Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

American Studies B.A.

American Studies
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2019
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 33
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
American Studies is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American Society. The program provides a broad, interdisciplinary approach to the study of critical issues to American society, with an emphasis on deep historical, cultural, and political understandings. Faculty in the program come from a range of fields and have varied expertise. Students majoring in American Studies undertake a unique, interdisciplinary study of American society, gaining critical perspectives on past and contemporary issues and topics. They typically pursue their own interests within the very broad range of educational opportunities in the program. Courses offered by the department explore a wide range of topics, including popular culture, politics, migration, religion, history, race, gender, and sexuality, as well as important issues such as America's changing place in the world, foreign policy, the events of 9/11, and economic crises and inequality. Majoring in American Studies provides an opportunity for students to pursue particular interests while gaining broad training in a variety of topics and interdisciplinary scholarship. The program of study provides opportunities for the development of writing, critical and creative thinking, and research skills, which culminate in the Senior Project. The Senior Seminar is a year-long course of study limited to graduating seniors in American Studies, giving a chance for undergraduates to work closely with the faculty member in developing and undertaking a major research project which serves as the capstone for the undergraduate program. This unique process allows students to use their skills and knowledge to conduct original research or creative work, which reflects their interests and expertise on a particular topic. In addition, the Department of American Studies cooperates with the Departments of African-American and African Studies, American Indian Studies, Chicano & Latino Studies, and Asian American Studies, which makes it possible for students to concentrate their studies in one of those cultural areas. American Studies provides a unique preparation for students interested in an interdisciplinary approach to a particular aspect of American society, while preparing them for careers or further graduate training. The program encourages service learning, internships, and partners with the Minnesota Historical Society to place undergraduates into working on and researching public history. Graduates are well prepared for work in the public and private sector, as well as nonprofit and non-governmental organizations. Current alumni work in a range of fields including education, non-profits, research, historical preservation, journalism, mass media, law, and medicine. Transfer students interested in American Studies should contact the Department of American Studies to discuss previous coursework, transfer credits, and likely course of study at Minnesota. Students wishing to double major or minor should also contact the department about developing a course of study and graduation plan.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the American Studies BA is AMST. At least 12 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus Students may earn a BA or a minor in American studies, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence.
Preparatory Courses
Any AMST 1xxx, 2xxx or its cross-list may count towards this requirement.
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMST 1012 - Migrants, Refugees, Citizens, and Exiles: The U.S. on an Immigrant Planet [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 1401 - Comparative Genders and Sexualities [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 1511 - Americans Abroad: Rethinking Travel, Culture, & Empire [GP, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 2011 - The United States since September 11 [CIV, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 2031 - Chasing the American Dream: Economic Opportunity & Inequality in the U.S. [DSJ, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 1011 - Religions and American Identity in the United States from World War II to the Present [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 1011 - Religions and American Identity in the United States from World War II to the Present [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Electives
Any AAS, AFRO, AMIN, AMST, CHIC 3xxx, 4xxx, or its cross-list may count towards this requirement. At least 4 of the 7 courses must be AMST or cross-listed with AMST. Other courses may be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.
Take exactly 7 course(s) totaling 21 or more credit(s) from the following:
American Studies Electives
Take 4 - 7 course(s) from the following:
· AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3114 - America in International Perspective [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 [HIS, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present [HIS, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMST 3920 - Topics in American Studies (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3993 - Directed Studies (1.0-9.0 cr)
· AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3752 - Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3752 - Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or AMST 3003 - Public History (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3001 - Public History (3.0 cr)
· AMST 4101 - Gender, Sexuality, and Politics in America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 4101 - Gender, Sexuality, and Politics in America [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3515 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Other Electives
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3006 - Impact of African Migrations in the Atlantic World (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3108 - Black Music: A History of Jazz (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3112 - In the Heart of the Beat: the Poetry of Rap (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3301 - The Music of Black Americans [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3426 - African Americans, Social Policy, and the Welfare State (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3910 - Topics in African American and African Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4112 - The Beat Goes on: Advanced Studies in the Poetry of Rap (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4910 - Topics in African American and African Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· AFRO 5910 - Topics in African American and African Studies (2.0-4.0 cr)
· AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers [AH] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3604 - Indigenous Immersion Methods for the Home, Classroom, and Community (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3701 - Ojibwe Culture and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3711 - Dakota Culture and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3876 - American Indian Education (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4511 - American Indian Political Economy (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4532 - Vine Deloria, Jr.: A Renaissance Indigenous Figure (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4990 - Topics in American Indian Studies (1.0-4.0 cr)
· AMIN 5202 - American Indians and the Supreme Court (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3213 - Chicano Music and Art [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3221 - Introduction to Chicana/o Cultural Studies: Barrio Culture and the Aesthetics of Everyday Life [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3223 - Chicana/o and Latina/o Representation in Film [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3275 - Service Learning in the Chicano/Latino Community [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3352 - Transnational Chicana/o Theory: Global Views/Borderland Spaces (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3452 - Xicana/Indigena Studies: History, Culture, and Politics [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3672 - Chicana/o Experience in the Midwest [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3771 - Latino Social Power and Social Movements in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3900 - Topics in Chicano Studies (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies (1.0-3.0 cr)
· AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
or ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3864 - African American History: 1619 to 1865 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3864 - African American History: 1619-1865 (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3865 - African American History: 1865 to the Present (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3865 - African American History, 1865 to Present (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3856 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4406 - Black Feminist Thought (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5406 - Black Feminist Thought (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 4406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3107 - Structure of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3141 - American Indian Language Planning (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
or POL 4507 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3212 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
or CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3634 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3446 - Chicana/o History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3446 - Chicana/o History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4401 - Chicana/Latina Cultural Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 4401 - Chicana/Latina Cultural Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Capstone: Proseminar Sequence
The Proseminar I and II is a two-semester capstone that furthers understanding of important debates in American Studies and the methodologies that scholars use in their research. Proseminar I will help students conceptualize a research project and develop a means of investigation in a collaborative classroom setting. Students will complete the research and writing of a capstone research project in Proseminar II, which concludes with a public presentation of the capstone.
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the American Studies capstone.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· AMST 4961 - Proseminar I (3.0 cr)
· AMST 4962W - Second Proseminar in American Studies [WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements. Only AMST courses may count towards this requirement.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 [HIS, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present [HIS, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AMST 4962W - Second Proseminar in American Studies [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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AMST 1012 - Migrants, Refugees, Citizens, and Exiles: The U.S. on an Immigrant Planet (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Immigration to the United States at various historical periods and across geographical/political terrains. How immigration, as a national/racial project, is shaped by legal categories and discursive practices based on race, class, gender, and sexuality. Diverse ways marginalized groups produce national/transnational political practices.
AMST 1401 - Comparative Genders and Sexualities (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Gender/sexual practices/identities within international framework. How such practices/identities reflect/refract national ideals and express national/international division.
AMST 1511 - Americans Abroad: Rethinking Travel, Culture, & Empire (GP, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we will look at Americans (including ourselves) who travel abroad and what their experiences, both in the present and historically, tell us about how we imagine others and our/their place in the world. What do these experiences tell us about who we are as a people, a culture, and a nation? This course will examine how these experiences have transformed (and continue to transform) Americans and the countries and cultures with which they interact. Indeed, this course challenges students to consider the overall effects that these processes have had on America’s relationship with the rest of the world.
AMST 2011 - The United States since September 11 (CIV, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How American citizenship and nationhood have changed since 9/11. The event and its aftermath in historical perspective. Political, economic, and military antecedents. How 9/11 has changed relations between the U.S. government, U.S. citizens, immigrants, and international community. How 9/11 has been remembered.
AMST 2031 - Chasing the American Dream: Economic Opportunity & Inequality in the U.S. (DSJ, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course begins by focusing on the historical origins and meanings of the American dream. How did this dream of unlimited opportunity come about? What has it meant in different historical moments and to divergent social groups? And, why does it continue to be such a powerful and compelling idea in the United States and around the world?
AMST 1011 - Religions and American Identity in the United States from World War II to the Present (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02008 - AmSt 1011/RelS 1011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political/cultural watersheds of last 60 years. Changing ideas about religion. Debates within/between religious traditions/communities. How gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped relationships between religion and politics. Tensions between secularism and religiosity and liberalism and fundamentalism. Ways in which religion has acted as both a progressive and a conservative political force.
RELS 1011 - Religions and American Identity in the United States from World War II to the Present (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02008
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political/cultural watersheds of last 60 years. Debates within/between religious traditions/communities. How gender, race, class, sexuality have shaped relationships between religion/politics. Tensions between secularism/religiosity, liberalism/fundamentalism.
AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse cultural (racial, ethnic, class) groups in America. Institutions/processes that shape their relations and create domination, resistance, hybridity, nationalism, racism, alliance. Specific content may vary.
AMST 3114 - America in International Perspective (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The nature of international cultural exchange. The impact of U.S. cultures and society on other countries of the world as well as the impact of other cultures and societies on the United States.
AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
AMST 3920 - Topics in American Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMST 3993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -9.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. prereq: instr consent
AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Impact of global economy on workplaces/workers in the United states, Mexico, and Caribbean countries. Influence on consumption. Consequences for American culture/character. Effects on U.S./Mexican factory work, service sector, temporary working arrangements, offshore production jobs in Dominican Republic, and professional/managerial positions.
AAS 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AMST 3001 - Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01126 - AAS 3001/AmSt 3001
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.
AMST 3752 - Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02404
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to sociological analysis of theoretical/methodological approaches to Chicano/a and Latina/o communities. Socioeconomic conditions, education, cultural change, the family, gender relations, political experiences. Theories, issues, methods of sociological research. Debates regarding qualitative/quantitative research methods.
CHIC 3752 - Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02404 - AmSt 3752/Chic 3752
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to sociological analysis of theoretical/methodological approaches to Chicano/a and Latina/o communities. Socioeconomic conditions, education, cultural change, the family, gender relations, political experiences. Theories, issues, methods of sociological research. Debates regarding qualitative/quantitative research methods.
AMIN 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01090 - AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, and websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities. prereq: instr consent
AMST 3003 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01090
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities.
HIST 3001 - Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01090 - AmIn 3001/AmSt 3003/Hist 3001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Interpretations of collective past as produced in public venues, including museum exhibitions, films, theme parks, websites. Intellectual and political issues in history produced for public audiences. Career opportunities. prereq: instr consent
AMST 4101 - Gender, Sexuality, and Politics in America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01556
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways public and private life intersect through the issues of gender, sexuality, family, politics, and public life; ways in which racial, ethnic, and class divisions have been manifest in the political ideologies affecting private life.
GLBT 4101 - Gender, Sexuality, and Politics in America (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01556
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways public and private life intersect through the issues of gender, sexuality, family, politics, and public life; ways in which racial, ethnic, and class divisions have been manifest in the political ideologies affecting private life.
AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/AmSt 5412/Anth 5412/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/AmSt 5412/Anth 5412/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/AmSt 5412/Anth 5412/
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the inter connections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 3412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
CHIC 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
GWSS 3515 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02631 - AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
AAS 3601W - War and Empire: Asian American Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the reach of war and empire in Asian America since the turn of the twentieth century. Starting with US wars in the Philippines (1898-1910) and the formation of the colonial state, the course will track the ascendancy of US empire in Asia and paths toward wars against imperialist Japan (1941-1945), in Korea (1950-53), and in Vietnam (1955-1975). The course will address the relevance of the unending Global War on Terrorism (2001-) in contemporary Asian America. Together, the course explores how these wars have shaped and continue to inform the lives and memories of Asian immigrants and refugees, their children, and other Asian Americans.
AFRO 3006 - Impact of African Migrations in the Atlantic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
People of African descent through history. Archeology, geography, literature. Migrations/activities in the Atlantic world. African history in the New World. Transfer of African rice growing technology and other skills. Development of African American society in the United States.
AFRO 3108 - Black Music: A History of Jazz
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The development of jazz in America and in the world, with special emphasis given to the roots or jazz in the African American experience.
AFRO 3112 - In the Heart of the Beat: the Poetry of Rap
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Contemporary African American poetry as expressed by popular culture contributors. Students analyze/evaluate poems used in rap, in context of African American literature, American culture, and aesthetics.
AFRO 3125W - Black Visions of Liberation: Ella, Martin, Malcolm, and the Radical Transformation of U.S. Democracy (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course on the critical thought of Black intellectual-activists and others enmeshed in the struggles for the radical transformation of U.S. democracy. Introduces the following three leaders and activists--Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X--whose work in the building of the Black freedom movement spanned the period from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Course proposition is that their life and times in the struggle for liberation offer important insights into the transformation of the U.S. political economy from the welfare/warfare state to the neoliberal state. These intellectual-activists, as well as others who translate their radical traditions through Black-Brown and Afro-Asian solidarity projects (e.g. Grace Lee Boggs of Detroit) have responded to racial formation in the U.S. and presented not just visions of liberation but concrete alternatives at the grassroots to usher in a more just, egalitarian, and ethical society.
AFRO 3301 - The Music of Black Americans (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Musical contributions of African American artists/innovators from 1619 to present. Apirituals, blues, ragtime, gospel, art music, jazz.
AFRO 3426 - African Americans, Social Policy, and the Welfare State
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Period between New Deal (1930s) and present. History/impact of federal policy (presidential, congressional, judicial) and race on African Americans. Politics of allocation of insurance versus relief in Social Security Act of 1935. Race and expansion of social benefits after World War II. School desegregation. Kennedy¿s civil rights policy, LBJ¿s War on Poverty. Affirmative Action. Warren court. Busing. Conservative retreat from welfare state under Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
AFRO 3910 - Topics in African American and African Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AFRO 4112 - The Beat Goes on: Advanced Studies in the Poetry of Rap
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continues/deepens work began in 3112. Aesthetics of rap/poetry. Close readings of rap/poems. Texts/theories employed in development of hip hop aesthetic. prereq: 3112
AFRO 4910 - Topics in African American and African Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AFRO 5910 - Topics in African American and African Studies
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary by instructor.
AMIN 3304 - Indigenous Filmmakers (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of film/video made by American Indian writers, directors, producers within contexts of tribally specific cultures/histories, as well as within context of US culture/film history.
AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American Indian environmental issues in U.S./Canada. Analysis of social, political, economic, legal forces/institutions. Colonial histories/tribal sovereignty.
AMIN 3604 - Indigenous Immersion Methods for the Home, Classroom, and Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Prepares students as advanced language students to participate in and facilitate immersion environments within both formal and informal settings including the home, second language classrooms, immersion classrooms, language tables, immersion camps, and other community settings. prereq: OJIB 3104, DAKO 3124 or four semesters of another target language
AMIN 3701 - Ojibwe Culture and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ojibwe culture, history, and traditions, including philosophy, religion, and lifestyle. Students develop an appreciation for the values and belief systems of traditional Indian people.
AMIN 3711 - Dakota Culture and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Dakota culture, language, history, literature. Contemporary issues, the arts.
AMIN 3876 - American Indian Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Educational processes in American Indian cultures. History of school programs established for tribes by missionaries/U.S./Canadian governments. Importance of boarding schools in shaping the lives, families, communities, educational expectations of Indian people in late-19th/early-20th centuries.
AMIN 4511 - American Indian Political Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Sources, nature, consequences of social/economic development/change in Indian communities. Precontact Indian communities. Effect of European contact. Social movements into 20th century, including phenomenon of urban Indian communities. prereq: 1001
AMIN 4532 - Vine Deloria, Jr.: A Renaissance Indigenous Figure
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth consideration of indigenous scholar and activist Vine Deloria Jr.'s intellectual works, and impacts on fields such as law, religion and theology, history, natural and social science, literary criticism, education, anthropology, paleontology, and political science. Students read, discuss, produce research on an aspect of Deloria's work.
AMIN 4990 - Topics in American Indian Studies
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AMIN 5202 - American Indians and the Supreme Court
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar explores the role and the practice of the US Supreme Court as a policy-making institution when dealing with indigenous nations and their citizens. Analysis of theoretical, behavioral, political, and institutional perspectives. Student work includes reading and textual analysis, leading discussions, analytical research paper.
AMIN 5920 - Topics in American Indian Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Various topics in American Indian studies, depending upon instructor/semester.
CHIC 3213 - Chicano Music and Art (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of diverse forms of cultural expressiveness in Mexican American music/art. History of various types of artistic production and musical forms in their regional specificity. Social/economic implications of several genres, styles, and traditions.
CHIC 3221 - Introduction to Chicana/o Cultural Studies: Barrio Culture and the Aesthetics of Everyday Life (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cultural studies approach to investigating aesthetic dimensions of experience that inform and are informed by dynamic relationship between culture, class, ethnicity, and power.
CHIC 3223 - Chicana/o and Latina/o Representation in Film (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Chicana/o and Latina/o visual representation. Depiction of Latina/o experience, history, and culture in film. Analyzing independent/commercial films as texts that illuminate deeply held beliefs around race, class, ethnicity, gender, and national origin.
CHIC 3275 - Service Learning in the Chicano/Latino Community (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01132 - Chic 1275/Chic 3275
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/applied ethics used to reflect on personal/societal responsibilities and to analyze U.S. educational systems. Institutional/social constraints on equitable educational opportunities for Chicano/Latino students. Models of inclusive/just education. Students tutor/mentor Chicanos/Latinos, dialogue with Chicano/Latino educators.
CHIC 3352 - Transnational Chicana/o Theory: Global Views/Borderland Spaces
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Demographic realities, political/economic shifts, cultural exchanges that characterize U.S.-Mexico borderland spaces in global economy. Historically contextualized, transnational approach to cultures, politics, and economics of U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. Dnamics of borderland spaces.
CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly survey and exploration of the sociocultural function of various types of folklore in Greater Mexico. Ways in which folklore constructs and maintains community, as well as resists and engenders cultural shifts.
CHIC 3452 - Xicana/Indigena Studies: History, Culture, and Politics (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical, cultural, and political processes impacting Chicanas/os and their understanding of being indigenous to the North American continent. History, culture, and identity formation as dynamic processes intimately related to present and future constructions of Mexican American identities and sociopolitical perspectives.
CHIC 3672 - Chicana/o Experience in the Midwest (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people generally defined as Chicano or Latino, living in the Midwest. Individual/group identity. Focuses on construction of Chicano-Latino experience. How identity affirmation, migration stories, immigration status, historical memory, and cultural traditions are impacted by being in the Midwest.
CHIC 3771 - Latino Social Power and Social Movements in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How Latinos have collectively resisted social domination. Theories of social power/movements. Resistance by Latinos during 60s/70s. Current organized efforts to curb immigration, establish English as official language, and limit immigrant rights.
CHIC 3888 - Immigration and the U.S. Latina/o Experience: Diaspora, Identity, and Community (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of migrants from Latin America to the United States in 20th/21st century. Migrant engagements with US society. Pre-existing Latina/o and other ethnic communities. experiences within political, economic, and social aspects of life at local/global level.
CHIC 3900 - Topics in Chicano Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary by section of course.
CHIC 4275 - Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.
CHIC 5920 - Topics in Chicana(o) Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multidisciplinary themes in Chicana(o) studies. Issues of current interest.
CHIC 5993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading, research, and study for completion of the requirements for a senior paper or honors thesis. prereq: instr consent
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02559 - AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
COMM 3341 - Asian American Images (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02576 - AAS 3341/Comm 3341
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From 19th-century anti-Chinese political cartoons to Harold and Kumar, visual representations of Asians in the United States have long influenced how Asian Americans are seen and treated. What are some of the ways that photography, graphic arts, and digital culture have pictured Asian Americans as aliens, citizens, immigrants, workers, family and community members, entertainers, and artists? Course topics will relate visual images to particular historical moments, including the early exclusion period and the "yellow peril" stereotype; WWII Japanese American incarceration and the drawings of Miné Okubo, and photo-journalism documenting U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia and its aftermath. How do photographic and other images work to counter historical amnesia, heal traumatic loss, and document social injustice? Other weeks of the class will explore the ways that individuals, families, and communities use photographs, video, and other visual media to preserve a sense of connection and belonging. We will also look at how contemporary Asian American photographers such as Tseng Kwong Chi, Nikki Lee, and Wing Young Huie experiment with visual images to raise questions of racial and national identity, social inequality, gender, sexuality, and political agency. The course also includes a digital storytelling project that encourages students to create video images and sound reflecting Asian American immigration stories from local communities.
AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02623 - AAS 3351/Comm 3351
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the past few decades, Asian Americans have become increasingly visible both as the subjects and producers of popular culture in the United States. This course will explore how this new recognition of Asian Americans in popular literature, cinema, television, and entertainment is related both to longer histories of Asian immigration and racial exclusion and to post-1960s efforts to forward racial awareness, community activism, and social justice. Our first unit will look at how particular stereotypes such as the yellow peril or the wartime enemy encouraged anti-Asian feeling and violence and legal restrictions on immigration and naturalization. We will then examine how throughout history, Asian immigrants and their descendants used song, dance, theater, writing, and other forms of popular culture to express personal desires and foster collective ties. Our final unit concentrates on contemporary popular culture and its relationship to the changing identities of Asian Americans. How do Asian Americans influence the current essays, films, and videos that are consumed by millions today? How are increasingly pan-ethnic, interracial, multiracial, transnational, and global experiences reflected in popular culture?
AAS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01876
Typically offered: Every Fall
Diversity of cultures designated "Asian American." Understanding women's lives in historical, cultural, economic, and racial contexts.
GWSS 3409W - Asian American Women's Cultural Production (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of media, art, literature, performance, on artistic contributions. History, politics, culture of Asian American women. Interpret cultural production to better understand role of race, gender, nation within American society/citizenship.
AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society.
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, honors
AAS 3877 - Asian American History, 1850 to Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066 - AAS 3877/HIST 3877
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
HIST 3877 - Asian American History, 1850-Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asian American history and contemporary issues, from 1850 to the present. Immigration, labor, anti-Asian movements, women/families, impact of World War Two, new immigrant/refugee communities, civil rights, Asian American identity/culture.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
AAS 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437 - AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
SOC 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
AFRO 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581 - AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02097 - AAS 3486/Hist 3486
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
HIST 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02097
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01887
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074 - AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
HIST 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in US History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America to learn from and engage with what historians enmeshed in ethnic studies do. These historians examine the systematic and coordinated exercises of power called race in the American past and make legible how racially aggrieved groups responded to this shaping power. Thus, throughout, we ask, "What did racial subjects do with what was done to them by the American system forged out of settler colonialism, slavery, racism, and other forms of injustice, exclusion, and violence?" This question issues an intellectual challenge to do all that needs to be done to capture community life, the politics of difference, and the dynamism of social identities in all their richness, fullness, and complexity. In other words, we study and write about the racial history of modern America, including its ugly past and arc of justice, to consider what it would take to transcend this racial past.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AAS 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
ALL 3866 - Arab American Experiences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02528
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Arab diasporic experiences in the West, and in America in particular, have been mediated by popular depictions of "the Arab" as violent terrorist, oppressor of/oppressed woman, religious fanatic, and myriad other negative stereotypes, heightened since September 11, 2001. How do Arabs in America, especially youth, navigate the superimposition of these images upon them? How do they relate to the multiple locations of "home" between the West and the Arab world? To what extent are they perpetually "out of place," and what strategies have they developed to navigate their liminal and often marginalized social position? Through the examination of memoirs, novels, film, music, and even food, this course will use Arab American cultural production as a lens through which to explore these questions.
AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811 - AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by Asian American, African American, American Indian, Latino, and Chicano playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 5120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788 - Afro 3120/Afro 5120/Hist 3456
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 3456 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00788
Typically offered: Every Fall
Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbeans. Socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries within African Diaspora. Resistance in Suriname, Guyana, Caribbean. Protest organizations, intellectual discourses, radical movements in United States/Europe.
AFRO 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02383
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Gender/sexual violence to poststructural, anti-racist theories and debates about social construction of sexuality. How intimacy and violence are co-constituted within normative frameworks of U.S. governmentality. Writings by black feminist criminologists who have linked incarceration, welfare reform, and other forms of state regulation to deeply systemic forms of violence against people of color.
GWSS 3402 - Pleasure, Intimacy and Violence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02383
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Gender/sexual violence to poststructural, anti­racist theories/debates about social construction of sexuality. How intimacy/violence are co­-constituted within normative frameworks of U.S. governmentality. Writings by black feminist criminologists who have linked incarceration, welfare reform, other forms of state regulation to deeply  systemic forms of violence against people of color.
AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 5593
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century black novelists, including Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Petry, Morrison, and Reed.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910 - Afro 3598W/EngL 3598W
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703 - Afro 3627/Afro 5627/EngL 5597
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
AFRO 5627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "the Veil of Color." prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703 - Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
AFRO 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00577 - Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 3655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00577 - Afro 3655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
African American cinematic achievements from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
ARTH 5655 - African-American Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00577 - Afro 4655/ArtH 3655/ArtH 5655
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
African American cinematic achievements, from silent films of Oscar Micheaux through contemporary Hollywood and independent films. Class screenings, critical readings.
AFRO 3864 - African American History: 1619 to 1865
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00202 - Afro 3864/Hist 3864
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Importance of dynamics of class, gender, region, and political ideology. Changing nature of race/racism.
HIST 3864 - African American History: 1619-1865
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00202 - Afro 3864/Hist 3864
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Importance of dynamics of class, gender, region, and political ideology. Changing nature of race/racism.
AFRO 3865 - African American History: 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Hist 3865
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of African American men and women from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Discussion of internal migrations, industrialization and unionization, The Great Depression, world wars, and large scale movements for social and political change.
HIST 3865 - African American History, 1865 to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Hist 3865
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of African American men and women from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Discussion of internal migrations, industrialization and unionization, The Great Depression, world wars, and large scale movements for social and political change.
AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
HIST 3856 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00790
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in U.S. Second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, grassroots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north/west.
AFRO 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02061 - Afro 3868/Hist 3868
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Role that race has played in American war history. Impact that wars have had on race and race relations in the United States and the world. Literature and film.
HIST 3868W - Race, War, and Race Wars in American History (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02061 - Afro 3868/Hist 3868
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Role that race has played in American war history. Impact that wars have had on race and race relations in the United States and the world. Literature, film.
AFRO 4406 - Black Feminist Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examine spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
AFRO 5406 - Black Feminist Thought
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examine spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
GWSS 4406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examine spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
GWSS 5406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02005 - Afro 4406/Afro 5406/GWSS 4406/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Critically examines spatiality of African descendant women in Americas/larger black diaspora. Writings from black feminist/queer geographies, history, contemporary cultural criticism. Recent black feminist theorizing.
AFRO 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00962 - Afro 5181/Th 5181
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theater traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theaters from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00962 - Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
AFRO 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00963 - Afro 5182W/Th 5182W
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00963 - Afro 5182/Th 5182
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
AMIN 3107 - Structure of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3107/5107
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Analysis of grammatical structures of Anishinaabemowin. prereq: 3103
AMIN 5107 - The Structure of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3107/5107
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Analysis of grammatical structures of Anishinaabemowin. prereq: 3104
AMIN 3141 - American Indian Language Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3141/5141
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Planning for maintenence/revitalization of North American indigenous languages. Condition/status of languages. Documentation, cultivation, literacy, education. prereq: 3103 or 3123
AMIN 5141 - American Indian Language Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3141/5141
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Planning for maintenance/revitalization of North American indigenous languages. Condition/status of languages. Documentation, cultivation, literacy, education. prereq: 3103 or 3123 or instr consent
AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions, modern literature from various tribal cultures.
ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions and modern literature from various tribal cultures.
AMIN 3301 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01620 - AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
RELS 3321 - American Indian Philosophies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01620 - AmIn 3301/RelS 3321
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
World views of indigenous people of Americas. Topics include native medicines/healing practices, ceremonies/ritual, governance, ecology, humor, tribal histories, status of contemporary native people.
AMIN 3402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02486 - AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 5402 - American Indians and the Cinema (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02486 - AmIn 3402/AmIn 5402
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Representations of American Indians in film, historically/contemporarily. What such representations assert about Native experience and cultural viability. What they reflect about particular relationships of power.
AMIN 3409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00746 - AmIn 3409/AmIn5409/GWSS 3412
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00746 - AmIn 3409/AmIn 5409
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states and federal government.
AMIN 3602 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02063
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 3601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02063
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
ANTH 5601 - Archaeology and Native Americans (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02063
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of the relationship of American archaeology to American Indian people. Case studies of how representational narratives about Native people are created through archaeology; responses by Native communities; and the frameworks for collaborative and equitable archaeological practice. Professional ethics in archaeology/heritage studies in American contexts.
AMIN 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American Indian history from the era of ancient Native America to the removal era. Social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
HIST 3871 - American Indian History: Pre-Contact to 1830 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3871
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to American Indian history from ancient native America to the removal era. Focuses on the social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of Native American peoples and Native American experiences with European colonialism.
AMIN 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3872
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.
HIST 3872 - American Indian History: 1830 to the Present (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn/Hist 3872
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.
AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01844 - AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century. prereq: 1001
POL 4507 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01844 - AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285 - Pol 4525/AmIn 4525
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4525/AmIn 4525
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance of new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature on policies.
AMIN 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00952 - AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
HIST 5890 - Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00952 - AmIn 5890/Hist 5890
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will read recently published scholarship in American Indian and Indigenous history that takes up pressing research questions, promises to push inquiry in new directions, and that theorizes important interventions in our thinking to understand where the field is situated and moving. Reflecting the instinctively interdisciplinary nature of American Indian and Indigenous history, readings will be drawn not just from the discipline of history but across other disciplines such as Anthropology, American Studies, Geography, Literature, Political Science, and Legal Studies. As well, readings will include scholarship that reaches out to embrace the Global Indigenous studies turn. prereq: Advanced undergrad with instr consent or grad student
CHIC 3212 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049 - Chic 3212/GWSS 3410
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, and autoethnography.
GWSS 3410 - Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01049 - Chic 3212/GWSS 3410
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, autoethnography.
CHIC 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02537 - ArtH 3216W/Chic 3216W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
ARTH 3216W - Chicana and Chicano Art (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02537
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A Chicana/o has been described as a Mexican-American with a political sense of identity that emerges from a desire for social justice. One journalist bluntly stated, "A Chicano is a Mexican-American with a non-Anglo image of himself" (Ruben Salazar, Los Angeles Times, 1970). This identity emerged through the Chicano Movement, a social and political mobilization that began in the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement witnessed the rise of community-based political organizing to improve the working conditions, education, housing opportunities, health, and civil rights for Mexican-Americans. For its inception, the Chicano Movement attracted artists who created a new aesthetic and framework for producing art. A major focus of Chicana/o artists of the 1960s and 1970s was representation, the right to self-determination, and the role of art in fostering civic and public engagement. This focus continues to inform Chicana/o cultural production. Social intervention, empowerment, and institutional critique remain some of the most important innovations of American art of the last several decades, and Chicana/o artists played a significant role in this trend.
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics.
GLOS 3634 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics.
HIST 3444 - Chicana and Chicano History: 1821-1945 (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00593
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the United States. Important eras in histories of Mexico, the United States, and Mexican Americans. Central role of Chicana/os in U.S. history, culture, and politics.
CHIC 3446 - Chicana/o History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02109
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.
HIST 3446 - Chicana/o History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02109 - Chic 3446/Hist 3446
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experiences of people of Mexican descent in U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, demographics. Social, economic, political changes. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans/other Latino groups.
CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817 - Chic 3507W/EngL 3507W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative non-fiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative nonfiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
CHIC 3852 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through an analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency, and response to larger political systems and behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, and the political economy.
POL 3752 - Chicana/o Politics (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01223 - Chic 3852/Pol 3752
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory/practice of Chicana/o politics through analysis of Mexican American experience, social agency. Response to larger political systems/behaviors using social science methods of inquiry. Unequal power relations, social justice, political economy.
CHIC 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02065
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Critical thinking of Chicanas/os and Latinas/os around construction of gender. Politics of sexual identity. How the self is gendered in relationship to sexual, racial, class, and national identities under different social structural conditions. Way in which the "borders" that define/confine sexual norms shift over time.
GLBT 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02065
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Critical thinking of Chicanas/os, Latinas/os around construction of gender. Politics of sexual identity. How self is gendered in relationship to sexual, racial, class, national identities under different social structural conditions.
CHIC 4401 - Chicana/Latina Cultural Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01460 - Chic 4401/GWSS 4401
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings in Chicana/Latina cultural studies. TV, film, art, music, dance, theatre, literature. Identity/sexuality. Production of culture/theory.
GWSS 4401 - Chicana/Latina Cultural Studies (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01460 - Chic 4401/GWSS 4401
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings in Chicana/Latina cultural studies. TV, film, art, music, dance, theatre, literature. Identity/sexuality. Production of culture/theory.
AMST 4961 - Proseminar I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classic/contemporary works/problems. Development of American Studies. Idealizing of American past. Challenges of multiculturalism. Contemporary themes. prereq: AmSt jr or AmSt sr or instr consent
AMST 4962W - Second Proseminar in American Studies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem related to representative theme, figure, or period. Students research/write senior theses. prereq: AmSt sr or instr consent
AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse cultural (racial, ethnic, class) groups in America. Institutions/processes that shape their relations and create domination, resistance, hybridity, nationalism, racism, alliance. Specific content may vary.
AMST 3252W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900 to 1940 (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
AMST 3253W - American Popular Culture and Politics: 1940 to the Present (HIS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Historical analysis of how popular arts represent issues of gender, race, consumerism, and citizenship. How popular artists define boundaries of citizenship and public life: inclusions/exclusions in polity and national identity. How popular arts reinforce/alter political ideologies.
AMST 4962W - Second Proseminar in American Studies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem related to representative theme, figure, or period. Students research/write senior theses. prereq: AmSt sr or instr consent