3355 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3452 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - History of Ecology and Environmentalism [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems (3.0 cr)
or ENT 5321 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3408W - Ecology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3304 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP adviser and their departmental faculty adviser.
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

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· Summer 2014
· Spring 2014
· Fall 2012

View sample plan(s):
· Information Technology and Design
· Biological and Health Sciences
· Legal Discourse and Public Policy
· Environmental Science

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· Scientific and Technical Communication B.S.
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WRIT 3001 - Introduction to Technical Writing and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Research origins/history. Technical communication. Audience, purpose, ethics, global communication, collaboration, usability, digital writing technologies. Journal articles, student/professional organizations, guest presentations, interviews, digital portfolio. Oral presentations, research. prereq: Technical Writing concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Communication Major or instr consent
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/practices of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and scientific and technical communication. Lecture, discussion, simulations, small group work. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
WRIT 3441 - Editing, Critique, and Style
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01667
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Editing for style, correctness, and content. Grammar/punctuation, Copyediting/proofreading. Working with a writer to develop, organize, write, and polish a document. Editing technical/scientific information. Paper/electronic assignments. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
WRIT 3671 - Visual Rhetoric and Document Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Rhetorical principles applied to visual displays of information/data in print/online documents. Analyze/create examples of visual communication/design for selected documents combined with various writing strategies. prereq: Jr or sr
WRIT 3701W - Rhetorical Theory for Writing Studies (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/history of rhetorical theory/criticism. Classical theories. Aristotle's Rhetoric applied to examples of contemporary communication. Relationship of classical theory to scientific discourse, technical communication. prereq: Sconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in TC Major, Soph or jr or sr or instr consent
WRIT 4501 - Usability and Human Factors in Technical Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/concepts of human factors/usability testing. Developing objectives, criteria, and measures. Conducting tests in lab, field, and virtual environments. Using software programs to analyze qualitative/quantitative data. prereq: [Sconcurrent registration is required (or allowed) in TC major, [jr or sr or grad student]] or instr consent
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3101W - Writing Arguments (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Soph or jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students learn about argument, drawn from a number of theories of argument. This goal is pragmatic: those theories provide a vocabulary for talking about argument and for developing and refining students' own written arguments. Students get regular practice, coaching, and feedback on their writing skills, primarily as these concern argumentative writing. Students also learn how to analyze argumentative texts, drawn from popular culture, academic fields, and the public realm. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language as creating rather than simply describing "reality." Reading and writing as arenas of active human struggle over social group power. Techniques for analyzing, interpreting, and participating in the conversation of critical literacies. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Visual communication, audience analysis, organizing presentation, presenting complex material. Emphasizes use of computers. prereq: COMM 1101 or instr consent
WRIT 3672W - Project Design and Development (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students study, plan, research, design, and develop technical communication print documents, including documentation, brochures, and newsletters. Workplace project processes. Develop production-quality documents. prereq: Jr or sr
WRIT 3751W - Seminar: Theory and Practice of Writing Consultancy (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How writers learn to write, how writing is taught in the academy, and how rhetorical conventions vary across disciplines. prereq: Currently working in a University writing center, instr consent
WRIT 4196 - Internship in Technical Writing and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Internships sites may include University, industry, or government agencies. Internship proposal, progress report, internship journal (optional), final report with letter from internship supervisor. prereq: 3562W, 24 cr in Technical Writing concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Communication major
WRIT 4573W - Writing Proposals and Grant Management (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Research funding sources. Interpreting RFP or program announcement. Letters of intent. Grant preparation, following guidelines of RFP or program announcement. Proposals for nonprofits or research/business. prereq: [[3562W or 3029W or equiv], [[jr or sr] STC major or grad student]] or instr consent
WRIT 4662W - Writing With Digital Technologies (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
WRIT 4662W is an advanced level Writing Studies course that explores various digital writing technologies and provides multiple opportunities to assess writing situations and make appropriate decisions about digital form and production. Students will learn the basic building blocks of writing in Internet environments (text, sound, images, video) as well as the vocabularies, functionalities, and organizing structures of Web 2.0 environments, how these impact understanding and use of information, and how to produce these environments (i.e., multimedia internet documents) for interactivity and use. This course includes design projects and practice with apps, markup language, content management systems, video, and social media. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Land in America as idea and as actual space. History of cultural values and the meanings land holds for us. Contrasting views of land, especially those of certain Native American peoples. Rise of the conservation movement and the urbanization of U.S. space. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
WRIT 3361 - Literature of Social Movements in the United States: 1950 to Present (LITR, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literature (fictional, nonfictional) of social movements in United States in last half of 20th century. Artistic truth in relation to historical truth. Roles/obligations of citizens to protest/change social structures. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or instr consent
WRIT 3371W - Technology, Self, and Society (TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cultural history of American technology. Social values that technology represents in shifts from handicraft to mass production/consumption, in modern transportation, communication, bioengineering. Ethical issues in power, work, identity, our relation to nature.
WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How written texts contribute to movements in art and culture. How such texts are written with particular audiences, purposes, styles, and forms. Readings, lectures, discussions, analysis of texts.
WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet (TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How persuasive communication is tailored to the Internet; how Internet technologies enable/limit persuasion; how to adapt rhetorical theory to 21st century digital writing; ethical issues, including free speech, copyright, fair use, privacy; rhetorics of social networks. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or instr consent
WRIT 4431W - Science, Technology, and the Law (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How issues in science/technology affect 21st century practice of law. Ownership, access, ethics, information, technology used to frame topics. Intellectual property, privacy, health law, research practice. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
WRIT 4562 - International Professional Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Communicating with multicultural audience/working as member of international team. Exposure with peers/instructors from various parts of world. prereq: 3562W or equiv
AFEE 3112 - Building Construction Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AFEE/BIE 3112
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
Instructional/lab exercises in light frame building construction. Site layout, foundations, framing, plumbing, insulating, sheathing, roofing. Emphasizes safety and use of modern tools, materials, and prefabricated components.
ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01278
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Introduction to design, design process. Developing/understanding ways of seeing, thinking, and acting as a designer. Changes in design being wrought by digital technology. Team design project.
ARTH 3422 - Off the Wall: History of Graphic Arts in Europe and America in the Modern Age
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3T
History/theory of creation of lithography, social caricature (e.g., Daumier, Gavarni), revival of etching (e.g., Goya/mid-century practitioners, Whistler), and color lithography (e.g., Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Bonnard). Media changes of 20th century. Revolutionary nature of new media.
COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Production/criticism of messages for electronic media. Theory/practice in planning, scripting, production, and criticism in various electronic media. Student productions in lab.
COMM 3204 - Advanced Electronic Media Production
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Video as communicative medium integrating visual/aural aesthetics. Creation of broadcast-quality production integrating message creation, audience analysis, argument development, and visual/audio scripting. Utilization of media aesthetics to develop/shape production content. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
COMM 3211 - Introduction to U.S. Electronic Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Historical development and current issues in electronic media technologies and programming. Effects of governmental, industrial, and public organizations on message content. Problem areas of electronic media.
COMM 4291 - New Telecommunication Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9T
Development and current status of new telecommunication media such as cable TV, satellites, DBS, MDS, and video disk/cassettes. Technology, historical development, regulation, and programming of these media and their influence on individuals, organizations, and society. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
CSCI 1001 - Overview of Computer Science (MATH, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Foundations/limits of today's computing/information technology. How to reason about applications/technological advances. Policy issues. Algorithms for automating solutions. Abstraction in design/problem solving. Concepts of computer databases, networks, expert systems human-computer interaction, Internet, Web, desktop software, personal computers. prereq: Non-CSci major, non-CompE major, non-EE major
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 2011 - Discrete Structures of Computer Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02004
Typically offered: 9V3V
Foundations of discrete mathematics. Sets, sequences, functions, big-O, propositional/predicate logic, proof methods, counting methods, recursion/recurrences, relations, trees/graph fundamentals. prereq: MATH 1271 or MATH 1371 or instr consent
CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Impact of computers on society. Computer science perspective of ethical, legal, social, philosophical, political, and economic aspects of computing. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
DES 1101W - Introduction to Design Thinking (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Theories/processes that underpin design thinking. Interactions between humans and their natural, social, and designed environments where purposeful design helps determine quality of interaction. Design professions.
DES 2101 - Design and Visual Presentation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
Introduction to visual design. Development of visual design skills. Visual presentation methods. Lectures, design exercises, discussion.
DES 3311 - Travels in Typography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01643 - Des 3311/DesI 3010
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V3V
Using collection in James Ford Bell Library, students study rare book/map collections and undertake hands-on exercises on history of type, including developments in typesetting, calligraphy, and letterpress printing.
GDES 1315 - Foundations: The Graphic Studio
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Graphic design process of problem-solving. Visual communication of ideas and information. Use of design software to compose with words, images, and forms. prereq: Graphic design premajor design minor or instr consent
GDES 4131W - History of Graphic Design (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Historical analysis of visual communication. Technological, cultural, and aesthetic influences. How historical events are communicated/perceived through graphic presentation/imagery. prereq: Intro history or art history course
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: 9V3V
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 3401 - Ethics in Science and Technology (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3401/5401
Typically offered: 9V3V
Historical issues involve research ethics including utilitarian, social Darwinian, and other ethical systems developed in science. Ethical problems posed by modern science and technology, including nuclear energy, chemical industry, and information technologies.
HSCI 3714 - Technology and Civilization: Stone Tools to Steam Engines (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00986 - HSci 1714/HSci 3714
Typically offered: 9V3V
History of technology in its cultural context from earliest times to the Industrial Revolution. Neolithic Revolution, Bronze/Iron Ages, ancient civilizations, Greece, Rome, Middle Ages, Renaissance.
HSCI 3715 - Technology and Civilization: Waterwheels to the Web (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00420 - HSci 1715/3715
Typically offered: 9V3V
Relations of technology to culture since Industrial Revolution. Diffusion of Industrial Revolution, modes of adaptation by different cultures, social impact.
HSCI 4321 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00497 - CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: 9E3O
Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
HUMF 5001 - Foundations of Human Factors/Ergonomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HumF/Kin 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9T
Variability in human performance influenced by interaction with designs of machines/tools, computers/software, complex technological systems, jobs/working conditions, organizations, sociotechnical institutions. Conceptual, empirical, practical aspects of human factors/ergonomics. prereq: Grad HumF major or minor or instr consent
JOUR 3006 - Visual Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Visual media, role of images in mass communication. Social, cultural, historical, psychological approaches.
JOUR 3614 - History of Media Communication (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01819
Typically offered: 9V3V
Historical perspective on tools of communication from earliest times to present. Impact of new technologies on society.
JOUR 4272 - Interactive Advertising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Interactive advertising models. Issues related to creating, measuring, pricing, targeting interactive ads. Interactive ads in global, legal, ethical contexts. prereq: Jour major or mass comm minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 4551 - New Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 3V
History, theories, social impact of digital/interactive media on culture. How new media, including Internet, mobile devices, websites, applications, social media, may change ways people communicate/distribute/process information.
KIN 3505 - Intro to Human-Centered Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HumF/ Kin 3505/5505
Typically offered: 9V
Application of design to meet human needs. Design of fabricated products, tools/machines, software/hardware interfaces, art/culture, living environments, and complex sociotechnical systems.
PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Mind-body problem. Philosophical relevance of cybernetics, artificial intelligence, computer simulation. prereq: one course in philosophy or instr consent
UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Web design process: plan, design, launch, and publish. Design principles, business practices, site analysis. Students use industry standard Web design software, including Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Dreamweaver, and Flash, to build Web site. HTML, CSS. Lectures, exercises, lab.
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: 9V
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/6021/Biol 3021
Typically offered: 9V3V
Survey of organic chemistry/biochemistry outlining structure/metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009, credit not granted if received for 3021
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 6021
Prerequisites: [2331 or CHEM 2301, [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003]] or #
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq: [2331 or CHEM 2301, [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003]] or instr consent
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640 - Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: 9V3V
Biological diversity from genetic variation to diversity of species/ecosystems. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes governing biological diversity. Genetic, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives on issues concerning human diversity, human population growth, health, agriculture, and conservation. Lab.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry; 1 term college chemistry recommended
BIOL 1101 - Genetics and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: No cr if taken after 4003 or GCB 3022
Typically offered: 3V
Principles of heredity and their social and cultural implications. prereq: No cr if taken after 4003 or GCB 3022
BIOL 2012 - General Zoology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/2012
Typically offered: 9V3V
Major animal groups (phyla). Applications of morphological, physiological, and developmental characteristics to define evolutionary relationships. Parasitic forms affecting human welfare. Lab requires dissection, including mammals. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2022/2822
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Principles of plant biology. Organization, function, growth/development, and reproductive biology of plants and plant-like organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 3811 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3411/3811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 5V
Biological study of animal behavior. Mechanism development, function, evolution. Emphasizes evolution of adaptive behavior, social behavior in natural environment. Lab, field work. prereq: 1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv or instr consent
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: [[BIOC 3021 or BIOC 4331], [any CBS major or major in [animal science or applied plant science or BA biology or BA microbiology or nutrition or physiology or biology/society/environment] or Grad MBS major]] or instr consent
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01965 - Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: 4003, [BIOC 3021 or BIOC 4331], [CBS major or CSE major or grad MSB major]
CHEM 2101 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lecture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V5V
Primarily for chemistry majors. Methods/concepts of measurement by chemical/instrumental analysis, including titrimetry, quantitative spectrophotometric analysis, chromatographic separations, equilibrium/rate methods. prereq: 1022 or equiv
CHEM 2111 - Introductory Analytical Chemistry Lab
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V5V
Lab for 2101. High precision methods, acidimetry and complexometry, single and multicomponent analysis by spectrophotometry, analysis of mixtures by ion exchange and gas chromatography, enzymatic and rate methods. prereq: 2101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2101
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H or equiv or B or better in 1071H/1075H, 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01923 - Chem 2302/Chem 2332H
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
CHEM 4001 - Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01147
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
Chemical principles underlying structure, properties, processing, performance of plant materials. prereq: 2301, [jr or sr or instr consent]
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003], [CHEM 2301 or BIOC 2331]
PHAR 1002 - Medical Terminology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Students analyze/build terminology by using/combining forms, suffixes, prefixes.
PHAR 5201 - Applied Health Sciences Terminology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Identify/describe various medical conditions/processes. Medical abbreviations, surgical procedures, medical terminology. Analyzing words at roots. prereq: Basic knowledge of human anatomy/physiology
PHCL 3100 - Pharmacology for Pre-Med and Life Science Students
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Principles/mechanisms of drug action. Major drug categories for different organ systems. prereq: College-level biology, biochemistry or physiology recommended
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01327
Typically offered: 9V
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of scientific knowledge. Reading of historical and contemporary sources that describe major scientific achievements and controversies. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PHIL 4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9T3T
Structure/status of evolutionary theory. Nature of molecular biology, genetics. Reductionism in biology. Legitimacy of teleology. Species concept. prereq: Courses in [philosophy or biology] or instr consent
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: 9V3V
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02195
Typically offered: 9V3V
Fundamental principles of health conservation and disease prevention.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: 9V3V
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Graphical/numerical presentations of data. Judging the usefulness/reliability of results/inferences from surveys and other studies to interesting populations. Coping with randomness/variation in an uncertain world. prereq: Mathematics requirement for admission to University
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 2211/Stat 3011/5021
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Prerequisites: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, Internet access; high school physics recommended; CHEM 1015 is a 3-credit, lecture-only course, with the lectures delivered online via Moodle, and exams taken in person on campus. Internet access is required. Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Lectures online, exams on campus. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: 9T
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
COMM 3631 - Freedom of Speech (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Communication theories and principles that underlie the concept of freedom of speech in the United States. A variety of contexts and practices are examined in order to understand how communicative interaction should be described and, when necessary, appropriately regulated.
CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Impact of computers on society. Computer science perspective of ethical, legal, social, philosophical, political, and economic aspects of computing. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
JOUR 3007 - The Media in American History and Law: Case Studies (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Media in socioeconomic-political-technological context of specific historical period. Focus on legal context/ethics questions.
JOUR 3776 - Mass Communication Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01768 - Jour 3776/Jour 3776H
Typically offered: 9V3V
Brief historical background, First Amendment rights, basic law of defamation, free press/fair trial, access to news, access to press, privacy, contempt, obscenity, regulation of broadcasting/advertising.
JOUR 5552 - Law of Internet Communications
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Whether/how/which traditional media laws/regulations apply to Internet. Developing law of communication on Internet, global/ethical issues.
PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Application of formal techniques for evaluating arguments.
PHIL 1004W - Introduction to Political Philosophy (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1004W/V
Typically offered: 9V3V
Central concepts, principal theories of political philosophy.
PHIL 4321W - Theories of Justice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9E5O
Philosophical accounts of concept/principles of justice. prereq: 1003 or 1004 or instr consent
POL 1001 - American Democracy in a Changing World (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Introduction to politics/government in the United States. Constitutional origins/development, major institutions, parties, interest groups, elections, participation, public opinion. Ways of explaining politics, nature of political science. Emphasizes recent trends.
POL 1201 - Political Ideas and Ideologies (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Analysis of key concepts and ideas (e.g., freedom, equality, democracy) as they are constructed by major theories and ideologies (liberalism, conservatism, socialism, etc.).
POL 3225 - American Political Thought (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Puritans, American Revolution, Constitution, pro- and anti-slavery arguments, civil war/reconstruction, industrialism, westward expansion, Native Americans, immigration, populism, socialism, social Darwinism, women's suffrage, red scares, Great Depression, free speech, pluralism, multiculturalism. prereq: Suggested prerequisite POL 1201
POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00860 - Pol 4308/5308
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Origin/development of U.S. congressional institutions, parties, committees, leaders, lobbying/elections, and relations between Congress/executive branch. Relationship of campaigning/governing, nature of representation, biases of institutional arrangements.
POL 3309 - Justice in America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01344 - Pol 3309/Pol 4309/Pol 5309
Typically offered: 9V3V
American judiciary. Selection of judges. How/why these individuals/institutions behave as they do. What influences judicial decisions. What impact decisions have. Why people comply with them. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or instr consent
POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9E3O
Theory/practice of constitutionalism in different countries. Conceptual/normative inquiry between constitutionalism, rule of law, and democracy. Origins/role of constitutions. Relevance of courts with constitutional review powers: U.S., Germany, Japan, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, Nigeria.
POL 4485 - Human Rights and Democracy in the World (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4485/5485
Typically offered: 9E3O
Human/democracy rights in global/comparative perspectives. History of ideas about human rights/democracy. Contrast economic, political, psychological, ideological explanations for repression. prereq: One 1xxx or 3xxx course in pol sci
POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Historical/analytical approaches to Court's landmark decisions. Theory/techniques of judicial review. Relates Court's authority to wider political/social context of American government.
POL 4502W - The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Supreme Court's interpretation of Bill of Rights, 14th amendment. Freedom of speech, press, religion; crime/punishment; segregation/desegregation, affirmative action; abortion/privacy.
SOC 3101 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Components, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of criminal justice/agencies (law enforcement, courts, corrections).
SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Sociological analysis of law/society. Why people obey law. Social forces involved in creating law (civil/criminal). Procedures of enforcement. Impact of law on social change. prereq: [1001, 3101, 3102] or 3701 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4161 - Criminal Law in American Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of criminal liability, justification, and excuse. Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public order, and morals. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4162 - Criminal Procedure in American Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 3V
How constitutional democracy balances need to enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be free of unnecessary government intrusion. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4170 - Soc of International Law: Trafficking, Human Rights, & Business Regulation (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01339 - GloS 4406/Soc 4170
Prerequisites: 1001 or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #; soc majors/minors must register A-F
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3T
Cultural values/practices in a globalized world. Role of international law. Immigration, terrorism, Americanization, structure of international legal system. prereq: 1001 or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
ANTH 3041 - Ecological Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00001
Typically offered: 9T
Concepts, theories, and methods of ecological anthropology (cultural ecology). How humans interact with biophysical environment. Compares biological/cultural interactions with environment. Examines adaptive strategies cross-culturally. prereq: 1003 or instr consent
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 3V
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
ARCH 4561 - Architecture and Ecology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01107 - Arch 4501/Arch 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Introduction to theories/practices of ecological approaches to architectural design. Ecological context, implications/opportunities of architecture. Historical/theoretical framework for ecological design thinking. Issues studied at various scales: site/community, building, component.
BBE 4733 - Renewable Energy Technologies (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01676 - BBE 4733/BBE 5733/ChEn 5551
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Energy security. Environmental, economic, societal impacts. Current/emerging technologies for production/use, characteristics of renewable energy, key methods for efficient production. Current/probable future. Impact on sustainable development. prereq: Junior or senior
CE 3501 - Environmental Engineering (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V
Introduction to environmental engineering. Quantitative approach to environmental problems. Scientific background for understanding roles of engineers and scientists. prereq: Chem 1022, Phys 1302
CHEN 5551 - Survey of Renewable Energy Technologies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
Technologies to generate renewable energy/chemicals. Biomass, solar, wind, hydroelectric. Emphasizes biomass processing using chemical/biological methods. Renewable technologies compared with fossil fuel technologies. prereq: [Upper div or instr consent], basic knowledge of chemistry, thermodynamics
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9V3V
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: 3V
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 3261 - Economics and Natural Resources Management (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00362
Prerequisites: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Microeconomic principles, their application to natural resource management problems. Tools to address market failure, project analysis. Economic/financial considerations. Benefit/cost analysis. Valuation/assessment methods for property/market/nonmarket benefits. Planning/management problems. Managing renewable natural resources. Case studies. prereq: MATH 1031 or MATH 1051 or MATH 1142 or MATH 1155 or MATH 1271 or ESPM 3012 or STAT 3011 or Soc 3811 or equiv
ESPM 3601 - Sustainable Housing--Community, Environment, and Technology (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00708
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
How sustainable housing practices build community. How community growth has impacted the environment and how natural events impact our communities. Science and technology required to build high performance houses.
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01075
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3604 - Environmental Management Systems and Strategy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 9V
Environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity.
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: 3V
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01201 - Geo 1001/1005/1012/1101/1105
Typically offered: 9V3V5V
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3E
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 3004 - Water and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9T
Processes that influence formation, circulation, composition, and use of water. Human influence on water quality through agricultural, industrial, and other land-use practices. International case studies examine human interaction with surface environment, influence of local land-use practices.
ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: 9O
Geologic aspects of energy/material resources. Resource size/life-times. Environmental consequences of resource use. Issues of international/public ethics associated with resource production, distribution, and use.
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
HSCI 3244 - History of Ecology and Environmentalism (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: 9V3V
Histories of ecological ideas; ecology as a scientific discipline; environmental ideas and movements in the United States and in the western world. Modern period (post-1650). European roots of ideas about relationships between plants, animals, humans, and their environments. United States and establishment of ecology as a scientific discipline, as well as its connection with efforts to protect and conserve natural resources. Efforts to place humans under the lens of ecology, critiques of the impact of humans on nature, and growth of the environmental movement in response to those critiques.
LA 3501 - Environmental Design and Its Biological and Physical Context (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V5V
Dynamic relationships between environmentally designed places and biological/physical contexts. Integration of created place and biological/physical contexts. Case studies, student design.
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: 3O
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846 - GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: 1001 or environmental course recommended, [soc majors/minors must register A-F]
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182 - GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Prerequisites: SOC 1001 recommended
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: 3V
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: 3V
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: 3V
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 5321 - Ecology of Agricultural Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/Ent 5321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 9V
Ecological approach to problems in agricultural systems. Formal methodologies of systems inquiry are developed/applied. prereq: [3xxx or above] course in [Agro or AnSc or Ent or Hort or PlPa or Soil] or instr consent
BIOL 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005 - Biol 3407/3807/5407/EEB 3001
Typically offered: 9V
Principles of population growth/interactions and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
BIOL 3408W - Ecology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005 - Biol 3407/3807/5407/EEB 3001
Typically offered: 3V
Principles of population growth/interactions and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
SUST 3003 - Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01345
Typically offered: 9V3V
Introduction to interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies minor. Scientific, cultural, ethical, and economic concepts that affect environmental sustainability and global economic justice. Key texts. Participatory classroom environment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: 3V
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr