Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Racial Justice in Urban Schooling

Curriculum & Instruction
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
The 15-credit racial justice in urban schooling minor prepares students to analyze educational practices that marginalize students from non-dominant social groups and to develop alternatives through liberatory curricula and pedagogies. This minor will critique contemporary commentary on urban education and support students whose educational interest is in the intersections of race, language status, social class, gender or sexual orientation. The central experiences in this minor bridge theoretical analysis with transformative pedagogies of possibilities, including culturally relevant pedagogy, funds of knowledge and inquiry approaches. Students explore the relationships among home, community and school cultures for students of color, focusing on classroom contexts, but extending outside of school spaces to educational practices and insights of households and community organizations. Students partner with a school to produce critical digital media that address local issues of urban education. Students select additional core coursework in critical perspectives in education on either race, class or language and in ethnic or gender studies classes. Students who combine this minor with an undergraduate degree in liberal arts, sciences, or ethnic studies will position themselves to critically engage their communities on educational issues or for graduate work in secondary teacher licensure, educational policy, and other educational studies.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
Minor requriements
Required core courses (9 credits).
CI 3101 - Issues in Urban Education (3.0 cr)
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education (3.0 cr)
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
or CI 5641 - Language, Culture, and Education (3.0 cr)
or CI 5464 - The Politics of Literacy and Race in Schools (3.0 cr)
Ethnic Studies Elective
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AAS 1101 - Imagining Asian America [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 1201 - Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 1021 - Introduction to Africa [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 1023W - Introduction to African World Literature [GP, LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3301 - The Music of Black Americans [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian & Indigenous Peoples [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1003 - American Indians in Minnesota [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers [AH] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3711 - Dakota Culture and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 1201 - Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3213 - Chicano Music and Art [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3221 - Chicana/o Cultural Studies: Barrio Culture and the Aesthetics of Everyday Life [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3672 - Chicana/o Experience in the Midwest [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 1002 - Politics of Sex [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3302 - Women and the Arts [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3306 - Pop Culture Women [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3307 - Feminist Film Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3002 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3455 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 1102 - Latinos in the United States: Culture and Citizenship [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 1102H - Honors: Latinos in the United States: Culture and Citizenship [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History I [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3634 - Chicana and Chicano History I [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History I [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 1003W - Women Write the World [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1003W - Women Write the World [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 1007 - Introduction to GLBT Studies [DSJ, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 1001 - Introduction to GLBT Studies [DSJ, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3102W - Feminist Thought and Theory [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3102V - Honors: Feminist Thought and Theory [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3305 - Queer Cinema [AH] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3305 - Queer Cinema [AH] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3407 - Women in Early and Victorian America: 1600-1890 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3347 - Women in Early America: 1600-1890 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
GENERAL ELECTIVES
Take 3 or more credits from the list provided or an additional 3 credits from the Core or Ethnic Studies Electives. Request approval from the Curriculum and Instruction Director of Undergraduate Studies for courses not included below.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CI 3421W - Writing on Education: Pivotal Experiences of Teaching and Learning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CI 4311W - Technology and Ethics in Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CI 5145 - Critical Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
· CI 5472 - Teaching Critical Media Analysis in Schools (3.0 cr)
· CI 5746 - Global and Multicultural Education in the Secondary Classroom (3.0 cr)
· CI 5762 - Developing Civic Discourse in the Social Studies (3.0 cr)
· CI 3901 - Exploring the Teaching Profession I (2.0 cr)
· EPSY 3132 - Psychology of Multiculturalism in Education [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 2103 - Family Policy (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4155 - Parent-Child Relationships (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1372 - Geography of Global Cities [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4870 - Introduction to Integrating Human Rights into Organizational Leadership (3.0 cr)
· POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3003 - Social Problems (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3452 - Education and Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education (3.0 cr)
· SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3301W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3001 - Introduction to History & Philosophy of Youthwork (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches (4.0 cr)
· YOST 3240 - Special Topics in Youth Studies (2.0-8.0 cr)
· SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers (4.0 cr)
or YOST 5032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers (4.0 cr)
 
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CI 3101 - Issues in Urban Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Issues in urban education examines and critiques contemporary commentary on urban education through texts, social media, case studies, and service-learning in schools. Through examination of socio-cultural and socio-political contexts of urban education, this course considers the role of teachers, curriculum, and community in urban schooling.
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02193
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Manifestations of culture/power in education. How culture is mediating factor in educational achievement of students of color. Relationship between home/community, school cultures. Theories/research that show importance of integrating students' interests, knowledge, experience for increasing student engagement/achievement.
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social, psychological, economic, political aspects of social class/poverty. Implications for education as social institution/classroom pedagogy. Social class in U.S., working-class literature for adults/children, labor histories, economic systems.
CI 5641 - Language, Culture, and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Applies current sociolinguistic and discourse theory/research to study of relationships between language and culture in educational settings: language curriculum and instruction; classroom language use; borders between school and home/community language use; and educational policies on literacy/second-language instruction.
CI 5464 - The Politics of Literacy and Race in Schools
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Literacy and race in schools examined, especially how power plays out, and what are the possibilities for creating radical democratic forms of life. Conceptions of language, literacy, whiteness, and racial identities are explored. Topics include educators’ talk and silence about race, Ebonics, and youth’s racial identities in global times.
AAS 1101 - Imagining Asian America (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues in Asian American Studies. Historical/recent aspects of the diverse/multifaceted vision of "Asian America," using histories, films, memoirs, and other texts as illustrations.
AAS 1201 - Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01688
Typically offered: Every Fall
How aggrieved racialized groups struggle over identity, culture, place, and meaning. Histories of racialization. Strategies toward rectification of historical injustices from dispossession, slavery, exploitation, and exclusion.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074 - AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 1021 - Introduction to Africa (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A comparative regional examination of contemporary African challenges and varied struggles using case studies, and a range of analytical parameters. Of particular focus will be issues of political destabilization, social fragmentation,economic disruption; internal displacement and international migration within regional and global contexts.
AFRO 1023W - Introduction to African World Literature (GP, LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Childhood is a time of intense growth and dramatic change; of rapid physical, mental and emotional development. It is a time of discovering, experiencing, exploring; of exuberant curiosity and creativity. It is a state characterized by play and activity, innocence and wonder, surprise and delight. But childhood can also be a time of great confusion and uncertainty; of doubt, turmoil and anxiety. Through select pieces of short fiction, prose, essays and cinematic works, we will analyze the popularity of the coming?of?age genre (or bildungsroman) as a primary mode of formative response within the African world literary tradition. We will consider how the autobiographical or semi-autobiographical story, told by a narrator who is growing up and becoming conscious of their body, their familial and wider social surroundings, their emotions, their very identity, dramatizes the cultural, political, and historical contexts in which it is set. Through our exploration of socialization as a thematic component of the bildungsroman, we will examine how ?coming-of-age? comes to represent something very different for boys and for girls.
AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course on the critical thought of Black intellectual-activists and others enmeshed in the struggles for the radical transformation of U.S. democracy. Introduces the following three leaders and activists--Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X--whose work in the building of the Black freedom movement spanned the period from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Course proposition is that their life and times in the struggle for liberation offer important insights into the transformation of the U.S. political economy from the welfare/warfare state to the neoliberal state. These intellectual-activists, as well as others who translate their radical traditions through Black-Brown and Afro-Asian solidarity projects (e.g. Grace Lee Boggs of Detroit) have responded to racial formation in the U.S. and presented not just visions of liberation but concrete alternatives at the grassroots to usher in a more just, egalitarian, and ethical society.
AFRO 3301 - The Music of Black Americans (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Musical contributions of African American artists/innovators from 1619 to present. Apirituals, blues, ragtime, gospel, art music, jazz.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 1001 - Introduction to American Indian & Indigenous Peoples (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to how voices/visions of indigenous peoples have contributed to history of cultural expression in North America. Historic contexts/varieties of this expression by region, tribal cultures. Emphasizes contributions in literature, philosophy, politics, fine arts.
AMIN 1003 - American Indians in Minnesota (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History, culture, and lived experience of American Indian people in Minnesota. Self-representation and histories of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) and Dakota peoples through film, music, oral traditions, and written texts. Work by non-Indian scholars focuses on cultural, philosophical, and linguistic perspectives of Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples.
AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of film/video made by American Indian writers, directors, producers within contexts of tribally specific cultures/histories, as well as within context of US culture/film history.
AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02486 - AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 3501 - Indigenous Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
AMIN 3711 - Dakota Culture and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Dakota culture, language, history, literature. Contemporary issues, the arts.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 1201 - Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01688 - AAS1201/Afro1201/AmIn1201/Chic
Typically offered: Every Fall
How aggrieved racialized groups struggle over identity, culture, place, and meaning. Histories of racialization. Strategies toward rectification of historical injustices from dispossession, slavery, exploitation, and exclusion.
CHIC 3213 - Chicano Music and Art (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of diverse forms of cultural expressiveness in Mexican American music/art. History of various types of artistic production and musical forms in their regional specificity. Social/economic implications of several genres, styles, and traditions.
CHIC 3221 - Chicana/o Cultural Studies: Barrio Culture and the Aesthetics of Everyday Life (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cultural studies approach to investigating aesthetic dimensions of experience that inform and are informed by dynamic relationship between culture, class, ethnicity, and power.
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly survey and exploration of the sociocultural function of various types of folklore in Greater Mexico. Ways in which folklore constructs and maintains community, as well as resists and engenders cultural shifts.
CHIC 3672 - Chicana/o Experience in the Midwest (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people generally defined as Chicano or Latino, living in the Midwest. Individual/group identity. Focuses on construction of Chicano-Latino experience. How identity affirmation, migration stories, immigration status, historical memory, and cultural traditions are impacted by being in the Midwest.
CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of migrants from Latin America to the United States in 20th/21st century. Migrant engagements with US society. Pre-existing Latina/o and other ethnic communities. experiences within political, economic, and social aspects of life at local/global level.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
GWSS 1002 - Politics of Sex (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introductory survey of historical, cultural, psychological, and sociopolitical dimensions of analyzing gender/sexuality. Norms/deviances pertaining to gender/sexuality as differently enacted/understood by social groups in different time-/place-specific locations. GWSS / Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies / Gender Studies
GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Similarities/differences in women's experiences throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media (feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral history, autobiography).
GWSS 3302 - Women and the Arts (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of women in the arts, as represented and as participants (creators, audiences). Discussion of at least two different art forms and works from at least two different U.S. ethnic or cultural communities.
GWSS 3306 - Pop Culture Women (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contemporary U.S. feminism as political/intellectual movement. Ways in which movement has been represented in popular culture.
GWSS 3307 - Feminist Film Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Construction of different notions of gender in film, social uses of these portrayals. Lectures on film criticism, film viewings, class discussions.
GWSS 3406 - Gender, Labor, and Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical developments/contemporary manifestations of women's participation in labor force/global economy. Gender as condition for creation/maintenance of exploitable category of workers. How women's choices are shaped in various locations. Women's labor organizing. GWSS / Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies / Gender Studies
AFRO 3002 - West African History: 1800 to Present (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02056 - Afro 3002/Hist 3455
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
West African history from late 18th century to present. Past/profound changes including new 19th century state formation, European colonialism, post-colonial issues.
HIST 3455 - West African History: 1800 to Present (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02056
Typically offered: Every Spring
West African history from late-18th century to present. Themes include study of continuities with past. Profound changes including new 19th century state formation, European colonialism, post-colonial issues.
AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.
HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbeans. Socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries within African Diaspora. Resistance in Suriname, Guyana, Caribbean. Protest organizations, intellectual discourses, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of modern African history from early 19th century to present. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions, modern literature from various tribal cultures.
ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions and modern literature from various tribal cultures.
AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01620 - AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01620 - AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American Indian history from the era of ancient Native America to the removal era. Social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to American Indian history from ancient native America to the removal era. Focuses on the social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance of new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature on policies.
AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01876
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diversity of cultures designated "Asian American." Understanding women's lives in historical, cultural, economic, and racial contexts.
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society.
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, honors
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066 - AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to the present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
CHIC 1102 - Latinos in the United States: Culture and Citizenship (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01061 - Chic 1102/Chic 1102H
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/cultural knowledge on the complex/multi-layered relationship that Latinos have to the U.S., their country of origin. Influence of social, cultural, and political dynamics on Latino identity, politics, and sense of belonging in the U.S. Cultural citizenship.
CHIC 1102H - Honors: Latinos in the United States: Culture and Citizenship (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01061 - Chic 1102/Chic 1102H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/cultural knowledge on the complex/multi-layered relationship that Latinos have to the U.S., their country of origin. Influence of social, cultural, and political dynamics on Latino identity, politics, and sense of belonging in the U.S. Cultural citizenship.
CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, and autoethnography.
GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049 - Chic 3212/GWSS 3410
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, autoethnography.
CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02109
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.
HIST 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02109
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, demographics. Social, economic, political changes. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans/other Latino groups.
CHIC 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History I (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, immigration, migration.
GLOS 3634 - Chicana and Chicano History I (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, immigration, migration.
HIST 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History I (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, immigration, migration.
CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative non-fiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative nonfiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through an analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency, and response to larger political systems and behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, and the political economy.
POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency. Response to larger political systems/behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, political economy.
CHIC 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02065
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Critical thinking of Chicanas/os and Latinas/os around construction of gender. Politics of sexual identity. How the self is gendered in relationship to sexual, racial, class, and national identities under different social structural conditions. Way in which the "borders" that define/confine sexual norms shift over time.
GLBT 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02065
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Critical thinking of Chicanas/os, Latinas/os around construction of gender. Politics of sexual identity. How self is gendered in relationship to sexual, racial, class, national identities under different social structural conditions.
GWSS 1003W - Women Write the World (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02326
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts in literary studies. Poems, plays, short stories, novels, essays, letters by women from different parts of world. Focuses on lives, experiences, and literary expression of women, including basic concepts of women's studies.
ENGL 1003W - Women Write the World (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02326 - EngL 1003W/GWSS 1003W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts in literary studies. Poems, plays, short stories, novels, essays, letters by women from different parts of world. Focuses on lives, experiences, and literary expression of women, including basic concepts of women's studies.
GWSS 1007 - Introduction to GLBT Studies (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01968
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of contemporary GLBT-identified communities. Terms of theoretical debates regarding sexual orientation, identity, experience. Analyzes problems produced/insights gained by incorporating GLBT issues into specific academic, social, cultural, political discourses.
GLBT 1001 - Introduction to GLBT Studies (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01968
Typically offered: Every Fall
History of contemporary GLBT-identified communities. Terms of theoretical debates regarding sexual orientation, identity, and experience. Analyzes problems produced and insights gained by incorporating GLBT issues into specific academic, social, cultural, and political discourses.
GWSS 3002W - Gender, Race, and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures throughout U.S.
GWSS 3002V - Honors: Gender, Race and Class in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02027 - GWSS 3002W/GWSS 3002V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of women, gender, race, class, sexuality in two or more ethnic cultures in U.S. prereq: Honors
GWSS 3102W - Feminist Thought and Theory (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02318 - GWSS 3102W/GWSS 3102V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course explores a range of feminist theoretical perspectives, asking how theory develops both in response to earlier theoretical traditions and in the context of diverse forms of practice, starting from the assumptions that theories emerge from (rather than just being applied to) practice, and that theory-making is itself a form of practice.
GWSS 3102V - Honors: Feminist Thought and Theory (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02318 - GWSS 3102W/GWSS 3102V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Course explores a range of feminist theoretical perspectives, asking how theory develops both in response to earlier theoretical traditions and in the context of diverse forms of practice, starting from the assumptions that theories emerge from (rather than just being applied to) practice, and that theory-making is itself a form of practice.
GWSS 3305 - Queer Cinema (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02024 - GLBT 3305/GWSS 3305
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What "queer" and "queering" signify in relation to cinema. Directors, films, styles, genres of queer cinema. Ways in which traditional narrative codes are challenged/repackaged. Ideological dimensions. Impact of political climate. Readings, screenings, discussions, assignments.
GLBT 3305 - Queer Cinema (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02024 - GLBT 3305/GWSS 3305
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What "queer" and "queering" signify in relation to cinema. Directors, films, styles, genres of queer cinema. Ways in which traditional narrative codes are challenged/repackaged. Ideological dimensions. Impact of political climate. Readings, screenings, discussions, assignments.
GWSS 3407 - Women in Early and Victorian America: 1600-1890 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00597
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varied experiences of women in American history from European settlement in North America to the end of the 19th century.
HIST 3347 - Women in Early America: 1600-1890 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00597 - GWSS 3407/Hist 3347
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varied experiences of American women 1600-1900. Topics include women's involvement in dispossession of native peoples, westward expansion, slavery, industrialization, reform, revolution, transformations in family life/sexuality.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
CI 3421W - Writing on Education: Pivotal Experiences of Teaching and Learning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reflection and narrative play important roles in developing deep understanding of teaching and learning. In this course students will read and write texts about critical moments of education, and through this work develop reflective, analytic, and writing skills that will enable them to become more thoughtful and effective citizens in the world of education. Whether students hope to become teachers, youth workers, community organizers, curriculum designers or administrators in educational settings, this course invites students to consider how writers represent experiences of teaching and learning and how these reflective narratives can inform our own work and worlds. Students will explore the ways that writers of creative nonfiction use language to examine pivotal experiences of teaching and learning in diverse contexts, and add their own voices to this rich body of work by producing their own texts. Through study of writing, students will develop familiarity with writing choices and practice employing these techniques and processes in their own writing. Students will read personal essays written by writers in the US who reflect on their own experiences and interrogate how aspects of their identities (including race, ethnicity, gender, family history and language) inform pivotal experiences of teaching and learning. Students will compose texts that explore their own experiences within a constellation of formal and informal educational settings and the questions raised and arguments made through these representations. We will use a workshop-based format that supports transformational learning, helping writers see themselves and their worlds in new ways. Course reading will introduce a range of issues raised by experiences in and outside of the classroom.
CI 4311W - Technology and Ethics in Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01754
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Critique of values and ethical issues related to technology use in education, the workplace, and family and community life.
CI 5145 - Critical Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of critical pedagogy; critique of power relations regarding race, culture, class, gender, and age in various educational settings; consideration of improved practice in education for children, youth, and adults.
CI 5472 - Teaching Critical Media Analysis in Schools
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
"Critical" media literacy means that we focus on, among other things, analyzing the intersection between media and issues of identity -- like gender, race, class and sexuality. We also focus on how to teach critical media analysis to students and others.
CI 5746 - Global and Multicultural Education in the Secondary Classroom
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues, classroom practices, and controversies surrounding global/multicultural perspective-taking in social studies education. Strategies for helping secondary social studies students develop global/multicultural worldviews.
CI 5762 - Developing Civic Discourse in the Social Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Philosophies, strategies, and research on developing civic discourse in secondary social studies classroom. Selecting issues. Democratic classroom climate. Relating to social/cultural contexts.
CI 3901 - Exploring the Teaching Profession I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to K-12 teaching as a profession. Culture of teaching, roles of teachers, student learning, multicultural/diverse students/contexts, societal influences. Volunteer experiences in Twin Cities. prereq: DirecTrack to Teaching program or department consent
EPSY 3132 - Psychology of Multiculturalism in Education (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course critically examines social and cultural diversity in the United States, confronting social issues of poverty, handicappism, homophobia, racism, sexism, victim-blaming, violence, and so on, and presenting models for change. Students examine how and why prejudices develop.
FSOS 2103 - Family Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01577 - FSOS 2103/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Connections between policies that governments enact, and families and their well-being. Conceptual frameworks for influences underlying policy choices. Evaluating consequences of such choices for diverse families.
FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00529 - FSoS 3102/FSOS 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Family systems/theories applied to dynamics/processes relevant to family life. Diversity issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability. Divorce, single parenthood, remarriage. Family strengths/problems. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
FSOS 3104 - Global and Diverse Families (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00758 - FSoS 3104/FSOS 4102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Perspectives on family dynamics of various racial/ethnic populations in the United States/other countries in context of national/international economic, political, and social processes. prereq: at least Soph or instr consent
FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3426/5426
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychology/sociology of drug use/abuse. Life-span, epidemiological, familial, cultural data regarding use. Fundamentals of licit/illicit drug use behavior. Variables of gender, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, sexual orientation, disability.
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human ecology/development as frameworks for examining sexuality in close relationships. Diversity of sexual beliefs, attitudes, behaviors within differing social contexts. Using scientific knowledge to promote sexual health among individuals, couples, families through various life stages. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Perspectives on gay, lesbian, bisexuals and transgender (GLBT) in families. Unique contributions of GLBT to understanding diversity among families. Homophobia, mythologies, coming-out, identity, gender, social networks, intimacy, sexuality, children, parenting, aging, AIDS, ethnicity.
FSOS 4155 - Parent-Child Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
History, theories, research, and contemporary practices of parent-child relationships in diverse families/cultures across the life span. Preparation for professionals in education, social work, and other human service occupations. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
GEOG 1372 - Geography of Global Cities (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Urban forms/processes. Uses key global cities as examples. Political, historical, and economic contexts of cities. Planning ideologies. Globalization. Race/segregation. Population growth. Environmental problems. Current issues in global urbanization.
HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America to learn from and engage with what historians enmeshed in ethnic studies do. These historians examine the systematic and coordinated exercises of power called race in the American past and make legible how racially aggrieved groups responded to this shaping power. Thus, throughout, we ask, "What did racial subjects do with what was done to them by the American system forged out of settler colonialism, slavery, racism, and other forms of injustice, exclusion, and violence?" This question issues an intellectual challenge to do all that needs to be done to capture community life, the politics of difference, and the dynamism of social identities in all their richness, fullness, and complexity. In other words, we study and write about the racial history of modern America, including its ugly past and arc of justice, to consider what it would take to transcend this racial past.
OLPD 4870 - Introduction to Integrating Human Rights into Organizational Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Forum to explore local and international policies/practices for integrating human rights into organizational leadership and management.
POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What role does education play in American democracy? What role should it play? Does American education, particularly public education, live up to its citizens’ hopes and expectations? And, perhaps most importantly, what do we mean by a “good education”? This is a question with deep historical roots in this country, one that is the subject of current policy debates and one that cannot be separated from questions of discrimination and inequality. The over-arching theme of the course is to wrestle with what it means to be an educated citizen in the context of historical struggles to achieve that vision in the face of multiple and inter-related inequalities and competing visions about how to make the American dream a reality in the field of public education. No one political perspective will be offered or favored. No magic powder will be revealed on the last day of the course. The fact is that the underlying issues are really complicated, often seemingly intractable, and very, very political. This course is intended as introduction to education politics and policy in the United States. It will focus on K-12 education, especially in the public system. It is designed for any student who might have an interest in exploring education, public policy, or American government. Topics will include equality of educational opportunity, educating democratic citizens, school finance, the role of political institutions in making educational policy, and efforts to reform and remake American education, including charter schools, private school vouchers, and standardized testing. By the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the provision of public education in the United States, including the ways in which education is governed and the institutions involved in that governance. Students should be able to critically reflect on the degree to which American education fulfills the sometimes-competing goals Americans have for their schools. This course fulfills the Social Sciences Core of the University liberal education requirements. In this course students will act as policy analysts, with all of the complexity that such a task entails in the field of American public education. This course also fulfills the Diversity and Social Justice in the United States theme of the University liberal education requirements.
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02096 - Soc 3451W/Soc 3451V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3003 - Social Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3452 - Education and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EdPA 5041/Soc 5455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structures and processes within educational institutions. Links between educational organizations and their social contexts, particularly as these relate to educational change. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change organizing. U.S. power relations. How people organize. Cross-class, multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do service learning in social justice organization. prereq: 2501W
WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language as creating rather than simply describing "reality." Reading and writing as arenas of active human struggle over social group power. Techniques for analyzing, interpreting, and participating in the conversation of critical literacies.
WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How written texts contribute to movements in art and culture. How such texts are written with particular audiences, purposes, styles, and forms. Readings, lectures, discussions, analysis of texts.
URBS 1001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02640 - Urbs 1001W/Urbs 3001W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3001W - Introduction to Urban Studies: The Complexity of Metropolitan Life (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02640 - Urbs 1001W/Urbs 3001W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial, historical, economic, political, and design perspectives, among many others.
YOST 2101 - Urban Youth and Youth Issues (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What it is like to be a young person in a city, in the United States and worldwide. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
YOST 3001 - Introduction to History & Philosophy of Youthwork
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Foundations of youthwork. Where contemporary American youthwork stands, particularly in comparison with international perspectives on youth/youthwork. prereq: 2xxx or instr consent
YOST 3101 - Youthwork: Orientations and Approaches
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical/contemporary approaches to youthwork, diverse settings in which it is done, importance of worker's life experience in crafting ethical, effective practice. At least 15 hours of field experience. prereq: One gen psy course, one gen soc course
YOST 3240 - Special Topics in Youth Studies
Credits: 2.0 -8.0 [max 10.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01174 - YoSt 3240/YoSt 5240
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In-depth investigation of one area of youth studies. Teaching procedure/approach determined by specific topic and student needs. Topic announced in advance. prereq: [Two social sci courses, exp working with youth] or instr consent
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
YOST 3032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01134 - YoSt 3032/YoSt 5032
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of theory/research about children/adolescents. How findings can be used. How theories facilitate understanding of behavior. prereq: 1001 or 2001 or 2002W or 2101, [any Psych or CPsy course]
YOST 5032 - Adolescent and Youth Development for Youthworkers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01134 - YoSt 3032/YoSt 5032
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of theory/research about children/adolescents. How findings/theories facilitate understanding of behavior. prereq: [1001 or 2001 or 2002W or 2101], [any Psych or CPsy course]