Twin Cities campus

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Twin Cities Campus

Wildlife Care and Handling Minor

Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2024
  • Required credits in this minor: 19 to 25
  • The capstone of the curriculum is an externship, FW 4625, a resident, professional experience in which students work hands-on with wild animals. Animal care in this sense might include wildlife research focused on capture and handling, rehabilitation, or permanently- or temporarily-captive wild animals. The residency might mean that students are working in a facility (e.g., zoo, nature center, sanctuary, rehabilitation facility, rescue center, wildlife care facility) or might mean that the student travels to provide care (e.g., working with a DNR wildlife field crew). The externship must provide hands-on experience with care and handling of wild animals, and must involve at least some understanding of the mission and overall operation of the facility or organization. The externship takes place in a wildlife handling facility off-campus; that might be in Minnesota or many other places in the world.
This minor enables students to develop an understanding of wildlife care and handling. It will be especially attractive to students in programs such as wildlife, animal science, biology, natural resources, and environmental studies. Students become acquainted with diagnosis, animal handling, ethics, and population-level concerns of animal care. Any direct involvement with medical care will be under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. Students interested in the minor should declare through the CFANS Student Services Office.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Basic biology is a prerequisite for courses in the minor.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Prerequisites
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or Subgroup 0
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)
or Subgroup 1
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
Core program
Three courses are required (9 credits).
VPM 2400 - Managed Captive Wildlife (3.0 cr)
FW 4629 - Wildlife Care and Handling Externship (3.0 cr)
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management (3.0 cr)
or FW 4107 - Principles of Fisheries Science and Management (3.0 cr)
Animal Care
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANSC 2015 - Animal Welfare Science and Ethics (3.0 cr)
· FW 4101 - Herpetology (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 2016 - Introduction to Applied Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology (2.0 cr)
· CFAN 3504 - Thailand: Tiger Conservation and Vertebrate Field Methods [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3529 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· FW 4136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· VPM 4400 - Diseases in free-ranging and captive wildlife (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3521 - Borneo Global Seminar: Tropical Wildlife Conservation & Climate Change [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Wildlife Handling
· FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management (2.0 cr)
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife (1.0-4.0 cr)
· Raptor Care
· VPM 2451 - Introductory Concepts in Raptor Rehabilitation (1.0 cr)
VPM 2455 - Introduction to Raptor Reconditioning and Release (1.0 cr)
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife (1.0-4.0 cr)
· EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife Handling
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3014 - Tribal and Indigenous Natural Resource Management (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5121 - Conservation Planning and Structured Decision-making (3.0 cr)
· Wildlife handling
An approved professional training course in wildlife care and handling may be substituted for FW 5625 and 1 credit of Directed Study Wildlife (FW 3393/5393). Substitutions are approved by petition. To qualify for approval, a training course must include at least 30 hours of instruction in a field setting, and at least one third of the instruction must be hands-on. A wide range of such professional courses is available. Contact the minor coordinator for guidance.
· UC 4301 - Perspectives: Interrelationships of People and Animals in Society Today (2.0 cr)
Directed Study: Wildlife
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife (1.0-4.0 cr)
or FW 5393 - Directed Study Wildlife (1.0-4.0 cr)
 
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BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS honors students
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
VPM 2400 - Managed Captive Wildlife
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is an introduction to key issues at the interface of humans and managed captive wildlife. Topics include: the role of managed captive wildlife species in conservation, education, exhibition, agriculture, and research; biodiversity, urban wildlife, biosentinel science, ethics, and animal welfare; and an introduction to the principles and techniques of the care and management of wildlife species in captive settings.
FW 4629 - Wildlife Care and Handling Externship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This externship class is the capstone experience of the wildlife care and handling minor curriculum. The class synthesizes the practical skills and experience you have developed in earlier classes in the minor. The capstone is a guided, supervised, hands-on, on-site experience in a wildlife handling setting, complemented by pre-, during- and post-experience reflection and analysis.
FW 4102 - Principles of Conservation Biology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: introductory biology course
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to themes/concepts of diverse, dynamic, and interdisciplinary field. Biological/social underpinnings of conservation problems/solutions. prereq: introductory biology course
FW 4103 - Principles of Wildlife Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the ecological basis for management of wildlife, including biological and sociological factors that influence management. Goals include: understanding the ecological mechanisms influencing the distribution and abundance of wildlife, learning the ecological and historical foundations of wildlife management and the ecological and social ramifications of management actions, thinking critically and logically about current wildlife issues, honing writing skills, and developing technical skills in key areas. prereq: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
FW 4107 - Principles of Fisheries Science and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Principles of Fisheries Management is an engaging and dynamic exploration to the principles and practices of fisheries management. The course is designed as a major requirement for Fisheries subplan majors in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology. It is also appropriate as an elective course for other majors and minors in FWCB, ESPM, or related biological disciplines. We cover the basics of fisheries science (habitats, ecology, and population dynamics) and management (e.g., goals, tools, implementation, and assessment) with an emphasis on human intervention and regulation. We first cover management approaches and planning, the development of an information base, and the identification of problems. We then provide a brief overview of applied limnology, fish ecology, and population dynamics, followed by approaches to manage fishery populations and habitats in freshwater and marine systems along with methods to assess management outcomes. Throughout, we demonstrate applications to specific fisheries and habitats. This is primarily a lecture-based course that also integrates field trips, group discussions, and activities. We use exams to measure comprehension, and case studies and assignments to encourage practical application. Prerequisite: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]
ANSC 2015 - Animal Welfare Science and Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 2015/AnSc5015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This multidisciplinary course helps students develop an intellectual framework for understanding and interpreting issues involving animal welfare and ethics of animal use in agriculture, science and society.
FW 4101 - Herpetology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles/amphibians, their systematics, behavior, ecology, physiology, development, and morphology. Diversity of reptiles/amphibians. Focuses on Minnesota fauna. Lab. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 2012
ANSC 2016 - Introduction to Applied Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic concepts and applications of animal behavior within the contexts of human use. Emphasis on domesticated species, but other species within captive environments also examined.
ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classification/function of nutrients. Use of nutrients for body maintenance, growth, egg production, gestation, and lactation. Comparative study of digestive systems of farm animal species.
BIOL 2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of marine animal diversity. Understanding major animal groups, how they relate to one another, how they differ in structure, how each group achieves survival/ reproduction in diverse environments. Lab includes dissections, including vertebrates, such as fish. Prereq/coreq: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
BIOL 4590 - Coral Reef Ecology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contemporary issues in tropical reef ecology from diverse perspectives. Option of two-credit seminar during fall semester plus additional two-credit field option (BIOL 4596) to involve SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef. prereq: Introductory biology course with lab
CFAN 3504 - Thailand: Tiger Conservation and Vertebrate Field Methods (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Thai culture and conservation challenges. Two-day barge trip learning culture before traveling to Thailand's premier conservation research site. Camera-trapping techniques, prey assessment methods, and radio telemetry approaches to the study of large mammals. prereq: instr consent
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
CFAN 3529 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key topics in wildlife medicine. Students will learn medical issues and approaches, the role of the veterinarian in wildlife conservation, zoo medicine, and wildlife rescue & rehabilitation. This program is held at the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic⿿s (BWRC) teaching facility with BWRC⿿s founder and wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand. Labs include distance immobilization, suture, spay & neuter, necropsy, comparative anatomy, radiography, parasitology and blood analysis. Field visits are conducted with Dr. Isabelle to the Belize Zoo and to avian, reptile, primate, and manatee centers. Students are introduced to preventative medicine and common diseases for many of these species. A spay & neuter lab reviews theory and suture practice, this is followed by a spay & neuter clinic organized in the field or at BWRC. Students also have the opportunity to observe, and when possible, assist the BWRC veterinary staff during their daily operations.
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
FW 4136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
VPM 4400 - Diseases in free-ranging and captive wildlife
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course will provide a basic understanding of animal health and disease in free-ranging and managed captive wildlife. Topics include: epidemiology of disease, infectious and non-infectious diseases, and potentials impacts of disease on human health, managed agriculture and wildlife for both individuals and populations.
CFAN 3521 - Borneo Global Seminar: Tropical Wildlife Conservation & Climate Change (GP, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This seminar explores tropical conservation by focusing on three main themes in Borneo: climate change, rehabilitation and release of charismatic rare and endangered species, and remote camera surveys for environmental education. Each theme is supported with in-country lectures, exploration activities, and a student product. We explore and learn about marine, montane, and tropical forest ecosystems. Threats to ecosystem health in Borneo are multi-faceted. Habitat loss and fragmentation, due to logging a few decades ago and primarily now oil-palm agriculture, mean that wildlife populations are smaller and increasingly isolated. This class engages students in global issues of climate change and habitat loss, helping them explore and analyze their observations critically. It also brings students face-to-face with rehabilitation and reintroduction of the species that suffer most as forests are felled for logging followed by oil palm agriculture. Species we investigate most closely are orangutans and sun bears. We explore riparian habitat, discuss issues of fragmentation, and pressures on protected areas at the Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC). DGFC is located in high-quality riparian habitat in the Kinabatangan Reserve, in patches of forest nestled in a matrix of oil-palm agriculture. This area is host to a truly incredible suite of wild species. The Kinabatangan River is home to clouded leopards, sun bears, orangutans, otters, proboscis monkeys, and crocodiles. At the field station, wild orangutans forage in the canopy overhead. If you follow the noise of rustling leaves, you will likely observe troops of long-tailed macaques moving in the canopy and hornbills feeding on forest fruits. Students learn wildlife monitoring techniques and design their own environmental education lesson. Students also connect issues of climate change and conservation in a range of ecosystems in Sabah, Borneo, and design enrichment projects for captive sun bears and orangutans.
EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a field station, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study of animal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicate to one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both of these. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independent research project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90 points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade. This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period in May/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical techniques to maximize human/animal safety and encourage effective operations. Preparation procedures, legal responsibilities, capture drugs/delivery systems, safety measures, ethical issues, basic veterinary procedures for handling wildlife. Field course. Uses live animals. prereq: General biology, [grad student or vet med student or FW sr]
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out a directed study on selected topics or problems under the direction of a faculty member; eg, literature review. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment. Students enrolling in a directed study will be required to use the University-wide on-line directed study contract process in order to enroll. Prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 6 credits of directed study counts towards CFANS major requirements.
VPM 2451 - Introductory Concepts in Raptor Rehabilitation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course will provide a basic understanding of raptor rehabilitation. Topics include: goals of wildlife rehabilitation; regulatory policies and permits; ethical decision making; anatomy and physiology; diet and nutrition; housing; restraint and handling; physical exam; and, emergency care.
VPM 2455 - Introduction to Raptor Reconditioning and Release
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This 1 credit online course will provide a basic understanding of raptor reconditioning and release, renesting of juveniles, and related management. Topics include: management in captivity; natural and captive behavior; principles of flight and exercise; flight evaluation; creance reconditioning technique; pre-release preparations, transport and release; renesting and release techniques for young raptors; and post-release monitoring.
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out a directed study on selected topics or problems under the direction of a faculty member; eg, literature review. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment. Students enrolling in a directed study will be required to use the University-wide on-line directed study contract process in order to enroll. Prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 6 credits of directed study counts towards CFANS major requirements.
EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: ?Why is that animal doing that?? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. The lecture parallels a required laboratory. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
AECM 2421W - Professional and Oral Communication for Agriculture, Food & the Environment (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Speaking/writing about scientific/technical issues. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation. Public communication.Lectures for this course will be online, while discussion sections will be held in-person.
AECM 3431 - Communicating Food, Agriculture & Environmental Science to the Public
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Planning/strategy for communication campaigns related to food/agriculture. Student-centered, relies on interaction/participation.
AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American Indian environmental issues in U.S./Canada. Analysis of social, political, economic, legal forces/institutions. Colonial histories/tribal sovereignty.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3014 - Tribal and Indigenous Natural Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3014/ESPM 5014
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is designed to develop and refine your understanding of tribal and Indigenous natural resource management, tribal and Indigenous perspectives, and responsibilities natural resource managers have for tribal and Indigenous communities. This course includes one eight-hour weekend field session.
ESPM 3202W - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
AECM 4115 - Culturally Responsive Engagement in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is broken up into five thematic and progressive modules. Module 1 will provide the opportunity for students to investigate contemporary and historical manifestations oppression and inequities within Agricultural, Food and Natural Resource Sciences (AFNR) with a special focus on community and educational spaces. Module 2 will support students to explore oppression, power, privilege, and white supremacy. Students will explore how these show in society at large, as well as how they personally embody and enact these very things. Module 3 will prompt students to consider the nature of knowledge that is legitimized and knowledge that is suppressed. We will then learn about diverse knowledge systems and decolonizing work. Module 4 will support students to explore culture, identity, intersectionality, and positionality ? their own and those of other cultural groups. We will consider how some cultures are lifted while others are marginalized in different spaces. Module 5 brings us to learning about methods of bring culturally responsive and anti-racist in AFNR work in educational and community spaces. We will employ the use of equity audits to assess various organizations and to design plans moving forward.
FW 5121 - Conservation Planning and Structured Decision-making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
We are impacting our planet and the species and ecosystems on it at an unprecedented rate. This creates key policy challenges to conserve species, ecosystems, and the benefits they provide to people. But, how do we decide what is the best way to tackle these challenges? How do we do this in a world with limited resources (time, money) for conservation and multiple stakeholders with different objectives? How can we make systematic decisions to get the biggest bang for our conservation buck? To address these questions, this course will cover key topics and concepts in conservation planning and provide exposure and hands-on experience with techniques for conservation plans and decisions. We will cover topics ranging from protected areas, restoration, ecosystem services, and climate change to structured decision-making, adaptive management, and return on investment. The course has a lecture and in-class computer lab component. This course will present structured approaches to problem-solving and decision-making from a conservation perspective, and students will leave with tools for structuring and solving complex environmental problems. Therefore, this is a foundational course in conservation planning but will also provide students will a tool-box to formulate and solve complex problems in environmental management more broadly and in life. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Recommended: One course in ecology, environmental science or permission of instructor.
UC 4301 - Perspectives: Interrelationships of People and Animals in Society Today
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CVM 6050/PubH 6283/VCS 3050/UC
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interrelationships of people and animals from several viewpoints. Social, economic, and health consequences of these relationships, including issues such as pets and people sharing an urban environment, animal rights, and the influence of differences in cultures on animal-human relationships.
FW 3393 - Directed Study Wildlife
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out a directed study on selected topics or problems under the direction of a faculty member; eg, literature review. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment. Students enrolling in a directed study will be required to use the University-wide on-line directed study contract process in order to enroll. Prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 6 credits of directed study counts towards CFANS major requirements.
FW 5393 - Directed Study Wildlife
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A course in which a student designs and carries out an independent project under the direction of a faculty member. Directed study courses may be taken for variable credit and special permission is needed for enrollment.