Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Family Social Science B.S.

Family Social Science
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 56 to 58
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Family social science is a multidisciplinary major for those who are interested in helping people, counseling, and understanding human relationships. This major prepares graduates for careers in working with individuals, families, or systems in human services. The major is enhanced by a required internship related to the student's specific program and career goals. Qualified graduates may continue their education through graduate study in family social science, prevention science, family education, marriage and family therapy,child and human development, social work, resource management, or allied health disciplines.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Preparatory Courses
Statistics
EPSY 1261 - Understanding Data Stories through Visualization & Computing [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
Additional Course
FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America [DSJ, SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Communication Courses
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Advanced Technical Writing
YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
or OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3027W - The Essay [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Major Courses
FSOS 2105 - Methods in Family Research (3.0 cr)
FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
FSOS 3105 - Technology in Parenting and Family Relationships [TS] (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4104W - Family Psychology [WI] (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4109W - Family Theories [WI] (3.0 cr)
Advanced/Applied Skill Course
Students must take FSOS 4294 or FSOS 4296 or FSOS 4160H (for Honors students) for 4 credits.
Take 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 4294 - Research Internship (1.0-4.0 cr)
· FSOS 4296 - Field Study: Working With Families (1.0-12.0 cr)
· FSOS 4160H - Honors Capstone Project (1.0-4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper-division Writing Intensive course within the major. For Family Social Science majors 4109W is required. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students much choose one course from the following list. Some of the courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take no more than 1 course(s) from the following:
· YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
· OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3027W - The Essay [WI] (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 4104W - Family Psychology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4109W - Family Theories [WI] (3.0 cr)
Concentration Areas
Students MUST select at least one of the three concentration areas.
Family and Community Engagement
This concentration will focus on nonprofit management, community development and evaluation, evidence-based programming, culturally relevant programming, family strengths, families navigating systems such as schools and hospitals.
FSOS 2107 - Preparation for Family and Community Engagement (3.0 cr)
FSOS 2103 - Family Policy (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4107 - Traumatic Stress and Resilience in Vulnerable Families Across the Lifespan (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or Family Therapy
This concentration will prepare students for clinical work at the Bachelors level, or to apply to graduate school and obtain a certification in MSW, MFT, CSPP, counseling psychology, or another area.
FSOS 2101 - Preparation for Working With Families (3.0 cr)
FSOS 3429 - Counseling Skills Practicum I (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4110 - Introduction to Family Therapy (3.0 cr)
FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture (3.0 cr)
or FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships (3.0 cr)
or Family Financial Studies
This concentration will focus on preparing students to work with families around financial issues, as a financial coach, counselor, or other delivery methods.
FSOS 2108 - Preparation for Family Financial Studies: Money Matters in Families (3.0 cr)
FSOS 2106 - Family Resource Management (3.0 cr)
FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances (3.0 cr)
FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling (3.0 cr)
Family Electives
Students should first select a concentration area. Next, students may choose a second concentration or take 12 credits of courses not previously taken. One course can not fulfill more than one program requirement.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America [DSJ, SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 1301 - Cash or Credit: You Need to Know (1.0 cr)
· FSOS 2101 - Preparation for Working With Families (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 2103 - Family Policy (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 2106 - Family Resource Management (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 2107 - Preparation for Family and Community Engagement (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 2108 - Preparation for Family Financial Studies: Money Matters in Families (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3429 - Counseling Skills Practicum I (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 3431 - Counseling Skills Practicum II (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4107 - Traumatic Stress and Resilience in Vulnerable Families Across the Lifespan (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4110 - Introduction to Family Therapy (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4150 - Special Topics in Family Social Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4154 - Families and Aging (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4155 - Parent-Child Relationships (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 5150 - Special Topics in Family Social Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 5932 - Introduction to Parent Education (1.0 cr)
· FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 5943 - Parent Learning and Development: Implications for Parent Education (2.0 cr)
 
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EPSY 1261 - Understanding Data Stories through Visualization & Computing (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02460 - EPsy 1261/PSTL 1004
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Academics and researchers have long used data & visualization to support and illuminate particular narratives in their scholarship. Today, data visualizations are found not only in the pages of academic journals; many non-academics, including journalists and activists, use increasingly complex data visualizations and statistical summaries to convey salient information and storylines. This course will help students build on their statistical thinking and understanding learned in high school to think critically about the use of summaries and visualization and their role in the data narrative. It will also cover the use of computational tools and methods for creating data summaries and visualization that facilitate seeing patterns and relationships in data, and producing better narrative through communicating with data. Students will learn course material through in-class activities and projects conducted in cooperative learning groups and through assignments requiring the application of concepts and technology presented in class to additional real-world examples of data visualization.
STAT 1001 - Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphical/numerical presentations of data. Judging the usefulness/reliability of results/inferences from surveys and other studies to interesting populations. Coping with randomness/variation in an uncertain world. prereq: Mathematics requirement for admission to University
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Couple dynamics. Overview of how to develop, maintain, and terminate an intimate relationship. Communication, conflict resolution, power, roles. Programs for marriage preparation, marriage enrichment, and marital therapy.
FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human development in a family context. Life-course and human development theories. Individual/family development, mate selection, birth, life cycle. Physical, cognitive, language, social, social, and personality development. Historical, social, and cultural factors. How theory/research are applied to everyday lives.
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02469
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to multicultural families using an ecological lens. The institution of the family is recognized globally as a basic unit of a society that produces, develops, socializes, and launches the next generation of its citizenry. This course will focus on families in contemporary America, a society that has grown increasingly diverse, and faces many complex challenges in today’s global environment. Using a human ecological lens allows us to examine families in their nested and interdependent environments--how individuals shape and are shaped by families, their human built environments, their socio-cultural environments, and their natural-physical environments.
FSOS 1461 - Presentations at Work: Families, Communities, Nonprofits, and Schools (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02467
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course prepares students to present information and adjust their messages based on audience need in a variety of future work contexts. Students interested in majoring in Family Social Science, Education, Youth Studies, and Kinesiology will take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in counseling, community-based organizations, education, and health sciences to convey important, and often sensitive, material to specific audiences.
OLPD 1461 - Presentations in Work Settings: Business & Marketing Education and Human Resource Development (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02467
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course prepares students to present information and hone their messages based on audience need in a variety of business, leadership, and workplace contexts. Students interested in majoring in Business and Marketing Education (BME), Human Resource Development (HRD), and other majors can take this course in order to develop the disciplinary practices used in training and development, as well as business and industry to convey vital and timely messages.
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02408
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing project focused on problem or issue in field of study. Propose project, identify audience, gather information through primary/secondary research. Create product tailored to audience needs. Collaborative activities/assignments. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
ENGL 3027W - The Essay (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01352
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Incorporating narrative, descriptive, analytical, and persuasive techniques into writing on general topics. Effective argumentation through critical reading. Use of library resources. Awareness of context/audience.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
FSOS 2105 - Methods in Family Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00757 - FSoS 2105/4105
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific method. Major questions/objectives of family research. Data collection/analysis/reporting. Social context of family research. prereq: STAT 3011 or PSTL 1004 or STAT 1001 or ESPY 3264 or SOC 3811 or SOC 2550 or PSY 3801 or instr consent
FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00529 - FSoS 3102/FSOS 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Family systems/theories applied to dynamics/processes relevant to family life. Diversity issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability. Divorce, single parenthood, remarriage. Family strengths/problems. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
FSOS 3105 - Technology in Parenting and Family Relationships (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The role of information and communications technologies in contemporary family life is explored through examination of theory, and research on technology use and family and family member outcomes. Applications of technology in family practice and issues regarding professional preparation will identify avenues for support and development.
FSOS 4104W - Family Psychology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes in families of origin, families of choice, and other close relationships, within diverse social contexts. Evaluating current research on family dynamics within/across generations. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4109W - Family Theories (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will include the review of current family theories, Bloom's Taxonomy of critical thinking, self-assessments, and application in a capstone paper.
FSOS 4294 - Research Internship
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Research project with faculty. May include planning, proposal writing, literature review, data collection/coding/cleaning/analysis, and reporting. prereq: [FSOS major, at least jr] or instr consent
FSOS 4296 - Field Study: Working With Families
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 48.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed paraprofessional work experience related to student's area of study. prereq: 2101 or instr consent
FSOS 4160H - Honors Capstone Project
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individualizes the honors experience by connecting aspects of major program with special academic interests.
YOST 3325W - Project-Based Writing For Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02408
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing project focused on problem or issue in field of study. Propose project, identify audience, gather information through primary/secondary research. Create product tailored to audience needs. Collaborative activities/assignments. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
OLPD 3324W - Writing in the Workplace for Education and Human Development Majors (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Explore professional communication. Research/analysis writing. Memos, reports, proposals, human resource-related documentation, letters or announcements, presentations. prereq: 60+ undergraduate credits, declared major
ENGL 3027W - The Essay (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01352
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Incorporating narrative, descriptive, analytical, and persuasive techniques into writing on general topics. Effective argumentation through critical reading. Use of library resources. Awareness of context/audience.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
FSOS 4104W - Family Psychology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes in families of origin, families of choice, and other close relationships, within diverse social contexts. Evaluating current research on family dynamics within/across generations. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4109W - Family Theories (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will include the review of current family theories, Bloom's Taxonomy of critical thinking, self-assessments, and application in a capstone paper.
FSOS 2107 - Preparation for Family and Community Engagement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will focus on preparing students to work with families in a community context. Central themes of the course include strategies for family and community engagement, understanding how families interact with community organizations and institutions, how to mobilize family and community assets, and collaborating with families to create systems change and build positive community resources. The course will pose questions for students about the roles of family professionals in supporting families in community contexts. The course will utilize readings about best practices in family and community engagement, both from the family studies literature and from cutting edge community-based organizations. Students will participate in a community project with a community organization that focuses on supporting families. This will enable them to attend community meetings, shadow family/community liaisons, and better understand the interface between families, community organizations, and institutions. Class assignments will allow students to engage in reflective practice and pull learning from their community-based experiences. They will learn concrete skills like meeting facilitation through a workshop format.
FSOS 2103 - Family Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01577 - FSOS 2103/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Connections between policies that governments enact, and families and their well-being. Conceptual frameworks for influences underlying policy choices. Evaluating consequences of such choices for diverse families.
FSOS 4107 - Traumatic Stress and Resilience in Vulnerable Families Across the Lifespan
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will focus on stress contexts that place families at risk across the life span such as poverty, war/civil conflict, disability, social disparities/discrimination, and family dissolution. An examination of family strengths, cultural diversity, and approaches for working with families across the life course in community based settings including classrooms, programs, and agencies will be emphasized. This course focuses on vulnerable families and those affected by historical and traumatic stress. It covers family members of all ages who face particular challenges, such as intergenerational exposure to traumatic events, persistent and structural inequality, and health disparities. This course is designed to increase awareness of the conditions that place families and children at risk, the theories and frameworks available to understand these risks, and both individual and family resiliency to these conditions. The course will primarily focus on a) individual, family, community, and developmental contexts of risk and resiliency, and b) family-level preventive and intervention frameworks and approaches to support individuals and families.
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the impact of “immigration” (i.e., refugee vs. various types of immigration statuses) on family relationships, specifically how culture of origin and acculturation processes influence individuals and families over time; explores issues faced by various immigrant family systems, including a consideration of generational status, gender identities, social classes, and ethnic/racial group identities; develops intercultural interaction skills that prepare students to effectively engage with diverse immigrant families in multiple contexts; and builds practical skills that enhance students’ abilities to work in and collaborate with community-and faith-based organizations to strengthen cultural resources while overcoming barriers to increase service utilization.
FSOS 2101 - Preparation for Working With Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Systematic preparation for upper division education, research/field internships, and career possibilities in Family Social Science.
FSOS 3429 - Counseling Skills Practicum I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3429/5429
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic counseling skills. Counselor needs/motivations, non-verbal communication, basic/advanced empathy, identifying strengths, maintaining focus, challenging discrepancies, use of self. Emphasizes building from client strengths, learning through role-playing.
FSOS 4110 - Introduction to Family Therapy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Family Therapy. Students who successfully complete the course should be well versed in the basics of both the foundational and contemporary theories of the discipline. Further, students will be exposed to a number of clinical vignettes and case scenarios that demonstrate the application of the theories in pre-recorded family therapy sessions. Through class assignments and discussions, students will be able to make a more informed decision as to whether or not family therapy is a field that holds potential for them in their own professional pursuits. Other mental health disciplines attend to family variables but having a background in family systems theory and family therapy theories will provide a solid knowledge base for someone embarking on a career in family clinical work. Systems theory guides the majority of what will be discussed in class.
FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3426/5426
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychology/sociology of drug use/abuse. Life-span, epidemiological, familial, cultural data regarding use. Fundamentals of licit/illicit drug use behavior. Variables of gender, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, sexual orientation, disability.
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human ecology/development as frameworks for examining sexuality in close relationships. Diversity of sexual beliefs, attitudes, behaviors within differing social contexts. Using scientific knowledge to promote sexual health among individuals, couples, families through various life stages. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 2108 - Preparation for Family Financial Studies: Money Matters in Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The goal of this course is to help students understand the role that money plays in the health and well-being of individuals, couples and families across differing social contexts over the life course. The course will teach student how values about money develop within families and society; how these values influence the choices made by families; and the impact of these choices on the quality of couple and family relationships. The course will introduce students to a variety of career paths related to families and money including financial coach, counselor and educator.
FSOS 2106 - Family Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of how individuals/families use interpersonal, economic, natural, and community resources to make decisions, solve problems, and achieve central life purposes.
FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: FSOS 4106 is a recommended prerequisite for this course.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of personal/family financial management principles. Financial planning of savings, investments, credit, mortgages, and taxation. Life, disability, health, and property insurance. Public/private pensions. Estate planning. prereq: FSOS 4106 is a recommended prerequisite for this course.
FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to family financial management applications through different stages in family financial life cycle. Case studies. prereq: [3101, 3102, 3429] or instr consent
FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Couple dynamics. Overview of how to develop, maintain, and terminate an intimate relationship. Communication, conflict resolution, power, roles. Programs for marriage preparation, marriage enrichment, and marital therapy.
FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human development in a family context. Life-course and human development theories. Individual/family development, mate selection, birth, life cycle. Physical, cognitive, language, social, social, and personality development. Historical, social, and cultural factors. How theory/research are applied to everyday lives.
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02469
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to multicultural families using an ecological lens. The institution of the family is recognized globally as a basic unit of a society that produces, develops, socializes, and launches the next generation of its citizenry. This course will focus on families in contemporary America, a society that has grown increasingly diverse, and faces many complex challenges in today’s global environment. Using a human ecological lens allows us to examine families in their nested and interdependent environments--how individuals shape and are shaped by families, their human built environments, their socio-cultural environments, and their natural-physical environments.
FSOS 1301 - Cash or Credit: You Need to Know
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Factual information about basic money management skills. Topics covered can be applied to everyday life. Online, interactive learning based class.
FSOS 2101 - Preparation for Working With Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Systematic preparation for upper division education, research/field internships, and career possibilities in Family Social Science.
FSOS 2103 - Family Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01577 - FSOS 2103/4103
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Connections between policies that governments enact, and families and their well-being. Conceptual frameworks for influences underlying policy choices. Evaluating consequences of such choices for diverse families.
FSOS 2106 - Family Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of how individuals/families use interpersonal, economic, natural, and community resources to make decisions, solve problems, and achieve central life purposes.
FSOS 2107 - Preparation for Family and Community Engagement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will focus on preparing students to work with families in a community context. Central themes of the course include strategies for family and community engagement, understanding how families interact with community organizations and institutions, how to mobilize family and community assets, and collaborating with families to create systems change and build positive community resources. The course will pose questions for students about the roles of family professionals in supporting families in community contexts. The course will utilize readings about best practices in family and community engagement, both from the family studies literature and from cutting edge community-based organizations. Students will participate in a community project with a community organization that focuses on supporting families. This will enable them to attend community meetings, shadow family/community liaisons, and better understand the interface between families, community organizations, and institutions. Class assignments will allow students to engage in reflective practice and pull learning from their community-based experiences. They will learn concrete skills like meeting facilitation through a workshop format.
FSOS 2108 - Preparation for Family Financial Studies: Money Matters in Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The goal of this course is to help students understand the role that money plays in the health and well-being of individuals, couples and families across differing social contexts over the life course. The course will teach student how values about money develop within families and society; how these values influence the choices made by families; and the impact of these choices on the quality of couple and family relationships. The course will introduce students to a variety of career paths related to families and money including financial coach, counselor and educator.
FSOS 3101 - Personal and Family Finances
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: FSOS 4106 is a recommended prerequisite for this course.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of personal/family financial management principles. Financial planning of savings, investments, credit, mortgages, and taxation. Life, disability, health, and property insurance. Public/private pensions. Estate planning. prereq: FSOS 4106 is a recommended prerequisite for this course.
FSOS 3426 - Alcohol and Drugs: Families and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3426/5426
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychology/sociology of drug use/abuse. Life-span, epidemiological, familial, cultural data regarding use. Fundamentals of licit/illicit drug use behavior. Variables of gender, ethnicity, social class, sexuality, sexual orientation, disability.
FSOS 3429 - Counseling Skills Practicum I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: FSoS 3429/5429
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic counseling skills. Counselor needs/motivations, non-verbal communication, basic/advanced empathy, identifying strengths, maintaining focus, challenging discrepancies, use of self. Emphasizes building from client strengths, learning through role-playing.
FSOS 3431 - Counseling Skills Practicum II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00405
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced therapeutic methods. Processes of change. Identifying, reinforcing, challenging core beliefs. Reframing. Paradox. Trance, guided imagery. Cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused, narrative therapies. Emphasizes non-pathologizing models of therapy.
FSOS 4101 - Sexuality and Gender in Families and Close Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human ecology/development as frameworks for examining sexuality in close relationships. Diversity of sexual beliefs, attitudes, behaviors within differing social contexts. Using scientific knowledge to promote sexual health among individuals, couples, families through various life stages. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 4107 - Traumatic Stress and Resilience in Vulnerable Families Across the Lifespan
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will focus on stress contexts that place families at risk across the life span such as poverty, war/civil conflict, disability, social disparities/discrimination, and family dissolution. An examination of family strengths, cultural diversity, and approaches for working with families across the life course in community based settings including classrooms, programs, and agencies will be emphasized. This course focuses on vulnerable families and those affected by historical and traumatic stress. It covers family members of all ages who face particular challenges, such as intergenerational exposure to traumatic events, persistent and structural inequality, and health disparities. This course is designed to increase awareness of the conditions that place families and children at risk, the theories and frameworks available to understand these risks, and both individual and family resiliency to these conditions. The course will primarily focus on a) individual, family, community, and developmental contexts of risk and resiliency, and b) family-level preventive and intervention frameworks and approaches to support individuals and families.
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the impact of “immigration” (i.e., refugee vs. various types of immigration statuses) on family relationships, specifically how culture of origin and acculturation processes influence individuals and families over time; explores issues faced by various immigrant family systems, including a consideration of generational status, gender identities, social classes, and ethnic/racial group identities; develops intercultural interaction skills that prepare students to effectively engage with diverse immigrant families in multiple contexts; and builds practical skills that enhance students’ abilities to work in and collaborate with community-and faith-based organizations to strengthen cultural resources while overcoming barriers to increase service utilization.
FSOS 4110 - Introduction to Family Therapy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Family Therapy. Students who successfully complete the course should be well versed in the basics of both the foundational and contemporary theories of the discipline. Further, students will be exposed to a number of clinical vignettes and case scenarios that demonstrate the application of the theories in pre-recorded family therapy sessions. Through class assignments and discussions, students will be able to make a more informed decision as to whether or not family therapy is a field that holds potential for them in their own professional pursuits. Other mental health disciplines attend to family variables but having a background in family systems theory and family therapy theories will provide a solid knowledge base for someone embarking on a career in family clinical work. Systems theory guides the majority of what will be discussed in class.
FSOS 4150 - Special Topics in Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Review of research/scholarly thought. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [Varies by topic]
FSOS 4152 - Gay, Lesbian,Bisexual and Transgender People in Families
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Perspectives on gay, lesbian, bisexuals and transgender (GLBT) in families. Unique contributions of GLBT to understanding diversity among families. Homophobia, mythologies, coming-out, identity, gender, social networks, intimacy, sexuality, children, parenting, aging, AIDS, ethnicity.
FSOS 4153 - Family Financial Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to family financial management applications through different stages in family financial life cycle. Case studies. prereq: [3101, 3102, 3429] or instr consent
FSOS 4154 - Families and Aging
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Aging families from diverse socioeconomic/cultural groups as complex multigenerational systems interacting within ever-changing social structures.
FSOS 4155 - Parent-Child Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History, theories, research, and contemporary practices of parent-child relationships in diverse families/cultures across the life span. Preparation for professionals in education, social work, and other human service occupations. prereq: At least jr or instr consent
FSOS 5150 - Special Topics in Family Social Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Review of research and scholarly thought. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: instr consent
FSOS 5701 - Prevention Science: Principles and Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02405
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations for strategic interventions to prevent behavioral problems and promote healthy development. Multidisciplinary roots of prevention science. Trends/directions and best practices.
FSOS 5932 - Introduction to Parent Education
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Philosophy, history, and models of parent education. Ethical, critically reflective professional practice. Observation of parent and family education practice.
FSOS 5937 - Parent-Child Interaction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis and critique of parent-child interaction theory/research. Implications for parent-child relationships and parents'/children's development. Application in professional work with families.
FSOS 5943 - Parent Learning and Development: Implications for Parent Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Research and theoretical perspectives critiqued. Challenging assumptions, examining competencies that promote facilitating learning with adults. Related to parent development and adult learning.